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Udo Ulfkotte's new book
#11
"Let me issue and control a nation's money and I care not who writes the laws. - Mayer Rothschild
"Civil disobedience is not our problem. Our problem is civil obedience! People are obedient in the face of poverty, starvation, stupidity, war, and cruelty. Our problem is that grand thieves are running the country. That's our problem!" - Howard Zinn
"If there is no struggle there is no progress. Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and never will" - Frederick Douglass
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#12
Wow--No kids-three heart attacks--murdered--Wow
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#13
Just beginning to scan and translate the book by Udo Ulfkotte called Verschlusssache BND.

Will keep all interested readers informed, especially if I come across any new information about the German BND which relates to previously unknown stuff about the CIA-BND connection.

James Lateer
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#14
The Ulfkotta book on the BND (German Intel) has so far yielded some new (to me) information.

He goes through the ancient history and recent history of BND/CIA operations. The most prominent new information he presents is:

1. Stalin had spies in the US atomic bomb projects from 1943 onwards. There were actually four teams of Soviet spies. They were at Los Alamos, Oak Ridge TN, Chicago and California.

2. Stalin's inside information was able to tell him exactly how many Atom bombs the US could have possessed (based on the production of uranium 235 and plutonium).

3. This, in turn, allowed Stalin to heat up the 1948 Berlin Crisis to spread the U S nuclear forces thin, so that the U S couldn't use atom bombs to aid Chiang Kai-Shek in China.

Ulfkotte also explains events such as the 1979 Iran Crisis and the 1982 Falklands War in a fairly new and unique way. Also, he claims that the sale of narcotics was, as of 1997, supporting the Afghanistan War as far as the US was sponsoring conflict there in 1997. His claims about Afghanistan seem, in retrospect, very accurate as far as a prediction. The bottom line was that the CIA was profiting off of the opium grown in Afghanistan.

Maybe that explains why Alexander the Great, the Russians, the UK and now the US have been fixated on Afghanistan. (I'm referring to the narcotics trade).

More to follow.

James Lateer
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#15
Here is the rough translation of what Udo Ulfkotte had to say about Operation Gladio:

BND President Gehien behaved as expected from a president: he ruled. Much has been since his departure changed in 1968. Until then there was not any Departmental structures. Only Gehien's successor, Gerhard Wessel, introduced them. Wessel instructed the dainty man responsible for the relations of the BND to the American intelligence services with the alias Heinrich Rosenlehner (name Heinrich Hellmann) with the formation of departments today, which he divided the service into news procurers, technical procurers, evaluators and one for personnel Rosenlehner, who several times mentioned himself in the spring of 1996, according to his friends, wohi[?], would like to replace Porzner in the BND presidential chair, assumed responsibility for department IV a from 1971 onwards. Organization, planning, budget, defense measures, post evaluation and a German "Gladio" department hardly known to the public in the meantime.The "Gladio" unit has since been disbanded, which had the task in case of war to become active behind the enemy lines through sabotage and Terrorist attacks should be added to the enemy Nadeistiche. Gladio had its own bases and its own infrastructure in Hanover and Berlin, and the whole operation was under Allied control, and in case of war Gladio was to be relocated to Portugal. Foresters discovered 198,133 earth depots with automatic weapons, chemical weapons, 14,000 gun ammunition, 509 anti-tank guns, 156 kg of explosives, 230 warheads and 258 hand grenades. It was alleged that this depot had been created by the right-wing extremist Lembke. In reality, it was apparently one of many Gladio "depots (see Erich Schmidt-Eenboom, The BND, pp. 365 ff.). In Austria, a weapons depot was found in May 1997, apparently subversive to the former Soviet KGB Fight against "Gladio". Explosives, timers, handguns and ammunition

The translation is courtesy of Google Translate and is very rough but readable.

James Lateer
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#16
Having finished the book on the book Verschlusssache by Udo Ulfkotte on the German BND, my takeaway was the following:

1. By comparison with the CIA, the German attitude toward their BND intelligence service was different. Ulfkotte states that there has been serious debate as to whether the BND earns its keep, whether it's worth the 700 million budgeted for it and whether the workforce should be reduced for better economy, or even abolished.

2. As far as things reported by Ulfkotte, the BND does not nor ever has perpetrated covert operations such as has always been done by our CIA.

3. The issues mostly worked on by the BND, especially in the 1980's and 1990's were Iranian bad actors and Iranian intel operations which the BND tried to foil.

4. At least in the 1990's the western intelligence agencies worked against each other on industrial espionage, especially the French SDECE against the BND. They were all trying to get access to the rival countries' military weapons technology.

5. The BND was mostly used to counter Russian Mafia activities, smugglers and dealers in stolen plutonium, shoulder-fired anti-aircraft missiles, etc. and to some minor extent, international and Islamic terrorism.

6. The BND cooperated widely with the Israeli Mossad, especially in countering threatening behavior by the Egyptians.

7. There was a lot of worry about poison gas manufacturing by both Libya and Syria.

8. Iran vs Iraq issues were important, especially regarding Iranian missiles and weapons of mass destruction in the hands of either Iran, Iraq or both.

9. Ulfkotte quoted the 1975 US Senate testimony by John LeCarre, the novelist, who stated to Congress that he had worked for UK intelligence for three years and that one half of UK journalists at major outlets were intelligence assets.

10. Mostly, (to be perfectly frank), Ulfkotte's book was pretty boring when compared to juicy exposes about the Truman, Eisenhower and Kennedy years. Not much to see here.

James Lateer
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#17
Order here:

https://www.progressivepress.com/book-li...esstitutes
"There are three sorts of conspiracy: by the people who complain, by the people who write, by the people who take action. There is nothing to fear from the first group, the two others are more dangerous; but the police have to be part of all three,"

Joseph Fouche
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#18
On vacation, I completed reading the lengthy book of the History of the Stasi by John O Koehler. A very interesting comparison can be made with the Udo Ulfkotte book on the BND. The author, Mr. Koehler had worked for Ronald Reagan. Not surprisingly, the only US official he "reviewed" using the Stasi files was Ronald Reagan. Koehler claimed the Stasi had endless admiration for Reagan, yet the Stasi was very down on Jimmy Carter.

Koehler did leave the impression that the Stasi Files were pretty open to researchers. He claimed that if the Stasi file folders were stacked next to each other, the length of the pile of the files would extend 121 miles. Pretty hard to imagine but may be true.

The notable thing about his book is that most of the stuff I had already read about, such as the kidnapping of Dr. Linse and the JFK affair with Ellen Rometsch. Pretty stale stuff.

But I was put on the trail, by Koehler, of likely a more objective book by Markus Wolf who was a defender of the Stasi and whose book sold many copies in Germany and the US. I bought the latter and intend to read it also for comparision.

All-in-all, the Stasi book was poor because the author didn't print any information or analysis of anything except run-of-the-mill spy cases involving lowly informants. I would much rather have been reading about the Stasi analysis of the JFK assassination, the West German Chancellors and other US Presidents like LBJ, Nixon, Ike, George HW Bush, etc., the Cuban Missile Crisis, the U-2 spy program, atomic strategy, etc.

One surprising thing was his detailed description of the Stasi and Soviet infiltration of many third world countries. Some were well known like Angola, but there was also South Africa, Ethiopia and others about which I had never heard that much about. Also, huge involvement in Nicaragua in a major way.

Koehler had a description of the "Bader-Mienhoff Gang" and the Red Army Faction. Koehler's reporting about the Red Army Faction and the" Bader-Meinhoff" crimes makes no sense whatever. If one knows anything about covert ops, the Skorzeny network, etc. then his description makes it look like there were only two or three folks in the Red Army Faction at any one time. Nothing about any infrastructure or organizational stuff. It seems to be only a convenient way for the West Germans to assassinate people and put the label "Red Army Faction" on it, and then walk away.

Also, not much involving the CIA or the BND. If there are 121 miles of Stasi files, it doesn't look to me like author Koehler studied more that a couple of feet of them at most.

James Lateer
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#19
I am not sure whether I posted the following correctly, so I will repeat it again here:

On vacation, I completed reading the lengthy book of the History of the Stasi by John O Koehler. A very interesting comparison can be made with the Udo Ulfkotte book on the BND. The author, Mr. Koehler had worked for Ronald Reagan. Not surprisingly, the only US official he "reviewed" using the Stasi files was Ronald Reagan. Koehler claimed the Stasi had endless admiration for Reagan, yet the Stasi was very down on Jimmy Carter.

Koehler did leave the impression that the Stasi Files were pretty open to researchers. He claimed that if the Stasi file folders were stacked next to each other, the length of the pile of the files would extend 121 miles. Pretty hard to imagine but may be true.

The notable thing about his book is that most of the stuff I had already read about, such as the kidnapping of Dr. Linse and the JFK affair with Ellen Rometsch. Pretty stale stuff.

But I was put on the trail, by Koehler, of likely a more objective book by Markus Wolf who was a defender of the Stasi and whose book sold many copies in Germany and the US. I bought the latter and intend to read it also for comparision.

All-in-all, the Stasi book was poor because the author didn't print any information or analysis of anything except run-of-the-mill spy cases involving lowly informants. I would much rather have been reading about the Stasi analysis of the JFK assassination, the West German Chancellors and other US Presidents like LBJ, Nixon, Ike, George HW Bush, etc., the Cuban Missile Crisis, the U-2 spy program, atomic strategy, etc.

One surprising thing was his detailed description of the Stasi and Soviet infiltration of many third world countries. Some were well known like Angola, but there was also South Africa, Ethiopia and others about which I had never heard that much about. Also, huge involvement in Nicaragua in a major way.

Koehler had a description of the "Bader-Mienhoff Gang" and the Red Army Faction. Koehler's reporting about the Red Army Faction and the" Bader-Meinhoff" crimes makes no sense whatever. If one knows anything about covert ops, the Skorzeny network, etc. then his description makes it look like there were only two or three folks in the Red Army Faction at any one time. Nothing about any infrastructure or organizational stuff. It seems to be only a convenient way for the West Germans to assassinate people and put the label "Red Army Faction" on it, and then walk away.

Also, not much involving the CIA or the BND. If there are 121 miles of Stasi files, it doesn't look to me like author Koehler studied more that a couple of feet of them at most.

James Lateer
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