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Austin Kelley
06-12-2010, 11:33 AM
Apparently, Assange and his mother were on the run for several years from a MKULTRAish cult based in Australia sometimes called "The Family".

If anybody else has an informed perspective on this group, which seemed to intersect with medical LSD experiments and psychosurgery, it would be great to hear what you think!

Magda Hassan
06-12-2010, 11:39 AM
I didn't know that Austin. The Family was I think based in Melbourne and surrounding countryside and the 'leader' was a woman who has fairly recently died but I can't recall her name off the top of my head. I do remember there were many interventions by the childrens welfare department. She collected children. I'll see if I can dig up any articles on them.

Magda Hassan
06-12-2010, 12:26 PM
Here is some things I found on The Family The woman who led them is Anne Hamilton-Byrne.
http://www.defamer.com.au/2010/06/the-strange-upbringing-of-wikileaks-founder-jullian-assange/
http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/the-family-cults-secrets-exposed/story-e6frf7kx-1225761971443
http://www.rickross.com/groups/thefamily.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santiniketan_Park_Association
http://home.vicnet.net.au/~atheist/CruelCultofA.htm
http://www.theatheist.net/previous-lectures/139-the-hamilton-byrne-family-frightened-freethinkers-and-a-reviews-rough-ride

Austin Kelley
06-12-2010, 01:00 PM
Thanks for this, Magda.

So Assange's life seems to have intersected with "the Octopus" early on, in some kind of strange and undetermined way. This seems to be true of many who are attracted to the sort of projects that Assange is involved with.

Was Assange exposed to any sort of traumatizing mind control techniques during the time he lived with a cult adherent? We may or may not hear more about this as time goes on...

Austin Kelley
06-12-2010, 01:42 PM
One survivor of the cult said:


My mother was Anne Hamilton-Byrne, the leader of a small sect in the Dandenongs called the Family or the Great White Brotherhood. I was a small part of her plan to collect children in what she herself once called a "scientific experiment". Later I discovered it was her intention that we children would continue her sect after the earth was consumed by a holocaust. She saw us as the "inheritors of the earth". I didn't know that then. In those days I was just a child. A child of a guru, but a child no less.

Twenty-two to twenty-eight children in all lived at Uptop in its heyday, although the fosters had varying lengths of stay

Why did Anne collect all of us children and make this false 'family'? I often wonder just what it was she wanted of us. Was it just to satisfy her ego? To satisfy her great need to be worshipped and adored by those around her?

Why did she raise us in almost total social isolation, miles from anywhere, with minimal contact with other humans apart from the sect members who looked after us? Why did she subject us to the bizarre and cruel regimen in which we grew up?

I suspect perhaps that there were more sinister motives than these alone. Some of us had multiple birth certificates and passports, and citizenship of more than one country. Only she knows why thus was and why we were also all dressed alike, why most of us even had our hair dyed identically blond. I can only conjecture because I will never know for sure. However I suspect that she went to such great lengths in order to enable her to move children around, in and out of the country. Perhaps even to be sold overseas. I'm sure there is a market somewhere in the world for small blond children with no traceable identities. If she did it, it was a perfect scam. Many ex-sect members have said that they were aware that Anne was creating children by a "breeding program" in the late 1960s. These were 'invisible' kids, because they had no papers and there is no proof that they ever existed. Yet we Hamilton-Byrne children had multiple identities. These identities could perhaps have been loaned to other children and the similarity of our appearance used to cover up their absence. One little blond kid looks very like another in a passport photo.

Excerpt from UNSEEN, UNHEARD, UNKNOWN

by Sarah Moore (Hamilton-Byrne)

http://www.leavingsiddhayoga.net/unseen.htm

Jan Klimkowski
06-12-2010, 03:05 PM
This Australian franchise version of "The Family" fits the template for an intel-controlled (im)plausibly deniable cult used to conduct what can loosely be called MK-ULTRA or social control experimentation on children over long periods of time.

Jonestown is an example of the template on a far larger scale. See the threads below for the types of experimentation and drugs used in social/mind control experimentation there:

http://www.deeppoliticsforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=223&highlight=jonestown

http://www.deeppoliticsforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2195&highlight=jonestown

So, "The Family" was quite possibly an intel operation.

However, there is no clear evidence that the young Assange was ever one of their family experiments.

Below is the relevant passage from the New Yorker article:


When Assange was eight, Claire left her husband and began seeing a musician, with whom she had another child, a boy. The relationship was tempestuous; the musician became abusive, she says, and they separated. A fight ensued over the custody of Assanges half brother, and Claire felt threatened, fearing that the musician would take away her son. Assange recalled her saying, Now we need to disappear, and he lived on the run with her from the age of eleven to sixteen. When I asked him about the experience, he told me that there was evidence that the man belonged to a powerful cult called the Familyits motto was Unseen, Unknown, and Unheard. Some members were doctors who persuaded mothers to give up their newborn children to the cults leader, Anne Hamilton-Byrne. The cult had moles in government, Assange suspected, who provided the musician with leads on Claires whereabouts. In fact, Claire often told friends where she had gone, or hid in places where she had lived before.

While on the run, Claire rented a house across the street from an electronics shop. Assange would go there to write programs on a Commodore 64, until Claire bought it for him, moving to a cheaper place to raise the money. He was soon able to crack into well-known programs, where he found hidden messages left by their creators. The austerity of ones interaction with a computer is something that appealed to me, he said. It is like chesschess is very austere, in that you dont have many rules, there is no randomness, and the problem is very hard. Assange embraced life as an outsider. He later wrote of himself and a teen-age friend, We were bright sensitive kids who didnt fit into the dominant subculture and fiercely castigated those who did as irredeemable boneheads.

Read more: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2010/06/07/100607fa_fact_khatchadourian?currentPage=all#ixzz0 qeRnq0ce

Austin Kelley
06-12-2010, 03:13 PM
Jan Klimowski wrote:
So, "The Family" was quite possibly an intel operation.

However, there is no clear evidence that the young Assange was ever one of their family experiments.

Agreed- and I don't want to impugn his reputation unfairly in any way whatsoever. As I alluded to previously, he may be like many activists in this area who have brushed up against the Octopus in one way or the other. It may also be that "The Family" was an independent cult, not a product of the deep power system.

That said, the ways in which young Assange may or may not have been effected by his early encounter with cult members is certainly grounds for further research..

Keith Millea
06-12-2010, 03:23 PM
Only she knows why thus was and why we were also all dressed alike, why most of us even had our hair dyed identically blond. I can only conjecture because I will never know for sure.

I wonder if Julian dyes his hair blond?

Jan Klimkowski
06-12-2010, 03:31 PM
Jan Klimkowski wrote:
So, "The Family" was quite possibly an intel operation.

However, there is no clear evidence that the young Assange was ever one of their family experiments.

Agreed- and I don't want to impugn his reputation unfairly in any way whatsoever. As I alluded to previously, he may be like many activists in this area who have brushed up against the Octopus in one way or the other. It may also be that "The Family" was an independent cult, not a product of the deep power system.

That said, the ways in which young Assange may or may not have been effected by his early encounter with cult members is certainly grounds for further research..

Agreed also. However, even if "The Family" started out as a genuine "social experiment", it appears to have been rapidly coopted by controllers with access to technology, drugs, a mental hospital and a ready supply of orphans.

Orphans and prisoners are classic victims of illegal and unethical state-sponsored experimentation.

It is the access to facilities, people and technology that largely reveals the People's Temple (Jonestown) as a controlled and sanctioned intel op.

Here is a wiki overview of the Australian "Family's", um, human, property, medical and legal resources:


During the late 1960s and 1970s Newhaven Hospital in Kew was a private psychiatric hospital owned and managed by Marion Villimek, a Santiniketan member; many of its staff and attending psychiatrists were also members.[4][5][6]

Many patients at Newhaven were treated with the hallucinogenic drug LSD [7]. The hospital was used to recruit potential new members from among the patients, and also to administer LSD to members under the direction of the Santiniketan psychiatrists Dr John Mackay and Dr Howard Whitaker [8]. One of the original members of the Association was given LSD, electroconvulsive therapy and two leucotomies during the late 1960s [9].

Although the psychiatric hospital had been closed down by 1992, in that year a new inquest was ordered into the death of a Newhaven patient in 1975 after new claims that his death had been due to deep sleep therapy. The inquest heard evidence concerning the use of electroconvulsive therapy, LSD and other practices at Newhaven but found no evidence that deep sleep had been used on this patient. [10]. The Newhaven building was later reopened as a nursing home with no connections to its previous owner or uses.

[edit] Kia Lama
Anne Hamilton-Byrne acquired fourteen infants and young children between about 1968 and 1975. Some were the natural children of Santiniketan members, others had been obtained through irregular adoptions arranged by lawyers, doctors and social workers within the group who could bypass the normal processes. The childrens identities were changed using false birth certificates or deed poll, all being given the surname 'Hamilton-Byrne' and dressed alike even to the extent of their hair being dyed uniformly blonde[11].

The children were kept in seclusion and home-schooled at Kia Lama, a rural property usually referred to as "Uptop", at Taylor Bay on Lake Eildon near the town of Eildon, Victoria. They were taught that Anne Hamilton-Byrne was their biological mother, and knew the other adults in the group as 'aunties' and 'uncles' [4]. They were denied almost all access to the outside world, and subjected to a discipline that included frequent corporal punishment and starvation diets [12].

The children were frequently dosed with the psychiatric drugs Anatensol, Diazepam, Haloperidol, Largactil, Mogadon, Serepax, Stelazine, Tegretol or Tofranil[4]. On reaching adolescence they were compelled to undergo an initiation involving LSD[13]: while under the influence of the drug the child would be left in a dark room, alone apart from visits by Hamilton-Byrne or one of the psychiatrists from the group[4].

[edit] Memoir
A few children managed to escape. One adoptive daughter, Sarah Hamilton-Byrne, later wrote a book of her experiences giving an account of stealing white children by the medical establishment and others. In it she claimed that her biological mother had come to get rid of a baby and that members of the medical establishment in Melbourne and Geelong took part in a process where women were told that their babies had died at birth, when they had actually been taken away and eventually passed on to Anne Hamilton-Byrne.[14]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santiniketan_Park_Association

Helen Reyes
06-12-2010, 03:40 PM
Interesting. The Great White Brotherhood is something I've run across before in relation to Theosophy, the Great Mahatmas, etc.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_White_Brotherhood

Also see the Vril thread in Alchemy and Bordlerlands.

Is Julian Assange a bleach-blond?

Austin Kelley
06-12-2010, 03:45 PM
Something very creepy was going on.

My take on mind control programs is framed by U.S. sources, which can take a very ethnocentric view. While I certainly have the impression that similar experimentation was going on in "enemy states", I also know that it was going on within states allied with the U.S. Empire- notably Britain, Canada, Australia, Israel and Apartheid South Africa. To what degree, these activities were conducted in concert, or not, remains to be proven. My best guess is that, not unlike the biological warfare network, there were- and are- a great deal of sub rosa connections..

Jan Klimkowski
06-12-2010, 04:07 PM
Remember there was a race element to the Manson Family.

Charlie's controllers, probably during his prison time where he became a Scientological clear, fed him the truly ludicrous Helter Skelter Race War scenario, whose elements on close examination read like an LRon-Hubbard-meets-Robert-Heinlein-apocalypse-survival pulp fiction.

The philosophy of the Jonestown controllers contained strong eugenic racial elements.

Pure Blavatskyan Great White Brotherhood mysticism was probably reserved for more intellectual cult leaders, and superficial accounts of the leaders of the Australian "Family" suggest that they may have fitted this latter mould.

Keith Millea
06-12-2010, 04:10 PM
Interesting. The Great White Brotherhood is something I've run across before in relation to Theosophy, the Great Mahatmas, etc.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_White_Brotherhood

Also see the Vril thread in Alchemy and Bordlerlands.

Is Julian Assange a bleach-blond?


Yes,throw in some good old occultism into the stew.Maybe these kids are "Starseed" from the Pleides.........:trytofly:

Helen Reyes
06-12-2010, 05:28 PM
FWIW Ingo Swann in his book talks about being transported to an underground defence facility where two twin body guards preside, but it turns out they aren't twins, they're made to look identical and have some sort of synchronous behaviour.

Ingo Swann was the allegedly scientologist remote-viewer who trained Major Ed Dames of Art Bell and Men Who Stare fame.

book here: http://www.sendspace.com/file/lxew1a

I wouldn't place too much credence in what Ingo says, but it is an interesting coincidence of detail.

Helen Reyes
06-12-2010, 05:33 PM
Interesting. The Great White Brotherhood is something I've run across before in relation to Theosophy, the Great Mahatmas, etc.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_White_Brotherhood

Also see the Vril thread in Alchemy and Bordlerlands.

Is Julian Assange a bleach-blond?


Yes,throw in some good old occultism into the stew.Maybe these kids are "Starseed" from the Pleides.........:trytofly:

Perhaps yes. Add Andrija Puharich's stable of children. I like what Assange is doing, and I hope he prevails. When the US announces someone has "fallen off the radar" when that someone was scheduled to speak in Las Vegas but didn't show, I tend to think he really is a target.

Jan Klimkowski
06-12-2010, 05:40 PM
FWIW Ingo Swann in his book talks about being transported to an underground defence facility where two twin body guards preside, but it turns out they aren't twins, they're made to look identical and have some sort of synchronous behaviour.

Ingo Swann was the allegedly scientologist remote-viewer who trained Major Ed Dames of Art Bell and Men Who Stare fame.

book here: http://www.sendspace.com/file/lxew1a

I wouldn't place too much credence in what Ingo says, but it is an interesting coincidence of detail.

Several of the key known military-intel remote viewers were allegedly onetime Scientologist Operating Thetans of very high rank.

See eg here where Helen and I have discussed previously:

http://www.deeppoliticsforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2453

Keith Millea
06-12-2010, 06:16 PM
Perhaps yes. Add Andrija Puharich's stable of children. I like what Assange is doing, and I hope he prevails. When the US announces someone has "fallen off the radar" when that someone was scheduled to speak in Las Vegas but didn't show, I tend to think he really is a target.

I'm sure that he is a target.I'm also pretty damn sure that the spooks have been trailing him for a long while now,which brings up the thought;They probably know where he is at. :flute:

Magda Hassan
08-24-2012, 04:24 PM
Raynor Johnson

Raynor Carey Johnson (1901–1987) was an English physicist and author.
]Life and career

Johnson was born in Leeds (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leeds), England. He earned an MA at the University of Oxford (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Oxford) and a PhD in physics at the University of London (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_London). He taught physics in London and Belfast (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belfast), working for a time with Ernest Rutherford (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernest_Rutherford) in the Cavendish Laboratory (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cavendish_Laboratory). He became increasingly interested in "the esoteric" and became connected with the Society for Psychical Research (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Society_for_Psychical_Research) in London.
Johnson's religious background led to work in Australia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australia), where he was Master of the Methodist (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methodism) Queen’s College (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queen's_College_(University_of_Melbourne)) at the University of Melbourne (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Melbourne) from 1934 to 1964. This university gave him a DSc honoris causa in 1936.
Johnson published several books on mysticism (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mysticism) and psychic research (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parapsychology) during the 1950s and 1960s. His interest and writings in esotericism eventually created concern within the Methodist Church, and he retired from his University position in 1964. At this time he owned a property called Santiniketan (abode of peace) at Ferny Creek (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferny_Creek,_Victoria) in the Dandenong Ranges (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dandenong_Ranges) outside Melbourne. There he hosted regular meetings of a religious and philosophical discussion group led by the yoga (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoga) teacher Anne Hamilton-Byrne. This group became The Family (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Family_(Australian_New_Age_group)), a cult that adopted a large number of children and treated them cruelly until Victorian police rescued them on August 14, 1987. Anne Hamilton-Byrne and her husband Bill were extradited from the United States six years later and faced criminal charges. Raynor Johnson died in 1987.
]Publications


Spectra. 1928 (Methuen: London)
Atomic Spectra. 1946 (Methuen: London)
An introduction to Molecular Spectra. 1949 (Methuen: London)
The Imprisoned Splendour. An approach to reality, based upon the significance of data drawn from the fields of natural science, psychical research and mystical experience. 1953 (Hodder & Stoughton: London); new edition 1989 (Pelegrin Trust in association with Pilgrim Books: Tasburgh, Norwich) ISBN 0-946259-30-5 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special:BookSources/0946259305)
Psychical Research. 1955 (English Universities Press: London)
Nurslings of Immortality. 1957 (Hodder & Stoughton: London); new edition 1989 (Pelegrin Trust in association with Pilgrim Books: Tasburgh, Norwich) ISBN 0-946259-43-7 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special:BookSources/0946259437)
Watcher on the Hills. 1959 (Hodder & Stoughton: London); new edition 1988 (Pelegrin Trust in association with Pilgrim Books: Tasburgh, Norwich) ISBN 0-946259-28-3 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special:BookSources/0946259283)
A Religious Outlook for Modern Man. 1963. (Hodder & Stoughton: London); new edition 1988 (Pelegrin Trust in association with Pilgrim Books: Tasburgh, Norwich) ISBN 0-946259-27-5 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special:BookSources/0946259275)
The Light and the Gate. 1964 (Hodder & Stoughton: London) ISBN 0-340-01214-5 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special:BookSources/0340012145)
The Spiritual Path. 1972 (Hodder & Stoughton: London) ISBN 0-340-15852-2 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special:BookSources/0340158522)
A Pool of Reflections: for the refreshment of travellers on the spiritual path. 1975 (Hodder & Stoughton: London) ISBN 0-340-19247-X (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special:BookSources/034019247X)
Light of All Life: Thoughts towards a philosophy of life. 1984 (Pilgrim Books: Tasburgh, Norwich) ISBN 0-946259-07-0 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special:BookSources/0946259070)
References


^ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raynor_Johnson#cite_ref-0) Former Heads of Colleges at University of Melbourne (http://www.unimelb.edu.au/unisec/calendar/headscolleges.html)
^ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raynor_Johnson#cite_ref-1) Discussion of Raynor Johnson on ABC (http://www.abc.net.au/rn/relig/spirit/stories/s150033.htm)
^ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raynor_Johnson#cite_ref-2) Supreme Court of Victoria (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supreme_Court_of_Victoria) 1999 Judgement in Kibby v. Registrar of Titles and Another (http://law.ato.gov.au/atolaw/view.htm?docid='JUD/*1999*1VR861/00002')

Jan Klimkowski
08-24-2012, 07:14 PM
Psychic Driving.... Procured Orphans.... Apocalyptic founding mythology.... Help and protection from the system..

As far as Sarah is concerned, the worst thing The Family did to the children - as it had the most lasting effect - was the withholding of love. "I believe to deny a child love is to deny its existence as a human being."

The Official Story is that the Pit of Despair was for monkeys only....

The Arrogant Dreams of a generation of Behaviourists...

Let me create a Tabula Rasa.


The cruel cult of Anne Hamilton-Byrne
Nigel H. Sinnott

Unseen Unheard Unknown (http://home.vicnet.net.au/~atheist/CruelCultofA.htm); by Sarah Hamilton-Byrne. 220 pp.; ppbk. Penguin Australia, 1995 (ISBN 0 14 017434 6). $14.95 [about £7].


Earlier this century, engineers in Victoria dammed the Goulburn River where it is joined by the Delatite to form a large artificial lake. Beside the dam is the town of Eildon and between this and the Fraser National Park a small settlement emerged by the lake at Taylor's Bay. The area around the lake appealed to retired people, artists, fishing and boating enthusiasts, bushwalkers, trail-bike riders and holiday makers. It was also secluded enough to attract a wealthy, secretive and sinister sect called The Family.
One of the founders of The Family (sometimes called the Great White Brotherhood) was Dr Raynor Johnson, a physicist and Master of Queen's College at the University of Melbourne. He was interested in Eastern mysticism and became "a world authority on religion".

The cult's doctrines were a syncretism or mixture of ideas from Hinduism, yoga, Zen, Christianity and other sources, combined with an uncritical adoration of the movement's female leader. Initiation involved the use of drugs - usually LSD but, if this was in short supply, psilocybin-rich toadstools would do. Secrecy and a low profile were encouraged by the motto "Unseen, unheard, unknown".

The co-founder was Anne Hamilton-Byrne, who claimed descent from the French royal family and the Biblical House of David. Her detractors believe she was the daughter of a railway engine cleaner and they further allege that her claims to have a pilot's licence and qualifications in psychiatric nursing, homoeopathy and physiotherapy are groundless.

Anne became the Master of the cult and sought a wealthy, middle-class following. In the late 1960s she decide, as a "scientific experiment" (warmly accepted by Dr Johnson), to collect a group of young children and indoctrinate them to continue her movement. They were supposed to become an élite leadership group after - she believed - most of the world had been destroyed by a massive explosion.

Children were acquired either direct from Family members or through adoptions arranged by cult doctors and social workers. The children's names were changed, their identities falsified, and they were sometimes provided with multiple false birth certificates. On one occasion they were baptised, en bloc, as Catholics, presumably so that Anne could acquire a swag of baptismal certificates.

For most of the time the children were kept at Taylors Bay, in strict isolation on a property called Kai Lama ("Uptop" to the children). They were dressed alike and often had their hair dyed blond to make them look alike. When Anne Hamilton-Byrne and her husband Bill were not around - which was most of the time - the children were looked after by rostered cult members called Aunties who had agreed to donate half their time to guruseva (Sanskrit for "service to the Master").

The children were rigidly controlled during their waking hours and had to speak in affected English middle-class accents. They were viciously punished - with beatings, bashings, starvation, vast numbers of lines to write and public humiliation - for the slightest infraction of Anne's rules. Children were routinely beaten for bed-wetting and even for fouling their nappies. The cult's maxims were "You can't murder a bum" and "A belting a day keeps evil away". On one occasion Anne asked someone to hold up the telephone while a child was being beaten "so I can hear the screams". She once held up a boy, less than two years old, by his ankles to show followers "the best way to belt a child". Cruelty to animals, on the other hand, was strongly denounced. The children received restricted and barely adequate food but vast amounts of vitamin tablets. They were routinely dosed with tranquillisers to keep them docile.

Anne had a horror of fatness, and any child she reckoned was overweight was put on even more restricted rations. The Master did not, of course, practise what she preached. She maintained her preferred body image with regular plastic surgery and liposuction.

If the children were ill, they were ignored or else punished for "attention seeking" or making undue noise. Anne, on the other hand, doled out homoeopathic remedies for "disobedience" and "thinking wrongly".

The children received a limited education of sorts and had regular hatha yoga and meditation sessions. The youngsters were occasionally taken to the cult's other properties in Victoria, England and the United States. As they got older, the boys were sent off to a private boarding school in England (Stoneyhurst). Anne was, apparently, not too fussy about formal education for the girls, though in 1984 the Kai Lama property was granted recognition as a school, Aquinel College.

The children were, in other words, brought up in an atmosphere which was callous, oppressive and manipulative. They were denied the features of childhood most youngsters take for granted: freedom consistent with safety, unconditional affection, emotional security, and opportunities to acquire coping skills in the outside world.

The misery and deprivation to which the children were subjected were conveniently rationalised by Anne Hamilton-Byrne's belief in reincarnation and karma. The Aunties, by the way, claimed that Anne was Jesus Christ reincarnated. Suffering, according to The Family, acquired merit (good karma) in this life and helped redeem sins in supposed former lives.

The children were trained to be afraid of outsiders in general and of the police in particular. But in 1987 a private investigator, who had been watching The Family for some time, persuaded three teenage girls - who had broken away from the cult or were trying to do so - to meet two women officers of the Victoria Police. Further meetings took place and, after the girls had made detailed statements, the police planned a dawn raid on Kai Lama.

The cult's daily timetable was, for once, convenient. Three busloads of police struck at 6:30 a.m. when the children were in one part of the building, doing yoga, and the adults upstairs. The raid went well and, once they had been reassured by the three older girls, the rest of the children started talking freely about their experiences. They had discovered that someone in the world was more powerful than Anne and Bill Hamilton-Byrne!

Sarah Hamilton-Byrne was one of the girls who went to the police and accompanied the raid. She has now written a book describing her experiences as one of Anne's children and her own efforts to break away and adjust to the outside world.

Sarah discovered, incidentally, that she was not Anne's real daughter as she had been led to suppose. Her real mother had been browbeaten, while dosed with tranquillisers, to sign adoption papers. The baby had been surreptitiously adopted by the family doctor, a cult member, and handed over to Anne. Coercion and subterfuge were the norm in most other cases as well.

After the raid at Lake Eildon the children were taken to the Victorian government's Allambie reception centre in the eastern suburbs of Melbourne. Sarah formed a high opinion of the staff there and of several police officers who continued to offer help and support. She gives a moving account of a little boy called David who, after looking at the refrigerator, was told he could help himself to anything he fancied. "I will never forget the look on David's face as he gazed into that fridge and realised he was free." A girl named Cassandra, who was much shorter than most children of her age, grew eleven centimetres in her first year of freedom. Another child received a vicious telephone call from an Aunty. She told him she was his real mother, reviled him, and then disowned him. Once again, as Sarah points out "the cruelty of the régime we had left was amply demonstrated".

The cult even obtained the services of a compliant journalist who claimed that Anne and Bill were the innocent victims of a witch-hunt and that they had taken in children who were retarded and "unwanted by anyone else".

The children's move to St. John's Homes for Boys and Girls, an Anglican institution, brought problems. Unlike the people at Allambie, Sarah relates:

The hierarchy at St John's believed it was important that staff remained aloof. The few staff who tried to befriend or comfort us were encouraged to leave. No affection was allowed; that was interpreted as a risk to 'professional boundaries'. At the same time, the St John's hierarchy actively tried to stop us making outside friends; new people were discredited. . . The staff were rude to the few people who had befriended us. . . Some . . . were especially vitriolic. . . The philosophy seemed to be 'Don't talk about it and it will all go away'. Whenever we tried to explain our background to them, they accused us of being self-indulgent and wanting sympathy.
Eventually the children decided to go their separate ways, though they still see each other frequently to celebrate anniversaries of the raid at Taylors Bay. A disappointment they had to bear was being told that the authorities were unable to prosecute members of The Family for cruelty, as more than twelve months had elapsed from the last date of abuse. Four of the Aunties were sentenced to a few months' jail for social security frauds; these sentences were later reduced on appeal.
And The Master herself? She was finally extradited from the United States to Australia to face charges involving false registration of births. She was fined $5,000 for making a false declaration. Sarah estimates Anne's assets as being at least $150 million.

Sarah is, if anything, a little too ready to absolve the Aunties. "Most of them were not intrinsically evil people" she writes. "They had merely subjugated all moral standards to the goal of obeying the Master's will. . . They were told to discipline us to within an inch of our lives and that is what they did." Elsewhere Sarah describes the Aunties' chorus of "Good on you Anne, they need to be taught from an early age!" I may not be alone in regarding "only obeying orders" as a poor excuse for gross cruelty.

One of the more appalling features of The Family - apart from Anne's egomania and double-talk - was the way in which its evil activities were furthered by a seedy coterie of morally defective professionals. The brutal Aunties were nurses or nursing students; then there were the doctors who provided the Aunties with prescription drugs (to sedate the children) or who supervised the abuse of LSD; psychiatrists who committed patients to a hospital run by a cult member; lawyers who fixed up the deed polls for bogus passports and birth certificates; and social workers who helped bypass normal adoption procedures. "Without their support and participation," Sarah comments, "Anne Hamilton-Byrne would never have become what she is today. It was their names that gave her the credibility and social power she needed. . . They looked respectable, therefore people thought they must be respectable."

When reading Sarah's book I found I could cope tolerably well with her descriptions of incessant beatings and humiliations; but when she came to describe the aftermath of the raid and her efforts to overcome her self-doubts, depression and fear of inadequacy, it became impossible to be objective or detached. No one should be put in a position where he or she has to write a first-hand account like this, but it needed to be done and has been written well. It has the ring of painful sincerity and a dogged concern for compassion, decency and honesty.

As far as Sarah is concerned, the worst thing The Family did to the children - as it had the most lasting effect - was the withholding of love. "I believe to deny a child love is to deny its existence as a human being." Elsewhere she says that "Destroying life and liveliness in people is perhaps the true definition of evil."

Thanks to a combination of luck, the help of loyal, perceptive friends and her innate intelligence and stubborn courage, Sarah has survived The Family's efforts to suborn her to its designs, and she is well on the way to being something that the Master could only bluster about - a real healer.

Dr Sarah Hamilton-Byrne has rendered a valuable public service by shedding a bright light on the dark secrets of The Family and by exposing it for the cruel, parasitic monstrosity it was.

Note (1997) by the editor of the Australian Humanist, James Gerrand:

Those who attended last year's Skeptics Convention were privileged to hear Dr Sarah speak of her ordeal as a further valuable service she rendered to the public.

Note (1997) by the editor of The Skeptic, Barry Williams:

Readers who attended the Australian Skeptics 1995 Convention in Melbourne would have had the privilege of hearing Dr Sarah Hamilton-Byrne speaking about her horrifying childhood experiences. It was a presentation not to be forgotten.

__________

Originally typed 23 October 1995.
First published as "The cruel cult of Anne Hamilton-Byrne" in the Australian Humanist, n.s., no. 46, May 1997: 9 -11.

Republished as "Anatomy of a cruel cult" in The Skeptic (Sydney) 17 (2), Winter [June] 1997: 45-46, 48.

Scanned 7 November 2005 (minor corrections 13 Nov. 2007).

Magda Hassan
08-25-2012, 10:17 AM
‎In the 1960's - 1970's there was a private psychiatric hospital in Kew, Victoria called Newhaven. It was owned by J.M.Villimek, whom was a member of the Santikietan lodge which was owned by Raynor C.Jonson (April 5 1901 -May 16 1987), all nurses and psychiatrists employed were all members of the 'Family', all 'Family' children were home schooled at 'Kia Lama' a rural property referred as 'uptop' in the Taylor Bay Lake area in Eildon.

Anne Hamilton - Bryne's true name is Evelyn Grace Victoria Edwards. Her mother was in Ararat Mental Asylum due to psychiatric illness (type unknown to me at the moment) and Evelyn grew up in Old Brighton Orphange.

Magda Hassan
08-26-2012, 02:08 PM
Creating the family tree


From:Sunday Herald Sun
August 16, 2009 12:00AM

1961 ANNE Hamilton meets Dr Raynor Johnson, Master of Queen's College at the University of Melbourne and renowned authority on mysticism.


1964 Dr Johnson buys land at Ferny Creek, where the cult builds Santiniketan Lodge, which becomes its headquarters.1961 (continued) Together they found The Family, a religion based on a blend of Eastern mysticism and Christianity.
1965 Hamilton-Byrne marries South African naval officer Michael Riley. The marriage does not last.
1960s The Family begins recruiting cult members from patients at the Newhaven private psychiatric hospital in Kew. The recruits are given heavy doses of LSD.
1968 Hamilton-Byrne begins adopting children with her "husband" Bill Byrne. Both change their surname to Hamilton-Byrne, but do not marry until the mid-1970s.
1970s She buys Broom Farm in Kent, England, and another house in the Catskills, New York.
1983 Australian Federal Police visit the cult's property at Eildon, looking for but not finding missing girl, Kim Halm.
1986 Newhaven hospital closes. The property is later the subject of a lawsuit between Anne Hamilton-Byrne and the descendants of a deceased cult member. She wins.
1987 Australian Federal Police raid the Eildon property, removing six children.
1988 Seven female cult members are jailed for defrauding social security of almost $200,000.
1989 Victoria Police establish Operation Forest to investigate The Family.
1990 Former cult solicitor Peter Kibby confesses to forging birth records on Anne Hamilton-Byrne's orders. Former "aunty" Patricia MacFarlane also gives details to police of her role in the adoption scams.
1993 Anne and Bill Hamilton-Byrne are arrested by the FBI in the Catskills Mountains, New York, after police traced calls made to Australia.
1994 Anne and Bill Hamilton-Byrne are extradited to Melbourne. They plead guilty to perjury through documents and are fined $5000.
2001 Bill Hamilton-Byrne dies. Anne Hamilton-Byrne attends his funeral in her only public appearance since she was convicted in 1994.
http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/creating-the-family-tree/story-e6frf7jo-1225761971530?sv=7bc4978a7cb23b622356d12cb362dabc

Magda Hassan
08-26-2012, 02:13 PM
CULT members Patricia MacFarlane and Peter Kibby gave evidence outlining their role in The Family. Here are edited versions of their stories:

MacFARLANE:
Raynor Johnson (the former Master of Queens College at the University of Melbourne) told me of this woman he had met.

He said that one day he answered the door to find a woman standing there. He said this woman's name was Anne Riley and she was spiritual being, or entity.

He said from that moment on he was enthralled by Anne.
In September 1967, my son, Adrian, was killed in a motor vehicle accident. My whole world was ripped apart.

Between one and two days later a woman appeared at our house. I realised she was the Anne Riley with whom Raynor was so besotted.
She believed I should undergo an "initiation" into "The Family".

The initiation was very simple and I don't remember any more of it. I think Anne may possibly have laid her hands on my head, but it was certainly nothing spectacular.I vividly recall that Anne entered the Cotham Clinic, Cotham Rd, Kew, which was a private medical clinic.
Anne was an in-patient and underwent surgery for a facelift.

She summoned myself, (my husband) Don, John McKay and Elizabeth Whitaker to her bedside.

She told Don and I that we were to seek a divorce immediately.

She told Don he was to move into Elizabeth's house in Kew. She told (Dr) John McKay that he was to leave Jan and obtain a divorce immediately. John was to move in with me.
When I started working as a nurse at Newhaven, the majority of the staff were sect members. The day patients were there for Electro Convulsive Therapy (ECT).
Newhaven specialised in the use of LSD and psilocybin (magic mushrooms), Deep Sleep Therapy and ECT.

Most psychiatrists used LSD and psilocybin.

KIBBY:
I was a solicitor on Collins St in the early 1960s when I developed Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. I was introduced to Anne through some friends and was convinced she could cure me.
I had two leucotomies - a form of lobotomy - at her suggestion.
I was very close to Anne and was responsible for her all her legal work, forging false birth certificates and adoption papers.
I knew all the inner workings of the cult's finances. But I became disillusioned by her in the late 1980s.

Jan Klimkowski
08-26-2012, 02:42 PM
[When I started working as a nurse at Newhaven, the majority of the staff were sect members. The day patients were there for Electro Convulsive Therapy (ECT).
Newhaven specialised in the use of LSD and psilocybin (magic mushrooms), Deep Sleep Therapy and ECT.

Most psychiatrists used LSD and psilocybin.

KIBBY:
I was a solicitor on Collins St in the early 1960s when I developed Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. I was introduced to Anne through some friends and was convinced she could cure me.
I had two leucotomies - a form of lobotomy - at her suggestion.
I was very close to Anne and was responsible for her all her legal work, forging false birth certificates and adoption papers.
I knew all the inner workings of the cult's finances. But I became disillusioned by her in the late 1980s.

Yup.

Psychic driving.

An Australian Allen Memorial Institute.


MKULTRA Subproject 68 was one of Cameron's ongoing "attempts to establish lasting effects in a patient's behaviour" using a combination of particularly intensive electroshock, intensive repetition of prearranged verbal signals, partial sensory isolation, and repression of the driving period carried out by inducing continuous sleep for seven to ten days at the end of the treatment period. During research on sensory deprivation, Cameron experimented with the use of Curare, a poison used by South American Indians to tip their arrow heads, to immobilise his patients. After one test he noted: "Although the patient was prepared by both prolonged sensory isolation (35 days) and by repeated depatterning, and although she received 101 days of positive driving, no favourable results were obtained." Patients were regularly treated with hallucinogenic drugs, long periods in the "sleep room", and testing in the Radio Telemetry Laboratory, which was built under Cameron's direction. Here, patients were exposed to a range of RF and electromagnetic signals and monitored for changes in behaviour. It was later stated by other staff members who had worked at the Institute that not one patient sent to the Radio Telemetry Lab showed any signs of improvement afterwards.

Magda Hassan
08-26-2012, 02:49 PM
On the receiving end of the cult’s services was Lord Casey, former Governor-General of Australia and the minister in charge of overseeing the Australian intelligence service. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Casey,_Baron_Casey


And here is the Coup De Grace from Sarah Moore. Saving the best and longest piece for last. One of the reasons this post took so long to get out was that I had to read the whole book and edit it down to the juiciest details! But I think I got the significant pages. Keep an eye out for Swami Muktanda of “Eat.Pray.Love” fame and for a certain Governor-General Casey, overseer of Australian intelligence back in the heyday of the cult. This really gets into the nitty-gritty of what a living HELL it must have been to grow up in the Family.
http://www.leavingsiddhayoga.net/unseen.htm
Excerpt from UNSEEN, UNHEARD, UNKNOWN
by Sarah Moore (Hamilton-Byrne)
My mother was Anne Hamilton-Byrne, the leader of a small sect in the Dandenongs called the Family or the Great White Brotherhood. I was a small part of her plan to collect children in what she herself once called a “scientific experiment”. Later I discovered it was her intention that we children would continue her sect after the earth was consumed by a holocaust. She saw us as the “inheritors of the earth”. I didn’t know that then. In those days I was just a child. A child of a guru, but a child no less.
Twenty-two to twenty-eight children in all lived at Uptop in its heyday, although the fosters had varying lengths of stay
She used to say that she couldn’t remember all the dates very well because she had so many children. Maybe, in retrospect, we should have realised that was weird but then we never thought it was anything out of the ordinary. She decided upon sets of twins and triplets and gave us ages and birth-dates to fit in with that idea. Birthday changes were just something you accepted. It was as if Anne knew so much more about everything than us and she just might be revealing another piece of our life plan if she changed our birthdays.
We were the children of The Family, the children of Anne Hamilton-Byrne. We were dressed alike. Most of the girls’ hair was dyed blond, cut into fringes and worn long with identical hairstyles and identically-coloured ribbons. All the boys had bowl haircuts.
…Why did she raise us in almost total social isolation, miles from anywhere, with minimal contact with other humans apart from the sect members who looked after us? Why did she subject us to the bizarre and cruel regimen in which we grew up? Was it to demonstrate that she had the power to create a generation that would be reared with her beliefs and believing in her? I suspect perhaps that there were more sinister motives than these alone. Some of us had multiple birth certificates and passports, and citizenship of more than one country. Only she knows why thus was and why we were also all dressed alike, why most of us even had our hair dyed identically blond.
I can only conjecture because I will never know for sure. However I suspect that she went to such great lengths in order to enable her to move children around, in and out of the country. Perhaps even to be sold overseas. I’m sure there is a market somewhere in the world for small blond children with no traceable identities. If she did it, it was a perfect scam. Many ex-sect members have said that they were aware that Anne was creating children by a “breeding program” in the late 1960s. These were ‘invisible’ kids, because they had no papers and there is no proof that they ever existed. Yet we Hamilton-Byrne children had multiple identities. These identities could perhaps have been loaned to other children and the similarity of our appearance used to cover up their absence. One little blond kid looks very like another in a passport photo. I don’t suppose we will ever know the truth because only Anne Hamilton-Byrne knows the truth about the whole affair and the truth is something she will never tell.
…I am training to be a doctor but sometimes I think my medical career will be sabotaged because there are still many in the sect who have a lot of influence in professional and academic circles. It may sound melodramatic, but I know that some who were Anne’s enemies have disappeared in strange circumstances.
….You would always hear the alarm clock going off upstairs in the lounge room where Aunty Helen slept on guard against food thieves. She would come stumbling downstairs, guided by torchlight, and go first to the boys’ bedroom and wake up Aunty Liz or Trish who slept in there. They would lurch out to the bathroom and get dressed.
Aunty Helen would light the gas light in the boys’ room, and then go around checking the boys’ beds to see who had wet them the night before. The poor children guilty of this would be led by the ear into the bathroom to have a belting administered by Aunty Trish or Liz. Then they would be shoved, still in their pyjamas, under a cold shower, no matter how freezing the weather outside.
Every morning I awoke to the sounds of children howling as they got their first belting for the day. Rare was the day that no-one wet the bed, at least until 1986, and even then the younger boys continued to do so on occasions.
The unfortunate child then had to wash his own sheets out during breakfast, and often had to miss lunch as well. The sheets were piled in a corner of the bathroom until breakfast time and they smelled horrible.
…Also, once a week, or more if it was considered that an individual had a weight problem, we were weighed and the results entered in a book to be communicated to Anne. She had a horror of fatness and was obsessed with body shape and weight. She always insisted that we girls were getting too fat, even though in some cases it was malnutrition rather than extra kilos that caused our bellies to stick out.
Weighing was a very serious business – particularly serious for us because if it was considered that we were putting on too much weight we would have our food rations cut down and that was a dreadful proposition – food being the most important thing in our lives. We girls viewed the scales with hatred. They made our miserable lives even worse.
Some of the girls also showered in the morning if there was time. We showered every two days in a rostered system, some in the morning and some at night. We were allowed a maximum of three minutes under the shower, and ‘no washing down there’!. We were forbidden to look at our bodies under the shower – we were supposed to shower with our eyes shut – and also we were ordered not to look at anyone else. Particularly forbidden was girls coming into contact with boys. I do believe that I had not seen a naked male body – even in a book , as these too were heavily censored- until HSC Biology. In summer, when water was scarce, we often couldn’t shower and had to wash from a bucket or else one bath would be filled and all of us had to use it. The water was pretty dark and scungy by the time it was the turn of the last few.
…After this we had to be on the floor in position for hatha yoga by 6:25 to 6:30 at the latest. Hatha time for lasted one hour, during which we followed a prescribed order of four main asanas (positions) with intervening minor exercises and relaxation.
As we did yoga every day of our lives from a very young age, we were extremely supple. We eventually got given red towels which we had to lay out to do our yoga on; before that time we laid out blankets, which I remember used to slip around on the lino. We lay on the floor side by side, about half a metre between us. The next row was placed in between the others to form staggered rows. Each person had a specific place and one child, who lay perpendicular to the rest at the front, acted as supervisor and directed the pace of the exercise and kept the time.
Hatha finished at 7:20 – 7:25 and then the girls picked up their towels. Hatha yoga was often the only exercise we got for the day especially during the long periods of time when we were totally confined indoors. This happened when there were people in the vicinity or some suspected media or police interest. It could go on for many months. Or we could be confined simply as punishment.
While we were doing our yoga, most of the Aunties were upstairs having their breakfast. THEY got tea and toast. They also read a daily affirmation from a book called `God Calling’. Sometimes one Aunty was left downstairs to keep an eye on us or would wash our clothes.
….Anne Hamilton-Byrne believed in discipline absolutely. We believed we were her children. She was, we were told, Jesus Christ reincarnated. This was rarely explicitly said by her: it was more assumed by how she referred to herself and acted. Her religion was based on distorted perceptions of the Hindu notion of “karma”: that you reap what you sow. Suffering as children was supposed not just to expiate the sins of this life, but also the sins of our past lives. Suffering built up our chances of salvation and redemption. Anne’s religion practically called for child-abuse.
Because she travelled so much she left two books of instructions called ‘Mummy’s Rule Books’. These books listed penalties for infractions. They had entries such as : “If David rocks or sways during meditation, he is to be hit over the head with a chair” and rules about everything, even about how many hours of piano practice each child was to do. These were signed by Anne. She encouraged the Aunties to belt us.
The guiding principle of our rigid existence was discipline. Discipline was the word used to justify abuse. It was discipline that we had to agree with no matter what.
It was enforced in the early days with beltings and the deprivation of food by the missing of meals almost every day. Later this changed to public humiliation, lines to write, the missing of ‘privileges’ and less common but more severe beltings.
We often had to watch others being beaten. If we took our eyes away that would be interpreted as disapproval and if you disapproved that was a worse crime. Public beatings were held to flush out insubordinates. Anyone who got upset or refused to look or appeared to be disagreeing that the person should be punished, got beaten as well.
Punishments came in waves. Whatever Anne considered the best way of disciplining us was enforced until she changed her mind. So I remember harsh times and softer times.
….Megan Dawes once missed meals for a day because she was caught wearing odd socks. We weren’t even allowed to go to the toilet until the designated recess time and so of course kids would wet their pants and be belted for that. One time we had a baby called Madeleine staying with us for a few weeks. She was locked in a cot all day with the sides up. She had not reached the walking stage and so couldn’t get out of the cot and get to the toilet. However that didn’t stop the Aunties. She still got belted when she wet or dirtied her nappy. I remember Trish ordering me to bathe Madeleine in a basin after she had soiled herself. The water had to be icy cold as a punishment and Trish smacked her after I bathed her. She was screaming and I had difficulty holding her still in the cold water.
…We were often punished for rocking. We used to rock ourselves to sleep at night because we felt so miserable, sitting up on our haunches and swaying to and fro, or just rocking our head from side to side.. Often after a belting we would call out ‘Mummy, Daddy’ as we rocked to and fro, calling out to a Mummy and Daddy who were not there and did not care. When we were younger a few of us, myself included used to headbang as we rocked: it was a way of seeking comfort. If we were caught, we were punished with another belting, or being put outside on the concrete for the remainder of the night, or getting cold water tipped over us. Rocking was considered to be bad because , even when we were tiny children it was interpreted as a form of sexual gratification.
…For most of my early childhood, I remember being constantly hungry. We were starving and it was Anne’s policy that we were. We were so hungry we ate dirt and leaves. We were so hungry we ate grass and scavenged in the rubbish bins. We were so hungry we ate the cats’ and dogs’ food, we ate bread and seed left out for the birds. We were so hungry we stole anything we could. Vitamin C capsules were considered by us as manna from Heaven.
….The irony was that stealing food was the crime for which we were most often punished. It was a Catch-22 situation: we were so hungry we stole food and if we stole food we were made to miss more meals. In light of this miserable situation it wasn’t surprising that most of us were obsessed with food.
Extraordinary measures were taken to prevent us stealing food. The kitchen cupboards were padlocked. There was a chain and padlock around the fridge, and an Aunty was delegated to guard the kitchen at all times. Amazingly, despite these measures, we were sometimes successful in stealing food. But, more often than not, the ever-vigilant Aunties noticed immediately if anything was missing.
…As well as trying to steal, we used to scavenge for what we could. The younger children would crawl under the dining table after the meal, supposedly to sweep up any mess, but their real purpose would be to eat whatever scraps or crumbs had fallen. Others of us would raid the rubbish bins and the compost bin. I only ate leaves and grass to assuage in some way the dreadful emptiness in my stomach. It was a desperation measure. Any edible plants and flowers were dealt with very quickly. I remember the nasturtiums in particular disappeared within minutes of flowering. We also ate the honeysuckle bush, and another type of grass that had a sweet tasting centre.
…The climax of each child’s drug-taking came in the sect practice known as ‘going-through’. I describe my own experience of this in another chapter. However during this process, also known as “clearing”, we were given LSD and a number of other hallucinogenic drugs. It was a state that was basically a sustained LSD trip. It was meant to clear your soul and take you to a higher plane of understanding, and was perhaps the key to Anne’s spiritual influence.
….The end of the massive vitamin doses coincided with the death of a prominent sect member called Joan Villimek, who owned the Newhaven Private Psychiatric Hospital in Kew. We believe that she was supplying the money to buy them; as it was inconceivable that Anne dig into her own pocket to provide anything, other than the occasional bizarre gifts and dresses she bought for us.
Being ill brought few pay-offs for us children. It did not result in appropriate medication or extra emotional support and affection. In fact, it often led to punishment rather than sympathy. For instance, David, who had chronic asthma and a history of other allergies, was punished by the Aunties for coughing and wheezing all the time. He was never given bronchodilators such as Ventolin or steroids – the proper treatment for his condition. He was just told that he was a wheezer, as if this was something that was his fault. And if he woke the Aunties at night with his coughing or wheezing, they would often tip water over him and lock him outside the house for the rest of the night, or just belt him. Often he slept in the bathroom because of his ‘noise’. He was even denied meals as a deterrent. Symptoms of any illness were attributed by Anne and the Aunties as ‘all in the mind’ or ‘attention-seeking’ and if someone were really sick, they tended to just be ignored.
Homoeopathy remedies, prescribed by Anne, were given to us regularly for all sorts of reasons. Anne proclaimed herself an expert on this form of treatment and told us she had studied it for six years in Tibet. For the affliction of ‘disobedience’ we were given Stramonium, for ‘shock’ (a term meaning either physical or emotional upset) the treatment was Aconite, for ‘thinking wrongly’ Pulsatilla, for ‘rocking at night’ and for farting Nux Vomica. These homoeopathic medicines were administered in addition to our usual punishments for offences, and in addition to other drugs.
…In an attempt to cure Cassandra of her attacks, Anne and the Aunties began using imported drugs on her. The drugs came from Germany and were meant to make her grow. At the time I thought they were steroids because two of the other kids, Timothy and Arrianne, had been given a course of them once before. Dr Christobel Wallace and the other Aunties called these drugs Timothy and Arrianne were given steroids. Anne wanted Arrianne to grow because she was very small, but she never grew much. I think her growth in height was actually halted by the early doses of steroids given to her.
…Sure, it was much more fun and more exciting than the life Uptop: in America and Hawaii we even got to spend some time with Baba Muktananda. But, from memories of the rest of her performance and attitude towards us, it seems unlikely that she was spending money to take us overseas just so that we could have fun, or spend time with Baba.
I don’t quite understand either why or how Anne got involved with Baba. He certainly paid her a lot of attention and treated her with respect. In the end she ended up causing a lot of trouble in the ashram, and several of Baba’s close disciples defected to the Family, including two prominent swamis of Baba. So maybe she was in it because she saw an opportunity to establish another sphere of influence. I was present when Swami Tajomayananda got initiated by Anne into the family, and, knowing what a wonderful person he was, because he had come to stay at Eildon with us for a while before that, I am still puzzled by why he would want to join a sect where everyone was so miserable, when it seemed to me that around Baba everyone was so happy.
Whatever Anne’s reasons for taking us overseas, life there was much better than that Uptop. We still lived a fairly isolated existence, but when we were in America we had trips every day to Baba’s ashram down the road, and interacted with the other disciples in the evening activities at the ashram. We also saw Baba at a private darshan about once a week, when he could come down to our house to see us.
At these darshans Baba was very good to us. In fact, in retrospect, it was remarkable that he gave us so much time and attention because at that time he was very famous and had many thousands of devotees worldwide, and lots of demands for his time and attention. Of course at the time we did not realise that and merely lapped up his affection and enjoyed the fun we had with him. He was very fond of us and would talk and laugh with us and give us chocolates and little gifts. We worshipped and adored him – we wanted nothing better than to stay at his feet forever. Once he asked us if we wanted to leave Anne and go to Ganeshpuri and stay with him in his ashram. We all enthusiastically said yes, and were later belted and abused by Anne for being so disloyal. I am not sure if he ever knew or guessed what our life was like: he certainly never criticised Anne and treated her with a lot of respect apart from occasionally playing practical jokes on her, much to our (stifled) amusement.
…Among the many things that Anne told us children was that she was a direct descendant of the French Royal Family. She also said we were indirect descendants of Jesus Christ because, she reasoned, she and thus us as her children, were from the House of David, which was the House of Jesus. The lineage was all set out in the front of the Bible. She told us that we weren’t allowed to tell anyone about this, because royalty were no longer popular and we “might get our heads cut off”!
….In fact the sect had come to the attention of the journalist who wrote the articles purely accidentally long before that because he owned land in the Dandenongs opposite Dr John Mackay, a sect psychiatrist. The journalist, David Elias, first realised there was something strange going on when his daughter had been playing with Helen, Dr Mackay’s daughter. Elias’s daughter said Helen Mackay “didn’t just have one mummy, she had lots”.
Gradually Elias became more interested in the sect’s activities and in 1979, while he was writing a series on alternative religions, he tried to write something on the Family, he was warned off by Dr Raynor Johnson, who threatened to sue the paper. Dr Johnson was at the time a very influential man. He was the retired head of Melbourne University’s Queen’s College and was a world respected authority on religion. He was also co-founder with Anne of The Family.
After ‘The Age’ was threatened with a writ it took another four years before Elias could come up with anything else on the Family because of the incredible secrecy that surrounded them.
The information on Anne Hamilton-Byrne he unearthed came from months of digging. He learned that the woman we knew as Anne Hamilton-Byrne was born Evelyn Grace Victoria Edwards in Sale, Victoria. She was one of seven children born to a railway engine cleaner Ralph Vernon Edwards and his English second wife Florence Louise.
Apparently young Evelyn’s mother was known for setting fire to her own curly red hair and for having an interest in psychic phenomenon and talking to the dead. Subsequently other journalists have reported that Anne’s mother was mentally ill and died alone in a mental asylum. Her aunts in England were institutionalised and her sister suffered from psychiatric problems as well.
Newspapers have reported that Anne grew up in a large family. After her mother was committed to Ararat Mental Asylum, Anne spent some of her childhood in the Old Brighton Orphanage.
Although she claims to have gone to Firbank Church of England Grammar School, school records show she began at grade one at Sunshine Primary School on February 7, 1929 and that she had come there from the orphanage.
She has said she was handicapped at school but fellow school pupils do not recall any callipers. In fact according to newspaper reports they only remember “an overweight child whose nickname was ‘Puddy’.”
She has claimed to have had qualifications in psychiatric nursing, homoeopathy, physiotherapy and a pilot’s licence. She also said she had been a famous opera singer, winning the Sun Aria awards, and later studying with Dame Joan Hammond and Dame Joan Sutherland. Journalists who have searched the records find no evidence of any of those qualifications. She also has a number of aliases including Fiona Macdonald, Anne Hamilton, and Michelle Sutherland.
In 1941 she married an twenty four year old RAAF policeman named Harris and had her daughter Judith (who later called herself Natasha). Harris was killed in a car accident in 1955. Newspapers report, though with no substantiation, that Harris’s death was predicted to Anne by a Tibetan guru she had earlier met. As with anything connected to Anne, it’s hard to know the truth.
Apparently after that Anne disappeared for four years. Some reports say she spent several years in Geelong where she gave yoga lessons for $1 a head in a church hall, then set herself up as a therapist of some sort in Melbourne. It is recorded that in 1959 she enrolled in a yoga class in Melbourne.
She called herself Anne Harris but registered her name as Anne Hamilton. She was asked to leave the class after putting a ‘spell’ on a fellow student. In the sixties she married a former Navy officer named Michael Riley and went to live in the Dandenong Ranges, just outside Melbourne.
The marriage didn’t last long. But it was useful to Anne in other ways. Riley worked as Dr Raynor Johnson’s gardener in those days and this may have been how Anne came to know the man with whom she went on to co-found The Family.
A group formed around Raynor Johnson and Anne. Dr Johnson was known within the group as the John the Baptist figure to Anne’s Christ. In the study of his big old house in the hills, they met on Thursdays and Sundays and the talk would be on the principles of yoga and meditation. Finally this group became more formal and developed into the beginning of The Family. They built a place called the Santiniketan Lodge. The Lodge was named after the school founded by the Indian mystic and poet Rabindranath Tagore.
Bill Byrne was an earth-moving contractor from Traralgon in Victoria. In 1968 he took his son Michael to the Newhaven Psychiatric hospital for treatment. This was the hospital that was owned by one of the sect members and staffed in part by psychiatrists, doctors and nurses who were sect members. It didn’t take long for Bill to come under Anne’s spell and he soon left his wife and moved in with Anne. They married in 1978. Bill had been a local government councillor and was still commuting from Gippsland when the first children were arriving at Winberra.

Key passage coming up and a great line (first sentence of paragraph) to boot. Note that Lord Casey was rumoured to have contributed large sums of money to the cult and was apparently nursed back to health by them.
It has been suggested that Anne would have had no power without a syringe. She claimed a lot of knowledge of medical things. She said she had been the matron of a hospital but there is no evidence she ever did nursing. I can’t emphasise the importance of nursing in the sect enough. It was critical to the way she viewed the Aunties and, it was what she planned for the girls’ future profession. She said nursing was one of the ideal occupations because it was a form of ‘selfless service’ that led to spiritual advancement. We knew that on their weeks off from Uptop the Aunties were either training to be nurses or practised as nurses. Several of the Aunties nursed Lord Casey, a former Governor-General of Australia. Rumour has it that he made a significant donation to the sect.

http://psychedelicdungeon.files.wordpress.com/2010/09/lord_casey.jpg?w=221&h=300Lord Casey had great taste in Doctors

Taking a quick break from Moore’s book text to supplement her mention of Lord Casey. This is from an Australian biography site and has more detail on Casey.
http://www.adb.online.anu.edu.au/biogs/A130426b.htm.htm
In public, Casey seemed to be a devoted Cold-War warrior, fervently supportive of Britain and the U.S.A., and deeply hostile towards the Soviet Union and China; he was the minister responsible for the Australian Secret Intelligence Service.”

OK, back to the mind control drugs…
I have mentioned earlier the alarming drug dependency of the sect and how we were constantly administered prescription drugs. There was always a lot of medical paraphernalia around Uptop: syringes, tablets, gauges and more. I remember one whole cupboard containing hundreds of bottles of homoeopathic medicines. This cupboard was in the downstairs girls’ room, and one summer we broke in and stole lots of this homoeopathy, because the pills were sugar-coated and tasted like lollies.
…Anne was extremely vain. Appearance was all in The Family. Ugly children were treated appallingly, as if they were less worthy. According to ex-sect members, people were even screened by Anne on the basis of their looks when they were trying to get into the sect.
As for us, Anne wanted people to believe we were her children, and she thought she was beautiful, so it was a certainty that she screened us on our looks, or at least screened our parents. We were to be the ones who would carry on the work of the sect – we were a direct reflection on her – so she was intimately concerned about our appearances. She used to talk a lot about “breeding” and talk about us being from the “right stock”.

A very Nazi attitude, obviously…
Anne was always a very rich woman who never spared herself anything. Lately though, she has been crying poor. But judging by all the real estate she owns throughout the world, I estimate she is worth at least A$150 million. Broom Farm, her three-storey mansion and hundred acres or so of farmland in Langton Green, Kent, England must be worth several million alone. She owns at least one more house in England in Crowborough, and, I think, another in Red Hill. She, or her companies, Fafette and Audette, owns at least a dozen houses in Ferny Creek and another mansion in Olinda. She and Bill have or did have a few years ago, a huge property just outside Traralgon. In the United States, there is another large property of hers in the Catskill Mountains outside New York, America with three houses on it. And of course there was Uptop, five acres of waterfront land in a popular holiday area.





.. In ‘The Age’ in September 1983 David Elias wrote at length about Anne’s methods and about Newhaven Hospital. The Hospital was owned by Mrs Marion Villimek and she was both a director and matron. He was contacted by a former patient, George Ellis, whose case perfectly illustrates the way the hospital was run.

In 1966 Mr Ellis was a patient at Newhaven, being treated for alcoholism. He had been a medical student at Queen’s College at Melbourne University and when Dr Raynor Johnson was still head. Dr Johnson visited a patient in the next bed and they recognised each other. Another frequent visitor to this patient was Anne Hamilton-Byrne, who was then Mrs Riley. “This was to be the lady who captivated me with her talk of spiritual things, her knowledge of God and a familiarity with things psychic and her soothsaying.”, he said.
Mr Ellis told ‘The Age’: “During her visits to Newhaven Mrs Riley became friendly with me – even then she had a sort of charisma. She suggested to me that on my discharge, it would be courting disaster to return to my bachelor flat and suggested that it would be a better idea to come and stay with her and another person at her home in Ferny Creek.” George Ellis went to live with Anne and pretty soon found he was being “introduced to the mysteries of the procedures of the sect”.
He was initiated into the cult and later married another member – at Anne’s suggestion – that marriage has since broken down. He detailed his attendances at “clearings” (also called “go-throughs”) where sect members were given drugs under the supervision of three psychiatrists. He claimed the clearings were carried out at Newhaven and in private houses. Sometimes as many as six sect members would be going-through at one time.
He talked about Anne’s method which involved having sect members sit with those going – through and reporting back to her anything that was said. Anne then used this knowledge to create the impression that she had psychic powers. He and his family were sent to England several times and once to India by Anne.
Later Anne sent him to Uptop as a cook and to look after us children. He talked about how he and other sect members had nursed Lord Casey, after a serious road accident. Mr Ellis was assigned to watch over Lord Casey at night and to give him his medication. All this despite the fact that he had only ever had a small amount of training as a medical student.
You would think the guy who oversees Australia’s intelligence service could get an actual doctor?

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Casey,_Baron_Casey)

Jan Klimkowski
08-26-2012, 06:44 PM
Casey seemed to be a devoted Cold-War warrior, fervently supportive of Britain and the U.S.A., and deeply hostile towards the Soviet Union and China; he was the minister responsible for the Australian Secret Intelligence Service.

Ewen Cameron, Dr Shock Therapy, analysed Rudolf Hess for Churchill, and in the 1950s was President of the Canadian, American and World Psychiatric Associations, the American Psychopathological Association and the Society of Biological Psychiatry.

MK-ULTRA was exposed in around 1975.

Western intelligence was sharing the techniques of narco-trauma-hypnosis, and its purported capacity to create human puppets, throughout the 50s and 60s.

Australia. A penal colony.

Magda Hassan
08-27-2012, 03:02 AM
Powerful corrupt friends in the catholic church.

But first off, the Catholics! What good is an LSD mind control religious cult sexual abuse story without the Catholic Church making a guest appearance?http://psychedelicdungeon.files.wordpress.com/2010/09/ronald-conway-200x0.jpg?w=188&h=300 (http://psychedelicdungeon.files.wordpress.com/2010/09/ronald-conway-200x0.jpg)Ronald Conway, Hypocrite Par Excellence

http://clericalwhispers.blogspot.com/2010/05/ronald-conway-hands-on-psychologist-who.html

For thirty years a prominent Australian Catholic psychologist, Ronald Conway, had a part-time role in assessing and helping trainee priests in the Melbourne seminary. Conway also worked as a consulting psychologist in psychiatric hospitals and in private practice, and some of his male patients say that Conway touched them sexually when they consulted him for professional help. These former patients say that, during “therapy”, they were masturbated by Conway, who encouraged the patients to touch him sexually in the same way as he touched them.
…At the requiem mass, Melbourne Archbishop Denis Hart gave a homily praising Conway. Hart acknowledged that Conway had been an adviser to the Melbourne archdiocese on priestly vocations. He paid tribute to Conway’s “immense contribution to the evaluation of seminarians, the ongoing assistance given to clerical and religious [people], helping people to discern their vocation.”
Hart added: “We shall never know how much following up he did with these people — in some cases, over many years.”
…In an article in the Weekend Australian on 21 March 2009, federal politician Tony Abbott (who himself was originally a trainee priest in a Catholic seminary in New South Wales) wrote about Conway: “He never contemplated joining the priesthood (as might have been expected of a bright young man of his temperament in that era) and never seems seriously to have considered marriage. He seems largely to have come to terms with any demons of his own and, in any event, chose not to make a spectacle of himself.”
To what “demons” was Abbott referring? And what did he mean about Conway not “making a spectacle of himself?
….Beginning in 1963 (according to Conway’s autobiography, page 98), he was involved in experimenting with psychodelic drugs on patients. He says these drugs eventually included LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide, which has sometimes also been known as “acid”) and “the milder psilocybin (derived from the magic mushroom)”. He says that such drugs were “stocked in the special restricted cupboards of the hospital pharmacy”.
Conway writes: “[At St Vincent's psychiatric department] we helped many a patient with LSD when all other resources, counselling, medication, psychotherapy, ECT [electro-convulsive therapy] and even thoughts of psychosurgery, had been abandoned. From my own work I concluded that no more appropriate substance for the treatment of obsessive-compulsive neuroses existed than LSD in resourceful hands.
“Its virtual abandonment due to hippy excesses and irresponsible and ignorant reporting remains one of the great tragedies of modern psychiatry [pages 98-99].”
Newhaven private hospital
Conway’s autobiography says that he began his LSD experiments at St Vincent’s Hospital. And former patients say that Conway also administered LSD to them at the Newhaven psychiatric hospital which was situated at 86 Normanby Road, Kew, in Melbourne’s inner east.
In the late 1960s and during the 1970s, Newhaven hospital was owned and managed by Marion Villimek, a member of a “New Age” sect called the Santiniketan Park Association, also known as “The Family”. A leader of the sect, Anne Hamilton-Byrne, was also an administrator at the Newhaven. Conway, Eric Seal and other therapists hired consulting rooms there on a sessional basis, and were not involved with the sect. Newhaven ceased being a hospital in 1992.
Celibacy and abuse
Ronald Conway became one of Australia’s most prominent Catholic intellectuals, writing books and newspaper articles about Australian society. He also appeared in radio and television discussion programs as a psychologist and social commentator.
When the church’s sexual scandals became news in Australia in the 1990s, Conway sometimes commented on the issues of celibacy and sexual abuse.
Judging from articles he wrote in the 1990s, Conway evidently believed that the incidence of actual abuse — that is, church personnel committing a breach of professional ethics in their pastoral relationship with children or vulnerable adults — was not as serious as many other people thought.
In July 1996, Christian Brother Robert Charles Best was convicted of indecent assault (for repeatedly putting his hand inside the pants of an eleven-year-old boy in a classroom in a Catholic primary school in Ballarat, Victoria). In an article in the Melbourne Age (25 August 2001), Conway claimed that Brother Robert Best “was seen by some students as more a nuisance and embarrassment than a threat”.
Conway evidently thought that Brother Best’s criminal offence and ethical breach were no big deal.
Conway took a similar elastic view towards the professional ethics of a psychologist by developing intimate (and sexual) relationships with some of his male patients.
The story of “Bill”
Conway’s autobiography says that one of his leisure pastimes was an involvement in amateur theatre production, during which he met a “sterling young man whom I will merely name as Bill.”
Conway says (page 99): “He [Bill] undertook, with the aid of LSD, a series of investigative treatments in a private hospital under psychiatric supervision, with myself as assisting therapist. The treatments were remarkably successful and Bill’s gratitude knew no bounds.”
…Broken Rites has been contacted by several males who received psychological counselling from Conway in the 1960s and 1970s. Conway developed intimate (and sexual) relationships with these patients.
1. “James” told Broken Rites on 17 February 1995 that when he was aged 15 to 16 in the 1960s he was having behavioural troubles, so his mother sent him to see Catholic psychiatrist Dr Eric Seal, who in turn referred him to Ronald Conway. James had counselling sessions for several years at Conway’s home, which was then situated in Torrington Street, Canterbury. Conway also took James to the Newhaven private hospital where he was placed under LSD as part of Conway’s therapy. James says that, on two occasions, Conway masturbated him — once at Newhaven Hospital while James was under LSD and once at Conway’s home. During these two sessions, Conway also allegedly exposed his own genitals to James.
2. “Pierre” told Broken Rites: “In my twenties I was having difficulty in forming relationships, so I sought help from Ron Conway. He treated me for several years at his house and at the Newhaven Hospital and the Sacred Heart Hospital, including with LSD. During several of these therapy sessions, he got me to engage in mutual masturbation with him. Eventually I realised this was not appropriate and I declined to engage in this, although I continued to associate with him as a friend. I know that Conway sexualised the relationship he had with many of his other patients. He justified that behaviour as being part of the therapy. I know of at least four other men who approached Conway for assistance and with whom he ended up having a sexual relationship.”
3. “Roger” told Broken Rites: “When I was twenty, I needed a counsellor. I heard about Conway and started having therapy sessions at his home. He said that I seemed tense, so he started touching me. At first, it was just holding hands but later it became more intimate — that is, sexual touching. In the late 1970s, Conway arranged through Dr Eric Seal for me to have a number of sessions at the Newhaven hospital, where I was given LSD to facilitate Conway’s therapy. This therapy included Conway touching my body in a sexual manner. He also displayed his own genitals to me. Later I put a stop to this sexual relationship but we kept up the friendship.”
Another ex-patient
“Damien” (a patient of Conway in the 1960s), wrote to Broken Rites on 11 May 2010 and authorised us to publish his commments:
…. “After several sessions with Conway, it was suggested that I undergo LSD therapy in Newhaven Private Hospital as an overnight patient. It was explained to me that this therapy was a way to fast-track psychoanalysis and would be very helpful in accepting my sexuality. Conway, as a psychologist, had no qualifications to administer drugs. I did not understand this at the time.
“During the last session I came to believe that I had been in the presence of God who authorized me to lead the sexual life which had been chosen for me.
“Conway then suggested that I continue to see him without the use of LSD.I explained to him that my finances were stretched and that it was not possible. He said that it was important that I continue to see him and that if I were willing he would see me at his home in Torrington Street, Canterbury, gratis.
“What a shock I got when one night he made advances to me and we ended up on the floor of his sitting room. The room was decorated as if it were the inside of an Egyptian tomb. He said this should not have happened but that, as it had, we should do it properly in his bedroom. It was a spartan room with the bed covers on a single bed already turned down and electric bar heaters turned on resting on tables either side.
…”In the early 1990s, when I was 48 years of age, I was a patient in the Freemason’s Hospital and woke up one afternoon to find Ron Conway sitting on my bed holding my hand. He had heard from someone that I was in hospital. I made it clear that I was not happy with his presence .He explained to me that he had been following my life through a work colleague of mine, another psychologist.
“Ron Conway never appeared again.”
Conway was not “religious” in the common sense and was not a “churchgoer”. In politics, he was right-wing and was opposed to political “progressives”. He was well known among the followers of the Catholic political commentator B.A. Santamaria. These Catholic connections helped him to develop his career as a psychotherapist.
From about 1969, he developed a part-time role at Melbourne’s Corpus Christi College seminary, which trained priests for all dioceses in Victoria and Tasmania. He says he “screened” or “helped” men who had applied to train for the priesthood. The church authorities also asked Conway to “help” other Catholic priests or religious brothers who were having problems, especially sexual problems.
Conway and the strange case of Father Paul David Ryan
It is unclear how the seminary’s “screening” worked and to what extent Conway was involved in it. Broken Rites has investigated the case of one Melbourne trainee priest, Paul David Ryan — and Ronald Conway certainly became involved in this case.
Ryan was originally a trainee priest at the Adelaide Catholic seminary but was expelled half-way through third year.
Despite this, Bishop Ronald Mulkearns, of the Ballarat Diocese in Victoria, accepted Ryan as a candidate for the priesthood in that diocese. In 1972 Mulkearns sponsored Ryan for admission to the Melbourne seminary.
Despite his poor references, Ryan was admitted and he stayed at the seminary for five years.
It is unclear why a reject from the Adelaide seminary was accepted into the Melbourne seminary. It is not known whether Ryan was one of the applicants who were screened by Conway at entry but Conway certainly became involved in issues surrounding Ryan in 1976, as explained below.
Broken Rites possesses copies of church documents, including correspondence between the rector of the Melbourne seminary (Fr Kevin Mogg) and a Father John Harvey in Maryland, U.S.A. (who specialized in helping priests with sexual problems). During his Melbourne seminary training (according to the church documents), Ryan “had been regularly involved in overt sexual behaviour” with about six other trainee priests. The acts (the seminary letter stated) included mutual masturbation and also some “more serious acts”.
The church authorities went ahead with Ryan’s ordination, which took place in Ballarat in May 1976, and he was due to be given an on-going appointment to a parish in the Ballarat diocese for early 1977.
But the news of his ordination alarmed a Ballarat mother, who complained to the diocesan authorities that Ryan sexually abused her teenage son (with disastrous consequences for the son) while Ryan was doing work-experience in a Ballarat parish during in the final year of his course.
The church authorities still intended to keep Ryan as a priest but they realised that this mother would go public if she saw Ryan being appointed to any Ballarat parish — and this would damage the respectable image of the Catholic Church.
The church authorities went into damage control. In late 1976 (according to the church documents) the seminary asked Ronald Conway to interview Ryan. Conway then wrote a report on Ryan and referred him to Catholic psychiatrist Dr Eric Seal.
On 18 November 1976, Dr Seal wrote to the rector of the Melbourne seminary (Fr Kevin Mogg), saying that he [Seal] had received a comprehensive report about Ryan from Ronald Conway.
Following the reports by Conway and Seal and after further discussions, the Ballarat diocese “solved” the problem of the angry Ballarat mother — the diocese arranged for Ryan to be given a trip to the United States in 1977.
Church documents (in the possession of Broken Rites) state that Ryan was allowed to work in parishes in the U.S., where he committed sexual crimes against a number of American schoolboys.
And, after returning to Australia, Ryan was also allowed to work in parishes in western Victoria, where he again committed sexual crimes (consisting of repeated indecent touching) against more boys, one of whom later committed suicide. Paul David Ryan was jailed in Australia in 2006 for his sexual crimes.
It is not known what Ronald Conway thought about the abusive behaviour of Father Paul David Ryan and similar church-offenders.
Did he think (as he said in the case of Christian Brother Robert Best who was convicted in 1996) that Ryan’s kind of criminal offences and ethical breaches were “more a nuisance and embarrassment than a threat”?
http://psychedelicdungeon.wordpress.com/2010/09/02/wikifreaks-pt-1-eat-pray-leak/

Magda Hassan
08-27-2012, 03:12 AM
Another Governor General connection but a different Governor general.

20-year bid for answers

The Herald Sun, Australia/April 14, 2009

By Fiona Hudson

The brother of a woman found dead in Toorak Village wants the coronial inquest reopened 20 years later, amid claims a cult was involved.
Cypra Helmer's naked and bloodied body was found on a busy street in 1988, while her clothes were in a car park two storeys above the scene.
The musician had spent the day with her parents, and told them she was going home to feed her cats.
No one saw the 37-year-old fall, but she left a note and investigating police concluded it was suicide.
A coroner ruled in 1989 that Ms Helmer - the niece of former governor-general Sir Zelman Cowen - had jumped.
But later this week her brother, Moscow-based journalist Dr John Helmer, will take the unusual step of asking a Supreme Court judge to reopen the inquest.
Dr Helmer claims to have new evidence that could point to investigative failures and, possibly, foul play. He has hired a legal team including solicitor Zarah Garde-Wilson.
Dr Helmer claims to have uncovered links between his sister and the notorious religious cult The Family.
Dr Helmer is concerned the original inquest was rushed, and claims investigators:
FAILED to check her body for signs she'd been pushed or resisted before the fall.
NEGLECTED to analyse the trajectory of her fall.
DIDN'T examine medical files or speak to Ms Helmer's psychiatrist about her mood.
INTERVIEWED only a few witnesses and made no effort to find anyone who may have seen her death.
Dr Helmer said a purported suicide note warranted analysis of who wrote it and when.
He believes a line in the note about "Their Will" is a reference to pressure from members of The Family.

Dr Helmer's application to have the inquest reopened is listed for hearing in the Supreme Court this Friday.