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Carsten Wiethoff
06-24-2016, 06:46 AM
https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2016/06/federal-court-fourth-amendment-does-not-protect-your-home-computer



In a dangerously flawed decision unsealed today (https://www.eff.org/files/2016/06/23/matish_suppression_edva.pdf), a federal district court in Virginia ruled that a criminal defendant has no “reasonable expectation of privacy” in his personal computer, located inside his home. According to the court, the federal government does not need a warrant to hack into an individual's computer.




The implications for the decision, if upheld, are staggering: law enforcement would be free to remotely search and seize information from your computer, without a warrant, without probable cause, or without any suspicion at all. To say the least, the decision is bad news for privacy. But it's also incorrect as a matter of law, and we expect there is little chance it would hold up on appeal. (It also was not the central component of the judge's decision, which also diminishes the likelihood that it will become reliable precedent.)


So exactly where can I reasonably expect privacy? ::fury::

Drew Phipps
06-24-2016, 11:59 AM
Yikes! And without a fully staffed Supreme Court, now the future of the Fourth Amendment is also at stake in the coming 2016 election. BTW the Supreme Court yesterday ruled 5-3 on whether or not to continue to allow states to make it a crime to refuse warrantless DWI breath tests. Justice Sotomayor warned in her dissent the 4th Amendment danger of this ruling. (Had Scalia still been alive, the issue would likely have been decided the same.)

So, for now, the future of electronic privacy in the US rests in the hands of the 4th Circuit federal Court of Appeals.

Magda Hassan
06-24-2016, 12:08 PM
I don't think they plan of giving us any privacy any where not just our computers. But really, your computer belongs to you the same way your look, wallet and jacket belong to you. Your operating system may belong to some one else who is only letting you borrow it on their terms and conditions but it doesn't have to be that way if you don't want it. (Gnu/Linux is your choice for freedom and privacy) You can make it secure.

Peter Lemkin
06-24-2016, 12:22 PM
I don't think they plan of giving us any privacy any where not just our computers. But really, your computer belongs to you the same way your look, wallet and jacket belong to you. Your operating system may belong to some one else who is only letting you borrow it on their terms and conditions but it doesn't have to be that way if you don't want it. (Gnu/Linux is your choice for freedom and privacy) You can make it secure.

Well, yes....and no....No, when they come into your home and just take it away for 'analysis' and downloading. Sadly America is quickly becoming a full-blown Police State and most are not catching on despite the obvious signs and examples. In fact, there is very little of our rights left and all soon to be gone. They want even to be able to see and hear inside our homes [the technology exists for both] and to even see into our thoughts [the technology is being worked on and is partly workable at this time]. Very sad ruling in a very sad state Amerika.