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Adele Edisen
08-29-2012, 05:55 AM
http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article32301.htm

Alleged Leader of group F.E.A.R. (Forever Enduring, Always Ready):

http://gawker.com/5938288/leader-of-army-plot-to-assassinate-obama-apparently-attended-the-2008-republican-convention-as-a-page


Adele

Peter Lemkin
08-29-2012, 07:21 AM
http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article32301.htm

Alleged Leader of group F.E.A.R. (Forever Enduring, Always Ready):

http://gawker.com/5938288/leader-of-army-plot-to-assassinate-obama-apparently-attended-the-2008-republican-convention-as-a-page


Adele
I 'get' the kill Obama part, but you'd need high-HIGH level insiders along with you in order to 'overthrow the government' even after an assassination.......where's the rest of the story...if there is one.

Magda Hassan
08-29-2012, 07:54 AM
http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article32301.htm

Alleged Leader of group F.E.A.R. (Forever Enduring, Always Ready):

http://gawker.com/5938288/leader-of-army-plot-to-assassinate-obama-apparently-attended-the-2008-republican-convention-as-a-page


Adele
I 'get' the kill Obama part, but you'd need high-HIGH level insiders along with you in order to 'overthrow the government' even after an assassination.......where's the rest of the story...if there is one.
Yes, that is why I laugh at the gun law fetish of the militia types. The government has really big guns and any one else's are just going to be totally inadequate to the task. Really going to need to think outside the box for that one.

Charles Drago
08-29-2012, 11:11 AM
This likely is a False Sponsor and/or patsy operation, or a GOTV (get out the vote) ploy.

If the latter, then the question becomes, "Whose vote?"

Adele Edisen
09-04-2012, 05:44 AM
To assassinate a political leader, it may take only one person, one gun, and one properly placed bullet.
Couldn't that be a coup d'etat?

Adele

Magda Hassan
09-04-2012, 06:34 AM
To assassinate a political leader, it may take only one person, one gun, and one properly placed bullet.
Couldn't that be a coup d'etat?

Adele
Depends if it is a garden variety patsy or a genuine lone nut. A very rare breed. Though the US would have you believe they are teeming with them. :pinkelephant:

One of our Prime Ministers went for a swim and wasn't seen again. But I don't think the sharks were acting on orders. While the other met with the English Queen's man. He was apparently acting on orders but not from the Queen.

Peter Lemkin
09-04-2012, 07:16 AM
To assassinate a political leader, it may take only one person, one gun, and one properly placed bullet.
Couldn't that be a coup d'etat?

Adele

To my way of thinking it would ONLY be a coup d'etat if the intention of the One Person was to change the DIRECTION and political / economic / military / social complexion of the government/country by the action. Otherwise, IMHO, it is just an assassination...as they are all made to look....but almost none are! So, it COULD, but is rarely portrayed that way....even when there is only one shooter with broader intentions than the death of one leader.

Albert Doyle
09-04-2012, 02:18 PM
Supported or independent they will still be used to make the middle look normal.

Adele Edisen
09-13-2012, 01:54 AM
San Antonio Express News
Wednesday, September 12, 2012

5 more charged in Ga. military militia case
RUSS BYNUM, Associated Press

Updated 5:04 p.m., Tuesday, September 11, 2012

SAVANNAH, Ga. (AP) — Four former Army soldiers and a civilian have been charged in new indictments for connections to an anti-government militia that authorities say was led by Fort Stewart troops who stockpiled weapons and talked of ultimately overthrowing the U.S. government.

A Liberty County grand jury indicted the five on charges of illegal gang activity and various counts involving theft, burglary and auto break-ins. Those crimes were committed to help fund the militia group, which called itself F.E.A.R., short for Forever Enduring Always Ready, District Attorney Tom Durden said Tuesday.

"The burglaries and entering autos, they were committed in an effort to fund F.E.A.R. and what F.E.A.R. was at least advocating they wanted to accomplish," said Durden, the top prosecutor for southeast Georgia's Atlantic Judicial Circuit. Their plans included bombing a Savannah park fountain and poisoning apple crops in the state of Washington, prosecutors say.

The new indictments Monday bring to 10 the total number of people charged in connection with the militia group.

Four are soldiers serving at neighboring Fort Stewart and are charged with murder in the December slayings of former soldier Michael Roark and his teenage girlfriend, Tiffany York. Prosecutors say Roark had access to the militia leader's credit cards and made purchases for the group, but they haven't said what he bought. Authorities say Roark was killed, along with York, after he left the Army in order to protect the group and its plots.

A wife of one of the soldiers has also been charged in the slayings.

Fort Stewart officials confirmed four of the men charged in the latest indictments are former soldiers — Christopher Jenderseck, 26, of St. Cloud, Minn.; Adam Dearman, 27, of Auburn, Ga.; Timothy Joiner, 21, of Hampton, Ga.; and Anthony Garner, 23, of Newnan, Ga. Three of them were discharged from the Army between November and May, while Jenderseck's enlistment ended in April.

The fifth man charged was Dearman's brother, Randall Blake Dearman. Their father, Randy Dearman, declined to comment when reached by phone Tuesday.

Durden said civilian authorities aren't sure how many members the militia group had. Army officials said they weren't surprised by the new indictments involving ex-soldiers, but they aren't saying how large the group was either.

"We remain confident there are no unknown subjects," Fort Stewart spokesman Kevin Larson said in a statement. "The five individuals indicted today ... were known to the investigation and were not publicly identified previously to preserve the integrity of the investigation and ongoing civilian legal proceedings."

Adam Dearman has been jailed since December in Elbert County, about 200 miles away in north Georgia, on charges of aggravated assault and possession of a firearm during a commission of a felony. Prosecutors said Dearman shot and wounded a man Dec. 6 in what they now believe was an attack related to the militia. The victim in the shooting, Jimmy Smith, declined to comment when reached by phone.

Elbert County prosecutors now plan to seek two additional gang-related charges against Dearman after receiving information from authorities investigating the militia case in southeast Georgia.

"Our contention is that the cases are connected, this is part of that street gang activity," said Leon Jourolmon, chief assistant district attorney for the Northern Judicial Circuit. He would not comment on the specifics of the case.

The indictments in south Georgia charged Joiner with three home burglaries, nine car break-ins, and other thefts of items including guns, cellphones, GPS devices, bulletproof vest, a motorcycle helmet and a woman's debit cards. Randall Dearman was also charged in two of the burglaries and the car break-ins, which all occurred within a two-day period in mid-December. Adam Dearman helped coordinate the thefts, according to the indictment. Garner was charged with receiving more than $500 worth of stolen goods from the burglaries.

Joiner answered his cellphone Tuesday but declined to discuss the case.

"I'm a proud Republican," Joiner said. "I will not make any comments about this on the record until I am in court."

Relatives of Jenderseck and Garner could not immediately be reached. It was not clear if any of the men had hired attorneys.

Only one of the new indictments was related to the double slaying. Jenderseck was charged with evidence tampering. Durden said he had helped the accused soldiers burn clothing they had worn during the killings of Roark and York, who were found shot to death in some woods near Fort Stewart.

Prosecutors have charged Army Pvt. Isaac Aguigui, Sgt. Anthony Peden and Pvt. Christopher Salmon with murder and are seeking the death penalty. Salmon's wife, Heather Salmon, has also been charged in the deaths.

A fourth soldier, Pfc. Michael Burnett, pleaded guilty last month to reduced charges after agreeing to help prosecute the other accused troops.
..

Read more: http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/article/5-more-charged-in-Ga-military-militia-case-3856410.php#ixzz26JGbgzYr

Adele

LR Trotter
09-13-2012, 09:56 PM
Ms Edisen,
To discount this story is to me a mistake. Being over age 65, and a native Texan, this article is not at all surprising. And, with all due respect, I have to wonder if everyone is actually paying attention to attitudes by a certain segment of society in this country. This story scares me, and I don't see any exaggeration of the danger. Maybe we see things in South Texas not seen elsewhere.
:hitler:

Adele Edisen
09-14-2012, 08:06 AM
Larry,

This paragraph is from the earliest reference in the first post of this topic, and it frightened me. US Troops Plotted to Kill President Obama - http://www.informationclearinghouse....ticle32301.htm


As The Atlanta Journal-Constitution's Jay Bookman notes, "Sometimes these things get blown out of proportion, but $87,000 in weaponry suggests otherwise. And when you’re willing to murder two people to keep the plot secret, you’re pretty serious about it." The news follows a controversial report published by Reuters' Daniel Trotta last week that the U.S. Army is battling soldiers within its ranks who enlist in the Army and Marine Corps "to acquire the skills to overthrow what some call the ZOG - the Zionist Occupation Government. Get in, get trained and get out to brace for the coming race war." At the time, Business Insider's Geoffrey Ingersoll pushed back against the report in a piece titled "Don't Believe the Report Going Around About Veterans Flocking to Right Wing Extremist Groups." The AP report doesn't say if the motivations to overthrow the government were racial or anti-semitic in nature in this case but much more details are likely to come. (Emphasis mine - AE)

The Associated Press has been reporting this story, and I did see a report in The New York Times about the murders by this group of Fort Stewart troops a short time ago. According to this paragraph (above) these types of groups appear to be found among Army and Marine Corp encampments.

Why this should be happening may be because so many young people join the military because there are no jobs for them and education in college is not an option for them. They are disillusioned and have lost hope, if they ever had any for themselves, and society is not paying attention to their needs. It has to do with the moral and economic decay of this nation as it has lost its own way in providing a saner, healthier and decent life for our young people. They become warriors and now look for enemies to fight, and will be seeking those who might be the targets of those who are influencing them with their vile ideas and who they will follow.

Adele

Jan Klimkowski
09-14-2012, 04:22 PM
Those crimes were committed to help fund the militia group, which called itself F.E.A.R., short for Forever Enduring Always Ready, District Attorney Tom Durden said Tuesday.

Has to be a psyop.

Only Psychological Operations fuckwits could come up with such a dull dull name.

I mean, FOREVER ENDURING ALWAYS READY....

C'mon.

At least back in the day, the names Symbionese Liberation Army and Field Marshall CINQUE had some flair suggestive of major ingestion of illegal substances by its Phoenix Program creators.

Clearly PsyOps graduates now drink tasteless yellow American beer, don't even smoke tobacco, and are clinically brain damaged by tedious Volkland Security edicts.

LR Trotter
09-14-2012, 10:09 PM
Ms Edisen,
Didn't you get the memo that said "that can't happen here"? Seriously, I believe it can, and does. Those people believe they are right, and within their rights to take those steps. They also seem to think the "like minded" number is near about half of the population. Thankfully, there are those that recognize the situation, but sadly far too many discount the magnitude of it. Thank you for your post expressing the nature of the problem.
:banghead:

Adele Edisen
09-15-2012, 01:20 AM
Committing two murders indicates that these individuals are very serious. Thanks, Larry.

Adele

Adele Edisen
09-18-2012, 09:26 AM
Ms Edisen,
Didn't you get the memo that said "that can't happen here"? Seriously, I believe it can, and does. Those people believe they are right, and within their rights to take those steps. They also seem to think the "like minded" number is near about half of the population. Thankfully, there are those that recognize the situation, but sadly far too many discount the magnitude of it. Thank you for your post expressing the nature of the problem.
:banghead:

Larry, I didn't have time to answer your post in more detail. I am sure, based on what you said, you know that in history, beginning about 1920 in Italy, war veterans were organizing into small militia groups which then melded and became Mussolini's private army of "Blackshirts."

In Germany, former army corporal Adolph Hitler was spewing his ideas in beer halls and also organizing war veterans into what became his militia, the Brownshirts.

In France, the veterans' groups organized under an umbrella organization, the Croix de Feu (Cross of Fire), a fascist-type group. This group was studied by the stockbroker who was working for a J.P. Morgan brokerage house on Wall Street, and also trying to convince retired US Marine General Smedley D. Butler to lead 500,000 American Legionnaires to Washington, D.C., to oust President Franklin D. Rosevelt and replace him with a fascist dictator in 1933-34. An act of treason by Wall Street bankers, industrialists, etc.

Since that time, we have had a president murdered, the shots probably fired by riflemen trained in the armed services (not Oswald), but Roscoe White and others are a possibility. We have had a federal building in Oklahoma City bombed by a former military person/persons. We have private militia groups in various states, Idaho and elsewhee, and I suspect some of their members are former soldiers.

By no means do I mean to imply that war veterans are dangerous. But some of the ones referred to in the news articles at the beginning of this topic had not yet been to war, but were in training and did have treasonous ideas. And from history we have observed that some soldiers do not like to give up their weapons...

Adele

Adele Edisen
09-18-2012, 09:37 AM
From Amazon.com:

Editorial Reviews
Review
Novel by Sinclair Lewis, published in 1935. It is a cautionary tale about the rise of fascism in the United States. During the presidential election of 1936, Doremus Jessup, a newspaper editor, observes with dismay that many of the people he knows support the candidacy of a fascist, Berzelius Windrip. When Windrip wins the election, he forcibly gains control of Congress and the Supreme Court, and, with the aid of his personal paramilitary storm troopers, turns the United States into a totalitarian state. Jessup opposes him, is captured, and escapes to Canada. -- The Merriam-Webster Encyclopedia of Literature

About the Author
Sinclair Lewis was born in 1885 in Sauk Centre, Minnesota, and graduated from Yale University in 1908. His college career was interrupted by various part-time occupations, including a period working at the Helicon Home Colony, Upton Sinclair’s socialist experiment in New Jersey. He worked for some years as a free lance editor and journalist, during which time he published several minor novels. But with the publication of Main Street (1920), which sold half a million copies, he achieved wide recognition. This was followed by the two novels considered by many to be his finest, Babbitt (1922) and Arrowsmith (1925), which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1926, but declined by Lewis. In 1930, following Elmer Gantry (1927) and Dodsworth (1929), Sinclair Lewis became the first American author to be awarded the Nobel Prize for distinction in world literature. This was the apogee of his literary career, and in the period from Ann Vickers (1933) to the posthumously published World So Wide (1951) Lewis wrote ten novels that reveal the progressive decline of his creative powers. From Main Street to Stockholm, a collection of his letters, was published in 1952, and The Man from Main Street, a collection of essays, in 1953. During his last years Sinclair Lewis wandered extensively in Europe, and after his death in Rome in 1951 his ashes were returned to his birthplace.

Adele Edisen
09-18-2012, 09:46 AM
http://www.aladin0.wrlc.org/gsdl/cgi-bin/library?e=d-01000-00---off-0ftpp--00-1--0-10-0---0---0prompt-10---4-------0-1l--11-en-50---20-help---01-3-1-00-0-0-11-0-0utfZz-8-00&a=d&c=ftpp&cl=CL8.2&d=HASHa1c5dc1a77b6f5e5b63765

By John C. Miffitt and Sinclair Lewis, 1936

Adele