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Magda Hassan
06-27-2009, 03:31 AM
WHAT HAPPENS IN HONDURAS TODAY WILL HAVE AN IMPORTANT IMPACT ON THE FUTURE OF THE COUNTRY, AND CENTRAL AMERICA
Democratic rule is on the line, a military coup is feared, but tens of thousands of Hondurans rushed to the defense of the President, filling and surrounding the presidential palace. The crisis is a tipping point in a political transformation of the country that has taken shape during Manuel Zelaya's presidency.
Months ago, "Mel", as Hondurans refer to their president, proposed that this Sunday, June 28, a national referendum be held to present Hondurans with the question whether a ballot box (the Cuarta Urna) should be established during the November 29, 2009 national elections in which Hondurans could vote whether or not to convoke a Constituent National Assembly (CNA) to write a new constitution in Honduras. For background info: http://www.rightsaction.org/articles/Copinh_052905.html
The current constitution was written in 1982 in the midst of repression and State terrorism that blanketed Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala in the 1980's. Honduras was controlled, at that time, by a US-backed military regime; the United States had 14 military bases in Honduras.
The Honduran Armed Forces initially pledged support to the President and commander in chief, and provide logistical support for Sunday's referendum, to be administered by the National Statistics Institute.
Then, on Tuesday June 23, the Honduran army informed the president they would not support the referendum. The president fired the head of the armed forces, General Romeo Vasquez, and the Minister of Defense resigned.
Fearing for the safety of the President, thousands of Hondurans surrounded the Presidential Palace.
The National Congress is strongly opposed to the referendum, and today met to draft a letter of resignation for the President. The Congress has also called upon the OAS to withdraw the elections observers currently arriving to observe Sunday's referendum, and entertained initiatives to block their entry to the country. Efforts to intimidate the voters include public statements by influential political figures claiming that if voters participate in Sunday's referendum, they could face 10 to 15 years in prison.
Around midday today, June 25, President Zelaya and thousands of civilian supporters left the presidential palace in city buses and headed to the Air Force base and successfully - ! - recovered the ballot boxed needed for Sunday's referendum.
The proposal to draft a new constitution, via the establishing of a CNA, is the culmination of a series of positive measures undertaken during "Mel's" presidency, including: a raise in the minimum wage; measures to re-nationalize energy generation plants and the telephone system; signing a bill that improves labor conditions for teachers; joining the Venezuelan Petrocaribe program which provides soft loans for development initiatives via petroleum sales; delaying recognition of the new US ambassador after the Bolivian government implicated the US embassy in supporting fascist paramilitary groups destabilizing Bolivia, and others.
In the measure that popular support has grown, with a reported 80% of population in support, opposition has grown in the economically and politically powerful minority sectors. The president has been blocked from the press, and important events have gone virtually unreported.
ON-THE-SPOT UPDATES FROM COPINH (IN SPANISH)
Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2009 4:44 PM
To: copinhonduras@yahoo.es
Subject: URGENTE reporte Honduras
ESTAMOS TRANSMITIENDO EN VIVO DESDE LA CAPITAL ...
PARA ESCUCHAR CLICK AQUI: http://208.43 (http://208.43/). 218.127:8070/

Reporte 13:00hrs
Hay desplazamiento de contingentes populares hacia la capital de la Rep?blica, a?n no se sabe el nivel de respuesta que tendr? el llamado del presidente Manuel "Mel" Zelaya, a la movilizaci?n popular en defensa del r?gimen constitucional, a?n ahora el General Romeo V?zquez Vel?zquez ex jefe del estado mayor del ej?rcito reclama ser reinstalado en el puesto, y hay militares en las calles, esta es una prueba de fuerza, se miden potencias y capacidades para dar el siguiente paso, anexo, env?o una entrevista que le hice por la madrugada a la ministra de trabajo del gobierno constitucional, Mayra Mej?a, espero que sea de su inter?s y la puedan reenviar o reproducir porque hay que difundir lo que ac? sucede. Seguimos en contacto. Ha comenzado el discruso de Mel... tic, tac...
From: copinh honduras [mailto:copinh@copinh.org (copinh@copinh.org)]
Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2009 10:10 PM
To: copinhonduras@yahoo.es
Subject: HONDURAS: reporte 4 pm
REPORTE 4PM
La coyuntura se mueve, el pueblo ha salido a la calle y junto con el presidente de la Rep?blica han viajado desde la casa presidencial en buses, camiones de pasajeros urbanos (?l, viaj? en el estibo llamando al pueblo que se suma a la caravana, porque la Corte orden? que se confiscaran las urnas), en los audios encontrar?n la cr?nica de esta caravana ins?lita, pues de pronto, el ej?rcito estaba en las calles, intimidando, y el pueblo entr? al cuartel de la fuerza ?erea a sacar las urnas para la consulta del domingo por la determinaci?n de exigir ahora el establecimiento de una asamblea nacional constituyente... el pueblo, en medio de un lodazal, dentro del recinto de la fuerza armada saca ahora las urnas...van cinco camiones que salen... una convicci?n se comparte, se puede cambiar, a pesar de embarrarse de lodo, hay que ensuciarse un poco para limpiarle la cara al pa?s... s?. sin duda... el mundo al rev?s y desde ac?, se ve menos mal
que antes...

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Honduras nears Chaos as Military Units Circle Presidential Palace



The Supreme Court has just ordered the return of the Top General in
Honduras just hours after President Zelaya ordered him dismissed.

General Vasquez, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs was removed last
night by President Manuel Zelaya after refusing to order troops to
assist in the illegal ballot due to be held Sunday here in Honduras.

The Congress and Military are supporting the Constitution, but
President Zelaya is unrelenting. At this time, Zelaya is planning to
install his new Top General, ignoring the Supreme Court, the Congress
and over 100,000 peaceful protesters that have taken to the streets
around the country.

Further, the Electoral Council has also determined that the Sunday's
Ballot is illegal and the Council has ordered the Prosecutor's office
to confiscate all ballots.

Currently, these ballots are in the possession of the Military and
until the ballots are handed over to the Prosecutor, the outcome will
remain unclear.

It is widely speculated that a "Yes" vote would initiate the
movement of Honduras from a Constitutional Democracy to a Socialist
State under the strong influence of Hugo Chavez. With the President of
the Congress stating that the new Constitution planned by Zelaya has
been written in Venezuela.

Yesterday in Venezuela elements of the Honduran, Cuban, Nicaraguan
and Bolivian Military marched under the Banner of the ALBA Union. A
union which Honduras entered into solely through a Presidential Decree
by Zelaya.

During his speech to the troops, Hugo Chavez reiterated, "This is an
armed revolution" and to "Summon our people to the great battle for the
full independence of our America, only the union will make us free".

UPDATE 2:50pm June 25th 2009

Honduran President Manuel Zelaya in a press conferance stated, "We
always knew that the Constitution denies the rights to Honduran
society," in front of hundreds of his supporters at the Presidential
Palace in Tegucigalpa and the Honduran president has asked his
followers to join him in a "Mission", but did not say what, or where.

It has been verified that Venezuelan flaged aircraft have landed at Air Force facilities aparently with the election materials.

UPDATE 2 3:55pm

It is now being reported that Manuel Zelaya and a "Mob" are arriving at the Airforce Base to collect the voting materials.

"I spoke with the commander of the Air Force, Prince Luis Javier and
he will deliver the electoral material," said President Manuel Zelaya
Rosales. The president said that the action is peaceful, calm but
defending their rights.

The situation in Honduras is rapidly coming to a head.

UPDATE 4:30pm

It is now being reported that elements of the 5th Infantry division
are being deployed around the Presidental Palace and the Toncont?n
Airport in the Capitol Teguicgalpa. Comanders are giving orders to long
lines of soldiers.

************************************************** **********************************************

Fred is right on to point out the danger that the ALBA Alliance also the target of this plot. It occurs just after an ALBA summit that welcomed more countries, most importantly Ecuador into the Alliance (the new name is Alliance in place of Alternativa, interesting in itsellf). I am trying to get a reading on whether the Salvadoran military are part of this.

La Prensa (Tegucigalpa) is using its web site to suport the coup, and to mobilize mass support "in defense or the national constitution." They are trying to comparre a large demonstration in the central Plaza to the mass Iranian demonstrations. There was also a "white" demonstration" before the Venezuelan consulate in Tegucigalpa accusing Chavez of being behind Sunday's scheduled referendum that has so traumatized the military high command and the leadfng bourgreois sectors. (thy dress in white, worship gingolandia, hate any plebian trends).

Curiously CNN is ignoring this development and also Iran and Iraq to devote almost nonstop coverage of the MJ and SF deaths in Los Angeles. More circus.





> This is far from over ... the US military has a strong presence in Honduras; the Honduran high command are largely an US-trained officer corps. If successful, the coup plot will destabilize both El Salvador and Nicaragua.


And lets not forget that it will inevitably draw in Venezuela and
others as Honduras is a member nation of ALBA. When a coup threaten to
overthrow Morales, Chavez said Venezuela would not keep its arms
folded, the same position goes for the current situation


************************************************** ************************************************** *****************

June 25, 2009

Honduras Leader Refuses to Restore Military Chief
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Filed at 11:46 p.m. ET
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2009/06/25/world/AP-LT-Honduras-Constitution.html?_r=1&pagewanted=print
TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras (AP) -- The Honduran president vowed Thursday to ignore a Supreme Court ruling ordering him to reinstate the military chief he fired, escalating a showdown that has threatened the leftist leader's hold on power.
President Manuel Zelaya's attempt to hold a referendum Sunday on changing the constitution has pitted him against the country's top courts, the attorney general, military leaders and even his own party, all of whom argue the vote is illegal.
But Zelaya has galvanized the support of labor leaders, farmers and civic organizations who hope constitutional reforms will give them a greater voice in a conservative country where 70 percent of the population is poor.
The crisis quickly ballooned when Zelaya fired Gen. Romeo Vasquez as head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff late Wednesday for refusing to support the referendum, which is intended to measure popular support for possible constitutional changes. Zelaya has not said what he wants, but critics accuse him of trying to extend presidential terms before his ends in January, like his ally Hugo Chavez did in Venezuela.
The Supreme court ordered Vasquez reinstated Thursday and warned Zelaya would face penal consequences if he does not respect the ruling.
''We will not obey the Supreme Court,'' Zelaya told more than 2,000 cheering supporters gathered in front of the presidential offices. ''The court, which only imparts justice for the powerful, the rich and the bankers, only causes problems for democracy.''
The top court, Congress and the attorney general say the vote is illegal because it would violate constitutional clauses barring some changes.
Late Thursday, lawmakers voted to open an investigation of Zelaya and determine whether his refusal to obey the Supreme Court order threatens the rule of law, said Ramon Velasquez of the opposition Christian Democratic Party.
''Once we conclude the investigation, we may will take more drastic measures, but they will be to save the republic,'' Velasquez said.
The president's dismissal of Vasquez prompted the chiefs of the army, navy and air force to resign. The president himself announced Wednesday night that Defense Minister Edmundo Orellana had resigned.
Vasquez said he could not support a referendum that the courts had declared illegal, but he ruled out the possibility of a coup.
''We are prudent and we accept the decision of the president, whom we respect and who has the right to dismiss whom he wants,'' Vasquez said.
The Organization of American States called an emergency meeting Friday to discuss the crisis.
The president's nonbinding referendum asks voters if they want a further, formal election on whether to call an assembly to write a new constitution.
Zelaya, who is close to Chavez and the Castro brothers in Cuba, has argued that Honduras' social problems are rooted in the 27-year-old constitution. Critics say Zelaya, like Chavez and other Latin American leaders, wants to expand presidential powers and remove limits on re-election.
Venezuela's socialist president offered Zelaya his full support. ''We're willing to do whatever it takes to make sure the Honduran people's will and sovereignty is respected,'' Chavez said during his ''Alo, Presidente!'' program.
Zelaya, a wealthy landowner grappling with rising food prices and a sharp spike in drug violence, is currently barred from seeking re-election when his four-year term ends in January.
''What you see is the growing delegitimizing of a president by a larger and growing group of leading elites, including the military,'' said Manuel Orozco, a political analyst with the Inter-American Dialogue, a Washington-based think tank.
But Zelaya has tapped into discontent among civil organization who see their chance to have greater influence in Honduran politics, Orozco said. And it will be hard to prevent the referendum from happening unless the military steps in directly, he added.
''This fragmentation of the political circles of power have given an opportunity to leverage the demands that civil society has, such as more freedom of expression in a country where the media is owned by a few families,'' Orozco said. ''I think he has the upper hand right now. The army is uncertain as to whether they should prevent the referendum.''
U.N. General Assembly President Miguel D'Escoto Brockmann, a leftist Nicaraguan priest and former foreign minister, ''clearly and strongly condemns the attempted coup d'etat that is currently unfolding against the democratically elected government of President Manuel Zelaya of Honduras,'' his spokesman said.
Earlier Thursday, the Supreme Court ordered police to remove all electoral material stored an air force base at the international airport in the capital, Tegucigalpa. After his speech, Zelaya and his supporters headed to the military base and took ballots and other materials out in military trucks and headed to an undisclosed location.
On Wednesday, the 128-seat unicameral legislature also voted unanimously to ask a group of international election observers to leave, arguing their presence legitimizes an illegal vote.
--------
Associated Press writers Jorge Rueda in Caracas, Carlos Rodriguez in Mexico City and Edith M. Lederer in New York contributed to this report.
__________________________________________________ ______________________
Honduras heads toward crisis over referendum
By FREDDY CUEVAS – 6 hours ago
TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras (AP) — With backing from Fidel Castro and Hugo Chavez, Honduras' leftist president pushed ahead Friday with a referendum on revamping the constitution, risking his rule in a standoff against Congress, the Supreme Court and the military.
Government supporters began distributing ballots at 15,000 voting stations across the country, defying a Supreme Court ruling declaring Sunday's referendum illegal and ordering all election material confiscated. President Manuel Zelaya had led thousands of supporters to recover the material from an air force warehouse before it could be confiscated.
Under Honduran law, soldiers are normally responsible for distributing ballots ahead of elections, but the military leadership has opposed the vote. Zelaya has fired the military chief for refusing to support the referendum and vows to ignore a Supreme Court ruling ordering him reinstated.
Zelaya has the vocal support of his fellow leftist Latin American leaders as he seeks to follow in the path of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez in transforming his country through a constitutional overhaul. The Venezuelan leader and former Cuban President Fidel Castro have warned a coup is under way in Honduras and pledged their support for Zelaya.
Zelaya says the constitution protects a system of government that excludes the poor, but has not specified what changes he will seek.
His opponents fear he will try to extend his rule by lifting a constitutional ban presidential re-election.
The showdown between the president and virtually all other circles of power in Honduras plunged the impoverished Central America country into a political crisis with no solution in sight. Congress — led by members of Zelaya's own Liberal Party — has opened an investigation into his mental stability and could declare him unfit to govern.
Thousands of Zelaya opponents marched through the capital of Tegucigalpa to demand his ouster Friday, chanting "he must leave now!" Many shops, gasoline stations and some schools were closed for fear of disturbances.
In Washington, the Organization of American States held a session to discuss the situation in Honduras. U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon urged "restraint by all concerned in order to prevent any further escalation" of the crisis, said U.N. associate spokesman Farhan Haq.
Zelaya lashed out at Congress early Friday for considering his ouster.
"Congress cannot investigate me, much less remove me or stage a technical coup against me because I am honest, I'm a free president and nobody scares me," Zelaya said in his two-hour speech, at one point bursting — Chavez-like — into song.
"But we have to forgive them. Glory to God! We have to forgive, and I know who to forgive because the people are my support and my best ally in this political process," he said.
He referred to Congressional President Roberto Micheletti — a member of his own party — as "a pathetic, second-class congressman who got that job because of me."
Micheletti, who by law would take over the presidency if Zelaya were ousted, retorted, "We should not have to suffer the aspirations of a disturbed man who wants to hold onto to power."
Sunday's referendum has no legal effect: it merely asks people if they want to have a later vote on whether to convoke an assembly to rewrite the constitution.
The Supreme Court, Congress and the attorney general have all said the referendum he is sponsoring is illegal because the constitution says some of its clauses cannot be changed.
The constitution, approved in 1982 as Honduras was throwing off two decades of nearly uninterrupted military rule, states that any politician who promotes presidential re-election will be barred from public service for 10 years.
The showdown over Sunday's referendum has all but overshadowed the election campaign, which pits Porfirio Lobo of the opposition National Party against Liberal Party candidate Elvin Santos, who resigned as vice president last year complaining that Zelaya had been trying to sideline him in the government.
Zelaya, whose four-year term ends in January, has seen his approval ratings fall over the past year as the country grapples with soaring food prices and a spike in drug violence that has saddled Honduras with one of the highest homicide rates in Latin America.
His campaign for changing the constitution has energized his support base of labor groups, farmers and civil organizations who have long felt marginalized in a country where a wealthy elite controls the media and much of politics, said Manuel Orozco, a political analyst with the Washington-based Inter-American Dialogue.
But "the bottom line is that whether he has some level of popular support or not, this is democracy and he has to follow the rule of law," Orozco said.

Peter Lemkin
06-27-2009, 06:17 AM
The hidden US hand must be very busy. It has long been a 'backyard' property of the American Empire and the US is mightly upset by what is going on generally in Central and S. A. - and determined to stop and reverse it....they were much happier when they had installed and 'ran' all the dictatorships, death squads, neo-fascist and military-run governments, etc. How dare these people try to run their own affairs in our backyard! :marchmellow:

Peter Presland
06-28-2009, 02:03 PM
From Al Jazeera Sunday: (http://english.aljazeera.net/news/americas/2009/06/2009628124715921328.html)

Manuel Zelaya, the president of Honduras, has been arrested by soldiers after he vowed to go ahead with a controversial referendum on constitutional changes, his allies and local media say.

Zelaya was reportedly arrested at his home on Sunday morning and taken to a military base on the outskirts of the capital, Tegucigalpa.
Zelaya fired the armed forces chief of staff last week after he refused to help him organise the unofficial referendum.

The non-binding vote, which was due to take place on Sunday, would have asked Hondurans whether they approved of holding a poll on constitutional change alongside general elections in November.
Al Jazeera's Mariana Sanchez, reporting from Tegucigalpa, said: "An eyewitness told us that between five and six in the morning local time about 100 to 200 soldiers surrounded his home in the centre of the capital and three vans drove up to his home and took him."

"A neighbour said that [the president] came out and the army shot at him, about five shots."

The streets of Tegucigalpa were almost empty of traffic on Sunday after reports on local radio urged the city's residents to stay inside.

Referendum 'illegal'

The supreme court and the attorney general have said the referendum is illegal because the constitution bars changes to some of its clauses, such as the ban on a president serving more than one term.

Their decision has been backed by the military and congress.

However, many union and farm groups support the referendum, which Zelaya says is aimed at improving the lives for the nearly three-quarters of Hondurans who live in poverty.

Zelaya was elected for a non-renewable four-year term in 2006.
Congress on Thursday approved plans to investigate the president and possibly declare him unfit to govern.
"We have tried to avoid breaching a constitutional order and sidestep a coup," Roberto Micheletti, the congressional president and a member of Zelaya's own Liberal Party, said.
Late on Friday, the president assured the country that the situation "had returned to normality", but he accused members of congress of "conspiracy" and insisted that the armed forces owed him "obedience".

Magda Hassan
06-28-2009, 03:36 PM
http://incakolanews.blogspot.com/2009/06/honduras-coup-detat-chavez-speaks.html


Honduras Coup D'Etat: Chavez speaks (http://incakolanews.blogspot.com/2009/06/honduras-coup-detat-chavez-speaks.html)

My translation of the direct quotes given by Hugo Chávez, ally of President Zelaya of Honduras, in this report (http://www.rnv.gov.ve/noticias/?act=ST&f=2&t=101020). I've kept the translation as clean as possible so there may be some phrases that don't sit perfectly in English, but they should be comprehensible enough.

This situation may become serious quickly.



xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxx


"To the coupmongers we say, "we are ready for action". These are no empty words. We have already started to mobilize. This coup will be defeated by the people of Honduras and by those of us that are outside of Honduras but equally feel ourselves to be Honduran.

"The Yankee empire has a lot to do with this. I will call the US President so that he speaks on this issue in the same way as we do from the depths of our soul. They look at us as if we were an operations base of the Empire; we are not.

"You know they call us coupmongers for the military action of February 4th, which was a patriotic military action against the bourgeious. This is the reverse.

"I call upon the soldiers of Honduras. We see them running, they are running without spirit. Please Lord don't let them use their weapons against their own people. The are men of the people, ordered by officials that also come from the people but have lost the notion of citizenry. They (the soldiers) are nearly children with guns in their hands, without conscience.

"There are some old troglodytes behind the troops, using them. You don't see a single general in the streets, they're in the barracks, well-protected.

"Not those soldiers are going to find out what a people is...the people have started coming out on to the street. They (the coup leaders) made their move in the early hours of the morning, in a cowardly manner.

Chavez said he had called the chancellor of Honduras, Patricia Rodas who "was surrounded; they took away her bodyguards and she is now under detention. She is trying to make contact with the social movements, she is very brave and dignified. We understand that teh social movements have begun to mobilize but they ahve no weapons. The troops commanded by the coupmongers have the weapons."

Magda Hassan
06-29-2009, 02:11 AM
It has all the signs of the US State Department's 2002 anti-Chavez coup. The president was kidnapped at night in his pyjamas by masked soldiers and flown to Costa Rica where he was dumped. His puppet replacement has accepted Zelaya's letter of 'resignation' and he has been 'voted' in to office by the congress. The Cuban, Venezuelan and Nicaraguan ambassadors were held captive and beaten during this same time. They are since released. This illegal and unnecessary act can only be seen as a provocation to draw in the ALBA countries. Other members of the government who may be supportive of the president have also been kidnapped by the military and communications are being cut off. There is no street lighting. The military have also taken over the channel 8 tv station. The military are running things through the air force.

Clinton and Obama are saying that Zelaya is the only president recognised by the US but.... what are they going to do about it now? The current puppet, Micheletti, says he will stay until January 2010 when the elections would be held. That is plenty of time for the elite and their US friends to get things organised their way.

The constitution that Zelaya wanted to change by referendum by the way was one installed by the last US military dictatorship and never repealled. Some people like things just the way they are it seems. A petition requesting the referendum was signed by 400,000 Hondurans.

Magda Hassan
06-29-2009, 04:28 AM
Coup d'etat in Honduras (http://leninology.blogspot.com/2009/06/coup-detat-in-honduras.html) posted by lenin (http://leninology.blogspot.com/2009/06/coup-detat-in-honduras.html)

So, is the six month old Obama administration taking ickle baby-steps towards its first (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/8123126.stm) coup (http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/wire/sns-ap-lt-honduras-referendum,1,3683222.story)? Eva Golinger thinks so (http://www.venezuelanalysis.com/analysis/4554). The background:

Supposedly at the center of the controversary is today's scheduled referendum, which is not a binding vote but merely an opinion poll to determine whether or not a majority of Hondurans desire to eventually enter into a process to modify their constitution. Such an initiative has never taken place in the Central American nation, which has a very limited constitution that allows minimal participation by the people of Honduras in their political processes. The current constitution, written in 1982 during the height of the Reagan Administration's dirty war in Central America, was designed to ensure those in power, both economic and political, would retain it with little interference from the people.

Ah yes, the Reagan years, during which time Honduras was the base for CIA training of Nicaraguan death squads. This was also the era during which John Negroponte was helping flood the country with military aid so that Battalion 316 could murder and torture dissidents. Proceeding:

Zelaya, elected in November 2005 on the platform of Honduras' Liberal Party, had proposed the opinion poll be conducted to determine if a majority of citizens agreed that constitutional reform was necessary. He was backed by a majority of labor unions and social movements in the country. If the poll had occured, depending on the results, a referendum would have been conducted during the upcoming elections in November to vote on convening a constitutional assembly. Nevertheless, today's scheduled poll was not binding by law. In fact, several days before the poll was to occur, Honduras' Supreme Court ruled it illegal, upon request by the Congress, both of which are led by anti-Zelaya majorities and members of the ultra-conservative party, National Party of Honduras (PNH).Zelaya has been irritating the country's ruling class for some time with his support for Chavez and the 'Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas', and his calls for drug legalisation, but the attempt to maybe, pending a possible future referendum, democratise the system a little was a step too far. The Miami Herald (http://www.miamiherald.com/news/americas/story/1115412.html), naturally enough, vocalised the propaganda of the would-be putschists a couple of days ago, namely their speculation that the aim might secretly be to try to remove the cap on presidential re-elections and thus have some sort of elected dictatorship just like that Chavez monster. So, to forestall the possibility, the military has installed an unelected dictatorship. The White House is denying any involvement in the coup. Is it a plausible denial? Back to Eve Gollinger:

Another major source of funding in Honduras is USAID, providing over US$ 50 millon annually for "democracy promotion" programs, which generally supports NGOs and political parties favorable to U.S. interests, as has been the case in Venezuela, Bolivia and other nations in the region. The Pentagon also maintains a military base in Honduras in Soto Cano, equipped with approximately 500 troops and numerous air force combat planes and helicopters. Foreign Minister Rodas has stated that she has repeatedly tried to make contact with the U.S. Ambassador in Honduras, Hugo Llorens, who has not responded to any of her calls thus far. The modus operandi of the coup makes clear that Washington is involved. Neither the Honduran military, which is majority trained by U.S. forces, nor the political and economic elite, would act to oust a democratically elected president without the backing and support of the U.S. government.Well. I would say that if the behemoth just to the north has a military base in your country, and funds your military and major pro-US parties, then you probably do have to get their permission before overthrowing the government. The Honduran army will presumably now have a brief to deal with the protesters, the social movements, the labour organisations, and everyone else who has been inconvenient in backing Zelaya and might now try to resist the coup. They're calling it a 'bloodless' coup... for now.
http://leninology.blogspot.com/2009/06/coup-detat-in-honduras.html

Magda Hassan
06-29-2009, 04:28 AM
Obama's First Coup d'Etat: Honduran President has been Kidnapped: Updates 1-17

http://www.venezuelanalysis.com/modules/print/icons/print_icon.gif (http://www.venezuelanalysis.com/print/4554)http://www.venezuelanalysis.com/modules/print/icons/mail_icon.gif (http://www.venezuelanalysis.com/printmail/4554) June 28th 2009, by Eva Golinger
Caracas, Venezuela - The text message that beeped on my cell phone this morning read "Alert, Zelaya has been kidnapped, coup d'etat underway in Honduras, spread the word." It's a rude awakening for a Sunday morning, especially for the millions of Hondurans that were preparing to exercise their sacred right to vote today for the first time on a consultative referendum concerning the future convening of a constitutional assembly to reform the constitution. Supposedly at the center of the controversary is today's scheduled referendum, which is not a binding vote but merely an opinion poll to determine whether or not a majority of Hondurans desire to eventually enter into a process to modify their constitution.
Such an initiative has never taken place in the Central American nation, which has a very limited constitution that allows minimal participation by the people of Honduras in their political processes. The current constitution, written in 1982 during the height of the Reagan Administration's dirty war in Central America, was designed to ensure those in power, both economic and political, would retain it with little interference from the people. Zelaya, elected in November 2005 on the platform of Honduras' Liberal Party, had proposed the opinion poll be conducted to determine if a majority of citizens agreed that constitutional reform was necessary. He was backed by a majority of labor unions and social movements in the country. If the poll had occured, depending on the results, a referendum would have been conducted during the upcoming elections in November to vote on convening a constitutional assembly. Nevertheless, today's scheduled poll was not binding by law.
In fact, several days before the poll was to occur, Honduras' Supreme Court ruled it illegal, upon request by the Congress, both of which are led by anti-Zelaya majorities and members of the ultra-conservative party, National Party of Honduras (PNH). This move led to massive protests in the streets in favor of President Zelaya. On June 24, the president fired the head of the high military command, General Romeo Vásquez, after he refused to allow the military to distribute the electoral material for Sunday's elections. General Romeo Vásquez held the material under tight military control, refusing to release it even to the president's followers, stating that the scheduled referendum had been determined illegal by the Supreme Court and therefore he could not comply with the president's order. As in the Unted States, the president of Honduras is Commander in Chief and has the final say on the military's actions, and so he ordered the General's removal. The Minister of Defense, Angel Edmundo Orellana, also resigned in response to this increasingly tense situation.
But the following day, Honduras' Supreme Court reinstated General Romeo Vásquez to the high military command, ruling his firing as "unconstitutional'. Thousands poured into the streets of Honduras' capital, Tegucigalpa, showing support for President Zelaya and evidencing their determination to ensure Sunday's non-binding referendum would take place. On Friday, the president and a group of hundreds of supporters, marched to the nearby air base to collect the electoral material that had been previously held by the military. That evening, Zelaya gave a national press conference along with a group of politicians from different political parties and social movements, calling for unity and peace in the country.
As of Saturday, the situation in Honduras was reported as calm. But early Sunday morning, a group of approximately 60 armed soldiers entered the presidential residence and took Zelaya hostage. After several hours of confusion, reports surfaced claiming the president had been taken to a nearby air force base and flown to neighboring Costa Rica. No images have been seen of the president so far and it is unknown whether or not his life is still endangered.
President Zelaya's wife, Xiomara Castro de Zelaya, speaking live on Telesur at approximately 10:00am Caracas time, denounced that in early hours of Sunday morning, the soldiers stormed their residence, firing shots throughout the house, beating and then taking the president. "It was an act of cowardice", said the first lady, referring to the illegal kidnapping occuring during a time when no one would know or react until it was all over. Casto de Zelaya also called for the "preservation" of her husband's life, indicating that she herself is unaware of his whereabouts. She claimed their lives are all still in "serious danger" and made a call for the international community to denounce this illegal coup d'etat and to act rapidly to reinstate constitutional order in the country, which includes the rescue and return of the democratically elected Zelaya.
Presidents Evo Morales of Bolivia and Hugo Chávez of Venezuela have both made public statements on Sunday morning condeming the coup d'etat in Honduras and calling on the international community to react to ensure democracy is restored and the constitutional president is reinstated. Last Wednesday, June 24, an extraordinary meeting of the member nations of the Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas (ALBA), of which Honduras is a member, was convened in Venezuela to welcome Ecuador, Antigua & Barbados and St. Vincent to its ranks. During the meeting, which was attended by Honduras' Foreign Minister, Patricia Rodas, a statement was read supporting President Zelaya and condenming any attempts to undermine his mandate and Honduras' democratic processes.
Reports coming out of Honduras have informed that the public television channel, Canal 8, has been shut down by the coup forces. Just minutes ago, Telesur announced that the military in Honduras is shutting down all electricity throughout the country. Those television and radio stations still transmitting are not reporting the coup d'etat or the kidnapping of President Zelaya, according to Foreign Minister Patricia Rodas. "Telephones and electricity are being cut off", confirmed Rodas just minutes ago via Telesur. "The media are showing cartoons and soap operas and are not informing the people of Honduras about what is happening". The situation is eerily reminiscent of the April 2002 coup d'etat against President Chávez in Venezuela, when the media played a key role by first manipulating information to support the coup and then later blacking out all information when the people began protesting and eventually overcame and defeated the coup forces, rescuing Chávez (who had also been kidnapped by the military) and restoring constitutional order.
Honduras is a nation that has been the victim of dictatorships and massive U.S. intervention during the past century, including several military invasions. The last major U.S. government intervention in Honduras occured during the 1980s, when the Reagain Administration funded death squads and paramilitaries to eliminate any potential "communist threats" in Central America. At the time, John Negroponte, was the U.S. Ambassador in Honduras and was responsible for directly funding and training Honduran death squads that were responsable for thousands of disappeared and assassinated throughout the region.
On Friday, the Organization of American States (OAS), convened a special meeting to discuss the crisis in Honduras, later issuing a statement condeming the threats to democracy and authorizing a convoy of representatives to travel to OAS to investigate further. Nevertheless, on Friday, Assistant Secretary of State of the United States, Phillip J. Crowley, refused to clarify the U.S. government's position in reference to the potential coup against President Zelaya, and instead issued a more ambiguous statement that implied Washington's support for the opposition to the Honduran president. While most other Latin American governments had clearly indicated their adamant condemnation of the coup plans underway in Honduras and their solid support for Honduras' constitutionally elected president, Manual Zelaya, the U.S. spokesman stated the following, "We are concerned about the breakdown in the political dialogue among Honduran politicians over the proposed June 28 poll on constitutional reform. We urge all sides to seek a consensual democratic resolution in the current political impasse that adheres to the Honduran constitution and to Honduran laws consistent with the principles of the Inter-American Democratic Charter."
As of 10:30am, Sunday morning, no further statements have been issued by the Washington concerning the military coup in Honduras. The Central American nation is highly dependent on the U.S. economy, which ensures one of its top sources of income, the monies sent from Hondurans working in the U.S. under the "temporary protected status" program that was implemented during Washington's dirty war in the 1980s as a result of massive immigration to U.S. territory to escape the war zone. Another major source of funding in Honduras is USAID, providing over US$ 50 millon annually for "democracy promotion" programs, which generally supports NGOs and political parties favorable to U.S. interests, as has been the case in Venezuela, Bolivia and other nations in the region. The Pentagon also maintains a military base in Honduras in Soto Cano, equipped with approximately 500 troops and numerous air force combat planes and helicopters.
Foreign Minister Rodas has stated that she has repeatedly tried to make contact with the U.S. Ambassador in Honduras, Hugo Llorens, who has not responded to any of her calls thus far. The modus operandi of the coup makes clear that Washington is involved. Neither the Honduran military, which is majority trained by U.S. forces, nor the political and economic elite, would act to oust a democratically elected president without the backing and support of the U.S. government. President Zelaya has increasingly come under attack by the conservative forces in Honduras for his growing relationship with the ALBA countries, and particularly Venezuela and President Chávez. Many believe the coup has been executed as a method of ensuring Honduras does not continue to unify with the more leftist and socialist countries in Latin America.
UPDATE 1: As of 11:15am, Caracas time, President Zelaya is speaking live on Telesur from San Jose, Costa Rica. He has verified the soldiers entered his residence in the early morning hours, firing guns and threatening to kill him and his family if he resisted the coup. He was forced to go with the soldiers who took him to the air base and flew him to Costa Rica. He has requested the U.S. Government make a public statement condemning the coup, otherwise, it will indicate their compliance.
UPDATE 2: 12pm noon - The Organization of American States is meeting in an emergency session in Washington concerning the situation in Honduras and the kidnapping of Honduras' president. Venezuelan Ambassador to the OAS, Roy Chaderton, just announced that the ambassadors of Venezuela, Bolivia and Nicaragua in Honduras have just been kidnapped along with Foreign Minister Patricia Rodas, and are being beaten by Honduran military forces.
President Obama has made a statement regarding his "concern" for the situation in Honduras and a call to all political leaders and parties to "respect democratic norms". However, this statement is NOT a clear condemnation of the coup d'etat that has taken place during the early morning hours on Sunday. Nor did Obama indicate, as other countries have done, that Washington would not recognize any other government in Honduras other than the elected government of Manual Zelaya.
Opposition forces in Honduras, led by a US-funded NGO Grupo Paz y Democracia, have stated via CNN that a coup has not ocurred, but rather a "transition" to democracy. Martha Diaz, coordinator of the NGO, which receives USAID funding, has just declared minutes ago on CNN that "civil society" does not support President Zelaya nor his "illegal quest" to hold a non-binding referendum on a potential future constitutional reform. She justified his kidnapping, beating and removal from power as a "democratic transition". Again, this is eerily reminiscent of the coup d'etat in Venezuela in April 2002, when so-called "civil society" along with dissident military forces kidnapped President Chávez and installed a "transition government". The goups involved also received funding from the U.S. government, primarily via the National Endowment for Democracy (NED) and later from USAID as well.
CNN en Español, Telesur, and other international television stations reporting on the situation in Honduras have been removed from the airways in the Central American nation. The whereabouts of the Foreign Minister and the ambassadors of Venezuela, Bolivia and Nicaragua are still unknown. OAS General Secretary Jose Miguel Insulze has announced he will travel immediately to Honduras to investigate the situation. President Chávez of Venezuela has also announced an emergency meeting of ALBA nations in Managua, Nicaragua, as soon as this evening.
More to come as the situation develops over the next few hours. Catch live blogging at www.chavezcode.com (http://www.chavezcode.com/).
UPDATE 3: 12:18pm - Dan Restrepo, Presidential Advisor to President Obama for Latin American Affairs, is currently on CNN en Español. He has just stated that Obama's government is communicating with the coup forces in Honduras, trying to "feel out" the situation. He also responded to the reporter's question regarding whether Washington would recognize a government in Honduras other than President Zelaya's elected government, by saying that the Obama Administration "is waiting to see how things play out" and so long as democratic norms are respected, will work with all sectors. This is a confirmation practically of support for the coup leaders. Restrepo also inferred that other countries are interfering in Honduras' international affairs, obviously referring to Venezuela and other ALBA nations who have condemned the coup with firm statements earlier this morning.
UPDATE 4: 12:26PM - President Chávez of Venezuela has just announced that the Cuban Ambassador in Honduras has been kidnapped and beaten by Honduran military forces. The Venezuelan Ambassador was beaten, kidnapped and left at the side of a road outside of Tegucigalpa. Chávez has denounced that both CNN and Venezuelan private station Globovisión have been trying to justify the coup against President Zelaya in Honduras. Chávez is live from the presidential palace together with the Honduran Ambassador in Venezuela. Chávez spoke with Fidel Castro in Cuba just over an hour ago regarding the situation. Both Cuba and Venezuela, along with Bolivia, Nicaragua and Ecuador, have unilaterally condemned the coup in Honduras.
UPDATE 5: 12:30PM - Foreign Minister of Honduras Patricia Rodas has been taken from her home by soldiers, beaten and imprisoned. Serious human rights violations are occurring in Honduras and President Obama has so far only said he is "concerned". Another showing of a US double standard? Since Zelaya is a "leftist" president, will the Obama administration refuse to condemn the coup against him?
Chávez announces that President Bachelet of Chile has also condemned the coup in Honduras and is emitting a formal declaration.
UPDATE 6: 1PM - President Zelaya is speaking right now live from San Jose, Costa Rica, alongside the right-wing president of Costa Rica, Oscar Arias, who traditionally has been a staunch ally of Washington. Arias has just adamantly condemned the coup against Zelaya and called for the whole hemisphere to follow suit.
UPDATE 7: 2:00PM - SOA WATCH CALLS FOR URGENT CALLS TO STATE DEPT
Military Coup in Honduras
A military coup has taken place in Honduras this morning (Sunday, June 28), led by SOA graduate Romeo Vasquez. In the early hours of the day, members of the Honduran military surrounded the presidential palace and forced the democratically elected president, Manuel Zelaya, into custody. He was immediately flown to Costa Rica.

A national vote had been scheduled to take place today in Honduras to consult the electorate on a proposal of holding a Constitutional Assembly in November. General Vasquez had refused to comply with this vote and was deposed by the president, only to later be reinstated by the Congress and Supreme Court.

The Honduran state television was taken off the air. The electricity supply to the capital Tegucigalpa, as well as telephone and cellphone lines were cut. Government institutions were taken over by the military. While the traditional political parties, Catholic church and military have not issued any statements, the people of Honduras are going into the streets, in spite of the fact that the streets are militarized. From Costa Rica, President Zelaya has called for a non-violent response from the people of Honduras, and for international solidarity for the Honduran democracy.

While the European Union and several Latin American governments just came out in support of President Zelaya and spoke out against the coup, a statement that was just issued by Barack Obama fell short of calling for the reinstatement of Zelaya as the legitimate president.
Call the State Department and the White House
Demand that they call for the immediate reinstatement of Honduran President Zelaya.

State Department: 202-647-4000 or 1-800-877-8339
White House: Comments: 202-456-1111, Switchboard: 202-456-1414
Visit www.SOAW.org (http://www.soaw.org/) and www.SOAW.org/presente (http://www.soaw.org/presente) for articles and updated information.
UPDATE 8: 2:10PM - CNN broadcasts from Honduran congree; stating Zelaya has resignedIncredible! Just like Venezuela, April 2002. CNN has just issued a report saying that the Honduran Congress has just read President Zelaya's resignation from the presidency and the head of Congress will be the new president of Honduras. However, just under one hour ago, President Zelaya spoke live from Costa Rica and did not give ANY indication whatsoever that he was going to resign. Zelaya moreover reiterated that he remains the elected president of Honduras until 2010 and was hoping to return to his country as soon as possible... Is the resignation letter real? Or is this yet another strange repetition of Venezuela in 2002 when the opposition forces released a forged resignation letter they attributed to President Chávez but had actually been doctored by the coup leaders...
UPDATE 9: 2:20pm -President Zelaya Denies Resignation, Live On CNN
President Manuel Zelaya of Honduras was just live on CNN enEspañol, confirming that he never signed nor authorized his resignation fromthe presidency. This is a coup d'etat taking place, he denounced. The Hondurancongress has forged a resignation letter removing illegally the president frompower. They say it's a correspondence they have received and have to process,but have not confirmed its authenticity. MAJOR COUP UNDERWAY.
UPDATE 10: 3:00PM -PEOPLE Taking To Streets In Honduras To Protest Military Coup
Minister of the Presidency in Honduras, Enrique FLoresLanza, is live on "Once Noticias" Channel 11 news in Hondurasaffirming that hundreds of thousands of Hondurans are taking to the streets todemand the return of President Zelaya. He has confirmed that President ZelayaHAS NOT RESIGNED and the letter presented by the Congress is a FAKE.
The OBAMA Administration has not yet called for theunequivocal reinstatement of Zelaya to the presidency of Honduras.
Call the State Department and the White House
Demand that they call for the immediate reinstatement ofHonduran President Zelaya.
State Department: 202-647-4000 or 1-800-877-8339
White House: Comments: 202-456-1111, Switchboard:202-456-1414
The Honduran Congress and Supreme Court are backing theArmed Forces and the military coup. They say a military coup per se has notoccurred because the military does not want to take power, but rather the headof Congress will be named president.
PRESIDENT ZELAYA WAS BEATEN AND KIDNAPPED FROM HIS HOUSETHIS MORNING AND TAKEN BY FORCE TO AN AIRPLANE AND SENT TO COSTA RICA. FOREIGNMINISTER PATRICIA RODAS HAS BEEN BEATEN, KIDNAPPED AND IMPRISONED BY MILITARYFORCES AND IS STILL IN CUSTODY, HER WHEREABOUTS UNKNOWN. HONDURAN TELEVISION ISTRYING TO SAY THIS IS NOT A COUP. BUT THIS IS A COUP D'ETAT AND MUST BEUNILATERALLY CONDEMNED AND DEFEATED BY THE INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY TOGETHERWITH THE HONDURAN PEOPLE.
UPDATE 11: 3:15PM -International Community Unanimously Rejects Military Coup In Honduras
The Organization of American States, ALBA nations, EuropeanCommunity, United Nations, UNASUR, MERCOSUR and even the United States have nowALL condemned the military coup underway in Honduras. HOWEVER, the HonduranCongress, Supreme Court and military are refusing to recognize their actions asa coup d'etat.
Still the other nation to not unequivocally call forPresident Zelaya's immediate rescue and reinstatement is the United States,nevertheless, Hillary Clinton has issued a statement condemning the"situation" in Honduras and calling for "respect" forconstitutional order.
Electricity and state media outlets in Honduras are stillshut down in order to impose a curfew and blackout state so the military coupcan succeed.
Honduran Congress live on CNN en español, Jose AlfredoSaavedra, Secretary of the Congress, has just read a Decree declaring PresidentZelaya no longer President of Honduras because he wanted to proceed with theopinion poll scheduled to occur today.
What happened to the validity of all those who voted forZelaya? He is the elected president since 2005!
UPDATE 12: 3:30PM -Honduran Congress Says Can't Allow Constitutional Assembly To Ever Take Place
A member of Honduras' Congress has just admitted that indiscussions with the US Ambassador in Honduras, the US Ambassador suggestedthey just let the opinion poll take place and then vote against theConstitutional Assembly in November, but, said the congressmember, "wecan't just allow 'these people' to do this with the help of Venezuela andCuba."
"we can't have a constitution that allows the 'people'to elect members on the supreme court and allows the 'people' to be involved ingovernment".......
They also blamed Zelaya for increases in corruption,drugtrafficking and the relationship with "chavismo" in Venezuela....
Nevertheless, they can be in disagreement with Zelaya'spolicies, but he was elected by a majority of Honduran people and still remainspopular as their president...It's the elite and the conservative parties, whichhave power in Congress, who have backed this coup...
UPDATE 13: 3:44PM - Fake Resignation Letter From Zelaya Dated 3Days Ago
Alleged resignation letter with forged signature fromPresident Zelaya is dated June 25, 2009. This is completely ridiculousconsidering that up until he was violently kidnapped this morning, Zelaya gaveno indication whatsoever that he was planning to resign. Today, in is forcedexile from Costa Rica, he has reaffirmed his role as constitutional presidentof Honduras and denied any resignation via letter or any other means.
The Honduran Congress has violated the human rights of itscitizens and has brutally repressed members of Zelaya's administration. ForeignMinister Patricia Rodas, who was beaten and taken from her home a few hoursago, has still not resurfaced.
The Honduran Congress says they have not executed a coupd'etat but rather are installing "rule of law" and"democracy". WTF?????
BTW, the FAKE RESIGNATION letter states:
"Mr. President:
Due to the polarizing political situation in the country,which has provoked a national conflict that is eroding my political support,and due to my uncureable health problems that have impeded me fromconcentrating on my fundamental duties in the government, I am handing in myirrevocable resignation as President of the Republic, together with my Cabinetmembers, effective as of today.
With my resignation, I hope to contribute to healing thewounds in the national political environment.
Sincerely,
Jose Manual Zelaya Rosales
President of the Republic of Honduras

Addressed to: President of the National Congress
Honorable Representative Don Roberto Micheletti Bain
Legislative Palace
Tegucigalpa"
THIS IS CLEARLY A FAKE! AND THE GUY IT'S ADDRESSED TO,MICHELETTI, IS THE ONE THE CONGRESS JUST NAMED PRESIDENT OF HONDURAS!
Also, the "health problems" referred to in theletter are regarding the opposition's claim that President Zelaya is"mentally ill". Hmmm....the Venezuelan opposition has tried to saythe same about President Chavez and have even had psychiatric studies conductedto back their "accusations".
Maybe all of us are mentally ill who fight for social andeconomic justice and refuse to bow to imperialism, fascism and military coups!!
UPDATE 14: 4:10PM -If Obama Does Not Refuse To Recognize Coup Leaders Than Us Approving MilitaryCoup
AS of this time, late Sunday afternoon, after the HonduranCongress has illegally removed President Zelaya from power and violentlykidnapped and forced him into exile in Costa Rica, the Obama Administration hasSTILL NOT stated that it WILL NOT recognize any other president of Hondurasother than the democratically elected President Manuel Zelaya.
All of the nations in the region have made clear that theywill only recognize President Zelaya as the legitimate president of Honduras.Even the United Nations and European Community have made clear the samesentiment. Only the Obama Administration has made no statement confirming thatit will not recognize the head of Congress, who just declared himself presidentof Honduras, as a legitimate leader.
THIS IS AN OUTRAGE! We must DEMAND the Obama Administrationrefuse to recognize any other president than Manuel Zelaya in Honduras. If theObama administration's rejects such a demand, then it is evidences its role inthis illegal military coup.
UPDATE 15: 4:32PM -Massive Human Rights Violations Underway In Honduras
The Honduran president, Manuel Zelaya, elected in November2005, has been kidnapped, beaten and forced into exile in Costa Rica. A fakeletter of resignation, with his forged signature (see blog entry below), wasused by Honduras' opposition majority Congress to justify the president'souster. Foreign Minister Patricia Rodas was brutally beaten and kidnapped bymilitary forces in her residence just before noon and taken into custody. Shehas not been seen since.
In complete violation of diplomatic law, the ambassadors ofVenezuela and Cuba were both beaten and kidnapped for a short period byHonduran soldiers, under orders of the coup leaders. They have both beenreleased and have taken refuge again in their respective embassies.
A non-binding vote, scheduled for today, on a possiblefuture constitutional assembly, was impeded by the coup leaders, violating theHonduran people's right to vote and participate in their political processes.
Nations around the world, including the United Nations,Organization of American States, Latin American countries and even the UnitedStates have condemned the events in Honduras. Only the Obama Administration hasyet to clarify whether they will recognize the illegal coup government led bythe president of Honduras' congress, Micheletti.
UPDATE 16: 5:00PM - Illegal Swearing In Of De FactoPresident In Honduras
RIght now the Honduran Congress is illegally swearing in thepresident of Congress, Micheletti, as the de facto president of Honduras, inthe next development of this ongoing military-civil coup taking placethroughout the day.
President Zelaya is still in forced exile in Costa Rica,after being beaten and kidnapped by soldiers under orders of those involved inthe coup. Foreign Minister Patricia Rodas is still disappeared, after also beingbeaten and taking prisoner by the Honduran military in clear violation of herrights.
The United States maintains a military base in Soto Cano,Honduras, that houses approximately 500 soldiers and special forces. The U.S.military group in Honduras is one of the largest in U.S. Embassies in theregion. The leaders of the coup today are graduates of the U.S. School of theAmericas, a training camp for dictators and repressive forces in Latin America.
Will the Obama Administration recognize the coup governmentin place now in Honduras? Or will Obama call for the reinstatement ofconstitutional president Manuel Zelaya. We are waiting to hear from the WhiteHouse....
Tonight, a special meeting of ALBA nations has been convenedin Managua, Nicaragua. Heads of state or high level representatives fromBolivia, Cuba, Ecuador, Venezuela, Dominica, San Vincent and Antigua andBarbados are expected to attend.
UPDATE 17: 5:37PM -Coup Government In Place In Honduras
It's official, illegal, but official. Roberto Micheletti, upuntil right now the head of Congress, has just been sworn in as de factopresident after violently ousting President Zelaya from power, kidnapping himand forcing him into exile in Costa Rica. Micheletti just gave a speech beforeCongress, broadcast live via CNN en Español and Telesur, along with Honduranstations, was enraged with power, often yelling and declaring his "utmostrespect for democracy and the constitution" (?!) He also discussed how his"cabinet" which he is about to announce, will "restoredemocracy" and "respect for the constitution" to the country. Herepeated over and over again that what took place was not a military-civil coupbut rather a "civil society" action to "ensure democracy".
Still no word about kidnapped and beaten Foreign MinisterPatricia Rodas' whereabouts. The Congress also did not explain PresidentZelaya's beating and kidnapping and forced exile or the forged resignationletter, which they now obviously are no longer using as a legitimate"justification" for the coup. It's just too bogus.
BTW, The US Military Group in Honduras trains around 300Honduran soldiers every year, provides more than $500,000 annually to theHonduran Armed Forces and additionally provides $1.4 million for a militaryeducation and exchange program for around 300 more Honduran soldiers everyyear.
http://www.venezuelanalysis.com/analysis/4554

Magda Hassan
06-29-2009, 04:45 AM
Just wanted to make sure that people see this fake resignation letter. From update 14 above.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Alleged resignation letter with forged signature fromPresident Zelaya is dated June 25, 2009. This is completely ridiculousconsidering that up until he was violently kidnapped this morning, Zelaya gaveno indication whatsoever that he was planning to resign. Today, in is forcedexile from Costa Rica, he has reaffirmed his role as constitutional presidentof Honduras and denied any resignation via letter or any other means.
The Honduran Congress has violated the human rights of itscitizens and has brutally repressed members of Zelaya's administration. ForeignMinister Patricia Rodas, who was beaten and taken from her home a few hoursago, has still not resurfaced.
The Honduran Congress says they have not executed a coupd'etat but rather are installing "rule of law" and"democracy". WTF?????
BTW, the FAKE RESIGNATION letter states:
"Mr. President:
Due to the polarizing political situation in the country,which has provoked a national conflict that is eroding my political support,and due to my uncureable health problems that have impeded me fromconcentrating on my fundamental duties in the government, I am handing in myirrevocable resignation as President of the Republic, together with my Cabinetmembers, effective as of today.
With my resignation, I hope to contribute to healing thewounds in the national political environment.
Sincerely,
Jose Manual Zelaya Rosales
President of the Republic of Honduras

Addressed to: President of the National Congress
Honorable Representative Don Roberto Micheletti Bain
Legislative Palace
Tegucigalpa"
THIS IS CLEARLY A FAKE! AND THE GUY IT'S ADDRESSED TO,MICHELETTI, IS THE ONE THE CONGRESS JUST NAMED PRESIDENT OF HONDURAS!
Also, the "health problems" referred to in theletter are regarding the opposition's claim that President Zelaya is"mentally ill". Hmmm....the Venezuelan opposition has tried to saythe same about President Chavez and have even had psychiatric studies conductedto back their "accusations".
Maybe all of us are mentally ill who fight for social andeconomic justice and refuse to bow to imperialism, fascism and military coups!!

Peter Lemkin
06-29-2009, 05:46 AM
This has the black hand of the Americans behind it, I fear. And we now see how Obama reacts to all such situations - words of 'concern'. Only. I fear the US will try this in many [read almost all] other Central and S. American countries in then next years. Not going to be pretty. Should Venezuela or anyone else come to the People's rescue against the coup, it will give the USA an excuse to invade.....something they'd just love.

EVEN the NYT does a better than usual job on this story:
Rare Hemisphere Unity in Assailing Honduran Coup
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By SIMON ROMERO
Published: June 28, 2009

BOGOTÁ, Colombia — With their condemnation on Sunday of the coup ousting President Manuel Zelaya in Honduras, governments in the Western Hemisphere from across the ideological spectrum found a rare issue around which they could swiftly arrive at unity.
Related
Honduran President Is Ousted in Coup (June 29, 2009)

At the same time, from the Obama administration’s measured response to the reaction of President Hugo Chávez of Venezuela, who put his military on alert over an apparent affront to the Venezuelan ambassador in Honduras, the responses both revealed and disguised fissures over different forms of democratic government that are taking root in the region.

On the one side are countries like Venezuela, Bolivia and Ecuador, where voters have given much greater power to their populist presidents, partly by allowing them to extend their time in office and sometimes eroding the function of Congress and the Supreme Court, institutions portrayed as allies of the old oligarchy. On the other side are nations of varying ideological hues, including Brazil, Latin America’s rising power, where resilient institutions have allowed for more diversity of participants in politics, ruling out the so-called participatory democracy that Mr. Chávez, the Venezuelan president, has been eager to promote in the region.

Mr. Zelaya himself pushed this tension with institutions to its limits in his clash with Honduras’s judiciary last week over his call for a referendum intended to clear the way for term limits to be eased. On Sunday, the Supreme Court of Honduras said that the military had acted in accordance with the Constitution to remove Mr. Zelaya.

But such legalistic arguments failed to dissuade governments from condemning the coup, particularly in countries like Chile, Argentina and Brazil, where bitter memories linger over human rights abuses by military officials that toppled civilian rulers in the 1960s and 1970s.

“The notion of military involvement in such an ouster is an anathema in much of the region,” said Peter Hakim, president of the Inter-American Dialogue, a policy group in Washington that focuses on Latin America.

Condemnations of the coup quickly united governments as ideologically disparate as Havana’s Communist rulers and conservative Colombia, a close ally of the United States. “It is a legal obligation to defend democracy in Honduras,” said Augusto Ramírez Ocampo, a former foreign minister of Colombia.

And while governments in the region may reject military ousters much more easily than, say, the civilian demonstrations that forced democratically elected leaders to resign earlier this decade in Argentina and Bolivia, the Obama administration has also shifted the way in which Washington reacts to such events.

By Sunday night, officials in Washington said they had spoken with Mr. Zelaya and were working for his return to power in Honduras, despite relations with Mr. Zelaya that had recently turned colder because of the inclusion of Honduras in the Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas, or ALBA, a leftist political alliance led by Venezuela.

The effort to engage Mr. Zelaya differed from Washington’s initial response to Venezuela’s brief coup in April 2002, when the Bush administration blamed Mr. Chávez for his own downfall and denied knowing about the planning of the coup, despite the revelation later that the Central Intelligence Agency knew developments about the plot in Caracas on the eve of its execution.

After his return to power following the 48-hour coup, Mr. Chávez demonized the Bush administration, and the ties that frayed with the United States are only now being repaired in part by the decision last week by Washington and Caracas to return ambassadors to embassies from which they had been expelled.

Magda Hassan
06-29-2009, 07:44 AM
Another aspect of the coup could involve drug money. President Manuel Zelaya has called for the legalisation of drugs. The Honduran military (US trained and partly funded) has worked with the CIA and been involved with drug trafficking going back to Iran Contra days and earlier. Perhaps they didn't want their business model changed.
http://www.cato-at-liberty.org/2008/10/14/president-of-honduras-calls-for-drug-legalization/

Magda Hassan
06-29-2009, 07:57 AM
Probably printed at the same place all those Iranian and Optor posters were. Looks like they have crossed out Chavez's name and address and substituted the Honduran president's details and recycled 2002 products. :sheep::stupido:

Peter Presland
06-29-2009, 08:47 AM
Posted by Kristin Bricker (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/kristin-bricker) - June 28, 2009 at 12:27 pm
on Narcosphere (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/kristin-bricker/2009/06/coup-honduras)

"The U.S. Army School of the Americas...is a school that has run more dictators than any other school in the history of the world." - Joseph Kennedy



The crisis in Honduras began when the military refused to distribute ballot boxes for the opinion poll in a new Constitution. President Zelaya fired the head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Romeo Orlando Vasquez Velasquez, who refused to step down. The heads of all branches of the Honduran armed forces quit in solidarity with Vasquez. Vasquez, however, refused to step down, bolstered by support in Congress and a Supreme Court ruling that reinstated him. Vasquez remains in control of the armed forces.

Vasquez, along with other military leaders, graduated from the United States' infamous School of the Americas (SOA). According to a School of the Americas Watch (http://www.soaw.org/) database compiled from information obtained from the US government, Vasquez studied in the SOA at least twice: once in 1976 and again in 1984.

The head of the Air Force, Gen. Luis Javier Prince Suazo, studied in the School of the Americas in 1996. The Air Force has been a central protagonist in the Honduran crisis. When the military refused to distribute the ballot boxes for the opinion poll, the ballot boxes were stored on an Air Force base until citizens accompanied by Zelaya rescued them. Zelaya reports that after soldiers kidnapped him, they took him to an Air Force base, where he was put on a plane and sent to Costa Rica.

Congressman Joseph Kennedy has stated, "The U.S. Army School of the Americas...is a school that has run more dictators than any other school in the history of the world."

The School of the Americas has a long, tortured history in Honduras. According to School of the Americas Watch, "In 1975, SOA Graduate General Juan Melgar Castro became the military dictator of Honduras. From 1980-1982 the dictatorial Honduran regime was headed by yet another SOA graduate, Policarpo Paz Garcia, who intensified repression and murder by Battalion 3-16, one of the most feared death squads in all of Latin America (founded by Honduran SOA graduates with the help of Argentine SOA graduates)."

Honduran Gen. Humberto Regalado Hernandez was inducted into the SOA's Hall of Fame. School of the Americas Watch notes that he was a four-time graduate. As head of the armed forces, he refused to take action against soldiers invovled in the Battalion 3-16 death squad.

School of the Americas Watch points out that this is not the first time the SOA has been involved in Latin American coups. "In April 2002, the democratically elected Chavez government of Venezuela was briefly overthrown, and the School of the Americas-trained [soldiers] Efrain Vasquez Velasco, ex-army commander, and Gen. Ramirez Poveda, were key players in the coup attempt."

According to School of the Americas Watch, "Over its 58 years, the SOA has trained over 60,000 Latin American soldiers in counter-insurgency techniques, sniper skills, commando and psychological warfare, military intelligence and interrogation tactics. Colombia, with over 10,000 troops trained at the school, is the SOA's largest customer. Colombia currently has the worst human rights record in Latin America."

Peter Lemkin
06-29-2009, 09:04 AM
Posted by Kristin Bricker (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/kristin-bricker) - June 28, 2009 at 12:27 pm
on Narcosphere (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/kristin-bricker/2009/06/coup-honduras)

"The U.S. Army School of the Americas...is a school that has run more dictators than any other school in the history of the world." - Joseph Kennedy



The crisis in Honduras began when the military refused to distribute ballot boxes for the opinion poll in a new Constitution. President Zelaya fired the head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Romeo Orlando Vasquez Velasquez, who refused to step down. The heads of all branches of the Honduran armed forces quit in solidarity with Vasquez. Vasquez, however, refused to step down, bolstered by support in Congress and a Supreme Court ruling that reinstated him. Vasquez remains in control of the armed forces.

Vasquez, along with other military leaders, graduated from the United States' infamous School of the Americas (SOA). According to a School of the Americas Watch (http://www.soaw.org/) database compiled from information obtained from the US government, Vasquez studied in the SOA at least twice: once in 1976 and again in 1984.

The head of the Air Force, Gen. Luis Javier Prince Suazo, studied in the School of the Americas in 1996. The Air Force has been a central protagonist in the Honduran crisis. When the military refused to distribute the ballot boxes for the opinion poll, the ballot boxes were stored on an Air Force base until citizens accompanied by Zelaya rescued them. Zelaya reports that after soldiers kidnapped him, they took him to an Air Force base, where he was put on a plane and sent to Costa Rica.

Congressman Joseph Kennedy has stated, "The U.S. Army School of the Americas...is a school that has run more dictators than any other school in the history of the world."

The School of the Americas has a long, tortured history in Honduras. According to School of the Americas Watch, "In 1975, SOA Graduate General Juan Melgar Castro became the military dictator of Honduras. From 1980-1982 the dictatorial Honduran regime was headed by yet another SOA graduate, Policarpo Paz Garcia, who intensified repression and murder by Battalion 3-16, one of the most feared death squads in all of Latin America (founded by Honduran SOA graduates with the help of Argentine SOA graduates)."

Honduran Gen. Humberto Regalado Hernandez was inducted into the SOA's Hall of Fame. School of the Americas Watch notes that he was a four-time graduate. As head of the armed forces, he refused to take action against soldiers invovled in the Battalion 3-16 death squad.

School of the Americas Watch points out that this is not the first time the SOA has been involved in Latin American coups. "In April 2002, the democratically elected Chavez government of Venezuela was briefly overthrown, and the School of the Americas-trained [soldiers] Efrain Vasquez Velasco, ex-army commander, and Gen. Ramirez Poveda, were key players in the coup attempt."

According to School of the Americas Watch, "Over its 58 years, the SOA has trained over 60,000 Latin American soldiers in counter-insurgency techniques, sniper skills, commando and psychological warfare, military intelligence and interrogation tactics. Colombia, with over 10,000 troops trained at the school, is the SOA's largest customer. Colombia currently has the worst human rights record in Latin America."

That he's a graduate of SOA says it all!...he's one of our Trojan horses. They should rename it School of the American Coup d'etats, torture and death squads.

Magda Hassan
06-29-2009, 09:41 AM
Honduran Military Reportedly Assassinated Leftist Presidential Candidate


Posted by Kristin Bricker (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/kristin-bricker) - June 28, 2009 at 5:09 pm Congressman Cesar Ham Was a Zelaya Ally and Organizer of the Opinion Poll on a New Constitution

http://www.radioeslodemenos.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/06/cesar_ham1.jpgCesar Ham, presidential candidate and the head of Honduras' only registered leftist political party, the Democratic Unification of Honduras, is dead, reports Notimex. He was killed by a squad of soldiers who arrived at his home this morning to arrest him.

The military has rounded up many of Zelaya's allies within the government. Chancellor Patricia Rodas remains kidnapped.

Honduran police confirmed Ham's death to Notimex (http://www.zocalo.com.mx/seccion/articulo/reportan-muerte-de-lider-popular-al-resistir-al-arresto-en-honduras). The official version of events, as reported by Notimex, is that Ham confronted the military squad that came to his house with a gun, "and therefore he had to be killed."

Despite being from a different party, Ham was a close ally of ousted President Manuel Zelaya. Ham's party, the Democratic Unification of Honduras, is Honduras' only registered leftist party. Zelaya is from the conservative Liberal Party; he became a populist leftist after being elected.

Ham, at the time of his reported assassination, was a member of Congress. He wholeheartedly supported President Zelaya's initiative to form a constitutional convention to write a new Constitution, and he was one of the main organizers of today's thwarted opinion poll that would have gauged public opinion on forming a constitutional convention.

Ham has come under fire this year from fellow members of Congress, with help from Honduras' right-wing media. Gregorio Baca, a dissident member of Ham's party who opposed an alliance with Zelaya, accused Ham of receiving "millions of dollars" (http://www.heraldohn.com/Pa%C3%ADs/Ediciones/2009/06/12/Noticias/Cesar-Ham-recibe-pisto-de-la-cuarta-urna) from President Zelaya in exchange for his support of a referendum on a new constitutional convention. Right-wing newspaper El Heraldo (http://www.heraldohn.com/Pa%C3%ADs/Ediciones/2009/01/30/Noticias/Diputado-Cesar-Ham-si-utilizo-dos-dispensas) accused Ham and his deputy Misael Castro of embezzling government money to pay for luxury cars. Neither of the accusations were ever verified by a court of law.

This past March the Democratic Unification party chose him as its presidential candidate (http://www.heraldohn.com/index.php/Pa%C3%ADs/Ediciones/2009/03/28/Noticias/Ratifican-a-Cesar-Ham-como-candidato-de-UD) by a vote of 104-4. The coup plotters had previously announced that the November 2009 elections would go on as planned. If reports that Ham has been assasinated are true, it means that the only leftist candidate in the upcoming elections is now dead.
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/kristin-bricker/2009/06/honduran-military-reportedly-assassinated-leftist-presidential-cand

Peter Lemkin
06-29-2009, 10:07 AM
Honduran Military Reportedly Assassinated Leftist Presidential Candidate


Posted by Kristin Bricker (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/kristin-bricker) - June 28, 2009 at 5:09 pm Congressman Cesar Ham Was a Zelaya Ally and Organizer of the Opinion Poll on a New Constitution

http://www.radioeslodemenos.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/06/cesar_ham1.jpgCesar Ham, presidential candidate and the head of Honduras' only registered leftist political party, the Democratic Unification of Honduras, is dead, reports Notimex. He was killed by a squad of soldiers who arrived at his home this morning to arrest him.

The military has rounded up many of Zelaya's allies within the government. Chancellor Patricia Rodas remains kidnapped.

Honduran police confirmed Ham's death to Notimex (http://www.zocalo.com.mx/seccion/articulo/reportan-muerte-de-lider-popular-al-resistir-al-arresto-en-honduras). The official version of events, as reported by Notimex, is that Ham confronted the military squad that came to his house with a gun, "and therefore he had to be killed."

Despite being from a different party, Ham was a close ally of ousted President Manuel Zelaya. Ham's party, the Democratic Unification of Honduras, is Honduras' only registered leftist party. Zelaya is from the conservative Liberal Party; he became a populist leftist after being elected.

Ham, at the time of his reported assassination, was a member of Congress. He wholeheartedly supported President Zelaya's initiative to form a constitutional convention to write a new Constitution, and he was one of the main organizers of today's thwarted opinion poll that would have gauged public opinion on forming a constitutional convention.

Ham has come under fire this year from fellow members of Congress, with help from Honduras' right-wing media. Gregorio Baca, a dissident member of Ham's party who opposed an alliance with Zelaya, accused Ham of receiving "millions of dollars" (http://www.heraldohn.com/Pa%C3%ADs/Ediciones/2009/06/12/Noticias/Cesar-Ham-recibe-pisto-de-la-cuarta-urna) from President Zelaya in exchange for his support of a referendum on a new constitutional convention. Right-wing newspaper El Heraldo (http://www.heraldohn.com/Pa%C3%ADs/Ediciones/2009/01/30/Noticias/Diputado-Cesar-Ham-si-utilizo-dos-dispensas) accused Ham and his deputy Misael Castro of embezzling government money to pay for luxury cars. Neither of the accusations were ever verified by a court of law.

This past March the Democratic Unification party chose him as its presidential candidate (http://www.heraldohn.com/index.php/Pa%C3%ADs/Ediciones/2009/03/28/Noticias/Ratifican-a-Cesar-Ham-como-candidato-de-UD) by a vote of 104-4. The coup plotters had previously announced that the November 2009 elections would go on as planned. If reports that Ham has been assasinated are true, it means that the only leftist candidate in the upcoming elections is now dead.
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/kristin-bricker/2009/06/honduran-military-reportedly-assassinated-leftist-presidential-cand

That he was on the left is NO accident. Get ready for a US-run rightwing dictatorship!......and then another and another....and all on Obama's 'watch'.....Change you can't count on! Is it 1954 Again?

In 1954 , the CIA overthrew the democratically elected president of Guatemala for the sole purpose of securing land after powerful lobbying efforts by United Fruit Company (now Chiquita Banana)

(via Wikipedia)

The 1954 Guatemalan coup d’etat was a covert operation organized by the United States Central Intelligence Agency to overthrow Jacobo Arbenz Guzm’an, the democratically-elected President of Guatemala. Arbenz’s government put forth a number of new policies that the U.S. intelligence community deemed Communist in nature and, suspecting Soviet influence, fueled a fear of Guatemala becoming what Allen Dulles described as a “Soviet beachhead in the western hemisphere”.

Dulles’ concern reverberated within the CIA and the Eisenhower administration, in the context of the anti-Communist fears of the McCarthyist era. Arbenz instigated sweeping land reform acts that antagonized the U.S.-based multinational company United Fruit Company, which had large stakes in the old order of Guatemala and lobbied various levels of U.S. to take action against Arbenz.

The operation, which lasted from late 1953 to 1954, planned to arm and train an ad-hoc “Liberation Army” of about 400 fighters under the command of a then-exiled Guatemalan army officer, Colonel Carlos Castillo Armas, and to use them in conjunction with a complex and largely experimental diplomatic, economic, and propaganda campaign.

The operation was preceded by a plan, never fully implemented, as early as 1951, to supply anti-Arbenz forces with weapons, supplies, and funding, Operation PBFORTUNE. Afterwards there was an operation, Operation PBHISTORY, whose objective was to gather and analyze documents from the Arbenz government that would incriminate Arbenz as a Communist puppet.

Naming

The operation name, PBSUCCESS, is a cryptonym, otherwise known as a codename. Each CIA cryptonym contains a two character prefix called a digraph, which designates a geographical or functional area. In this case, PB stands for “Presidential Board” and with the words that followed, SUCCESS and FORTUNE, simply being indicative of the general optimism and confidence amongst its planners at the CIA at the time. This varied from the normal CIA practice of choosing arbitrary or deliberately misleading words to complete a cryptonym.

Background

Under the regime of General Jorge Ubico, and Ubico’s predecessor Manuel Jos’e Estrada Cabrera, Guatemala was widely opened up to foreign investment, with special favors being made from Ubico to the United Fruit Company (UFC) in particular. The UFC responded by pouring investment capital into the country, buying controlling shares of the railroad, electric utility, and telegraph, while also winning control over the majority of the country’s best land and de facto control over its only Atlantic port facilities. As a result, the Guatemalan government was often subservient to the UFC’s interests.

In the “October Revolution” of 1944 General Jorge Ubico was overthrown. Juan Jos’e Ar’evalo Bermejo was elected. A new constitution allowed for the possibility of expropriating land. This, as well as Ar’evalo philosophy of “spiritual socialism”, alarmed Guatemala’s landed elite who began to accuse Ar’evalo of supporting Communism. In 1947 he signed a labor protection law that implicitly targeted the UFC. The American Embassy in Guatemala sent alarming messages that Ar’evalo was allowing Communists to organize and had reputedly provided known Communists with support. Ar’evalo supported the Caribbean Legion, a group of ostensibly reformist Latin Americans who plotted to overthrow dictatorships in the Dominican Republic, Venezuela, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica. A 1949 CIA analysis described it as a “destabilizing force.”

Jacobo Arbenz Guzman, who as an army Captain had played an important role in the “October Revolution” of 1944, won 65% of the vote in the 1950 election.

In the U.S. McCarthyism caused intense anti-Communist suspicions.

Land redistribution

Arbenz advocated social and political reforms, unionization, and land reform. For the latter, Arbenz secretly met with members of the Communist Guatemalan Labor Party (known by its Spanish acronym ‘PGT’) in order to establish an effective land reform program. Such a program was proposed by Arbenz as a means of remedying the extremely unequal land distribution within the country: in 1945, it was estimated that 2.2% of the country’s population controlled 70% of all arable land, but with only 12% of it being utilized.

While impoverished peasants welcomed Arbenz’s Agrarian Reform Act of 1952, known as Decree 900, the landowning upper-classes and factions of the military accused him of bowing to Communist influence. Tension resulted in civil unrest in the country and fueled the indignation of the UFC. In March 1953 uncultivated lands owned by UFC were to be expropriated with a proposed compensation plan, whereby the Guatemalan government would pay the United Fruit roughly US$600,000 based on the company’s declared taxes, in essence offering the company what it publicly said the land was worth as compensation. In the following October 1953 and in February 1954, the Guatemalan government took another 150,000 acres (600 km^2) of uncultivated land from the United Fruit Company, bringing the total amount of appropriations to almost 400,000 acres (1,600 km^2). In April 1954 the U.S. State Department delivered a note to the Arbenz government demanding that Guatemala pay $15,854,849[citation needed] for the UFC properties expropriated on the Pacific Coast alone. Guatemala denied this overture, charging violation of its sovereignty.

After the expropriations began in 1953 the UFC began lobbying the U.S. government in an attempt to draw them into their confrontation with Arbenz. The U.S. State Department responded by, amongst other things, successfully seeking approved cuts in economic aid and cuts in trade, with devastating effect to Guatemala, since “85% of Guatemala’s exports are sold in the country and 85% of their imports come from the U.S.” Internal U.S. State Department documents stated that the cutoff would have to be done “quietly” because this was “a violation of the Non-intervention agreement, to which we are party… If it became obvious that we were in violation of this agreement, other Latin American governments would rally to the support of Guatemala.”

A U.S. State Department report released in 2003 states that social unrest within Guatemala and Arbenz’s alleged Communist ties were the reason the CIA first drew up a contingency plan to oust Arbenz, entitled Operation PBFORTUNE (later changed to Operation PBSUCCESS.) The plan was drafted in 1951, before the United Fruit Company’s landholdings had been expropriated. “In the Agency’s view, Arbenz’s toleration for known Communists made him at best a ‘fellow traveler,’ and at worst a Communist himself. The social unrest that accompanied the passage and implementation of the Agrarian Reform Law supplied critics in Guatemala and Washington with confirmation that a Communist beachhead had been established in the Americas. Agrarian reform was not the issue–communism was.”

Richard Bissell, a former Special Assistant to the Director of Central Intelligence, has stated that there “is absolutely no reason to believe” the desire to help United Fruit played “any significant role” in reaching the decision.

CIA agent Howard Hunt, who was involved with the coup, has suggested to the contrary that United Fruit’s lobbying campaign was a contributive factor in making policy; although Hunt suggests that the action was justified by security concerns, he believes that United Fruit’s political clout was nonetheless a key factor.

Operation PBFORTUNE

As early as 1951, before the agrarian reform law had been written or passed, CIA apprehension about a Communist takeover caused the agency to seriously explore options for Arbenz’s overthrow. Arbenz’s toleration for known Communists made him at best a “fellow traveler,” and at worst a Communist himself.

The most viable option being considered was the covert backing of rebel groups and dissidents already active in Guatemala and the then CIA Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) Walter B. Smith sent an agent to Guatemala City to investigate potential candidate individuals or organizations. At the time the state of the opposition to Arbenz was inert, divided, and increasingly fractious. The agent returned empty handed. Fortunately for the CIA, this roughly coincided with the first state visit of the President of Nicaragua, Anastasio Somoza. He informed them of Castillo Armas’s small rebel group and stated that, with the CIA’s support, he and Armas could unseat Arbenz. They also could expect financial backing from Dominican dictator Rafael Trujillo and, as Armas later claimed, from internal elements within the Guatemalan army. DCI Smith urged his subordinates to follow up on this and to establish contacts with Armas, which they did in June of the same year. At the CIA’s request, Armas then relayed to them a plan for invasion, which was to launch from El Salvador, Mexico, and Honduras (from UFC land) and would be coordinated with simultaneous uprisings within Guatemala. Armas requested arms, money, aircraft, and boats and informed them that he would launch the invasion as planned regardless of the CIA’s support if need be. In July the CIA secured arms, transport, and $225,000 (US) for Armas, and furnished a few WWII-era airplanes. In September the CIA secured State Department approval and Operation PBFORTUNE was set.

One of two major setbacks occurred shortly afterwards when, while preparing for the arms shipment, the operation had to be called off. Somoza had been speaking of the invasion plan with other Central American leaders and the operation’s cover, which was very important due to the fragile diplomatic situation the United States had with the region, was blown. While Operation PBFORTUNE was officially terminated, the operation led a twilight existence with the arm shipment prepared prior still kept in waiting and with Armas being kept on a $3,000 a week retainer, which allowed him to hang on to his small troupe of rebels.

The Coup

With the departure of President Harry S. Truman and the arrival of Dwight D. Eisenhower, hopes were again raised within the CIA about the possibility of reviving the invasion. Eisenhower expressed favor toward covert operations as a means of cheaply and covertly combating the Soviet Union. While working toward getting this support, anxiety within the Agency about the possibility of a premature coup attempt being enacted by overeager rebel groups began to rise and was justified in early 1953 when a futile and poorly planned invasion was attempted by a rebel group marginally associated with Armas. The invasion precipitated exactly the reaction feared within the Agency: the Guatemalan government was provided with a justification for severely clamping down on anticommunist elements within their country — jailing many — and was supported by a popular backlash against the anti-communists amongst the people. With almost all of their local assets destroyed, the CIA was forced to rely solely on the much more fragmented exile groups.

After all but abandoning the project in mid-1953, the U.S. National Security Council revived the project in August of that year after a review of the situation in light of the success of the recent CIA-organized coup against Mossadegh in Iran. CIA officers involved included Tracy Barnes, the CIA officer in charge, David Atlee Phillips, Jacob ‘Jack’ Esterline, E. Howard Hunt, David Sanchez Morales.

Upon establishing operation headquarters in Florida in December 1953, the Agency started recruiting pilots, oversaw the training of rebels, set up a radio station to use for propaganda purposes, and stepped up the diplomatic pressure on Guatemala. Although they couldn’t halt the exports of coffee, a major industry in Guatemala at the time, they succeeded in foiling two deals to buy arms and ammunition from Canada and Germany. Faced with dwindling military supply and witnessing the buildup of armaments in neighboring countries, Arbenz started to seriously take into account the possibility of an invasion, which had been rumored for months and finally confirmed when a defector from the Agency’s stable of rebels informed the Arbenz regime of PBSUCCESS and its details, and began looking for potential sellers of crucial supplies. This brought Arbenz to conclude a deal, announced in the newspaper El Imparcial, with Czechoslovakia for arms; apparently Czechoslovakia had kept tons of captured German arms in storage since the end of World War II, a decade before. While the cash-and-carry deal was made with a Soviet Bloc country, not with the Soviet Union, when the arms shipment arrived, the CIA took their opportunity and promoted the transaction as proof of the Soviet hand pulling the strings. The American public was told only that Guatemala was undergoing a “revolution.”

After the revelation of the Czech arms shipment and the domestic support it whipped up, the US drastically stepped up both its covert and overt campaigns. On May 20, 1954 the US Navy began air-sea patrols under the twin pretexts of arms interdiction and protection of Honduras from Guatemalan invasion.[8] On June 7, a “contingency evacuation” force, consisting of five amphibious assault ships plus an “anti-submarine warfare” (ASW) aircraft carrier was dispatched to the area. Embarked was a US Marine Battalion Landing Team; meanwhile the only utility of the ASW carrier in the situation could have been for helicopter assault (then under development by the US Marines).

These forces were used to implement a comprehensive sea blockade of Guatemala by the American Navy. Known as Operation HARDROCK BAKER, it also included the deployment of submarines again, ostensibly to stop and inspect all incoming ships for arms (though submarines are not at all suited for this role). The de facto aggressive configuration of this naval force, and the disingenuous representations of its true purpose, had a decisive psychological impact within Guatemala, extinguishing the remaining hope of international law coming to the assistance of Guatemala and raising the very credible prospect of an American invasion.

Propaganda

Psychological warfare was prominent in the operation. The CIA planned to make heavy use of rumor, pamphleteering, poster campaigns, and, most of all, radio, which had turned the tide at the critical moment in the Iran operation. Although relatively few Guatemalans personally owned a radio, the radio was considered to be an authoritative source, and the CIA hoped that word of mouth would assist in the dissemination of their propaganda to an audience greatly exceeding those with radios. The radio station, La Voz de la Liberacion (The voice of liberation), was set up in Miami but claimed to be operating from “deep in the jungle” and broadcast a mix of popular music, humor, and anti-government propaganda. While the broadcasts were overtly tailored to the general populace, they were specifically and subversively targeted at “men of action”, particularly the officers in the Guatemalan military, whose complicity was essential to the success of the operation. The Guatemalan army, made up of around 5,000 well trained and armed soldiers, was more than a match militarily for Armas’s 400 undisciplined rebels. Depending on a strictly military success was not an option, and winning the officer class over, mostly through intimidation, was pivotal to the success of the operation. Immediately preceding the invasion propaganda efforts were intensified with Armas sending warplanes to fly low over the capital, buzzing the presidential palace, and drop leaflets urging the military to disavow their Communist government.

Internal propaganda activities were taken up mostly by student groups under direct instruction of CIA experts stationed at the Florida headquarters. Employing many advanced ideas and techniques, they met with immediate success. They started a weekly pamphlet and plastered the number “32? — for Article 32 in the constitution that prohibited international political parties — on buses and walls across the whole country, garnering much local media attention. Encouraged by this initial success the group began using an increasingly wide variety of ideas and approaches. One scheme was to put stickers saying “A communist lives here” on the homes of Arbenz’s supporters. Another was to send out fake death notices for Arbenz or other leading members of his cabinet to local newspapers. These activities reached such a height that Arbenz found it necessary to take harsh measures to stymie them, arresting many members of the student groups, limiting freedom of assembly, and intimidating newspapers into ignoring their activities. These severe clampdowns essentially turned Guatemala into the repressive regime that the Agency was trying to portray it, which only succeeded in giving ammunition to Agency claims and hastening Arbenz’s downfall.

Invasion

At 8:00 p.m. on June 18 Castillo Armas’s forces crossed the border. Divided into four groups, his roughly 480 strong party invaded at five key points along the Guatemalan-Honduran and the Guatemalan-Salvadorian border. This was done to give the impression of a massive forces invading along a wide front, and also to disperse the men so as to minimize the chance of the entire force being routed in a single unfavorable engagement. In addition to these regular troops, ten trained saboteurs slipped in ahead and were given the task of blowing up key bridges and cutting telegraph lines. All of the invading forces were instructed to minimize actual encounters with the Guatemalan army, for many reasons but most of all to avoid giving reason for the uniting of the army against the invaders. The entire course of the invasion was specifically designed to sow panic and to give the impression of insurmountable odds in order to bring the populace and the military over to its side, rather than defeat them. During the invasion, radio propaganda also assisted towards this end, transmitting false reports of huge forces joining the local populace in a popular revolution.

Almost immediately, Armas’s forces met with decisive failure. Invading on foot and hampered by heavy equipment, it was in some cases days before the rebels reached their objectives. This weakened the psychological impact of the initial invasion, as local Guatemalans realized they were in no immediate danger. One of the first groups to reach its objective, the group of 122 rebels whose task it was to capture the city of Zacapa, were severely crushed by a small contingent of 30 Guatemalan army soldiers, leaving only 28 rebels who had escaped death or capture. An even larger defeat was handed to the group of 170 rebels who undertook the task of capturing the heavily guarded port city of Puerto Barrios. After the police chief spotted the invading force, he quickly armed local dock workers and assigned them defensive roles. In a matter of hours the vast majority of the rebels were killed or captured, with the remaining men fleeing back into Honduras. Within three days, two of Armas’s four prongs were out of commission. Attempting to recover momentum, Armas ordered an air attack on the capital the following day. This too failed, as a single slow flying plane managed to bomb a small oil tank, creating a minor fire that was doused in 20 minutes.

After these rebel failures, Arbenz ordered his military commander to allow Armas’s forces to advance deep into the country. Arbenz and his chief commander didn’t fear Armas’s ragtag army, but there was a concern that, were the rebels to be too severely crushed, it would provide a pretext for open American military intervention. This fear spread widely amongst the officer class, with no one wanting to engage and defeat Armas’s increasingly decimated force. Rumors spread - fueled greatly by the presence of the American amphibious assault force - that a Honduran landing by US Marines was in progress; preparatory to an invasion of Guatemala. Arbenz feared that the officers would be cowed into striking a deal with Armas. Confirmation of Arbenz’ fear came when an entire army garrison surrendered to Armas a few days later in the town of Chiquimula. Arbenz summoned his cabinet to explain that the army was in revolt, and on June 27 Arbenz announced his resignation.

Aftermath

In the 11 days after Arbenz’s resignation five successive juntas occupied the presidential palace, each more amenable to American demands than the last, with Armas himself finally taking office at the end. He proved to be embarrassingly inept and his corrupt and repressive policies renewed civil conflict unseen in the country since before the revolution of 1944.

The coup was reviled by the international press. Le Monde and The Times both attacked America’s “modern form of economic colonialism.” There was a widespread and long-lasting protest of the coup in Latin America, with Guatemala becoming a symbol of resistance to American designs for the region. United Nations Secretary General Dag Hammarskj”old accused the US’s actions of being at odds with the UN Charter and even West German papers, usually gentle to America, were condemning the coup.

According to Kate Doyle, director of the Mexico Project of National Security Archives and a regular contributor to Americas Program of the Interhemispheric Resource Center, most historians now agree that the military coup in 1954 was the definitive blow to Guatemala’s young democracy. Over the next four decades, the succession of military rulers would wage counter-insurgency warfare, destabilizing Guatemalan society. The violence caused the deaths and disappearances of more than 140,000 Guatemalans, and some human rights activists put the death toll as high as 250,000. At the later stages of this conflict the CIA tried with some success to lessen the human rights violations and in 1993 stopped a coup and helped restore the democratic government.

Following closely on the heels of the successful CIA-orchestrated coup which overthrew the democratically elected government of Iran to allow the Shah to rule autocratically in 1953 (see Operation Ajax), some argue that it employed ideas and methods that were relatively new at the time and, due to the ostensible success of the operation, led to Operation PBSUCCESS becoming the de facto model for the overthrow or destabilization of a defiant government for some time to come, including the abortive coup in Cuba in the early 1960s and Chile in the 70s.

Operation PBHISTORY

After the campaign, the CIA sent a handful of agents to Guatemala in order to gather and analyze government documents that would, amongst other things, find evidence that would support the CIA’s belief that Guatemala was a rising Soviet puppet state, in an operation that was known as Operation PBHISTORY. Despite amassing well over 150,000 pages, they found very little to substantiate the key premise of the invasion. The socialism that gained influence under Arbenz’s presidency in fact had no ties to the Soviet Union. Nevertheless, some private sector leaders and the military began to believe that Arbenz represented a Communist threat and supported his overthrow despite most Guatemalans’ attachment to the original ideals of the 1944 uprising.

Magda Hassan
06-29-2009, 11:32 AM
US Govt. Confirms It Knew Coup Was Coming
by Eva Golinger A New York Times article has just confirmed that the US Government has been "working for several days" with the coup planners in Honduras to halt the illegal overthrow of President Zelaya. While this may indicate nobility on behalf of the Obama Administration, had they merely told the coupsters that the US Government would CUT OFF all economic aid and blockade Honduras in the event of a coup, it's almost a 100% guarantee that the military and right wing parties and business groups involved in the coup would not have gone through with it.
So, while many make excuses for the Obama Administration's "calculated" statements, had they been more firm with the coup leaders, instead of "negotiating", the coup may never have happened. Also, the State Department says they believed "dialogue" was the best way to resolve the situation, but their lack of clarity and firm position has caused multiple human rights violations to occur in Honduras and a lot of tension to take place in the region.
And during the April 2002 coup against Chávez in Venezuela, the State Department also claimed it knew of the coup and tried to "stop" it. Later, in my investigations, it was discovered through documents from State and CIA declassified under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) that CIA, State and other US agencies, funded, supported, advised and armed the coup leaders. . . .
Here (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/29/world/americas/29honduras.html) is the NY Times article posted a few hours ago.
http://mrzine.monthlyreview.org/golinger290609.html

Peter Lemkin
06-29-2009, 12:28 PM
US Govt. Confirms It Knew Coup Was Coming
by Eva Golinger A New York Times article has just confirmed that the US Government has been "working for several days" with the coup planners in Honduras to halt the illegal overthrow of President Zelaya. While this may indicate nobility on behalf of the Obama Administration, had they merely told the coupsters that the US Government would CUT OFF all economic aid and blockade Honduras in the event of a coup, it's almost a 100% guarantee that the military and right wing parties and business groups involved in the coup would not have gone through with it.
So, while many make excuses for the Obama Administration's "calculated" statements, had they been more firm with the coup leaders, instead of "negotiating", the coup may never have happened. Also, the State Department says they believed "dialogue" was the best way to resolve the situation, but their lack of clarity and firm position has caused multiple human rights violations to occur in Honduras and a lot of tension to take place in the region.
And during the April 2002 coup against Chávez in Venezuela, the State Department also claimed it knew of the coup and tried to "stop" it. Later, in my investigations, it was discovered through documents from State and CIA declassified under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) that CIA, State and other US agencies, funded, supported, advised and armed the coup leaders. . . .
Here (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/29/world/americas/29honduras.html) is the NY Times article posted a few hours ago.
http://mrzine.monthlyreview.org/golinger290609.html

LIHOP or MIHOP?
Much of the show today of www.democracynow.org is about Honduras, with intelligent analysis and calls from Honduras.

AMY GOODMAN: In the first military coup in Central America in a quarter of a century, the Honduran military has ousted the democratically elected President Manuel Zelaya. Former Parliamentary speaker Roberto Micheletti, who was sworn in as Zelaya’s replacement Sunday, has imposed a two-day nationwide curfew. But hundreds of Zelaya supporters remain on the streets. Shots were fired at protesters near the presidential palace early Monday morning.

The ousted president was forced from the presidential palace by armed soldiers early Sunday morning and flown to Costa Rica after he tried to carry out a non-binding referendum to extend his term in office. Micheletti says Zelaya was not ousted through a coup but by a legal process. But speaking at a press conference in Costa Rica, Zelaya called it a kidnapping and vowed to return to his country as president. He explained a small group of elites and military officers were behind the coup.

PRESIDENT MANUEL ZELAYA: [translated] I think it is a group of military men, and it’s not the entire army or all the armed forces. There are good soldiers who are good and capable people who are not blinded with ambition or greed. There are some who have not been blinded by the voracity of a small elite, which, through politics and the economy, have provoked this terrible event.


AMY GOODMAN: The military coup in Honduras and the reported arrests of the Cuban, Venezuelan and Nicaraguan ambassadors to Honduras have been roundly condemned by the Organization of American States that held an emergency session Sunday. The Honduran representative compared the coup to what happened in Chile in 1973. The Venezuelan representative accused former Bush administration undersecretary of state Otto Reich of complicity in the coup. Earlier in the day, the Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez warned his armed forces were on alert.

President Obama, meanwhile, issued a declaration Sunday morning saying he was, quote, “deeply concerned” by reports from Honduras. In a statement later in the day, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said the action against the ousted Honduran President should be, quote, “condemned by all.” The US ambassador to Honduras reaffirmed the United States only recognizes Manuel Zelaya as the President of Honduras.

Well, for the latest from Honduras, we go there to Dr. Juan Almendares. He joins us on the line from the capital, Tegucigalpa. We’re also joined here in our firehouse studio by New York University professor of Latin American history, Greg Grandin.

We welcome you both to Democracy Now! Let’s begin with Dr. Almendares. Can you describe what is happening right now in Tegucigalpa?

DR. JUAN ALMENDARES: Well, what we are having here is a military coup d’etat who has been persecuting and repressive action against some member of the legitimate government of President Zelaya and also popular leaders. We have almost a national strike for workers, people, students and intellectuals, and they are organized in a popular resistance-run pacific movement against this violation of the democracy. So we want a democracy now. We want people from all over the world to [inaudible] service, make contacts, because what we are looking right now is a really—hello? Hello? Hello?

AMY GOODMAN: Yes, we can hear you fine. We can hear you fine, Dr. Almendares.

DR. JUAN ALMENDARES: Oh, yes, alright, alright. So what we are looking now is, we are going back to repressive situation. Some of the advisers of the government have been perpetrators, torture perpetrators, of the 1980s. We have a very, very strong, conservative way of looking things. However, we are not only strong for—not only for President Zelaya; we are also strong for the rights of the people, because in this movement is not only persons from one side of political sector. There are many sectors involved in this movement trying to restitute the constitutional rights, the human rights. We are really worried for the human rights.

Some of these people think like Pinochet, and they are comparing Zelaya with Salvador Allende. And we have here in Honduras a different situation. We have a government who were doing not a referendum; they were doing just a survey, a simple survey, to ask people whether they want to have a constitutional reform. But we have an alliance between the very powerful class in this country with the military.

And we want really actions from the Organization of States of America, from the European community, not only declarations. We want actions to contribute to the democratic beginning, because we don’t really have a true democracy in this country. We have just a beginning to have some democratic principles. That’s why the people are struggling. This is a very, very poor country. We are still occupied by the United States of America. We want really important solution. Of course, we want self-determinancy, sovereignty, but also we want to have respect of human rights of the people.

AMY GOODMAN: What kind of information are you getting, Dr. Almendares, from television? I understand TV channel 8 was shut down, radio stations closed, CNN and Telesur not allowed to air news on cable.

DR. JUAN ALMENDARES: That’s true. I mean, in the beginning, they were all—cancel out all the TV channels, the radio information, who are against the video situation in Honduras. And we don’t have really freedom of press. We don’t have access to the people who are opposing to the video situation. So there is no—not really access to information, no freedom of the press. And we are really having almost a terror situation for our popular leaders. We have people concentrating in front of the presidential house and [inaudible]—

AMY GOODMAN: What do you mean, “a terror situation,” Dr. Almendares, for popular leaders?

DR. JUAN ALMENDARES: Well, because they are—they are calling—they are having, all the time, militaries coming against people demonstration. And also, they are persecuting some leaders. They have to be out of the country. And also, they captured the minister of foreign relationship, Patricia Rodas. We don’t know what happened with her. So, we don’t have so much information, and also there is no freedom of communication. We have also a curfew, because after 9:00 you can be shot if you are on the streets. So we have a curfew from 9:00 to 6:00 a.m.

AMY GOODMAN: You can be shot, you said? You can be shot, you said?

DR. JUAN ALMENDARES: Well, I mean—well, yes, because [inaudible] we have a—I don’t know if you understand; maybe I don’t explain very well—a curfew. So, if you go on the street after 9:00, I mean, they are not responsible if they shoot you, because they say this is for, they say, like prevention of any situation. So they are threatening. They’re threatening the human rights of the people. And human rights activists are really—we consider that there is a new situation on respect of human rights in Honduras.

AMY GOODMAN: Dr. Juan Almendares, we have to break, but we’re going to come back. I want to ask you more about who you believe is behind this coup and also talk to Greg Grandin, professor of Latin American history, author of Empire’s Workshop.

This is Democracy Now! Then a national broadcast exclusive with the President of Ecuador. By the way, he’s in Nicaragua today, along with the President of Venezuela and, of course, Nicaragua, meeting with Zelaya, the ousted president of Honduras. Stay with us.

AMY GOODMAN: Coup in Honduras, that’s what we’re talking about right now with Dr. Juan Almendares, who is a Honduran medical doctor, award-winning human rights activist, president of the Honduran Peace Committee, and Greg Grandin, professor of Latin American history at NYU, New York University. His latest book is called Fordlandia: The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford’s Forgotten Jungle City.

Who is behind this, Greg?

GREG GRANDIN: Well, I think it’s fairly clearly, who is behind it is the military, sectors of the military, if not the whole military, and sectors of the old political establishment, who see the changes in South America, and they’re doing their best to make sure they don’t arrive in Central America.

AMY GOODMAN: And the connection to the School of the Americas at Fort Benning, Georgia?

GREG GRANDIN: Well, a number of the leaders of the Honduran military were trained in the School of the Americas, both during the Cold War and after, at the end of the Cold War.

AMY GOODMAN: Like who?

GREG GRANDIN: Well, Romeo Vasquez, the head of the armed forces, who Zelaya removed from office just a few days ago, because he refused to support the referendum, non-binding referendum. He’s obviously behind it, as well as the head of the navy and other high-ranking officials.

The Honduran military is effectively a subsidiary of the United States government. Honduras, as a whole, if any Latin American country is fully owned by the United States, it’s Honduras. Its economy is wholly based on trade, foreign aid and remittances. So if the US is opposed to this coup going forward, it won’t go forward. Zelaya will return, if the United States—if Obama and Hillary Clinton are sincere in their statements about returning Zelaya to power.

AMY GOODMAN: And what do you think about their responses. There was concern when it first happened, the ouster, that the language wasn’t strong enough.

GREG GRANDIN: Yeah, at first the language is very tepid. Obama expressed concern for events, and Clinton also issued a statement that was a little bit better, but not very strong. This is another example of the United States following the lead of South America and Latin America as a whole. Latin America came out very strongly against this coup, all of the leaders. I mean, you hear in the mainstream media Chavez and Fidel Castro condemning it, but what you don’t hear is that Lula in Brazil, Bachelet in Chile, every—almost every Latin American leader and government condemn this coup in an uncertain terms. And the United States is playing catch-up aligning itself.

AMY GOODMAN: Interesting today, President Obama, who met with Bachelet last week, of Chile, in Washington, is meeting today with Alvaro Uribe of Colombia in Washington. Dr. Juan Almendares, do you agree with Professor Grandin’s assessment of who is behind this coup?

DR. JUAN ALMENDARES: Well, I will say that we have really—we have an army who have been really repressive and torturers since the 1980s, and most of this military have been trained by the School of America. I agree with that, and I think that is terrible, because they have been guardians of the multinational business from the United States or from other countries. And this is [inaudible] to be all the school of the army in Honduras who wants to—who have links with very powerful people, very rich, wealthy people who keep the poverty in the country, who keep the lack of freedom of speech. And I think that this is very important.

But that’s what I say, to have a concrete action. They usually—they usually have been, in history, obeying to the US policy. But now they have the [inaudible] statement against this coup d’etat by the ambassador of the United States in Honduras, by President Obama. And we think that it’s important that we—we want a concrete action. We usually obey the orders of US policy. So, behind this actually are the—really the old line of military who are really with the mind of torturers, perpetration of the violation of human rights of the Honduran people.

AMY GOODMAN: Interesting, when looking at past coups and the parallel being made to 1973, the September 11th, ’73, coup against Allende, when President Obama met with Michelle Bachelet, a reporter asked if he wanted to apologize for CIA involvement in the Chilean elections. Obama said last week, “I’m interested in going forward, not looking back. I think that the United States has been an enormous force for good in the world. I think there have been times where we’ve made mistakes. But I think that what is important is looking at what our policies are today and what my administration intends to do in cooperating with the region.” So he refused to outright apologize, Professor Grandin.

GREG GRANDIN: Yeah, and he has an opportunity to look forward. He could do all—he could bring the full power of the United States to the restoration of Zelaya to Honduras. And the reference—I think it’s obviously important to remember all of the series of coups during the Cold War, but there was a more recent coup that I think that this actually bears striking similarity to, and that’s the kidnapping of Aristide, Jean-Bertrand Aristide, in Haiti in 2004. And this in many ways parallels that. And the question is, will Obama actually use the US to restore Zelaya?

AMY GOODMAN: In fact, Dr. Juan Almendares, same language used. President Aristide said he was kidnapped, and then the opposition forces, the coup leaders, said he had signed a resignation letter, the same thing they’re saying about Zelaya, which he is contesting.

DR. JUAN ALMENDARES: Well, I think this is a lie. I hear the voice of the administer of presidency and also the voice of President Zelaya in Costa Rica, who say that he didn’t sign that. I mean, this is a told statement. And that’s the why we don’t believe it. Nobody believes in this country; particularly thousands of people don’t believe that. And also we have been terrified, so what we are doing is [inaudible]—

AMY GOODMAN: Well, we will continue to follow this story. I want to thank you for being with us, Dr. Juan Almendares, speaking to us from the Honduran capital of Tegucigalpa, where a coup has just occurred, the ouster of the democratically elected President Zelaya, who is now in Nicaragua meeting with other Latin American leaders. Thank you for being with us, head of the Honduran Peace Commission, and Greg Grandin, professor of Latin American history at New York University.

Peter Lemkin
06-29-2009, 04:22 PM
President Zelaya of Honduras has just been kidnapped

[Note: As of 11:15am, Caracas time, President Zelaya is speaking live on Telesur from San Jose, Costa Rica. He has verified the soldiers entered his residence in the early morning hours, firing guns and threatening to kill him and his family if he resisted the coup. He was forced to go with the soldiers who took him to the air base and flew him to Costa Rica. He has requested the U.S. Government make a public statement condemning the coup, otherwise, it will indicate their compliance.]

Caracas, Venezuela - The text message that beeped on my cell phone this morning read “Alert, Zelaya has been kidnapped, coup d’etat underway in Honduras, spread the word.” It’s a rude awakening for a Sunday morning, especially for the millions of Hondurans that were preparing to exercise their sacred right to vote today for the first time on a consultative referendum concerning the future convening of a constitutional assembly to reform the constitution. Supposedly at the center of the controversary is today’s scheduled referendum, which is not a binding vote but merely an opinion poll to determine whether or not a majority of Hondurans desire to eventually enter into a process to modify their constitution.

Such an initiative has never taken place in the Central American nation, which has a very limited constitution that allows minimal participation by the people of Honduras in their political processes. The current constitution, written in 1982 during the height of the Reagan Administration’s dirty war in Central America, was designed to ensure those in power, both economic and political, would retain it with little interference from the people. Zelaya, elected in November 2005 on the platform of Honduras’ Liberal Party, had proposed the opinion poll be conducted to determine if a majority of citizens agreed that constitutional reform was necessary. He was backed by a majority of labor unions and social movements in the country. If the poll had occured, depending on the results, a referendum would have been conducted during the upcoming elections in November to vote on convening a constitutional assembly. Nevertheless, today’s scheduled poll was not binding by law.

In fact, several days before the poll was to occur, Honduras’ Supreme Court ruled it illegal, upon request by the Congress, both of which are led by anti-Zelaya majorities and members of the ultra-conservative party, National Party of Honduras (PNH). This move led to massive protests in the streets in favor of President Zelaya. On June 24, the president fired the head of the high military command, General Romeo Vásquez, after he refused to allow the military to distribute the electoral material for Sunday’s elections. General Romeo Vásquez held the material under tight military control, refusing to release it even to the president’s followers, stating that the scheduled referendum had been determined illegal by the Supreme Court and therefore he could not comply with the president’s order. As in the Unted States, the president of Honduras is Commander in Chief and has the final say on the military’s actions, and so he ordered the General’s removal. The Minister of Defense, Angel Edmundo Orellana, also resigned in response to this increasingly tense situation.

But the following day, Honduras’ Supreme Court reinstated General Romeo Vásquez to the high military command, ruling his firing as “unconstitutional’. Thousands poured into the streets of Honduras’ capital, Tegucigalpa, showing support for President Zelaya and evidencing their determination to ensure Sunday’s non-binding referendum would take place. On Friday, the president and a group of hundreds of supporters, marched to the nearby air base to collect the electoral material that had been previously held by the military. That evening, Zelaya gave a national press conference along with a group of politicians from different political parties and social movements, calling for unity and peace in the country.

As of Saturday, the situation in Honduras was reported as calm. But early Sunday morning, a group of approximately 60 armed soldiers entered the presidential residence and took Zelaya hostage. After several hours of confusion, reports surfaced claiming the president had been taken to a nearby air force base and flown to neighboring Costa Rica. No images have been seen of the president so far and it is unknown whether or not his life is still endangered.

President Zelaya’s wife, Xiomara Castro de Zelaya, speaking live on Telesur at approximately 10:00am Caracas time, denounced that in early hours of Sunday morning, the soldiers stormed their residence, firing shots throughout the house, beating and then taking the president. “It was an act of cowardness”, said the first lady, referring to the illegal kidnapping occuring during a time when no one would know or react until it was all over. Casto de Zelaya also called for the “preservation” of her husband’s life, indicating that she herself is unaware of his whereabouts. She claimed their lives are all still in “serious danger” and made a call for the international community to denounce this illegal coup d’etat and to act rapidly to reinstate constitutional order in the country, which includes the rescue and return of the democratically elected Zelaya.

Presidents Evo Morales of Bolivia and Hugo Chávez of Venezuela have both made public statements on Sunday morning condeming the coup d’etat in Honduras and calling on the international community to react to ensure democracy is restored and the constitutional president is reinstated. Last Wednesday, June 24, an extraordinary meeting of the member nations of the Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas (ALBA), of which Honduras is a member, was convened in Venezuela to welcome Ecuador, Antigua & Barbados and St. Vincent to its ranks. During the meeting, which was attended by Honduras’ Foreign Minister, Patricia Rodas, a statement was read supporting President Zelaya and condenming any attempts to undermine his mandate and Honduras’ democratic processes.

Reports coming out of Honduras have informed that the public television channel, Canal 8, has been shut down by the coup forces. Just minutes ago, Telesur announced that the military in Honduras is shutting down all electricity throughout the country. Those television and radio stations still transmitting are not reporting the coup d’etat or the kidnapping of President Zelaya, according to Foreign Minister Patricia Rodas. “Telephones and electricity are being cut off”, confirmed Rodas just minutes ago via Telesur. “The media are showing cartoons and soap operas and are not informing the people of Honduras about what is happening”. The situation is eerily reminiscent of the April 2002 coup d’etat against President Chávez in Venezuela, when the media played a key role by first manipulating information to support the coup and then later blacking out all information when the people began protesting and eventually overcame and defeated the coup forces, rescuing Chávez (who had also been kidnapped by the military) and restoring constitutional order.

Honduras is a nation that has been the victim of dictatorships and massive U.S. intervention during the past century, including several military invasions. The last major U.S. government intervention in Honduras occured during the 1980s, when the Reagain Administration funded death squads and paramilitaries to eliminate any potential “communist threats” in Central America. At the time, John Negroponte, was the U.S. Ambassador in Honduras and was responsible for directly funding and training Honduran death squads that were responsable for thousands of disappeared and assassinated throughout the region.

On Friday, the Organization of American States (OAS), convened a special meeting to discuss the crisis in Honduras, later issuing a statement condeming the threats to democracy and authorizing a convoy of representatives to travel to OAS to investigate further. Nevertheless, on Friday, Assistant Secretary of State of the United States, Phillip J. Crowley, refused to clarify the U.S. government’s position in reference to the potential coup against President Zelaya, and instead issued a more ambiguous statement that implied Washington’s support for the opposition to the Honduran president. While most other Latin American governments had clearly indicated their adamant condemnation of the coup plans underway in Honduras and their solid support for Honduras’ constitutionally elected president, Manual Zelaya, the U.S. spokesman stated the following, “We are concerned about the breakdown in the political dialogue among Honduran politicians over the proposed June 28 poll on constitutional reform. We urge all sides to seek a consensual democratic resolution in the current political impasse that adheres to the Honduran constitution and to Honduran laws consistent with the principles of the Inter-American Democratic Charter.”

As of 10:30am, Sunday morning, no further statements have been issued by the Washington concerning the military coup in Honduras. The Central American nation is highly dependent on the U.S. economy, which ensures one of its top sources of income, the monies sent from Hondurans working in the U.S. under the “temporary protected status” program that was implemented during Washington’s dirty war in the 1980s as a result of massive immigration to U.S. territory to escape the war zone. Another major source of funding in Honduras is USAID, providing over US$ 50 millon annually for “democracy promotion” programs, which generally supports NGOs and political parties favorable to U.S. interests, as has been the case in Venezuela, Bolivia and other nations in the region. The Pentagon also maintains a military base in Honduras in Soto Cano, equipped with approximately 500 troops and numerous air force combat planes and helicopters.

Foreign Minister Rodas has stated that she has repeatedly tried to make contact with the U.S. Ambassador in Honduras, Hugo Llorens, who has not responded to any of her calls thus far. The modus operandi of the coup makes clear that Washington is involved. Neither the Honduran military, which is majority trained by U.S. forces, nor the political and economic elite, would act to oust a democratically elected president without the backing and support of the U.S. government. President Zelaya has increasingly come under attack by the conservative forces in Honduras for his growing relationship with the ALBA countries, and particularly Venezuela and President Chávez. Many believe the coup has been executed as a method of ensuring Honduras does not continue to unify with the more leftist and socialist countries in Latin America.

evagolinger@hotmail.com or evagolinger@gmail.com)

Jan Klimkowski
06-29-2009, 05:05 PM
Mr Inka Kola succinctly articulates the situation:


It's difficult to believe how much crap I've waded through this morning, written in English about Honduras and actually debating whether what's been going on is a coup or not. Let's be clear:

* When a country's president is woken up at 1am by soldiers firing shots into his house, it's a coup.

* When that president is bundled into a waiting aircraft and flown out of the country against his will, it's a coup.

* When the army closes down TV and radio stations, shuts off power supply and orders an immediate 48 hour curfew across the nation, it's a coup.

* When a fake letter of resignation is used in parliament to justify the transfer of power, it's a coup.

* When the first thing said by the abused president to the press is "I've have not resigned and this is a coup", it's a coup.

http://incakolanews.blogspot.com/2009/06/honduras-coup-obvious-missing-from.html

The only somewhat mysterious element is (alleged Prez) Obama's comments:


President Obama:
"I am deeply concerned by reports coming out of Honduras regarding the detention and expulsion of President Mel Zelaya. As the Organization of American States did on Friday, I call on all political and social actors in Honduras to respect democratic norms, the rule of law and the tenets of the Inter-American Democratic Charter. Any existing tensions and disputes must be resolved peacefully through dialogue free from any outside interference."

What do we reckon, boys and girls?

Is Obama simply lying?

Or has he been played by the deep black structures in a test of who's really running things?

Peter Lemkin
06-29-2009, 05:14 PM
mr inka kola succinctly articulates the situation:


it's difficult to believe how much crap i've waded through this morning, written in english about honduras and actually debating whether what's been going on is a coup or not. Let's be clear:

* when a country's president is woken up at 1am by soldiers firing shots into his house, it's a coup.

* when that president is bundled into a waiting aircraft and flown out of the country against his will, it's a coup.

* when the army closes down tv and radio stations, shuts off power supply and orders an immediate 48 hour curfew across the nation, it's a coup.

* when a fake letter of resignation is used in parliament to justify the transfer of power, it's a coup.

* when the first thing said by the abused president to the press is "i've have not resigned and this is a coup", it's a coup.

http://incakolanews.blogspot.com/2009/06/honduras-coup-obvious-missing-from.html

the only somewhat mysterious element is (alleged prez) obama's comments:


president obama:
"i am deeply concerned by reports coming out of honduras regarding the detention and expulsion of president mel zelaya. As the organization of american states did on friday, i call on all political and social actors in honduras to respect democratic norms, the rule of law and the tenets of the inter-american democratic charter. Any existing tensions and disputes must be resolved peacefully through dialogue free from any outside interference."

what do we reckon, boys and girls?

Is obama simply lying?

in part

or has he been played by the deep black structures in a test of who's really running things?

in part

Magda Hassan
06-30-2009, 01:53 AM
Wayne Madsen is saying that there were U.S. troops stationed at air bases in Honduras during coup. Also that it has US fingerprints all over it.

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/facility/soto-cano.htm

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
FROM REUTERS: HONDURAN ARMY SMOTHERS MEDIA AFTER COUP (http://www.chavezcode.com/2009/06/from-reuters-honduran-army-smothers.html)

TEGUCIGALPA, June 29 (Reuters) - Honduras has shut down television and radio stations since an army coup over the weekend, in a media blackout than has drawn condemnation from an international press freedom group.

Shortly after the Honduran military seized President Manuel Zelaya and flew him to Costa Rica on Sunday, soldiers stormed a popular radio station and cut off local broadcasts of international television networks CNN en Espanol and Venezuelan-based Telesur, which is sponsored by leftist governments in South America.

A pro-Zelaya channel also was shut down.

The few television and radio stations still operating on Monday played tropical music or aired soap operas and cooking shows.

They made little reference to the demonstrations or international condemnation of the coup even as hundreds of protesters rallied at the presidential palace in the capital to demand Zelaya's return and an end to the blackout.

"The spurious government is violating our right to information, blocking the signals of channels like CNN," Juan Varaona, a protest leader at a barricade, said as burning tires sent plumes of black smoke into the sky.

CNN en Espanol is the Spanish-language channel of the U.S.-based 24-hour news network CNN.

Others blasted the two main Honduran newspapers and said they were still online because they supported the coup.

"El Heraldo and El Tribuno are two papers that were part of the coup plot, them and some television channels controlled by the opposition," said 27-year-old Erin Matute, a government health worker.

"This morning, they were the only ones with signals, the others were shut down," Matute said at a barricade on a side street in the capital.

El Heraldo's website ran one headline saying "Semblance of normality across Honduras."

Some Hondurans used Internet social networking site Twitter to urge on demonstrators and spread news about the protests.

"Down with the coup! Brothers of Honduras break the information blackout and watch the repression on Telesur on the Internet," one message said.

Some protesters burned and smashed El Heraldo newspaper stands and others used them as barricades to block streets around the presidential palace.

PRESSURE ON OAS, WEST

Paris-based press freedom group Reporters Without Borders criticized the media shutdown.

"The suspension or closure of local and international broadcast media indicates that the coup leaders want to hide what is happening," the group said in a statement.

"The Organization of American States and the international community must insist that this news blackout is lifted."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~

URGENT UPDATE 5:53PM TELESUR JOURNALISTS DETAINED BY COUP FORCES IN HONDURAS (http://www.chavezcode.com/2009/06/urgent-update-553pm-telesur-journalists.html)

Telesur, which has been the ONLY media outlet to provide non-stop coverage on the coup in Honduras since yesterday, has just been the victim of violent repression in Honduras. During the beginning of the meetings taking place this afternoon in Nicaragua with all heads of state from Latin America, Telesur abruptly interrupted coverage to broadcast the words and cries of Adriana Sivori, Telesur correspondent in Tegucigalpa, denouncing she was being detained, along with her cameraman, by military forces in Honduras under orders by the coup dictatorship. There is massive repression underway in Honduras right now. The Telesur team has been detained by armed forces and placed under arrest in clear violation of international law. Their identification documents have been confiscated by the military and they have been kidnapped.

Roberto Micheletti is the name of the dictator in Honduras, who illegally took over yesterday after the military coup kidnapped and forced into exile the democratically elected president Manuel Zelaya. Remember his name for he should be tried for human rights violations.

SECRETARY OF STATE CLINTON TODAY STATED THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT WAS NOT READY TO LEGALLY CALL THE DEVELOPMENTS IN HONDURAS A COUP D'ETAT, BECAUSE DOING SO WOULD REQUIRE WASHINGTON TO CUT OF ECONOMIC AID TO THE CENTRAL AMERICAN NATION AND BREAK RELATIONS, WHICH THEY ARE STILL HESITANT TO DO BECAUSE THOSE THAT ILLEGALLY TOOK POWER YESTERDAY IN HONDURAS ARE GROUPS AND POLITICAL PARTIES THAT RECEIVE US GOVERNMENT FUNDING FROM USAID, NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR DEMOCRACY, INTERNATIONAL REPUBLICAN INSTITUTE AND NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS. ADDITIONALLY THE HONDURAN MILITARY IS HEAVILY FUNDED BY THE STATE DEPARTMENT AND PENTAGON.

CALL ON THE OBAMA ADMINISTRATION TO IMMEDIATELY DEMAND THE RELEASE OF THE TELESUR CORRESPONDENTS IN HONDURAS AND TO SUSPEND ALL ECONOMIC AID TO HONDURAS UNTIL DEMOCRATIC ORDER IS RESTORED, THE REPRESSION CEASES AND THE CONSTITUTIONAL PRESIDENT, MANUEL ZELAYA, IS RETURNED TO POWER:

State Department: 202-647-4000 or 1-800-877-8339
White House: Comments: 202-456-1111, Switchboard: 202-456-1414

Magda Hassan
06-30-2009, 02:12 AM
Reports: Two Military Battalions Turn Against Honduras Coup Regime


Posted by Al Giordano (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/al-giordano) - June 29, 2009 at 4:38 pm By Al Giordano
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/mapa%20honduras.jpeg
Community Radio “Es Lo de Menos” (http://www.radioeslodemenos.org/?p=413) was the first to report that the Fourth Infantry Battalion has rebelled from the military coup regime in Honduras. The radio station adds that “it seems” (“al parecer,” in the original Spanish) that the Tenth Infantry Battalion has also broken from the coup.
Rafael Alegria, leader of Via Campesina, the country’s largest social organization, one that has successfully blockaded the nation’s highways before to force government concessions, tells Alba TV (http://albatv.org/article173.html):

“The popular resistance is rising up throughout the country. All the highways in the country are blockaded…. The Fourth Infantry Battallion… is no longer following the orders of Roberto Micheletti.”
Angel Alvarado of Honduras’ Popular Union Bloc tells Radio Mundial (http://www.radiomundial.com.ve/yvke/noticia.php?27442):

"Two infantry battalions of the Honduran Army have risen up against the illegitimate government of Roberto Micheletti in Honduras. They are the Fourth Infantry Battalion in the city of Tela and the Tenth Infantry Battalion in La Ceiba (the second largest city in Honduras), both located in the state of Atlántida."
(You can see Tela and La Ceiba on the map, above, along the country's northern coast.)
Meanwhile, defenders of the violent coup d’Etat now have to eat the fact that their favored regime has extended its wave of terror to the press corps, censoring all independent media in the country, including CNN and Telesur. Reuters reports (http://www.reuters.com/article/worldNews/idUSTRE55S5W120090629):

TEGUCIGALPA (Reuters) - Honduras has shut down television and radio stations since an army coup over the weekend, in a media blackout than has drawn condemnation from an international press freedom group.
Shortly after the Honduran military seized President Manuel Zelaya and flew him to Costa Rica on Sunday, soldiers stormed a popular radio station and cut off local broadcasts of international television networks CNN en Espanol and Venezuelan-based Telesur, which is sponsored by leftist governments in South America.
A pro-Zelaya channel also was shut down.
The few television and radio stations still operating on Monday played tropical music or aired soap operas and cooking shows.
At the White House this afternoon, US President Obama reiterated his government’s non-recognition of the coup regime. According to the White House pool report by David Jackson of USA Today (obtained by Narco News via email):

Obama criticized the Honduras coup as "not legal," and said it would set a "terrible precedent" for the region. "We do not want to go back to a dark past," he said. "We always want to stand with democracy."
If Rafael Alegría - a serious man who gets serious results - says that the highways of the country are successfully blockaded, I tend to believe him. He likewise is not one to spread rumors about the Fourth Infantry Battalion without having solid information.
It seemed inevitable that once the cat is got of the bag regarding the total international rejection of the coup d'etat that military divisions would revolt and point their tanks in the opposite direction: toward the coup plotters above them. We may be witnessing the beginning of the end of a short-lived coup in Honduras.
Keep refreshing the front page of Narco News (http://narconews.com/) for more updates, sure to shortly come.
Update: TeleSur TV (http://www.telesurtv.net/solotexto/nota/index.php?ckl=53094) is reporting that its correspondents in Honduras, as well as those of Associated Press, have been arrested by the coup regime.
Update II: Here is a fuller text of US President Obama's statement at the aforementioned press conference:

President Zelaya was democratically elected. He had not yet completed his term. We believe that the coup was not legal and that President Zelaya remains the president of Honduras, the democratically elected president there. In that, we have joined all the countries in the region, including Colombia and the Organization of American States.

I think it's -- it would be a terrible precedent if we start moving backwards into the era in which we are seeing military coups as a means of political transition, rather than democratic elections.
The region has made enormous progress over the last 20 years in establishing democratic traditions in Central America and Latin America.
We don't want to go back to a dark past. The United States has not always stood as it should with some of these fledgling democracies. But over the last several years, I think both Republicans and Democrats in the United States have recognized that we always want to stand with democracy, even if the results don't always mean that the leaders of those countries are favorable toward the United States. And that is a tradition that we want to continue.
So we are very clear about the fact that President Zelaya is the democratically elected president. And we will work with the regional organizations, like OAS, and with other international institutions to see if we can resolve this in a peaceful way.

Magda Hassan
06-30-2009, 03:07 AM
http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.telesurtv.net%2Fsolotexto%2Fnot a%2Findex.php%3Fckl%3D53100

TeleSUR 29/06/09
El presidente legítimo de Honduras, Manuel Zelaya, anunció este lunes que regresará el jueves a su país para terminar su mandato luego de realizar el viaje a Estados Unidos atendiendo la invitación del presidente de la Asamblea General de Naciones Unidas, Miguel D'Escoto. The legitimate president of Honduras, Manuel Zelaya, announced Monday it will return to his country on Thursday to end its mandate after the journey to United States at the invitation of the President of the United Nations General Assembly, Miguel D'Escoto.
Viajará acompañado del secretario de la Organización de Estados Americanos (OEA), José Miguel Insulza y una comisión de retorno. Travel together with the secretary of the Organization of American States (OAS) Jose Miguel Insulza and a committee of return.

"Voy a cumplir mi mandato de cuatro años, estén ustedes -los golpistas- de acuerdo o no", precisó Zelaya. "I will fulfill my term of four years, you are the coup-de-agree or not," said Zelaya.

El presidente de Honduras viajará este martes a Estados Unidos por invitación de Miguel D'Escoto. The president of Honduras on Tuesday will travel to United States at the invitation of Miguel D'Escoto.


"Regresaré por voluntad propia con la protección de Cristo y el pueblo. Regresaré a mi pais, y le pediré a la OEA que me acompañe y acepto el ofrecimiento de quienes me quieran acompañar, es por invitación del Jefe de Estado y no por injerencia de asuntos" internos, afirmó. "I'll come back voluntarily to the protection of Christ and the people. I'll be back to my country, and will ask the OAS to accompany me and accept the offer of those who wish to accompany me, is at the invitation of the Head of State and not by interference "internal, he said.

Zelaya manifestó que el golpe de Estado del cual fue objeto el pasado domingo representa un " retroceso a la época en que se gobernaba bajo la fuerza en América Latina y representa un desconocimiento a las luchas por las conquistas de los valores sociales de la región". Zelaya said that the coup d'etat which was last Sunday is a throwback to the time they ruled on the strength in Latin America and represents a disregard to the struggles for the conquest of the social values of the region. "

Agregó que los sectores que los secuestraron y sacaron a la fuerza del poder " pretenden negar el acceso a la grandes mayorías de la población a un futuro mejor". He added that the sectors that abducted and forcibly removed from power "seek to deny access to the vast majority of people to a better future."

Zelaya afirmó que existen sectores que se niegan a aceptar el concepto de participación ciudadana para mantener sus cuotas de poder. Zelaya said that there are sectors who refuse to accept the concept of citizen participation in maintaining their share of power.

"No podemos permitir que la fuerza bruta vuelva a imperar sobre la razón. Tenemos que volver a empezar o simplemente nos volvemos a humillar y sucumbir ante la fuerza", dijo. "We can not allow again the brute force to prevail over reason. We have to start over again or just humiliate us and succumb to the force," he said.

Zelaya informó que el presidente de Brasil, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, lo telefoneó este lunes para transmitirle su apoyo contra el golpe militar que lo sacó del poder en Tegucigalpa. Zelaya said that Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, and telephoned on Monday to convey their support against the military coup that took him out of power in Tegucigalpa.

El mandatario brasileño transmitió al gobernante su convencimiento de que la intensa actividad diplomática puesta en marcha en el continente podrá restituirlo en el cargo. The Brazilian government sent to its belief that the intensive diplomatic activity starting on the continent may be restored in the post.


Esta mañana Lula había defendido ante los medios de comunicación "el aislamiento de Honduras, mientras no tenga un presidente democráticamente electo". Lula has argued this morning before the media "the isolation of Honduras, while not having a democratically elected president."


"No podemos permitir que en pleno siglo XXI tengamos un golpe militar en América Latina. Es inaceptable. No podemos reconocer al nuevo Gobierno. Tenemos que exigir el regreso del Gobierno democráticamente elegido", afirmó. "We can not allow that in the twenty-first century have a military coup in Latin America. It is unacceptable. We can not recognize the new government. We need to demand the return of the democratically elected government," he said.

Durante la reunión se conoció que la presidenta de Chile, Michelle Bachelet, llamó a su embajador en Tegucigalpa, medida que también fue adoptada por los g obiernos de Brasil y de México. During the meeting it was learned that the president of Chile, Michelle Bachelet, called its ambassador in Tegucigalpa, which was also adopted by OVERNMENTS g of Brazil and Mexico.

Magda Hassan
06-30-2009, 04:29 AM
What a 'peaceful' coup looks like.

Peter Lemkin
06-30-2009, 04:31 AM
What is upsetting me is the official 'silence' in the USA. Yes, Obama made a mumble about being 'upset' - or was it 'worried'; as did Ms. Clinton...but they have really said nothing and done less!! Believe me, if the US Govt. told the coup leaders to disappear and/or quit - they would without even any other threats or force - military or economic. Sadly, makes me think this has the support, if not the backing, of the USG and either Obama is being two-faced or is uninformed. Ditto Clinton.

Magda Hassan
06-30-2009, 04:31 AM
More 'peaceful' coup shots (sic)

Magda Hassan
06-30-2009, 04:34 AM
So much peace breaking out here I could just cry!

Magda Hassan
06-30-2009, 04:45 AM
What is upsetting me is the official 'silence' in the USA. Yes, Obama made a mumble about being 'upset' - or was it 'worried'; as did Ms. Clinton...but they have really said nothing and done less!! Believe me, if the US Govt. told the coup leaders to disappear and/or quit - they would without even any other threats or force - military or economic. Sadly, makes me think this has the support, if not the backing, of the USG and either Obama is being two-faced or is uninformed. Ditto Clinton.

Yes. Some are saying that OB is showing that the US has really changed. But he could a) have stopped it in the first place since they knew about it by making it very clear that there would be consequences if they went ahead b) he could be demonstrating what those consequences are now given that they have gone and done it. Firstly they can come right out and say that the coup is illegal unambiguously. They could be cutting off all US government funding. Cutting off diplomatic ties. Not giving access to the 'joint' military facilities for the Honduran Air Force to remove their president and neighboring ambassadors and the foreign minister. It would be against their contracts to use the supplied military equipment against purposes agreed on. Freeze all US Honduran assets and bank accounts. There are plenty of options the US could take.

Peter Lemkin
06-30-2009, 05:25 AM
http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.telesurtv.net%2Fsolotexto%2Fnot a%2Findex.php%3Fckl%3D53100

TeleSUR 29/06/09
El presidente legítimo de Honduras, Manuel Zelaya, anunció este lunes que regresará el jueves a su país para terminar su mandato luego de realizar el viaje a Estados Unidos atendiendo la invitación del presidente de la Asamblea General de Naciones Unidas, Miguel D'Escoto. The legitimate president of Honduras, Manuel Zelaya, announced Monday it will return to his country on Thursday to end its mandate after the journey to United States at the invitation of the President of the United Nations General Assembly, Miguel D'Escoto.
Viajará acompañado del secretario de la Organización de Estados Americanos (OEA), José Miguel Insulza y una comisión de retorno. Travel together with the secretary of the Organization of American States (OAS) Jose Miguel Insulza and a committee of return.

"Voy a cumplir mi mandato de cuatro años, estén ustedes -los golpistas- de acuerdo o no", precisó Zelaya. "I will fulfill my term of four years, you are the coup-de-agree or not," said Zelaya.

El presidente de Honduras viajará este martes a Estados Unidos por invitación de Miguel D'Escoto. The president of Honduras on Tuesday will travel to United States at the invitation of Miguel D'Escoto.


"Regresaré por voluntad propia con la protección de Cristo y el pueblo. Regresaré a mi pais, y le pediré a la OEA que me acompañe y acepto el ofrecimiento de quienes me quieran acompañar, es por invitación del Jefe de Estado y no por injerencia de asuntos" internos, afirmó. "I'll come back voluntarily to the protection of Christ and the people. I'll be back to my country, and will ask the OAS to accompany me and accept the offer of those who wish to accompany me, is at the invitation of the Head of State and not by interference "internal, he said.

Zelaya manifestó que el golpe de Estado del cual fue objeto el pasado domingo representa un " retroceso a la época en que se gobernaba bajo la fuerza en América Latina y representa un desconocimiento a las luchas por las conquistas de los valores sociales de la región". Zelaya said that the coup d'etat which was last Sunday is a throwback to the time they ruled on the strength in Latin America and represents a disregard to the struggles for the conquest of the social values of the region. "

Agregó que los sectores que los secuestraron y sacaron a la fuerza del poder " pretenden negar el acceso a la grandes mayorías de la población a un futuro mejor". He added that the sectors that abducted and forcibly removed from power "seek to deny access to the vast majority of people to a better future."

Zelaya afirmó que existen sectores que se niegan a aceptar el concepto de participación ciudadana para mantener sus cuotas de poder. Zelaya said that there are sectors who refuse to accept the concept of citizen participation in maintaining their share of power.

"No podemos permitir que la fuerza bruta vuelva a imperar sobre la razón. Tenemos que volver a empezar o simplemente nos volvemos a humillar y sucumbir ante la fuerza", dijo. "We can not allow again the brute force to prevail over reason. We have to start over again or just humiliate us and succumb to the force," he said.

Zelaya informó que el presidente de Brasil, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, lo telefoneó este lunes para transmitirle su apoyo contra el golpe militar que lo sacó del poder en Tegucigalpa. Zelaya said that Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, and telephoned on Monday to convey their support against the military coup that took him out of power in Tegucigalpa.

El mandatario brasileño transmitió al gobernante su convencimiento de que la intensa actividad diplomática puesta en marcha en el continente podrá restituirlo en el cargo. The Brazilian government sent to its belief that the intensive diplomatic activity starting on the continent may be restored in the post.


Esta mañana Lula había defendido ante los medios de comunicación "el aislamiento de Honduras, mientras no tenga un presidente democráticamente electo". Lula has argued this morning before the media "the isolation of Honduras, while not having a democratically elected president."


"No podemos permitir que en pleno siglo XXI tengamos un golpe militar en América Latina. Es inaceptable. No podemos reconocer al nuevo Gobierno. Tenemos que exigir el regreso del Gobierno democráticamente elegido", afirmó. "We can not allow that in the twenty-first century have a military coup in Latin America. It is unacceptable. We can not recognize the new government. We need to demand the return of the democratically elected government," he said.

Durante la reunión se conoció que la presidenta de Chile, Michelle Bachelet, llamó a su embajador en Tegucigalpa, medida que también fue adoptada por los g obiernos de Brasil y de México. During the meeting it was learned that the president of Chile, Michelle Bachelet, called its ambassador in Tegucigalpa, which was also adopted by OVERNMENTS g of Brazil and Mexico.

This is a very brave move, but without US support, it is a deathtrap for him and perhaps for some accompanying him.

Magda Hassan
06-30-2009, 05:47 AM
Well some other nations have the cojones even if Hilary and Obama don't.


Latin American Nations Begin Economic and Political Blockade Against Coup Government


Posted by Kristin Bricker (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/kristin-bricker) - June 29, 2009 at 10:48 pm Border Closings, Suspension of Aid, and Cutting of Diplomatic Relations Present a Non-Violent Response to a Violent Coup

Mexico and the countries of Central America have announced various political and economic sanctions against the coup government in Honduras as part of a non-violent and non-military strategy to return democratically elected President Manuel "Mel" Zelaya to power.

Member countries of the Central American Regional Integration adopted a resolution earlier today that requires taking "necessary measures in a staggered manner, including measures related to interregional commerce, against Honduras' de facto government until President Jose Manuel Zelaya is reinstated as president and institutional normalcy is reestablished." In the first direct action against the coup government, Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Guatemala will close their borders (http://www.prensalibre.com/pl/2009/junio/29/324988.html) with Honduras for 48 hours. The border closing means that all cross-border commerce will be shut down for 48 hours.

SICA countries also agreed to suspend all political, economic, financial, cultural, sports, tourist, and cooperation meetings with the de facto government. They will also instruct the board of directors of the Central American Bank for Economic Integration (a regional development bank) to suspend all loans and grants to Honduras. SICA will also pressure the United Nations to take action.

Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras (represented by Zelaya), Panama, the Dominican Republic, Belize, and Nicaragua signed the SICA declaration, which is reprinted here (http://www.minci.gob.ve/noticias_-_prensa/28/190105/sica_solicitara_la.html):

1. Immediately call all ambassadors to Honduras from SICA countries for consultations.

2. Instruct the directors from SICA countries in the Central American Bank for Economic Integration to immediately suspend all loans and grants to Honduras.

3. Suspend all political, economic, financial, cultural, sports, tourist, and cooperation meetings with the de facto government.

4. Veto the participation of all Honduran representatives that are not accredited by President Manuel Zelaya in SICA meetings.

5. Fully support the Organization of American States (OAS) resolution regarding the current situation in Honduras dated June 28, 2009, to reactive the reestablishment of constitutional order and request an urgent meeting of the United Nations Security Council so that it issues a resolution condemning [the coup] and adopts necessary coercive measures.

6. Request that the UN Secretary General open a session called "Honduras' Political Situation" that leads to a General Assembly resolution condemning [the coup].

7. If the constitutional order is not reestablished, SICA member countries will take the necessary measures in a staggered manner, including measures related to interregional commerce, against Honduras' de facto government until President Jose Manuel Zelaya is reinstated as president and institutional normalcy is reestablished.

8. Declare that no government that arises from this constitutional breakdown is recognized.

9. Maintain permanent contact, in particular through the Rio Group, in order to evaluate the situation as it evolves and the measures that will be necessary to adopt in the future in order to achieve the full reestablishment of democratic normalcy. The consultations with SICA's respective ambassadors to Honduras does not necessarily mean that SICA countries will withdraw their ambassadors and cut off all diplomatic relations. El Salvador, for example, will not withdraw its ambassador (http://www.diariocolatino.com/es/20090629/nacionales/68524/). However, other countries have decided to withdraw their ambassadors and cut off diplomatic relations with the coup government. Mexico has withdrawn its ambassador (http://www.eluniversal.com.mx/notas/608279.html) in solidarity with ousted President Zelaya, as have all nations that are members of the Bolivarian Aliance of the Americas (ALBA).

Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez has announced that he will call a meeting of Petrocaribe on Tuesday to halt oil exports to Honduras (http://deportes.eluniversal.com/2009/06/29/chon_ava_chavez-convocara-reu_29A2436403.shtml). An agreement that President Zelaya signed with Venezuela has allowed Honduras--Central America's second poorest nation--to purchase Venezuelan crude at significantly reduced prices. The agreement was proposed in 2006, and likely saved the Honduran economy when petroleum prices drastically rose in recent years. Honduras imports 100% of its petroleum. Whereas Guatemala, El Salvador, and Nicaragua's border closing will only last 48 hours, Chavez says that oil exports to Honduras won't resume until Zelaya returns to power.

Economic Impact

The 48-hour border closing will not deal a death blow to Honduras' economy. Over 70% of Honduras' exports go to the United States (http://www.nationsencyclopedia.com/economies/Americas/Honduras-INTERNATIONAL-TRADE.html), and many of them pass through Honduras' ports. 90% of all Honduras trade passes through ports (http://www.puertocortez.com/Custom-Aduana.html) in Puerto Cortes and San Pedro Sula and the airport in Tegucigalpa, all of which will be unaffected by the border closings.

However, by merely by opening up the question of economic boycott, the SICA countries opened the floodgates to a nonviolent strategy that would shake an already faltering economy and thus the business class that had originally supported the coup.

Indeed, the business class is already in an uproar over the first of Central America's escalating sanctions against the coup government. The Private Enterprise Federation of Central America, the Dominican Republic, and Panama (Fedepricap) issued a statement against the border closing (http://www.adn.es/politica/20090630/NWS-0015-Empresarios-Honduras-centroamericanos-fronteras-oponen.html). "It will limit interregional commerce," they complained. "Closing the borders is a blow to trade..."

While Honduras' ports are likely to keep Honduran trade rolling during the temporary border closing, SICA's measures will also impact Puerto Cortes for an indefinite period of time. Puerto Cortes is Central America's largest Caribbean port. The Central American Bank for Economic Integration (CABEI) is currently providing $120 million in financing to upgrade the port. SICA's decision to suspend all CABEI funds to Honduras will bring that project to a sudden halt. Overall, in 2007 (the latest year data is available), the CABEI approved nearly $400 million in funding for Honduras (http://www.bcie.org/spanish/publicaciones/memorias_07.php).
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/kristin-bricker/2009/06/latin-american-nations-begin-economic-and-political-blockade-agains

Magda Hassan
06-30-2009, 06:19 AM
There are conflicting reports on the death of Cesar Ham. The Honduran military have conformed his death but there are others who are saying that he is still alive. I will wait and see if there is more information.

Magda Hassan
07-01-2009, 04:44 AM
Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner President of Argentina has been the first to offer herself to go to Honduras with President Zelaya on Thursday when he returns. In a press conference following his speech to the United Nations General Assembly, Zelaya stated that Ecuadoran President Rafael Correa will also accompany him.

Magda Hassan
07-01-2009, 08:23 AM
Now, this wouldn't have anything to do with it would it? Nah....

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~


Norway Company Explores for Oil in Honduras Caribbean
Petroleum Geo-Services to use seismic imaging.

http://www.laht.com/honduras/zelayahat.jpgTEGUCIGALPA -- Norway's Petroleum Geo-Services plans to explore for oil off the Caribbean coast of Honduras, according to an agreement signed in Tegucigalpa.

PGS will "lay some 10,000 kilometers (6,213 miles) of seismic lines in the territorial waters of Honduras," the office of President Mel Zelaya said in a statement.

The president and Natural Resources Minister Tomas Vaquero signed the deal with PGS vice president Michael Edwards and the company's head of new projects for Latin America, George Buzan.

The agreement is subject to approval by the Honduran Congress.

Oslo-based PGS, which specializes in geophysical research and analysis, has operations in 30 countries, with regional offices in London, Houston and Singapore.

Buzan said the geophysical studies to be conducted by PGS "will allow the evaluation of the petroleum and hydrocarbons potential of the country," according to the statement issued by Zelaya's office.

PGS will analyze information from 31 oil wells drilled by different companies before 1993 and conduct new seismic studies using a ship that will explore the Central American country's waters.

The studies conducted by PGS will be used to determine future oil concessions granted by Honduras.

Honduras "has a very great potential for energy and mineral resources" that has not been exploited, Zelaya said.

The president said the information obtained by PGS would assist "Honduras in making the decision on whether or not to exploit" the oil in Caribbean waters.

Companies from the United States, Russia, Japan, Canada and other countries have explored for oil in the Honduran Caribbean for years, but no one has yet discovered commercially viable amounts of petroleum.
http://www.laht.com/article.asp?CategoryId=23558&ArticleId=323973
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~


And the oil companies wouldn't be pissed off would they? Nah....
What is Shell's Corrib security firm up to now? Any Irish or Hungarian mercenaries here yet?
Honduras temporarily grabs Exxon, Chevron terminals

Reuters
Sunday, January 14, 2007; 1:59 PM

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras (Reuters) - Honduras will take temporary control of foreign-owned oil storage terminals as part of a government import program meant to drive down fuel prices, President Manuel Zelaya said late on Saturday.
Zelaya ordered the move after failing to reach a deal with big oil companies Exxon Mobil (http://financial.washingtonpost.com/custom/wpost/html-qcn.asp?dispnav=business&mwpage=qcn&symb=XOM&nav=el) (XOM.N) and Chevron (CVX.N), as well as local company DIPPSA, to rent the terminals.

"It is not a nationalization, it's a temporary use of the storage tanks through a lease and payment of a reasonable price," he said.
Honduras produces no crude of its own and no longer has a refinery. Its fuel market, like that of most Central American countries, is dominated by Shell (RDSa.L), Exxon Mobil and Chevron.
The government program takes control of imports away from the small group of oil companies that operate service stations in the Central American nation. Those companies have opposed the new system, saying it is anti-competitive.
A congressional commission set up to study the new system has said it could save Honduras -- one of the poorest countries in the Western Hemisphere -- about $66 million a year.
Zelaya, a logging magnate, said the decree will allow the government to go ahead with a deal reached in November with Conoco Phillips (COP.N) to import at least 8.4 million barrels of gasoline and diesel a year.
Exxon Mobil and Chevron could not immediately be reached for comment.
A spokesman for an oil companies group in Honduras, Mario del Cid, warned on Sunday the imposition would hurt the country's reputation among investors.
"Investment is based on clear rules, and decisions of this kind are not a good message," he told Reuters.
Oil companies in Honduras imported some $900 million worth of fuel in 2005.
Foreign oil companies' operations in Honduras are much smaller than in Venezuela, where President Hugo Chavez said on Saturday the country's entire energy sector had to be nationalized, reinforcing his socialist revolution.
He said Venezuela was "almost ready" to take over the foreign-run oil projects of the Orinoco Belt run by heavyweights such as Chevron, Conoco Phillips and Exxon Mobil, that produce about 600,000 barrels per day.
(Additional reporting by Nick Zieminski in New York)
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/01/14/AR2007011400325.html



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~

But it may have more to do with this...

As referred to earlier in this forum.
I don't believe he, el Presidente, is into drug trafficking but I do think his plan to legalise drugs and educate users has made big enemies of those who thrive from that black market in misery. Hence the need to smear him with this...


Deposed Honduran prez accused of drug ties
By FRANK BAJAK – 3 hours ago
BOGOTA (AP) — The regime that ousted Manuel Zelaya in Honduras claimed Tuesday that the deposed president allowed tons of cocaine to be flown into the Central American country on its way to the United States.
"Every night, three or four Venezuelan-registered planes land without the permission of appropriate authorities and bring thousands of pounds ... and packages of money that are the fruit of drug trafficking," its foreign minister, Enrique Ortez, told CNN en Espanol.
"We have proof of all of this. Neighboring governments have it. The DEA has it," he added.
U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration spokesman Rusty Payne in Washington said he could neither confirm nor deny a DEA investigation.
Zelaya was traveling from New York to Washington and could not immediately be reached to respond to the allegations.
In an interview Tuesday evening with The Associated Press in Tegucigalpa, interim Honduran President Roberto Micheletti was asked about Ortez's allegations and said only that it would be up to prosecutors to present any evidence.
Honduras and other Central American nations have become major transshipment points in recent years for Colombian cocaine, particularly as Mexico's government cracks down on cartels.
The drugs arrive in Honduras on noncommercial aircraft and, increasingly, in speedboats, from Venezuela and to a lesser extent Colombia, according to the Key West, Florida-based Joint Interagency Task Force-South, which coordinates drug interdiction in region. The boats tend to make short hops up Central America's coast.
In its most recent report on the illicit narcotics trade, the U.S. State Department said in February of Honduras that "official corruption continues to be an impediment to effective law enforcement and there are press reports of drug trafficking and associated criminal activity among current and former government and military officials."
The report did not name names.
Drug-related violence appears to be up in Honduras.
Homicides surged 25 percent from some 4,400 in 2007 to more than 7,000 in 2008 while more than 1,600 people were killed execution-style, suggesting drug gang involvement, according to the Central American Violence Observatory.
In October, Zelaya proposed legalizing drug use as a way of reducing the violence. He also had pledged to double the country's police force, which reached 13,500 last year, up from 7,000 in 2005, according to the State Department report.

Peter Lemkin
07-01-2009, 09:53 AM
Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner President of Argentina has been the first to offer herself to go to Honduras with President Zelaya on Thursday when he returns. In a press conference following his speech to the United Nations General Assembly, Zelaya stated that Ecuadoran President Rafael Correa will also accompany him.

My guess [and only that] is they won't allow anyone off the plane...it will sit there for many days and then leave....they can't afford to let him off the plane with such high-profile persons and UN backing. Let's hope there is no airline 'accident'....

Magda Hassan
07-01-2009, 02:03 PM
This incredibly dangerous child and her father were so threatening to the new Honduran dictatorship they had to be arrested at 3.00 am and imprisoned by the Honduran military for more than 24 hours before they were released. Their crime? He is a cartoonist. Whilst he was in custody the military ransacked his home and burned all his drawings and his art materials like that will stop his putting into form his observations of the idiocy and mendacity of oppression.

Magda Hassan
07-01-2009, 03:24 PM
Why President Zelaya's Actions in Honduras Were Legal and Constitutional (http://rebelreports.com/post/133319827/why-president-zelayas-actions-in-honduras-were-legal)

http://media-2.web.britannica.com/eb-media/25/91325-004-C65AECC4.jpg
Zelaya attempted to give Hondurans the gift of participatory democracy. It was the coup leaders who violated the constitution. Those who say otherwise are wrong.

By Alberto Valiente Thoresen, RebelReports Guest Contributor
EDITOR’S NOTE: RebelReports is publishing this original article as a response to those who claim that the coup in Honduras was legal and/or constitutional and to the reporting by those media outlets that consistently repeat false characterizations of Honduran law and President Zelaya’s actions.—JS
In the classic Greek tragedy, Prometheus Bound, the playwright observes: “Of wrath’s disease wise words the healers are.” Shortly put, this story is about Prometheus, a titan who was punished by the almighty gods for having given humanity the capacity to create fire. This generated a conflict, which ended with Prometheus’ banishment and exile.

Currently, there is a tragedy being staged in the Central American republic Honduras. Meanwhile, the rest of humanity follows the events, as spectators of an outdated event in Latin America, which could set a very unfortunate undemocratic precedent for the region. In their rage, the almighty gods of Honduran politics have punished an aspiring titan, President Manuel Zelaya, for attempting to give Hondurans the gift of participatory democracy. This generated a constitutional conflict that resulted in president Zelaya’s banishment and exile. In this tragedy, words are once again the healers of enraged minds. If we, the spectators, are not attentive to these words, we risk succumbing intellectually, willfully accepting the facts presented by the angry coup-makers and Honduran gods of politics.

In this respect, media coverage of the recent military coup in Honduras is often misleading; even when it is presenting a critical standpoint towards the events. Concentrating on which words are used to characterize the policies conducted by President Zelaya might seem trivial at first sight. But any familiarity to the notion of ‘manufacturing of consent’, and how slight semantic tricks can be used to manipulate public opinion and support, is enough to realize the magnitude of certain omissions. Such oversights rely on the public’s widespread ignorance about some apparently minor legal intricacies in the Honduran Constitution.

For example, most reports have stated that Manuel Zelaya was ousted from his country’s presidency after he tried to carry out a non-binding referendum to extend his term in office. But this is not completely accurate. Such presentation of “facts” merely contributes to legitimizing the propaganda, which is being employed by the coup-makers in Honduras to justify their actions. This interpretation is widespread in US-American liberal environments, especially after Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said that the coup is unacceptable, but that “all parties have a responsibility to address the underlying problems that led to [Sunday]’s events.” However, President Zelaya cannot be held responsible for this flagrant violation of the Honduran democratic institutions that he has tried to expand. This is what has actually happened:

The Honduran Supreme Court of Justice, Attorney General, National Congress, Armed Forces and Supreme Electoral Tribunal have all falsely accused Manuel Zelaya of attempting a referendum to extend his term in office.

According to Honduran law, this attempt would be illegal. Article 239 of the Honduran Constitution clearly states that persons, who have served as presidents, cannot be presidential candidates again. The same article also states that public officials who breach this article, as well as those that help them, directly or indirectly, will automatically lose their immunity and are subject to persecution by law. Additionally, articles 374 and 5 of the Honduran Constitution of 1982 (with amendments of 2005), clearly state that: “it is not possible to reform the Constitution regarding matters about the form of government, presidential periods, re-election and Honduran territory”, and that “reforms to article 374 of this Constitution are not subject to referendum.”

Nevertheless, this is far from what President Zelaya attempted to do in Honduras the past Sunday and which the Honduran political/military elites disliked so much. President Zelaya intended to perform a non-binding public consultation, about the conformation of an elected National Constituent Assembly. To do this, he invoked article 5 of the Honduran “Civil Participation Act” of 2006. According to this act, all public functionaries can perform non-binding public consultations to inquire what the population thinks about policy measures. This act was approved by the National Congress and it was not contested by the Supreme Court of Justice, when it was published in the Official Paper of 2006. That is, until the president of the republic employed it in a manner that was not amicable to the interests of the members of these institutions.

Furthermore, the Honduran Constitution says nothing against the conformation of an elected National Constituent Assembly, with the mandate to draw up a completely new constitution, which the Honduran public would need to approve. Such a popular participatory process would bypass the current liberal democratic one specified in article 373 of the current constitution, in which the National Congress has to approve with 2/3 of the votes, any reform to the 1982 Constitution, excluding reforms to articles 239 and 374. This means that a perfectly legal National Constituent Assembly would have a greater mandate and fewer limitations than the National Congress, because such a National Constituent Assembly would not be reforming the Constitution, but re-writing it. The National Constituent Assembly’s mandate would come directly from the Honduran people, who would have to approve the new draft for a constitution, unlike constitutional amendments that only need 2/3 of the votes in Congress. This popular constitution would be more democratic and it would contrast with the current 1982 Constitution, which was the product of a context characterized by counter-insurgency policies supported by the US-government, civil façade military governments and undemocratic policies. In opposition to other legal systems in the Central American region that (directly or indirectly) participated in the civil wars of the 1980s, the Honduran one has not been deeply affected by peace agreements and a subsequent reformation of the role played by the Armed Forces.

Recalling these observations, we can once again take a look at the widespread assumption that Zelaya was ousted as president after he tried to carry out a non-binding referendum to extend his term in office.

The poll was certainly non-binding, and therefore also not subject to prohibition. However it was not a referendum, as such public consultations are generally understood. Even if it had been, the objective was not to extend Zelaya’s term in office. In this sense, it is important to point out that Zelaya’s term concludes in January 2010. In line with article 239 of the Honduran Constitution of 1982, Zelaya is not participating in the presidential elections of November 2009, meaning that he could have not been reelected. Moreover, it is completely uncertain what the probable National Constituent Assembly would have suggested concerning matters of presidential periods and re-elections. These suggestions would have to be approved by all Hondurans and this would have happened at a time when Zelaya would have concluded his term. Likewise, even if the Honduran public had decided that earlier presidents could become presidential candidates again, this disposition would form a part of a completely new constitution. Therefore, it cannot be regarded as an amendment to the 1982 Constitution and it would not be in violation of articles 5, 239 and 374. The National Constituent Assembly, with a mandate from the people, would derogate the previous constitution before approving the new one. The people, not president Zelaya, who by that time would be ex-president Zelaya, would decide.

It is evident that the opposition had no legal case against President Zelaya. All they had was speculation about perfectly legal scenarios which they strongly disliked. Otherwise, they could have followed a legal procedure sheltered in article 205 nr. 22 of the 1982 Constitution, which states that public officials that are suspected to violate the law are subject to impeachment by the National Congress. As a result they helplessly unleashed a violent and barbaric preemptive strike, which has threatened civility, democracy and stability in the region.

It is fundamental that media channels do not fall into omissions that can delay the return of democracy to Honduras and can weaken the condemnation issued by strong institutions, like the United States government. It is also important that individuals are informed, so that they can have a critical attitude to media reports. Honduras needs democracy back now, and international society can play an important role in achieving this by not engaging in irresponsible oversimplifications.

Alberto Valiente Thoresen was born in San Salvador, El Salvador. He currently resides in Norway where he serves on the board of the Norwegian Solidarity Committee with Latin America
http://rebelreports.com/post/133319827/why-president-zelayas-actions-in-honduras-were-legal

Peter Lemkin
07-01-2009, 09:07 PM
Tomorrow is going to be an interesting day.....one way or another....

Magda Hassan
07-02-2009, 03:08 AM
President Zelaya is delaying his return to Honduras. This is so the OAS can give the coup plotters an ultimatum.

Eve Golinger's article follows:
The conclusions of the emergency Organization of American State (OAS) meeting held yesterday in Washington regarding the coup d'etat in Honduras resulted in the suspension of President Zelaya's declared return to the country for another 72 hours. Zelaya had announced on Monday that he would return this Thursday, July 2nd, to reclaim his constitutional position as President of Honduras, after a military coup ousted him violently on early Sunday morning and forced him into exile in Costa Rica. The OAS members issued an ultimatum to the coup government in Tegucigalpa, headed by Roberto Micheletti, former head of Congress, who has now evolved into Honduras' first dictator since 1979. The regional body, comprised of all nations in the Americas, except for Cuba, has informed Micheletti's illegal government that it has 72 hours to step down or face suspension from the OAS and regional - as well as international - isolation. Micheletti, who enjoys the strong support of Honduras' armed forces, the majority trained, schooled and funded by the United States, has vowed he will not step down from the office he has long desired and has now illegally usurped after Sunday's coup.

Sub-Secretary of State, Thomas Shannon, attending the OAS meeting in Washington yesterday, confirmed that Manuel Zelaya is the "legal and constitutional" president of Honduras, but still stopped short of clarifying the U.S. government's position regarding the coup d'etat and Zelaya's unconditional return to power. The US has signed on to the OAS statement, but this is not the same as Washington legally and officially declaring on its own terms that a coup d'etat has occurred and that it will only recognize the government of Zelaya as legitimate. OAS resolutions, similar to UN General Assembly resolutions, are not legally binding.

Here is the OAS Resolution, available at www.oas.org (http://www.oas.org/):


RESOLUTION ON THE POLITICAL CRISIS IN HONDURAS

(Adopted at the plenary session, held on July 1, 2009 and
pending to be revised by the Style Committee)


THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY,

GRAVELY CONCERNED about the political crisis in the Republic of Honduras as a result of the coup d’état against the government of President José Manuel Zelaya Rosales, which has produced an unconstitutional alteration of the democratic order;

RECALLING Permanent Council resolutions CP/RES. 952 (1699/09) of June 26, 2009 and CP/RES. 953 (1700/09) of June 28, 2009, regarding the situation in Honduras;

CONVENED urgently by the Permanent Council in accordance with Article 20 of the Inter-American Democratic Charter;

REITERATING the principles and purposes established in the Charter of the Organization of American States and the Inter-American Democratic Charter on the strengthening and preservation of the democratic institutional system in member states, as well as the importance of strict adherence to and respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms, and the principle of nonintervention in the internal affairs of other states; and

TAKING NOTE of the declarations by international organizations, sub-regional groups, and governments of the member states,

RESOLVES:

1. To condemn vehemently the coup d’état staged against the constitutionally established Government of Honduras, and the arbitrary detention and expulsion from the country of the constitutional president José Manuel Zelaya Rosales, which has produced an unconstitutional alteration of the democratic order.

2. To reaffirm that President José Manuel Zelaya Rosales is the constitutional President of Honduras and to demand the immediate, safe, and unconditional return of the President to his constitutional functions.


3. To declare that no government arising from this unconstitutional interruption will be recognized, and to reaffirm that the representatives designated by the constitutional and legitimate government of President José Manuel Zelaya Rosales are the representatives of the Honduran State to the Organization of American States.

4. To instruct the Secretary General to undertake, together with representatives of various countries, diplomatic initiatives aimed at restoring democracy and the rule of law and the reinstatement of President Jose Manuel Zelaya Rosales, pursuant to Article 20 of the Inter-American Democratic Charter and report to the Special General Assembly on the results of the initiatives. Should these prove unsuccessful within 72 hours, the Special General Assembly shall forthwith invoke Article 21 of the Inter-American Democratic Charter to suspend Honduras’ membership.

5. To extend this special session of the General Assembly until July 6, 2009.

Magda Hassan
07-02-2009, 03:11 AM
If there are any people who still doubt that this is a 'real' coup and not some means to protect 'democracy' from the president the true face of the threatened oligarchs is shown for what it is.
Honduras' Coup Congress Cancels Five Basic Liberties

Posted by Al Giordano (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/al-giordano) - July 1, 2009 at 6:55 pm By Al Giordano

Despite the best efforts of what I call "the Oligarch Diaspora" to flood the Internet with near identical messages that the Honduran coup "is not a coup" and that was a "constitutional succession" (cough, cough) dressed in the blue-and-white flag of Honduran democracy, the coup regime bared its fangs today. And like any vampire, it's coming out at nightfall.
The same Congress that, after the military had kidnapped, beaten and dumped President Manuel Zelaya in Costa Rica had declared one of its own, Roberto Micheletti as the coup "president" today passed an emergency l aw stripping Hondurans of the following rights from the country's constitution:
1. The right to protest.
2. Freedom in one's home from unwarranted search, seizure and arrest.
3. Freedom of association.
4. Guarantees of rights of due process while under arrest.
5. Freedom of transit in the country.
Tomorrow morning's papers are already out across the ocean in Europe, and correspondent Pablo Ordaz of the Madrid daily El Pais has reported from Tegucigalpa (http://www.elpais.com/articulo/internacional/Estado/sitio/encubierto/Honduras/elpepuint/20090701elpepuint_7/Tes) about the Coup Congress' decree:

"Minute by minute, step by step, Honduras moves farther from its freedoms..."
Read the defenders of the coup and they are united by one powerful feeling: fear. They're afraid of the growing demonstrations in the streets, like the in the capital city this afternoon captured in the video above, where despite the brutal repressions against the people, each day the opposition crowds grow larger, more emboldened, and better organized. In the defiant but smiling faces of the Hondurans opposing the coup you can see the palpable difference between their passion and the lack of it from the passive bumps on a log that attended yesterday's pro coup rally.
The Congressional decree specified that only at night may those five freedoms be disappeared. And so tonight, a new reign of terror begins.
The coup defenders are afraid, they say, of Honduras becoming another another Cuba, or Venezuela, or Nicaragua, of losing their "freedoms" and their "democracy." But today, in one fell swoop their leaders erased those very freedoms, atop all the other ones they've already burned alive - freedom of the press, freedom to elect their own president, among them - and buried democracy with it.
For democracy is not possible unless a people has freedom to protest, freedom from unwarranted invasion of their homes, freedom of association, rights of due process under law, and freedom of travel in its own country.
That's over now, and will be as long as the coup regime remains in power.
The Oligarch Diaspora will not likely blink, comforting themselves with the Kool-Aid that this attack on civil rights and freedoms is not (well, not yet) aimed at them, but, rather, at "those people," the workers, the poor, the farmers, the indigenous, the rebel students and youth, their social organizations, organizer priests, defense attorneys, human rights observers and authentic journalists, the ones that want their democracy back so much that they risk life and limb now each time they say it.
The Oligarch Diaspora will continue spamming the Internet with their hysterical claims that the rest of the world "just doesn't understand," that the coup was "legal" (attorney Alberto Valiente Thorensen made mincemeat of that claim (http://www.counterpunch.org/thorensen07012009.html) today), that they represent a majority (unsaid is that they are afraid to let that majority vote on a non-binding referendum, revealing that even they know they are not), that "Honduras wants the coup." But if the opposition were so small would the Coup Congress really have needed to enact the State of Siege and its repeal of those five basic freedoms?
The Oligarch Diaspora - and hey, Larry Birns (yes, you to whom I sent that memo (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/thefield/clinton-coup-honduras-should-be-condemned) on Sunday) didn't you and your organization COHA find out the hard way this week how they swarm and leech upon NGOs and media organizations to spread their falsehoods, causing your organization to have to issue another embarrassed "clarification"? (http://www.coha.org/2009/07/clarification-of-coha%E2%80%99s-position-on-president-zelaya-and-what-went-on-in-honduras/) - will continue to deceive the gullible into thinking they're really of democratic and freedom-loving tendencies.
But what they don't tell you is that they don't want those freedoms for all Hondurans, just for the ones with money and property and political power and privilege: themselves. The rest must be subordinated to them and controlled, by force if necessary.
And so today, Honduras said goodbye to the following articles of its Constitution (http://www.honduras.net/honduras_constitution2.html):

Article 69: "A persons liberty is inviolable and can only be restricted or suspended temporarily through process of law."
Article 71: "No person can be arrested nor kept incommunicado for more than 24 hours without being placed before a competent authority to be judged. Judicial detention during an investigation must not exceed six consecutive days from the moment that the same is ordered."
Article 78: "Freedoms of association and meeting are always guaranteed when they are not contrary to public order and good customs.
Article 79: "All persons have the right to meet with others, peacefully and without weapons, in public demonstration or transitory assembly, in relation to their common interests of any type, without necessity of notice or special permission."
Article 81: "All persons have the right to circulate freely, leave, enter, and remain in national territory. No one can be obligated to change home or residence except in special cases and with those requirements that the Law establishes."
The Oligarch Diaspora says that the democratically elected president was removed by force because he supposedly "violated the Constitution" by proposing a nonbinding referendum to ask all Hondurans if they wanted the chance to vote about whether they wanted to rewrite it through a Constitutional Convention.
But the coup leaders the Oligarch Diaspora defends just rewrote that same constitution today without any formal process of consulting the people at all.
They claim they're fighting for their constitution, but they just ripped it apart.
Gone. All gone. Everything they claim to be defending is gone now, destroyed and in tatters at the hands of the very political class that claimed it was protecting them.
And now, with the Congress' invitation to enter the people's door, the vampires begin to come out... tonight.
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/thefield/honduras-coup-congress-cancels-five-basic-liberties

Magda Hassan
07-02-2009, 06:30 AM
CNN BACKS COUP; SUSPENSION OF CIVIL RIGHTS IN HONDURAS; EUROPEAN UNION RECALLS ALL AMBASSADORS FROM HONDURAS (http://www.chavezcode.com/2009/07/day-4-cnn-backs-coup-suspension-of.html)

CNN en Español, viewed throughout Latin America, has been backing the coup against Honduran President Manuel Zelaya since day 1, Sunday, June 28th. They initially referred to the events as a military coup during the early hours, then slowly transformed their headlines to call the coup a "forced succession". By the end of the day, dictator Roberto Micheletti was considered, by CNN, the "constitutional president" of Honduras and Zelaya was the "deposed" president.

Since then, CNN has shown about 90% coverage favorable of the coup government in Honduras, conducting interviews with Micheletti as well as those in his "cabinet". The "analysts" and "experts" providing insight and commentary on the coup in Honduras have all been either conservative U.S. voices of those on the Latin America right, like Alvaro Vargas Llosa. CNN has done little or no reporting on the mass protests on the streets in Honduras against the coup government, nor has it covered or reported on the detention of several Telesur and Associated Press journalists by military forces in Honduras this past Tuesday. CNN is also not providing much coverage of the major media blackout still in place in Honduras or the repressive measures taken by the coup government to impose states of emergency, suspend civil and human rights and mandate a national curfew through the weekend. And CNN is obsessed with making this whole thing to be about Chávez, and not about the internal class struggles in Honduras.

The coup government in Honduras announced this evening that the congress has passed a decree suspending all constitutional rights in the country indefinitely. This means the coup forces can enter homes without warrants, detain anyone with no notice or justification, prohibit all public gatherings, such as marches, rallies, protests or meetings, and maintain censorship of independent media. Due process rights are also suspended as are all other civil and political rights. Hondurans are also denouncing the coup government is forcing men as young as 15 to join the military to "defend" the country against any potential foreign threats or forces that may invade the country to restore Manuel Zelaya to the presidency.

If, as the coup leaders say, all is calm and peaceful in the streets of Honduras and a majority of Hondurans support the coup government led by Micheletti, then why does martial law need to be imposed and individual rights suspended?

In April 2002, when the coup was executed against President Chávez, the dictator who took over briefly, businessman Pedro Carmona, told CNN in a live interview that all was calm and peaceful in the streets of Caracas and throughout Venezuela. Meanwhile, millions of people were pouring into the streets around the capital and the nation to demand their president be returned to power. In Venezuela, the people and loyal armed forces were able to rescue their democracy, constitution and president, and defeat a coup backed by Washington.

Thousands are protesting in the streets throughout Honduras, facing repression and risking detention, or even worse, assassination. The people of Honduras fighting this brutal repressive coup and dictatorship (that is refusing to step down, despite all the international pressure) need your solidarity and support! Especially if you are in the US, find ways to pressure the Obama administration and demand it suspend aid to Honduras until the coup government steps down. Both the World Bank and the Inter-American Development Bank have temporarily suspended loans to Honduras until constitutional order is restored. All member nations of the European Union have withdrawn their ambassadors in Honduras. The US is the only nation that has not followed suit. Washington appears to be buying time trying to figure out how to save face and save its strategic interests in Honduras. Latin America and Europe have stood firm against tyranny. Will the US be an ally to tyranny or an example of democracy?
http://www.chavezcode.com/2009/07/day-4-cnn-backs-coup-suspension-of.html

Magda Hassan
07-02-2009, 06:44 AM
Wow. They sure teach them some tricks at that School of the Americas.
Below is an eyewitness account.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~

Hello and thanks for answering the message. Look, I want to tell you that the situation is still precarious and that the repression from this de facto government led by dinosaurs is getting bigger. Last night (Tuesday night) and a few minutes ago the red dinosaur Michelleti and his cavemen subalterns addressed the nation on all TV and radio stations, giving out totally false information. Of course we know, those of us who are here know the true story. We have no access to communications and the only information presented is that which helps the coupmongers.

I inform you that in communities such as El Progreso, department of Yoro they have ordered forced military recruitment aimed mostly at youths (to use them as a barricade in any confrontation). Also, in the department of Olancho (the biggest in the country and the home territory of Zelaya) they have repressed people who were travelling to the capital in buses, beating them and forcing them off the buses and shooting through the bus tires.

In San Pedro Sula, the place where I live, they have given an order to depose the mayor of the city (who was one of the mayors allied to Zelaya) and have issued an arrest warrant for him. They are trying to replace him with one William Hall (strangely the cousin of Michelleti).

I hope this is useful to you, and anything else I have I'll inform you. All the same, if you need something send a mail or phone me, my number is open 24/7, (504) 9*******

Yours, Dario

Magda Hassan
07-02-2009, 07:32 AM
Forced recruitment in Honduras (http://66.249.89.132/translate_c?hl=en&u=http://hondurasresistencia.blogspot.com/2009/07/reclutamiento-forzoso-en-honduras.html&rurl=translate.google.com&usg=ALkJrhjEAVemRzDBGvIZeZceKVdppcGOxw)


Publicado por Resistencia Posted by Resistance

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El dirigente sindical hondureño, Renán Fajardo, denunció que el gobierno de facto de Roberto Micheletti recluta a jóvenes de las zonas rurales de esta nación " esto con el objetivo de someter y hacer uso de la población". Honduran union leader, Renán Fajardo, charged that the de facto government of Roberto Micheletti recruits rural youth of this nation "that in order to subdue and make use of the population."


Durante un contacto telefónico que sostuvo con teleSUR, Fajardo dijo que "la policía esta usando todos los medios para reprimir a la gente y en un momento va ser uso de la población". During a telephone contact he had with Telesur, Fajardo said that "the police are using every means to suppress the people and time will be use of the population."


El dirigente sindical mencionó que autoridades policiales ingresan "por la fuerza a las casas y reclutan violentamente a la gente". The union leader said that police entered by force at home and violently recruit people. "


Asimismo, indicó que los efectivos no les han permitido avanzar en su marcha a la capital hondurena (Tegucigalpa), "no nos ha dejado avanzar porque a los buses se le pinchan las llantas a punta de balas", afirmó. He indicated that the numbers have not made progress in its march to the capital of Honduras (Tegucigalpa), "has not left us to move because he plays the buses tires to tip bullets," he said.


Esta misma situación fue reportada más temprano, por la directora del Centro de Investigación y Promoción en Derechos Humanos (Ciprodeh) Reina Rivera y el sacerdote Ismael Moreno, que ratificaron que han sido amenazados. The same situation was reported earlier by the director of the Center for Research and Development in Human Rights (CIPRODEH) Reina Rivera and the priest Ismael Moreno, who confirmed that they have been threatened.


Moreno sostuvo que en comunidades rurales, especialmente en las zonas bananeras, el ejército ha emprendido una labor de reclutamiento forzado de jóvenes, incluso menores de edad, para "fortalecer sus bases". Moreno argued that in rural communities, especially in the banana plantations, the Army has undertaken a work of forced recruitment of young people, including minors, "to strengthen its foundations."


Mencionó, además, que tiene informes de que "la vieja guardia" de las fuerzas armadas está apoyando el golpe, mientras "en la nueva generación hay gente más educada que se está inclinando a las demandas de las democracias modernas". Also mentioned that have reports that the "old guard" of the armed forces supporting the coup, while "the new generation are more educated people are inclined to the demands of modern democracies."


Reina Rivera señaló que canales de televisión, emisoras de radio y las casas de diversos activistas sociales están vigiladas por el Ejército. Reina Rivera said that television channels, radio stations and the homes of several activists are guarded by the Army.


En el caso de que Zelaya sea encarcelado si regresa a Honduras, como lo ha advertido el nuevo presidente Roberto Micheletti, se presentaría un escenario "muy complejo", dijo Rivera, quien agregó que la posición de la comunidad internacional será "determinante" para solventar la situación. In the event that Zelaya be imprisoned if returned to Honduras, as it has warned the new president Roberto Micheletti, presented a "very complex," said Rivera, adding that the position of the international community will be "crucial" to solve the situation.


En relación a estas versiones el ministro de defensa del gobierno de facto de Honduras, Adolfo Sevilla, afirmó que en las Fuerzas Armadas de esta nación "están llenos todos los cupos con los soldados, y si hubiera un problema fronterizo, debemos estar tranquilos porque en ese momento todo hondureño se convierte en un miembro de las fuerzas armadas al servicio de la patria". In relation to these versions of the defense minister of the de facto government of Honduras, Adolfo Seville, said that the Armed Forces of this nation "all places are filled with soldiers, and if there is a border problem, we must remain calm because then everything becomes a Honduran member of the armed forces to serve the motherland. "


El golpe de Estado en Honduras ha recibido la condena generalizada de la comunidad internacional y Zelaya anunció que regresará a Tegucigalpa (capital de honduras) este fin de semana, cuando se cumpla el plazo de 72 horas dado por la Organización de Estados Americanos (OEA) al Gobierno de Micheletti para que le restituyan en la jefatura del Estado. The coup in Honduras has received widespread condemnation from the international community and Zelaya announced that it will return to Tegucigalpa (capital of Honduras) this weekend, when the deadline of 72 hours given by the Organization of American States (OAS) Micheletti for the government to return at the head of state.
http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fhondurasresistencia.blogspot.com%2F

Magda Hassan
07-02-2009, 07:49 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wC4LQU_UeTs&feature=player_embedded

Magda Hassan
07-02-2009, 10:40 AM
The Naumann Caucus
2009/06/30

TEGUCIGALPA/BERLIN
(Own report) - Right up to the putsch, Honduran President, Manuel Zelaya's liberalist opponents were being supported by forces close to the German Free Democratic Party (FDP). Zelaya's rival and current presidential candidate, Elvin Santos, is among them, as well as Roberto Micheletti. Micheletti took over the office of president following Zelaya's kidnapping, last weekend. During the course of his presidency, Zelaya, who, just a few years ago, had himself been supported by the FDP affiliated Friedrich Naumann Foundation, turned his back on the German organization's neo-liberal policy. He turned instead toward the ALBA international alliance ("Alternative Bolivariana para las Américas" or Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas) formed around Venezuela, Bolivia and Cuba. This has led to hefty power struggles inside his party. His opponents, who up until two weeks ago were being advised by an FDP affiliated strategist, have close ties to the Naumann Foundation. The putsch resolved the conflict to the advantage of the partners in the Naumann Foundation. Following the putsch, the representative of the foundation in Tegucigalpa wrote that Zelaya shares the responsibility for the military coup; he is "more the culprit than the victim."


Strategy Consultation
In November 2005, the presidential candidate of the Liberal Party (Liberal Party of Honduras - PLH), Manuel Zelaya, won the elections. The German political advisor, Peter Schroeder, had already been supporting the PLH in their election campaign, at the time in favor of Zelaya. From 1971 - 1982 Schroeder had worked for the FDP, his last position having been that of director of the "Communication and Service" section in the FDP's national headquarters. Today he heads his own communications and consultant firm in the vicinity of Bonn, but always works for organizations affiliated with the FDP. At the beginning of his term of office, Zelaya had greatly appreciated Schroeder's support. "Without the strategy counseling of Peter Schroeder (...) I would not have won the elections" appraised the Honduran president in January 2006.[1]

With Foundation Background
At the time, the German liberals held an unusually influential position in the PHL through the FDP-affiliated Friedrich Naumann Foundation. More than half of the 62 PLH parliamentarians had been in contact with the German foundation and graduated from their training or advanced training courses. "We now have a 39 member Naumann Caucus in the Honduran Parliament" triumphantly proclaimed the project coordinator of the Friedrich Naumann Foundation in Honduras, Rosbinda Sabillón.[2] As the foundation declared at the time, four ministers and four vice-ministers in the new Zelaya government had a "foundation background." Eight other persons evolving directly from the foundation's "projects' environment" were, under the new president, promoted to directors of the highest state offices. "Among the 165 elected liberal mayors, about 60 evolved out of the milieu of the projects of the Liberal Youth organizations," reported the Naumann Foundation at the time, seeing their young talent "in the starting blocks for political careers." They would seek "in the coming four years of liberal government" to contribute to the "consolidation of this success," particularly by supporting the application of what they saw as the "urgently necessary liberal reforms in Honduras."

Orientation Conflict
A turning point came in this thriving cooperation between Zalaya and the Friedrich Naumann Foundation, when the president, in the course of his term of office, turned toward the ALBA international alliance and its political objectives. The ALBA nations seek to extract themselves from the hegemony of the USA and EU and have radically changed their course away from neo-liberal economic models. But this is not to be achieved in alliance with the German foundation. The Naumann headquarters in Berlin was outraged when two of its apprentices were fired, for rejecting measures taken by the president. Presidential Minister Yani Rosenthal was dismissed and Central Bank Director, Gabriela Nuñez had to step down, when she stubbornly refused to accept bank transfers from the ALBA member state, Venezuela.[3] The conflict escalated, when the president announced his intention to call for a referendum. This referendum was to have the people of Honduras decide whether next November, simultaneous with the general (presidential, parliamentary and municipal) elections, there should be a "forth ballot box" ("cuarta urna"). This "fourth ballot box" was to determine if a referendum should be held on the convening of a constituent assembly. Such a step is characteristic of the ALBA nations and is a means used for their determined rejection of neo-liberal economic policies.

Intensified "Consultation"
FDP circles stepped up their efforts to thwart these intentions from being realized. As far back as February of last year, the FDP Vice Chairman and spokesperson for foreign policy affairs, Werner Hoyer, held consultations with Micheletti, President of the Honduran Parliament, at the time, who, following the putsch, is currently president. The objective was an "intensification of the Naumann Foundation's consultation activities particularly in view of the upcoming internal party elections in November (2008, gfp.com)"[4], which were won by former Vice President Elvin Santos. Santos belongs to the "traditional" wing of the PLH, which has consistently cooperated closely with the FDP and its Naumann Foundation. He has announced that should he win the presidential elections, he would withdraw Honduras from ALBA.

Rejection
Policy and strategy advisor Peter Schröder, who has close ties to the FDP, also met from June 13 to 16 with Santos and his followers.[5] The meeting took place under the cover of the Naumann Foundation and was focused on the popular referendum planned for Sunday. In a discussion with german-foreign-policy.com, Schröder declared that it was to be expected, that Zelaya's "cuarta Urna" - a vote on whether to create a constituent assembly - would win the referendum. In the meeting, the participants also agreed, according to Schröder, that Zelaya's opponent Santos would make an appearance on Monday, June 29. The PLH presidential candidate would then publicly demand a rejection of the creation of a constituent assembly that - as was to be expected - would be approved by the popular referendum, Schröder explained. In unison with the majority of western media, the German strategy advisor alleges that Zelaya's "cuarta urna" was only aimed at prolonging the term of his incumbency. Zelaya had rejected these accusations just prior to the coup. "I have no option allowing me to remain in office," he declared in an interview with the Spanish daily "El Pais". "The sole option would be to violate the constitution, which I will not do. (...) I will terminate my term of office January 27 2010."[6]

No Other Choice
In the aftermath of the putsch, the representative of the Naumann Foundation in Tegucigalpa accuses Zelaya of sharing responsibility for the coup d'état. According to his standpoint, Zelaya is not "completely without fault" for these developments, because he provoked both the legislative and the executive with the question of a referendum. The kidnapped president is "more the culprit than the victim" of this development. After all, his approach left the putschists "no other choice."[7]

Anti-ALBA Interventions
Over the past few years, the Friedrich Naumann Foundation has, on several occasions, been conspicuous with its activities against the governments of ALBA member nations, for example by supporting secessionists seeking a drastic weakening of Bolivia's central government (german-foreign-policy.com reported [8]). The foundation has been consistently confronted with public protests against its interference in the domestic affairs of sovereign nations.[9] But these protests are hardly noticed by the German population. The foundation's support for Zelaya's Honduran opponents is but a continuation of its political interference in Latin America.

[1], [2] Ex-Alumni der Stiftung in politischen Spitzenpositionen; www.freiheit.org (http://www.freiheit.org)
[3] Christian Lüth: Opportunismus und 'Kontinuismus'. Der Präsident von Honduras missachtet die Verfassung und seine Liberale Partei; Hintergrundpapier der Friedrich-Naumann-Stiftung Nr. 5, April 2009
[4] Hoyer trifft liberale Spitzenpolitiker Nicaraguas und Honduras; www.liberale.de (http://www.liberale.de)
[5] Peter Schröder en Honduras; www.la.fnst-freiheit.org (http://www.la.fnst-freiheit.org)
[6] "El jefe del Ejército desobedeció a su comandante, que soy yo"; El País 28.06.2009
[7] Mehr Täter als Opfer; www.freiheit.org (http://www.freiheit.org) 28.06.2009
[8] see also The Balkanization of South America (http://www.german-foreign-policy.com/en/fulltext/56082?PHPSESSID=svg5cpcmun42jqt4o4d52nm770), Divide and Rule (http://www.german-foreign-policy.com/en/fulltext/56165?PHPSESSID=svg5cpcmun42jqt4o4d52nm770), Neoliberal Networking (http://www.german-foreign-policy.com/en/fulltext/56171?PHPSESSID=svg5cpcmun42jqt4o4d52nm770) and Profit and Autonomy (http://www.german-foreign-policy.com/en/fulltext/56193?PHPSESSID=svg5cpcmun42jqt4o4d52nm770)
[9] see also Neoliberal Networking (http://www.german-foreign-policy.com/en/fulltext/56171?PHPSESSID=svg5cpcmun42jqt4o4d52nm770)

http://www.german-foreign-policy.com/en/fulltext/56260

Magda Hassan
07-02-2009, 01:33 PM
MEMORANDUM
Re: Legal situation of the transition government in Honduras
June 29, 2009 legal description of the Honduraian "coup" which saw President Mel Zelaya's removed from power by the armed forces. The document is being pushed in diplomatic circles by those opposed to President Zelaya but has not otherwise appeared. This is the english version of the document.
It should be noted that the document is clearly designed to be a defence of the President's removal.

Magda Hassan
07-02-2009, 02:46 PM
US Special Forces briefing to Congressman Miller exposes involvement in 19 Latin American countries during 2009 including Honduras, 17 May 2009


This confidential US Special Forces (7th, US Southern Command), briefing dated 17 May 2009 was created for Florida Congressman Miller. Although unclassified, it specifies a For Official Use Only (http://wikileaks.org/wiki/For_Official_Use_Only) (FOUO) distribution restriction.
On page 7 of the document, it is proudly proclaimed that the 7h Special Forces Group has conducted missions in every Latin American country.
On page 10 a map is given, revealing Special Forces deployments to 19 Latin American countries during 2009 alone, including two bases or missions in Honduras.
The briefing provides a history of the Special Forces such as its genesis as the covert action arm of the OSS (the intelligence arm of which became the CIA). Notable is a graph of Special Forces growth. Its numbers now substantially eclipse its previous 1968 peak during the height of the cold war.

Jan Klimkowski
07-02-2009, 04:51 PM
Magda - big kudos for your efforts in this thread.


CNN en Español, viewed throughout Latin America, has been backing the coup against Honduran President Manuel Zelaya since day 1, Sunday, June 28th. They initially referred to the events as a military coup during the early hours, then slowly transformed their headlines to call the coup a "forced succession". By the end of the day, dictator Roberto Micheletti was considered, by CNN, the "constitutional president" of Honduras and Zelaya was the "deposed" president.

Since then, CNN has shown about 90% coverage favorable of the coup government in Honduras, conducting interviews with Micheletti as well as those in his "cabinet". The "analysts" and "experts" providing insight and commentary on the coup in Honduras have all been either conservative U.S. voices of those on the Latin America right, like Alvaro Vargas Llosa. CNN has done little or no reporting on the mass protests on the streets in Honduras against the coup government, nor has it covered or reported on the detention of several Telesur and Associated Press journalists by military forces in Honduras this past Tuesday. CNN is also not providing much coverage of the major media blackout still in place in Honduras or the repressive measures taken by the coup government to impose states of emergency, suspend civil and human rights and mandate a national curfew through the weekend. And CNN is obsessed with making this whole thing to be about Chávez, and not about the internal class struggles in Honduras.

They take us for fucking idiots, assuming that only "spics" speak Spanish.

Magda Hassan
07-03-2009, 08:09 AM
We are now entering the twilight zone.

Surprise ! Surprise! Pro coup publisher claims there is no media censorship. He also claims there has been NO COUP! This will come as something of a surprise to all the people who can no longer work at their place of employment in the non-pro-coup media as they have been closed down by the military! It will also come a surprise to know there is no coup to all those people who have been beaten and disappeared by the military and those who have had their children forcibly removed from their families to be used by the military for who knows what. It will also come as a surprise to President Manuel Zelaya that there is no coup. He could have sworn that he was arrested and forcibly removed from his residence and the country in a military plane where he still is. Or was that a helicopter? I suppose that means he can come back as it never really happened.



Obviously a massive psy-ops is being conducted on the people of Honduras.



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Edgardo Dumas, publisher of the pro-coup daily La Tribuna (http://www.latribuna.hn/web2.0/) in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, and the country’s former Defense Minister, is saying that he speaks for the Inter American Press Association (IAPA where he sits on one of 13 committees) to claim there is no media censorship under the coup regime in Honduras.
(This would not be the first time that the IAPA and its newspaper owners acted in ways contrary to their stated mission in Latin America.)
Well, of course his newspaper isn’t being censored: It spouts only the authorized propaganda of the coup regime.
Dumas said, in this interview today with W Radio in Bogotá (http://mercury.websitewelcome.com/%7Esipiapa/v4/index.php?page=sip_comites&seccion=6&idioma=us), Colombia:
Dumas: Right now, today, July 2, I don’t see any limit on freedom of the press. The four newspapers are putting out the impartial and true news… No TV or radio station has been interfered with.”
Q. Are you sure that the press is functioning normally today in Honduras?
Dumas: I am absolutely certain... I have no doubt about it.
Q. So the rumors that are coming about censorship aren’t true.
Dumas: They are totally and absolutely false.
Q. You are a representative of the IAPA, no?
Dumas: Yes
Q. And as representative of IAPA you support the coup?
Dumas: I don’t support a coup because there has been no coup…
Q. The cutting of CNN was a coincidence?
Dumas: There were no cuts… right now the press is working independently without any restriction… That CNN is badly informing, I have no doubt… CNN is broadcasting on the payroll of the dictator of Venezuela Hugo Chavez.
Q. It pains me to ask this question. Should a representative of IAPA, who represents journalists like us, take sides in a situation like this?
Dumas: I’m not taking sides. I’m trying to be the most objective and impartial I can be…
Q. Pardon me. You say CNN is at the service of Chavez, isn’t that taking sides?
Dumas: …It is not informing the world of what is happening in this country
Q. Mr. Dumas. Are you saying that as a representative of the IAPA?
Dumas: I am vice president of the committee of Press Freedom of the IAPA in Honduras.
Q. Is what you are saying, has it been consulted with the IAPA or is it your personal opinion?
Dumas: It’s my personal opinion.
="MsoNormal">Q. A vice president…
Dumas: For three years I’ve been informing with the IAPA… about freedom of expression in our country…
Q. It’s clear. For you there is no repression, there has not been a coup, there is no disinformation, what is happening is of total normality, and it is CNN and the international press that is disinforming?
Dumas: Exactly.
Q. Thank you very much, Mr. Dumas.
Every board member of the IAPA must be made to watch these following videos, demonstrating the brutal closure of TV and radio stations under the coup regime in Honduras.
Watch the coup's soldiers taking Channel 36 TV off the air:

Watch the coup's soldiers force Radio Progreso 103.3 FM to cease broadcasting:

That scene is from 10:30 a.m. on Sunday, after the station had reported that a coup d’etat had taken place. Spontaneously, listeners of the station in the nearby neighborhood gathered outside its gates to find out what happened. That turne d into a demonstration in defense of the radio station, with chants of “People! Unite!”
At seven minutes into the video, a radio station employee comes out and says “we’ve decided to stop broadcasting.”
Here’s what happened next:

A radio station employee explains how they were convinced by the soldiers to stop broadcasting. A local citizen then addresses the crowd: “Radio Progreso is the voice of all the people of Progreso…. They are informing us that to avoid confrontations… they have decided to close operations... They are going to close the radio frequency… Radio Progeso asks that the people organize ourselves.”
Then a group of soldiers leaves, heading for one of the various trucks they arrived in, as people yell “get out, get out.”
Even the Miami Herald, publishing from the city where IAPA is based, has reported the true facts about massive media censorship under the coup regime (http://www.miamiherald.com/news/americas/story/1122536.html), so the IAPA can’t claim to be unaware of it:
TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras -- At the close of the one of this week's nightly news broadcasts, Channel 21 news anchor Indira Raudales made a plea: ``We have a right to information! This can't be happening in the 21st century!''
If Raudales offered more details, viewers did not hear them: the screen briefly went to static.
Her on-air appeal for freedom of the press came as the newly installed Honduran government kept several news outlets closed, detained international reporters, and periodically interrupted the signal of CNN en español.
Reporters for The Associated Press were taken away in military vehicles and Venezuela's Telesur network -- and any other station supportive of toppled president Manuel Zelaya -- are still off the air.
Stations that are broadcasting carry only news friendly to the new government. Several local papers have yet to publish information about Zelaya's international support in neighboring countries.
''They militarized Channel 36, which is owned by me,'' said Esdras López, director of the show, ''Asi se Informa.'' ``They brought more than a battalion -- 22 armed men -- took the channel and said nobody could come in and nobody could come out...
The dishonest statements made by Dumas, in the name of the Interamerican Press Association, are an outrage.
All too typical of so many IAPA member newspapers - it is a trade association for industry owners, after all - they are pro-regime in their own land, and therefore do not provoke the censorship and repression that authentic and independent journalists incur, so they are willing to go to the extreme of lying to cover up repression against the more journalistic competition.
I call upon the IAPA to denounce his statements, correct them through its own public statement, and summarily remove Edgardo Dumas from all positions within the organization.
If you’d like to do the same, here is an online form at its website (http://www.sipiapa.org/v4/index.php?page=sip_contacto&idioma=sp) where you can send them a message.
Or you can call (305) 634-2465.
If you get a response out of IAPA, write me at narconews@gmail.com so we can share it with all.
Update: IAPA executive director Julio Muñoz thanked me for passing along this information, and shortly thereafter sent us this statement:
Complaints of restrictions on the press continue
Miami (July 2, 2009)—The Inter American Press Association (IAPA) today repeated its call for full respect for press freedom to the new Honduran authorities. The call came as the organization's ongoing monitoring of the situation in the Central American country compiled complaints from news media and journalists that they are still restricted, intimidated and attacked while they attempt to report.
IAPA President Enrique Santos Calderón declared, “To guarantee to the people their right to receive full information the government should not only cease any limitations on the work of the press but also protect and ensure that all media, no matter what their editorial policies, can work freely and in safety.”
“Freedom of the press and of expression is a shared asset belonging to all within a society,” Santos Calderón stated. “And nobody has the right to claim he has the legal authority to decide what the people or society can or must receive as information.” He cited Principle 1 of the Declaration of Chapultepec, which reads “The exercise of this freedom (of the press) is not something authorities grant, it is an inalienable right of the people.”
The chairman of the IAPA’s Committee on Freedom of the Press and Information, Robert Rivard, editor of the San Antonio Express-News, Texas, added that “we cannot allow ourselves to be misguided by the existing polarization and permit discrimination against the media, reporters and columnists who might be on one side or the other politically.” He recalled that the basis “of press freedom is plurality and diversity” and that “in this conflict we are seeing that all reporters and editors are being affected in one way or another by the conflicting groups.”
IAPA concern is based on numerous actions and complaints in the wake of last Sunday’s coup d’etat, especially incidents, restrictions and censorship that the broadcast media have been subjected to. Although some television channels have returned to the air following Sunday's suspension, including state-run Canal 8and privately-owned Canal 6 and Canal 11, there have been complaints about control of the information being put out; international television channel Telesur, meanwhile, remains off the air.
In another offense, correspondents from The Associated Press (Esteban Félix, Nicolás García and two of their assistants) and Telesur (Adriana Sivori, María José Díaz and Larry Sánchez) were arrested on Monday while sending video and photos from a hotel room in the Honduran capital when armed members of the military burst in and took them to the Immigration Service office. They were released after it was found they were in the country legally.
Reporters, photographers and cameramen from various news media have filed complaints of attacks by the Common Crimes Unit of the Attorney General’s Office. Among them were three reporters with the Canal 42program “Entrevistado” (Interviewed) who were attacked on Sunday with sticks and stones by demonstrators yelling insults who then seized and smashed their cameras. A similar situation was reported by Radio Globoin Tegucigalpa, from where journalists were temporarily taken to the local Attorney General’s Office, whileRadio Progreso in El Progreso, Yoro province, was “invaded by a contingent of around 25 soldiers” according to a press release issued by the station.
Another TV station not allowed to broadcast was Canal 66 Maya TV. In statements to the San Pedro Sula newspaper Tiempo, Eduardo Maldonado, a former presidential candidate and host of the radio and television program “Hable como Habla” (Say What You Will), reported that on Sunday “They shut us down and locked us out, saying it was on orders.” He added that although broadcasts were resumed on Monday “We didn’t put out full information, only the official line.”

Print media, while less hindered in its efforts to report the news in both its print editions and its online versions, was nonetheless not exempt from restrictions and hostility by the warring groups. Some editors, after receiving constant threats against themselves and their journalists -- in their newsrooms and in cell phone messages -- have decided to protect their families by moving them out of their hometowns or out of the country.
Among other developments, the San Pedro Sula newspaper La Prensa reported that on Monday a mob threw sticks and stones at the front of its building and painted slogans in support of ousted President Manuel Zelaya. News photographer Juan Ramon Sosa of La Tribuna was beaten up, insulted and had his camera taken by members of the federal police in Tegucigalpa while covering a demonstration. Meanwhile, several newspapers saw their distribution facilities damaged, from vending kiosks to delivery trucks.
Carlos Mauricio Flores, editor of the Tegucigalpa daily paper El Heraldo, confirmed to the IAPA that its reporters have received phone threats and he also revealed that last Saturday (June 27) “a self-styled People’s Commando sent to several e-mail addresses a message with degrading photos and text about at least eight journalists from independent media and called on the public to punish them.”
On a final note, the IAPA officers pointed out that many of the attacks on the Honduran press, especially those encouraged by the government, have been criticized by the organization for years now. It cited, in particular, discrimination in the placement of official advertising and the use of state resources to reward or punish journalists, as well as payments to reporters, the constant damaging remarks made about journalists and media by senior officials, the use of public media outlets as organs of propaganda, and the limitation and manipulation of official information.
In recent years a number of Honduran journalists have been forced to leave the country and there is still a high level of impunity in the unsolved cases of the murders of two journalists and two news media consultants.
That's quite the opposite version of events as that forwarded by Mr. Dumas.
IAPA made no direct comment in response to my questions about his standing to make such statements for the organization.
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/thefield/iapa-vice-president-covers-press-censorship-honduras

Peter Lemkin
07-03-2009, 09:29 AM
New kind of 'coup' - stage a coup and then say it is not a coup. Obama is acting as if he's upset by the 'coup' that is not a 'coup', but doing nothing. If he were just to call the people behind the coup, I'd bet they'd just melt back to their barracks.... One can only assume the USG is OK with the coup, but thinks they should put up a false face and mumble some opposition.

Magda Hassan
07-03-2009, 03:48 PM
Weasel words from the US State Department.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Today the Secretary General of the Organization of American States (OAS), Jose Miguel Insulza, is traveling to Tegucigalpa to personally inform the coup government, in place since Sunday's military coup d'etat, that if they don't step down by Saturday and allow for President Manuel Zelaya's return to power, then Honduras will be suspended from the most important multilateral organization in the region. The suspension will not just be symbolic, it also includes ceasing all economic aid from the Inter-American Development Bank, which provides millions of dollars in support to the Central American nation, and the imposition of sanctions for human rights violations through the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR).

The coup government, led by Roberto Micheletti, has said it will remain in power "with or without" the OAS. We'll see how things develop today.

Meanwhile, the United States is the only remaining country in the Americas still maintaining diplomatic relations with Honduras after Sunday's coup. The US Ambassador to Honduras, Hugo Llorens, remains in Tegucigalpa, apparently "negotiating" with the coup government to find a solution. However, President Zelaya, the constitutional and democratically elected president of Honduras since 2005, has stated he will not "negotiate" his return to power. It's ridiculous to request a president overthrown in an illegal coup negotiate with the criminals who overthrew him in order to reestablish constitutional order.

There are a lot of things going on behind the scenes that the US Government is, unfortunately, involved in that will soon be exposed.

Check out how the State Department is finding ways to get out of sanctioning Honduras and pressuring the coup government to step down by now legally classifying what took place as a "military coup d'etat" under US law. Note how instead of referring to the coup in English, the State Dept official does it in Spanish, as though that somehow makes it mean something else (yeah, since it's said in Spanish, it doesn't mean the same under US law):

Excerpt from Wednesday's State Department press briefing:

"QUESTION: And so this is properly classified as a military coup?
SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL ONE: Well, I mean, it’s a golpe de estado. The military moved against the president; they removed him from his home and they expelled him from a country, so the military participated in a coup. However, the transfer of leadership was not a military action. The transfer of leadership was done by the Honduran congress, and therefore the coup, while it had a military component, it has a larger – it is a larger event."


The Obama administration is trying desperately to save its image before the world, but not break ranks with its allies in Honduras. It's very pleased with the outcome of the coup, just not the method used to get there. So now they're saying, it was a "golpe de estado", and even though the armed military guards in ski masks kidnapped President Zelaya from his bed at gunpoint in the middle of the night and forced him into exile, since it was a leader of Congress, a civilian, and not a military general, who subsequently named himself the de facto president, then it's not a "military coup".

Way to go State!
http://www.chavezcode.com/2009/07/day-6-oas-secretary-general-heads-to.html

Jan Klimkowski
07-03-2009, 04:51 PM
Excerpt from Wednesday's State Department press briefing:

"QUESTION: And so this is properly classified as a military coup?
SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL ONE: Well, I mean, it’s a golpe de estado. The military moved against the president; they removed him from his home and they expelled him from a country, so the military participated in a coup. However, the transfer of leadership was not a military action. The transfer of leadership was done by the Honduran congress, and therefore the coup, while it had a military component, it has a larger – it is a larger event."

:party:

As far as I can tell, a golpe de estado occurred when the fascist military overthrew Allende in Chile in 1973.

http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golpe_de_Estado_del_11_de_septiembre_de_1973

Of course that was part of Operation Condor, so it was a Yankee-sanctioned coup d'etat.

Is that the real meaning of this State Department doublespeak?

Yes, it's a golpe d'estado, but it's our golpe d'estado - OK!

Peter Lemkin
07-03-2009, 05:44 PM
Excerpt from Wednesday's State Department press briefing:

"QUESTION: And so this is properly classified as a military coup?
SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL ONE: Well, I mean, it’s a golpe de estado. The military moved against the president; they removed him from his home and they expelled him from a country, so the military participated in a coup. However, the transfer of leadership was not a military action. The transfer of leadership was done by the Honduran congress, and therefore the coup, while it had a military component, it has a larger – it is a larger event."

:party:

As far as I can tell, a golpe de estado occurred when the fascist military overthrew Allende in Chile in 1973.

http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golpe_de_Estado_del_11_de_septiembre_de_1973

Of course that was part of Operation Condor, so it was a Yankee-sanctioned coup d'etat.

Is that the real meaning of this State Department doublespeak?

Yes, it's a golpe d'estado, but it's our golpe d'estado - OK!

...not to mention the time we kidnapped Aristide in Haiti...and a few tens of dozens of other such..

Magda Hassan
07-04-2009, 12:04 AM
Reports are still sketchy and unconfirmed at the moment and there's no link of worth to give you, but word coming in from Honduras is that tens of thousands of people are now marching in separate protests through the streets of Tegucigalpa protesting against the coup d'etat and demanding that President Manuel Zelaya is reinstated. Protest marches are also supposedly happening in other cities in Honduras. Expect the Washington Post to mention minor disturbances on page 427 tomorrow.

The protests are going ahead despite the curfew orders, the stripping of basic rights via the suspension of articles in the constitution and the "welcoming committee" of heavily armed miliary, part of which you see protecting the Presidential palace this morning. Also, last night a bomb reportedly exploded in restaurant just 100m from the capital's airport. The welcoming committee's way of greeting Insulza as he lands today, I suppose.

UPDATE: Avoiding Honduras media that insists all is quiet in the capital (as TV station directors report (http://www.radiomundial.com.ve/yvke/noticia.php?t=27812) they've been under military occupation for the last 100 hours), and avoiding Prensa Latina that thinks there are a million pro-Zelayans marching right now, here's Notimex with a bit of coverage (http://elextranewspaper.com/news.php?nid=11889) that talks about the area around the Presidential palace as a 'battleground' right now and that two military helicopters are firing into the crowd. It's still very difficult to get reliable word on what's going on, but something big is clearly happening.
http://incakolanews.blogspot.com/2009/07/honduras-big-anti-coup-marches.html

Magda Hassan
07-04-2009, 03:55 AM
Chambers of Commerce Court conspired to blow (http://66.249.89.132/translate_c?hl=en&u=http://hondurasresistencia.blogspot.com/2009/07/camaras-de-comercio-de-cortes.html&rurl=translate.google.com&usg=ALkJrhggAKYHXnqOxIYkvh24niFeHmBgVA)


Publicado por espectrods on 7/3/09 Published by espectrods on 7/3/09


[/URL]

http://www.gthonduras.com/Imagenes%20de%20la%20Web/head2.jpg (http://66.249.89.132/translate_c?hl=en&u=http://hondurasresistencia.blogspot.com/search/label/HOnduras&rurl=translate.google.com&usg=ALkJrhj-XwjZa0cMqprErO8MLAqBdEbrlw)

Este mensjae me llego al correo electronico tomen el tiempo en leerlo This brings me mensjae mail to take the time to read

______________ ______________


Estimados(as) Amigos(as): Dear (as) Amigos (as):

La actual Presidenta de la Camara de Comercio e Industrias de Cortes, Lic. Aline Flores (Gerente General de Corporacion Flores), ha girado una nota entre todos los grandes, medianos y pequeños empresarios para que "aporten", para patrocinar las Farsas Marchas Por la Paz, que se han estado dando en diferentes ciudades del Pais, para hacerles creer a todos que el "Pueblo", esta a favor del gobierno de facto del golpista y dictadors Roberto Michelletti Bain. The current President of the Camara de Comercio e Industrias de Cortes, Mrs. Aline Flores (Corporación Flores General Manager), has turned a note to all large, medium and small entrepreneurs to "make" to sponsor marches Farsa Peace, who have been taking place in different cities, to make them believe all that the "People", is in favor of the government's de facto coup and dictadors Roberto Michelletti Bain.


Aline Flores esta pidiendo una "Pequeña", colaboracion a los empresarios, esta colaboracion esta divida de la siguiente manera: Aline Flores calling this a "small" business partnership, this collaboration is divided as follows:

Grandes Empresas: $5000.00 Enterprise: $ 5000.00

Mediana: $3000.00 Median: $ 3000.00

Pequeña: entre $2000.00 y $1000.00 Small: between $ 2000.00 and $ 1000.00

en dicho comunicado se lee tambien que esta "Pequeña" colaboracion sera deducida del Impuesto sobre la Renta, que ellos pagan, cuando quieren y lo que quieren. in that press release also says that this short contribution is deducted from income tax, they pay when they want and what they want.



Hondureño, pasa este mensaje, no es justo que los mismos de siempre, nos quieran seguir marginando, de todos es sabido que empresas como Grupo Intur, no pagan impuestos, que son miles de $, lo que el Pais, deja de persibir, por culpa de este grupo de burqueses que han manejado el Pais a su antojo, han hecho lo que quieren con el fisco, este grupo, dueños tambien de Televicentro, supermercados la colonia, banco ficohsa y otras, son las empresas que no pagan energia, los que han lucrado a costillas nuestras. Hondureño, pass this message, it is not fair for them to always want to continue to marginalize us, everyone knows that companies like Group Intur not pay taxes, which are thousands of $, so that the country stops persibir by Because of this group of burqueses that have driven the country at will, have what they want to tax this group, also owners of Televicentro, the Cologne supermarkets, bank Ficohsa and other companies are not paying energy, who have profited to our ribs.


Este fue el principal delito de Manuel Zelaya Rosales, tocar los intereses de los grupos de poder, querer darle al pueblo una vida mas digna, hacer que los ricos y poderosos pagen lo que tienen que pagar de impuestos, para darle a Honduras mas Hospitales, para abastecer de medicamentos los centros de salud y hospitales de toda Honduras, para contratar mas medicos, para abrir mas escuelas, para contratar mas maestros, para reparar las carreteras, etc. This was the main crime of Manuel Zelaya Rosales, touching the interests of power groups, wanting to give the people a more dignified life, to make the rich and powerful pagen what they have to pay taxes, but to give Honduras Hospitals, to supply medicines for health centers and hospitals across Honduras, to recruit more doctors, open more schools to hire more teachers, to repair roads, etc..


Esto no puede seguir pasando, es tiempo de alzar nuestra voz y de hacer que se respeten nuestros derechos, Digamos NO a los grupos de poder! This can not continue happening, it's time to raise our voice and enforcing our rights groups say no to power!


Viva la verdadera Democracia! Viva true Democracy!

Viva Honduras! Viva Honduras!

Fuera el gobierno golpistas y los grupos facticos! Outside the government and groups putschists factual!
[url]http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fhondurasresistencia.blogspot.com%2F 2009%2F07%2Fcamaras-de-comercio-de-cortes.html
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Pathetic. People who want real democracy will do it for nothing because it is in their hearts.

Magda Hassan
07-04-2009, 09:07 AM
Centro de Medios Independientes - Chiapas, México http://chiapas.mediosindependientes.org Independent Media Center - Chiapas, Mexico http://chiapas.mediosindependientes.org

Honduras: Políticos, empresarios y militares: protagonistas de un golpe anunciado Honduras: Political, business and military players in a coup announced

9:52am Jueves 2 Julio 2009 / Thursday 02 Jul 2009 9:52 am Thursday, 2 July 2009 / Thursday 02 Jul 2009
autor(a): Leticia Salomón Author (a): Leticia Salomón

Imprimido / Printed: 6:59pm Miércoles 31 Diciembre 1969 / Saturday Jul 4 '09 Printed / Printed: 6:59 pm Wednesday, 31 December 1969 / Saturday Jul 4'09

© Centro de Medios Independientes. © Independent Media Center.
Todo el contenido de este sitio es libre de ser republicado y retransmitido en el web o cualquier otro lado, para uso no-comercial, a menos que lo indique la/el autor(a). All content on this site is free to be republished and rebroadcast on the Web or elsewhere, for non-commercial use, unless you specify / el author (a).
© Independent Media Center. © Independent Media Center.
All content is free for reprint and rebroadcast, on the net and elsewhere, for non-commercial use, unless otherwise noted by author. All content is free for reprint and rebroadcast, on the net and elsewhere, for non-commercial use, unless otherwise noted by author.



Resumen / Summary Abstract / Summary

Excelente análisis de antecedentes del Golpe de Estado Hondureño Excellent background to the coup d'état Hondureño


A. A.
LOS HECHOS THE FACTS


1. 1.
LA DETENCIÓN Y EXPATRIACIÓN DEL PRESIDENTE DETENTION OF THE PRESIDENT AND EXPATRIATION


El domingo 28 de junio de 2009, un contingente de militares rodearon la residencia del Presidente de la República, Manuel Zelaya Rosales (2006-2010), lo detuvieron, lo trasladaron a la Fuerza Aérea Hondureña y lo enviaron a Costa Rica, en un acto similar al que realizaban los militares en el pasado cuando querían deshacerse de los antiguos Jefes de las Fuerzas Armadas. Sunday June 28, 2009, a contingent of soldiers surrounded the residence of the President, Manuel Zelaya Rosales (2006-2010), arrested him, took him to the Honduran Air Force and sent him to Costa Rica, in an act similar to that performed by the military in the past when they wanted to get rid of the old heads of the Armed Forces.
El detonante principal fue la convocatoria a una encuesta de opinión a realizarse ese mismo día, promovida por el Presidente de la República, a través de la cual se le consultaría a la ciudadanía si deseaba que en las elecciones de noviembre se colocara una cuarta urna (las otras tres corresponden al Presidente, a los diputados ya los alcaldes) para votar por la instalación de una Asamblea Nacional Constituyente en el 2010, cuyo fin primordial sería la elaboración de una nueva Constitución de la República. The main trigger was the announcement of an opinion poll conducted the same day, promoted by the President of the Republic, through which he would consult with the public if they wanted in the November elections was placed fourth urn ( the other three relate to the President, deputies and mayors) to vote for the installation of a National Constituent Assembly in 2010, whose aim would be to draft a new Constitution of the Republic.


2. 2.
EL PROCESO DE PRODUCCIÓN DEL GOLPE DE ESTADO THE PRODUCTION PROCESS OF THE COUP D'ETAT


El golpe de Estado se venía gestando desde varios días atrás, alimentado por una confrontación creciente entre los tres poderes del Estado, específicamente entre los poderes Legislativo y Judicial contra el Poder Ejecutivo. The coup d'état had been gestating since several days ago, fueled by a growing confrontation between the three branches of government, specifically between the legislature and judiciary against the executive.
Una de las manifestaciones más evidentes fue el desconocimiento por dos poderes del Estado, de la decisión del Presidente de la República de destituir al Jefe del Estado Mayor Conjunto, General Romeo Vásquez Velásquez, por negarse a cumplir una orden del Ejecutivo, facultad establecida en la propia Constitución de la República que se enmarca dentro de la subordinación jerárquica de las Fuerzas Armadas al poder legítimamente constituido. One of the most obvious was the lack of two branches of government, the decision of the President to dismiss the Chief of Joint Staff, General Romeo Vasquez Velasquez, for refusing to comply with a direction of the Executive power in the Constitution of the Republic which is part of the subordination of the armed forces to power legitimately constituted.
La restitución del mencionado General en su cargo en una operación relámpago por parte de la Corte Suprema de Justicia y similar acción por parte del Congreso Nacional, que llegó al extremo de declarar héroe nacional al militar, constituyó un atentado a la independencia de poderes y llevó al límite la negativa de ambos poderes a realizar una consulta ciudadana. The return of the General's office said in a lightning operation by the Supreme Court, and similar action by the National Congress, which went so far as to declare a national hero to the military, was a violation of separation of powers and carried refusal to limit the powers of both to perform a citizen.


La decisión de consumar el golpe de Estado se tomó el jueves 25 de junio cuando el mismo Presidente del Congreso pidió al pleno declarar deshabilitado al Presidente de la República para continuar desempeñando su cargo, y procedió a constituir una Comisión de Dictamen cuya resolución no se produjo con la celeridad que se esperaba, lo que unido a la cautela del Embajador de los Estados Unidos para apoyar la inhabilitación, impidió que el golpe de Estado se consumara ese mismo día. The decision to consummate the coup d'etat was made on Thursday June 25 when the President asked Congress to declare full disabled the President to continue in office, and proceeded to establish a Commission opinion whose resolution was not with the speed expected, which together with the caution of the Ambassador of the United States to support the ban, which prevented the coup d'etat was accomplished that day.


3. 3.
EL DESENCADENANTE The trigger


La Constitución vigente en Honduras data de 1982 y en ella no se contemplan los mecanismos para revisarla y crear una nueva. The Constitution in force in Honduras in 1982 and there are no mechanisms for review and create a new one.
Los constituyentes de la época, conscientes de las debilidades de los partidos políticos tradicionales, establecieron un conjunto de artículos denominados “pétreos” y una advertencia encaminada a considerar como delito cualquier intento de reformarla. The constituents of the time, aware of the weaknesses of traditional political parties, established a series of articles called "stone" and a warning to consider as a crime any attempt to reform it.
La iniciativa del Presidente Zelaya de impulsar una consulta/encuesta ciudadana para preguntarle a la ciudadanía si quería que se colocara una cuarta urna en las elecciones generales de 2009, para decidir sobre la instalación de una Asamblea Nacional Constituyente que se encargaría de reformar la constitución, recibió una reacción adversa de la clase política que recordaba constantemente que en el pasado autoritario esa propuesta llevaba implícita un golpe de Estado y, derivado de ello, el empeño continuista del Presidente de la República. President Zelaya's initiative to promote a consulting / public survey to ask citizens if they wanted to be placed fourth in the general election ballot box in 2009, to decide on the establishment of a National Constituent Assembly that would reform the constitution, received an adverse reaction from the political class that constantly reminded that in the authoritarian past that proposal implies a coup and hence, the continuing efforts of the President of the Republic.
A partir de ese momento, todo intento del Presidente para realizar la consulta chocaba con la oposición del Poder Legislativo, primero, y del Poder Judicial, después. From that moment on, any attempt by the President to conduct consultations with the opposition came from the Legislature, first, and the judiciary, then.
Ambos intensificaban su oposición emitiendo constantes y veloces fallos de ilegalidad a las iniciativas del poder Ejecutivo, relacionadas con la cuarta urna, ya sea en la fase de consulta o en la fase de encuesta. They intensified their opposition emitting constant and rapid failure of illegality to the initiatives of the executive, on the fourth ballot box, either at the consultation stage or at the stage of inquiry.


B. B.
LA ALIANZA POLÍTICO-ECONÓMICA-MEDIÁTICA ALLIANCE POLITICAL-ECONOMIC-MEDIA


Lo anterior permitió la confluencia de intereses diversos: This allowed the confluence of diverse interests:


1. 1.
intereses político-partidarios, que aglutinaron a seguidores del Presidente del Congreso Nacional, Roberto Micheletti, candidato perdedor en las elecciones primarias del partido Liberal, con un fuerte resentimiento con el presidente del Poder Ejecutivo por no haberle dado el apoyo suficiente para asegurar su triunfo; militantes del partido Nacional, que vieron la iniciativa del Presidente Zelaya como una amenaza al triunfo del candidato de su Partido, Porfirio “Pepe” Lobo; diputados de dos de los tres partidos pequeños, Pinu y Democracia Cristiana, que se posicionaron al lado del presidente del Congreso Nacional en la confrontación de poderes del Estado (la excepción la constituyó el partido Unificación Democrática de tendencia izquierdista y con muy poca representación en el parlamento). partisan political interests, which brings together supporters of the President of Congress, Roberto Micheletti, losing candidate in a primary election of the Liberal Party, with a strong resentment to the chairman of the Executive Branch for not giving him enough support to ensure its success; militants of the National Party, which saw President Zelaya's initiative as a threat to win his party's candidate Porfirio "Pepe" Lobo; Members of two of the three small parties, Pinu and Christian Democracy, which is positioned next to the president National Congress in the confrontation of state power (the exception was the Democratic Unification Party left-leaning and with very little representation in parliament).


2. 2.
Intereses político-institucionales, en torno a los que se agruparon las siguientes instituciones: a) Corte Suprema de Justicia, de cuyos miembros ocho son del partido Liberal, incluido su presidente, y siete son del partido Nacional. Political and institutional interests, around which were grouped by the following institutions: a) Supreme Court, eight of whose members are the Liberal Party, including its chairman, and seven are from the National Party.
Todos ellos fueron nombrados por el Congreso Nacional a propuesta de una Junta Nominadora, pero todos guardan un alto nivel de subordinación hacia el partido que votó por ellos y, en el caso del Presidente (de la Corte Suprema) mantiene una relación de dependencia directa con respecto al Presidente del Congreso Nacional b) Ministerio Público, dirigido por el Fiscal General, perteneciente al partido Liberal, y el Fiscal General Adjunto, del partido Nacional, ambos nombrados recientemente por el Congreso Nacional luego de fuertes negociaciones entre las bancadas en las que el presidente Micheletti jugó un papel activo c) Procuraduría General de la República, liberal nombrada por el Congreso Nacional y con fuerte dependencia de su partido d) Comisionado Nacional de los Derechos Humanos, reelecto por el Congreso Nacional luego de intensas negociaciones con el partido Liberal ye) Tribunal Supremo Electoral, organismo altamente partidizado cuyo presidente pertenece al partido Liberal y mantiene vínculos directos con el presidente del Congreso. All were appointed by Congress a proposal for appointing a board, but all have a high level of subordination to the party that voted for them, and in the case of the President (of the Supreme Court) has a direct relationship of dependency with the President of Congress b) Public Ministry, headed by the Attorney General, a member of the Liberal Party, and the Attorney General, the National Party, both recently appointed by Congress after negotiations between the strong banks in the Micheletti president played an active role c) Attorney General of the Republic, a liberal appointed by Congress and his party's heavy reliance d) the National Commissioner for Human Rights, elected by the National Congress after intense negotiations with the Liberal party ye ) Supreme Electoral Tribunal, a body highly partidizado which belongs to the Liberal party president and maintains direct links with the Congress president.


3. 3.
Intereses económicos, que juntaron a dirigentes empresariales de las organizaciones gremiales, Consejo Hondureño de la Empresa Privada (COHEP) y Asociación Nacional de Industriales (ANDI), que estaban disgustados con la decisión presidencial de aumentar unilateralmente el salario mínimo en diciembre anterior, a pesar de la negativa empresarial a aumentarlo. Economic interests, which together with business leaders from trade associations, Honduran Council of Private Enterprise (COHEP) and National Association of Industrialists (ANDI), who were displeased with the president's decision unilaterally to increase the minimum wage in the previous December, despite the refusal of business to increase.


4. 4.
Intereses mediáticos, que hicieron confluir a los principales dueños de medios de comunicación a) Rafael Ferrari, del Partido Liberal, dueño de canales de televisión 3, 5 y 7, y de una cadena de radio y varias radios menores, b) Carlos Flores, también del Partido Liberal, ex presidente de Honduras y dueño de Diario La Tribuna, de mucha influencia en la zona central del país y padre de la Vicepresidenta del Congreso Nacional a quien colocó por su amistad con Roberto Micheletti, entonces Presidente del Congreso Nacional, con una relación de dependencia hacia el ex presidente; c) Jorge Cañahuatti, del Partido Nacional, dueño de los diarios El Heraldo y La Prensa, con fuerte influencia en la zona central el primero y nacional el segundo, confrontado con el gobierno desde el inicio, por cuestiones partidarias y por quedar excluido de los contratos del gobierno. Media interests, which brought the major media owners a) Rafael Ferrari, Liberal Party, owner of TV channels 3, 5 and 7, and a radio station and several smaller radii, b) Carlos Flores, also of the Liberal Party, former president of Honduras and owner of La Tribuna, a lot of influence in the central area of the country and father of the Vice-President of Congress who placed his friendship with Roberto Micheletti, President of Congress, with a dependent relationship to the former president; c) Jorge Cañahuatti, the National Party, who owns the newspapers El Heraldo and La Prensa, with strong influence in the central zone, the first and second national confronted with the government from the beginning, partisan issues and be excluded from government contracts.
Desde dos años atrás el presidente comenzó a señalar a los "poderes fácticos" que lo presionaban para conseguir beneficios económicos, dentro de los cuales se encontraban los empresarios de medios de comunicación y otras actividades económicas, que se han señalado. Since two years ago the president began to draw to the "powers" that press for economic benefits, among which were the entrepreneurs of the media and other economic activities that have been identified.

| |

C. C.
LOS ARGUMENTOS SEÑALADOS IDENTIFIED THE ARGUMENTS


1. 1.
El presidente quería imponer la democracia participativa The President wanted to impose participatory democracy


La clase política del país, representada en el Congreso Nacional a través de los partidos actualmente constituidos, ha manifestado una resistencia creciente a aceptar nuevas formas de democracia, como la participativa, argumentando que la democracia representativa es la única forma de ejercicio de la democracia y que los diputados al Congreso Nacional son los únicos facultados para opinar sobre los asuntos públicos. The political class in the country, represented in Congress by parties currently constituted, has shown a growing resistance to accept new forms of democracy such as participation, arguing that representative democracy is the only form of exercise of democracy and that Members of Congress are the only ones entitled to comment on public affairs.
La idea de consultar a la ciudadanía para opinar sobre un asunto de trascendencia nacional, como la creación de una nueva Constitución adaptada a los cambios que ha experimentado el contexto nacional e internacional luego de 28 años de haber sido emitida, alteró la calma legislativa y sus diputados comenzaron a argumentar que la Constitución de la República no se podía cambiar porque los constituyentes que emitieron la Constitución de 1982, actualmente vigente, decidieron que habían artículos pétreos que hacían imposible que la Constitución fuera reformada. The idea of consulting the public to comment on a matter of national importance, such as creating a new constitution adapted to the changes experienced by the national and international context after 28 years of being issued, legislative change and its calm Members began to argue that the Constitution could not be changed because the constituencies that gave the 1982 Constitution currently in force, they decided that they had items that did not rock the Constitution was reformed.


2. 2.
El Presidente desobedeció las órdenes judiciales President disobeyed orders


La insistencia del Presidente de la República de continuar adelante con la idea de la cuarta urna, pese a la oposición del Poder Legislativo, secundada por el Poder Judicial, llevó al límite la confrontación entre los poderes del Estado y todos ellos terminaron con argumentaciones y contra argumentaciones jurídicas que evidenciaron la politización partidaria del Poder Judicial que se posicionó al lado del Poder Legislativo en el conflicto entre Poder Legislativo y Poder Ejecutivo. The insistence of the President to continue with the idea of the fourth ballot box, despite opposition from the Legislature, supported by the judiciary, led to limit the confrontation between the authorities and they all ended up with arguments against legal arguments that showed the partisan politicization of the judiciary that was positioned next to the Legislature in the conflict between legislature and executive.
De esta manera, lo que pudo haber sido un conflicto exclusivamente jurídico, que debía resolverse en los tribunales de Justicia, se convirtió en un problema esencialmente político que se manejó públicamente como problema jurídico, aunque privadamente, a través de negociaciones entre el Poder Ejecutivo y la alianza político-económica-mediática, se manejó como un problema político. In this way, what could have been an exclusively legal conflict that should be resolved in courts of justice, became an essentially political problem that was handled as a legal problem publicly, but privately, through negotiations between the Executive and political-economic alliance-media was maintained as a political problem.


3. 3.
El Presidente pretendía continuar en el poder The President intended to continue in power


El argumento del continuismo comenzó a ser utilizado por el Congreso Nacional, secundado por los dueños de medios de comunicación, la empresa privada, sectores conservadores, personas y grupos interesados, y militares retirados que comenzaron a plantar la idea de que el presidente quería continuar en el poder, a pesar de su reiterada afirmación de que él estaría en el gobierno hasta el último día de su mandato y que la Asamblea Nacional Constituyente sería tarea del nuevo gobierno que iniciaría en el 2010. The argument of the continuity began to be used by Congress, supported by media owners, private business, conservative, individuals and interest groups, and retired military officers who began to plant the idea that the president wanted to continue in power, despite its repeated assertion that he was in government until the last day of his mandate and to the National Constituent Assembly of the new government would work to begin in 2010.
En esta percepción pudieron influir declaraciones iniciales contradictorias por parte de funcionarios allegados al Presidente de la República, que pudieron contribuir a confundir a los sectores en confrontación sobre este tema, aunque el mismo adquirió su propia dinámica y comenzó a repetirse una u otra vez por parte de todos los componentes de la alianza política-económica-mediática, hasta lograr un alto nivel de manipulación y desinformación. This perception may have influenced initial contradictory statements by officials close to the President of the Republic, which could contribute to confusion for the sectors in conflict on this issue, although it acquired its own momentum and began to repeat one time or another by all components of the alliance-political-economic media, to achieve a high level of manipulation and misinformation.


4. 4.
El presidente quería instaurar el comunismo en el país The president wanted to establish communism in the country


La cercanía del Presidente Zelaya con los países integrantes de la Alianza Bolivariana de las Américas (ALBA) y Petrocaribe, le creó una imagen de centro izquierda que incomodó a empresarios y políticos que comenzaron a asociar todas las decisiones gubernamentales con acciones encaminadas a instaurar el comunismo en el país, situación que fue hábilmente manipulada por los medios de comunicación y repetida insistentemente por los militares retirados que adquirieron un protagonismo creado y estimulado por las fuerzas opositoras al gobierno. President Zelaya of the proximity with the member countries of the Bolivarian Alliance of the Americas (ALBA) and Petrocaribe, he created an image of the center-left who are uncomfortable with businessmen and politicians began to involve all government decisions with actions aimed at establishing communism in the country, which was skillfully manipulated by the media and repeated insistence by the retired military officers who became a role created and stimulated by the forces opposing the government.
La cercanía a los países de la ALBA, en particular, Venezuela, Nicaragua y Cuba, les llevó a estigmatizar a gobierno y ciudadanos de estos países, ya considerar que la presencia de sus diplomáticos en el país constituía una amenaza para la democracia. Proximity to the ALBA countries, particularly Venezuela, Cuba and Nicaragua, it took them to stigmatize government and citizens of these countries, considering that the presence of its diplomats in the country constituted a threat to democracy.


5. 5.
El Presidente ha incumplido sus funciones The President has failed to fulfill its functions


El tema de la cuarta urna desplazó a todos los otros temas de la agenda nacional, acaparando la atención de legisladores, funcionarios y medios de comunicación, al extremo que medios de comunicación de la alianza político-económica-mediática dedicaban espacios casi completos a cuestionar el tema y, por supuesto, el gobierno utilizaba el canal del Estado y un par de canales más, para defender su posición en torno a la cuarta urna. The theme of the fourth urn went to all the other items on the national agenda, attracting the attention of legislators, officials and media, to the point that the media-politico-economic alliance media space devoted almost entirely to the question subject and, of course, the government used the state channel and a pair of channels, to defend its position on the fourth ballot box.
La alianza opositora continuó cuestionando la insistencia presidencial en mantener el tema y decidieron cuestionarlo por la falta de atención, que según ellos, le restaba a la fiebre AH1N1, inundaciones y terremotos. The opposition alliance has continued to question the presidential insistence on keeping the issue and decide questions about the lack of care, which according to them, he remained at fever AH1N1, floods and earthquakes.


D. D.
EL PAPEL DE LOS MILITARES THE ROLE OF THE MILITARY


Conforme avanzaba la confrontación entre poderes del Estado, en una evidente crisis de ingobernabilidad política, la alianza opositora comenzó a acercarse al Jefe del Estado Mayor Conjunto, General Romeo Vásquez Velásquez, ya la Junta de Comandantes, para pedirles que no obedecieran las órdenes del presidente de la República, de repartir las cajas para la encuesta de opinión en todo el país. As we move the confrontation between branches of government, in an apparent crisis of political governance, the opposition alliance began to approach the Head of the Joint Staff, General Romeo Vasquez Velasquez, and the Board of commanders to ask them not to obey the orders of the president of the Republic, to distribute funds for the survey of opinion across the country.
A la vez que negociaba con la cúpula militar en privado, colocaba en la agenda pública a militares retirados, protagonistas de la década de los ochenta, formados en plena guerra fría, reafirmando posiciones anticomunistas, incitando a la desobediencia y haciendo llamados a la insubordinación de los militares activos. As well as negotiating with the military leadership in private, placed on the public agenda for military retirees, protagonists of the eighties, formed in the Cold War, anticommunist reaffirming positions, prompting calls to disobedience and insubordination of the military assets.
La crisis permitió que personajes sumados en el anonimato adquirieran visibilidad y se convirtieran en referentes notables para los medios de comunicación de la alianza opositora, militarizando la agenda de los medios y polarizando la sociedad en dos grupos fuertemente enfrentados, los que estaban a favor y los que estaban en contra. The crisis allowed characters together in anonymity gain visibility and become outstanding relating to the media of the opposition alliance, militarizing the agenda of the media and polarizing society into two sharply opposing groups, those who were in favor and they were against.
La destitución del Jefe del Estado Mayor y la renuncia del Secretario de Defensa, Edmundo Orellana, fue una consecuencia lógica de la presión político-jurídica a que se vieron enfrentados los militares durante varios días de confrontación. The dismissal of the Chief of Staff and the resignation of Secretary of Defense Edmundo Orellana, was a logical consequence of political and legal pressure to be faced by the military for several days of confrontation.


Hasta ese momento las Fuerzas Armadas aparecían como víctimas de la polarización civil en el plano político. Until then the armed forces appeared to be victims of polarization in the political calendar.
A partir de ahí y luego de la restitución político-judicial del General en su cargo, y después de su reconocimiento público en el Congreso Nacional como “héroe nacional”, por haberle desobedecido al Presidente de la República, el militar comenzó a participar en marchas y protestas callejeras, ya dar entrevistas para los medios opositores, definiéndose claramente del lado de la alianza político-económica-mediática. From there and after the return of political-judicial-General's office, and after his public recognition at the National Congress as "national hero" for having disobeyed the President of the Republic, the military began to participate in marches and street protests, and giving interviews to media opponents, clearly defining the side of the political-economic alliance media.
La Junta de Comandantes, constituida por los Jefes de las tres fuerzas y el Inspector General, además del propio Jefe del Estado Mayor Conjunto, decidió involucrarse en la confrontación tomando partido por la alianza opositora y ejecutando el golpe de Estado de la mañana de 28 de junio. Commanders of the Board, consisting of the heads of the three forces and the Inspector General, in addition to the Joint Chief of Staff, decided to get involved in the confrontation by taking a stand for the opposition alliance and executing a coup on the morning of 28 June.
Muchos años de profesionalización y creciente subordinación militar a los gobiernos legítimamente constituidos fueron echados por la borda por los Comandantes militares que prefirieron anteponer sus intereses y rencores particulares, y sucumbir ante el poder económico y político, cometiendo uno de los errores más grandes que marcarán negativamente a su institución. Many years of increasing professionalization and military subordination to the legitimately constituted governments were thrown overboard by military commanders who preferred to put their private interests and grudges, and succumb to the economic and political power, committing one of the biggest mistakes that will negatively his institution.
En estos 28 años de construcción democrática, las Fuerzas Armadas lograron construir paso a paso una fuerte legitimidad ante la sociedad, al grado que aparecían en las encuestas con un nivel de aceptación similar al de la iglesia católica. In these 28 years of building democracy, the armed forces constructed step by step a strong legitimacy in the eyes of society, to the extent shown in the polls with a similar level of acceptance at the Catholic church.
Verlos en la calle, al lado de la Policía, persiguiendo y golpeando a ciudadanos hondureños que se plantaron para rechazar el golpe de Estado, representa un retroceso grave por el cual pagarán su precio ante la historia y ante la sociedad. Seeing them on the street, next to the police chasing and beating that Hondurans were planted to reject the coup, represents a serious setback by which the price paid to history and to society.


E. E.
LAS CONTRADICCIONES DEL CONGRESO NACIONAL CONTRADICTIONS OF THE NATIONAL CONGRESS


Lo ocurrido en el Congreso nacional durante el domingo 28 de junio pasará a la historia del país como un ejemplo de los extremos a los que puede conducir la combinación de intolerancia, manipulación del significado de la democracia, intereses personales, ideologización del conflicto político y rivalidades intrapartidarias. What happened in Congress during the Sunday June 28 will move to the country's history as an example of the extremes to which the combination can lead to intolerance, manipulation of the meaning of democracy, personal, ideological conflict and political rivalries intrapartidarias.
Lo más lamentable es la reproducción de los viejos métodos militares que combinaban mentiras sostenidas como verdades, silencio oficial ante la situación crítica, sometimiento de los medios de comunicación opuestos al golpe, desinformación, ausencia de información sobre lo que ocurre, intervención de teléfonos, detención de funcionarios, represión de manifestantes, interrupción del fluido eléctrico, intento de controlar la comunicación electrónica y auto proclamación como defensores de la nación. Most unfortunately, the reproduction of the old military methods that combine sustained lies as truths, official silence before the critical situation, subjecting the media opposing the coup, misinformation, lack of information about what is happening, telephone tapping, detention officials, repression of protesters, interruption of electric power, attempt to control the electronic communication and self proclaimed defenders of the nation.
Lo anterior dio lugar a una serie de contradicciones en que incurrieron los diputados y allegados, reproducidas fielmente por los medios de comunicación, las cuales se resumen en lo siguiente: This led to a series of contradictions that were incurred Members and associates, faithfully reproduced by the media, which are summarized as follows:


1. 1.
La carta de renuncia del Presidente del Ejecutivo The letter of resignation from the Chairman of the Executive


La justificación del golpe de Estado fue la renuncia que supuestamente había firmado y sellado el presidente de la República el domingo 28 de junio, en la que indicaba que lo hacía por razones de salud y para preservar la paz de la nación. The justification of the coup d'état was the resignation that he had allegedly signed and stamped the president on Sunday, June 28, which indicated that it was for health reasons and to preserve the peace of the nation.
La carta presentaba fecha del jueves 25 de junio, fecha en que se había planificado el golpe de Estado como producto de las conversaciones entre el presidente del Congreso Nacional y el Jefe del Estado Mayor Conjunto y en la cual esperaban inhabilitar al Presidente de la República. The letter dates from Thursday June 25, when he had planned the coup d'etat as a product of discussions between the chairman of the National Congress and Chief of Joint Staff and in which waited off to the President of the Republic.


2. 2.
Sustitución versus derrocamiento Replacement versus overthrow


La argumentación central utilizada por los diputados del Congreso Nacional es que ante el vacío dejado por la renuncia del Presidente de la República, el Congreso Nacional se ve obligado a sustituirlo por el Presidente del Congreso, a quien le toca constitucionalmente la sucesión en el cargo. The central argument used by Members of Congress is that before the void left by the resignation of the President, Congress is forced to replace it by the President of Congress, whom he plays constitutionally succession in office.
Sin embargo, ellos mismos y sus allegados han caído en contradicciones al repetir que el presidente ha sido derrocado, relevado de su cargo, inhabilitado o separado del mismo por incumplir órdenes judiciales. However, they and their families have fallen into contradictions with repeated that the president has been overthrown, dismissed, or separate from it disqualified for breaching court orders.
El Decreto Legislativo estableció improbar la actuación del Presidente de la República y separarlo de su cargo. The Act established reject the action of the President and removed from office.


3. 3.
Espíritu de cuerpo versus intereses partidarios Spirit versus partisan interests


El Congreso Nacional ha asumido posiciones bastante homogéneas ante el golpe de Estado. The National Congress has taken up positions at the fairly homogenous coup.
Ha aparecido como un poder del Estado confrontado con otro poder del Estado, sin distinciones partidarias entre liberales y nacionalistas, aunque a nivel individual cada uno apuesta a sus propios intereses, como la distribución de cargos públicos en los siete meses que faltan para que el Presidente Zelaya termine su período presidencial, y la distribución de cargos en el Congreso Nacional, una vez que inicie el próximo gobierno. Has emerged as a state power when confronted with another state power, without partisan distinctions between liberals and nationalists, but at each individual bet on their own interests, such as the distribution of public positions in the seven months remaining for the President Zelaya finish his presidential term, and the distribution of seats in Congress, once you start the next government.
Los nacionalistas apostaron al golpe confiando que esta crisis ahondaría las diferencias del partido Liberal y les haría perder las elecciones de noviembre. Nationalists pushed the coup confident that this crisis ahondaría Liberal party differences and make them lose the November elections.
Los liberales apostaron al golpe pensando que el control del gobierno por siete meses les permitirá disponer de recursos públicos para financiar su campaña y ganar los comicios de noviembre. Liberals believe that bet-coup government control for seven months they will provide public funds to finance his campaign and win the polls in November.


4. 4.
De candidato perdedor a presidente de facto Defeated candidate for president de facto


La pérdida de las elecciones primarias de su partido ante su opositor Elvin Santos, no fue un obstáculo para incorporarlo como socio menor en el proceso de golpe de Estado, porque esa alianza lo fortalecía frente al Presidente quien lucía aislado de su partido. The loss of the primaries of his party before his opponent Elvin Santos, was not an obstacle for incorporation as junior partner in the coup, because the alliance is strengthened against the President, who wore isolated from his party.
El resentimiento generado como resultado de sus frustradas aspiraciones presidenciales por la vía legal, se vio compensado ante la posibilidad de ser presidente por la vía ilegal, como producto de un golpe de Estado. The resentment generated as a result of his presidential aspirations dashed by legal means, to offset the possibility of becoming president through illegal, as the product of a coup.


F. F.
LAS DEBILIDADES GENERADORAS DE LA CRISIS GENERATING THE WEAKNESSES OF THE CRISIS


Es indudable que la crisis político-institucional que desembocó en el golpe de Estado del 28 de junio, tiene raíces en la estructura del sistema político y en sus debilidades para enfrentar adecuadamente los retos que supone la construcción de la democracia en nuestro país, entre las cuales podemos señalar las siguientes: Clearly, the political-institutional crisis that led to the coup of June 28, has roots in the structure of the political system and its weaknesses to address adequately the challenges of building democracy in our country, between which we note the following:


1. 1.
Politización partidaria de las instituciones Partisan politicization of the institutions


Todas las instituciones del Estado son políticas por naturaleza, pero imprimirle un sello partidario excluyente, subordinado e irrespetuoso, traspasa los límites de lo aceptable y se convierte en una debilidad que puede convertirse en una amenaza para el fortalecimiento democrático. All state institutions are political in nature, but make it a partisan stamp exclusionary and disrespectful subject, beyond the limits of what is acceptable and becomes a weakness that can become a threat to the strengthening of democracy.
La falta de independencia y la limitación de la autonomía para desempeñarse frente a la ciudadanía se convierte en una fuerte debilidad que ha aflorado en esta crisis con dimensiones tan grandes que deben motivar a una profunda reflexión. The lack of independence and limit the autonomy to act against the public becomes a strong weakness that has emerged in this crisis with such large dimensions that should motivate a deeper reflection.


2. 2.
Candidatura presidencial de los Presidentes del Poder Legislativo Presidential candidacy of the Presidents of the Legislative Branch


En los últimos años se ha observado una creciente tendencia a la confrontación entre los poderes Legislativo y Ejecutivo, particularmente en los dos últimos años de gobierno, cuando comienzan a definirse los precandidatos y candidatos a la Presidencia de la República. In recent years there has been an increasing trend of confrontation between the legislative and executive powers, particularly over the last two years in office, when they begin to identify the candidate and candidate for President of the Republic.
Un factor explicativo clave es el lanzamiento de las candidaturas presidenciales de los presidentes del Congreso Nacional que lleva al parlamento a poner distancia ante el poder Ejecutivo e inclusive confrontarlo, para obtener una mayor aceptación popular o para comenzar a ejercer el poder antes de obtenerlo. A key explanatory factor is the launch of the presidential candidacies of the chairmen of the National Congress that leads to the parliament to put away the executive branch to confront and even, for greater popular acceptance or to begin to exercise the power before you get it.
En años pasados se realizó una reforma encaminada a impedir que este tipo de candidaturas se pudieran lanzar sin antes haber renunciado a su cargo, pero la misma politización de las instituciones, en particular del Sistema Judicial, ha hecho que los dos últimos presidentes de ese poder del Estado hayan lanzado sus candidaturas a pesar de la prohibición derivada de una reforma constitucional. In past years there was a reform aimed at preventing this kind of applications could be launched without having resigned his post, but the politicization of institutions, particularly the Judiciary, has the last two presidents of this power State have launched their candidacy despite the ban stemming from a constitutional reform.


3. 3.
Incapacidad política para lograr acuerdos Inability to reach political agreements


De manera creciente se ha observado la incapacidad política para articular consensos y alcanzar acuerdos, característica que libró en el pasado a nuestro país de los enfrentamientos bélicos que se produjeron en otros países de Centroamérica. So there has been a growing political inability to articulate and reach consensus, a characteristic that in the past to rid our country of the military conflicts that occurred in other countries in Central America.
Esta tendencia ha llegado a su máxima expresión en la crisis que condujo al actual golpe de Estado, situación que pudo evitarse si hubiera existido voluntad política para ceder en las dos partes en conflicto, mayor disposición a la negociación y mejor preparación para la solución pacífica de los conflictos. This trend has reached its maximum expression in the current crisis which led to the coup, which was avoided if there had been political will to compromise on both sides of the conflict, more willing to bargain and better preparation for the peaceful resolution of conflicts.


4. 4.
Recurrencia a poderes arbitrales Recurrence arbitration powers


Una gran debilidad del sistema político hondureño, muy vinculada a la anterior, es la constante búsqueda de poderes arbitrales para solucionar los conflictos. A major weakness of the Honduran political system, closely linked to the previous one, is constantly searching for arbitration powers to resolve conflicts.
La recurrencia a las Fuerzas Armadas es la actitud que lo ha caracterizado históricamente, aunque esta decisión ha terminado siempre, como ahora, en golpes de Estado, luego de otorgarles un protagonismo político que no les corresponde. The recurrence of the Armed Forces is the attitude that has historically characterized, although this decision has ended forever, as now, in coups d'état, after giving them a political role that is not theirs.
Una nueva manifestación de esta tendencia se expresa en la recurrencia a las iglesias como factor mediador y arbitral, papel que tampoco les corresponde por la condición laica del Estado hondureño. A new manifestation of this trend is reflected in the recourse to the churches as a mediator and arbitration, nor their role in the secular status of the Honduran State.
En este proceso de polarización y posterior golpe de Estado, las iglesias hondureñas, tanto la católica como las evangélicas, no sólo fallaron en su papel mediador sino que se inclinaron por una de las fuerzas en conflicto, exacerbando los ánimos e intensificando la polarización. In this process of polarization and subsequent coup, the churches in Honduras, both the Catholic and the Protestant, not only failed in its role as mediator, but they settled on one of the forces in conflict, exacerbating the moods and intensify the polarization.
Esta tendencia es negativa porque le concede protagonismo político a dos instituciones que no deben tenerlo porque ocupan y deben ocupar espacios que no deben estar contaminados por la política. This trend is negative because it gives prominence to political institutions that should not have it because it must occupy space and should not be polluted by politics.


5. 5.
Cultura de la intolerancia, el irrespeto y la confrontación Culture of intolerance, disrespect and confrontation


Una característica relativamente nueva del sistema político hondureño es la intolerancia a los que son y piensan diferente; el irrespeto al otro, incluidas las máximas autoridades de nuestro país; y la tendencia a convertir diálogos en confrontación. A relatively new addition to the Honduran political system is intolerant to those who are and think differently; disrespect to the other, including the highest authorities of our country and the tendency to turn into confrontational dialogue.
Esta situación se ha observado con mucha preocupación en la crisis actual tanto en el ámbito político como en el ámbito social. This situation has been observed with great concern the current crisis in both political and social matters.
Llama la atención que la confrontación llegó al límite, provocada y estimulada por los medios de comunicación de la alianza opositora, impregnando a la sociedad de lo que hasta ahora ha sido una característica de los medios de comunicación en general: ofensas, lenguaje soez, gritos, invasión de la privacidad, agresión, acusaciones infundadas. Striking that the confrontation reached the limit, caused and stimulated by the media of the opposition alliance, pervading a society which has hitherto been a feature of the media in general offenses, foul language, yelling , invasion of privacy, assault, allegations unfounded.
Todo ello se vio en este proceso, lo que imposibilita más la búsqueda de consensos y la solución pacífica de los conflictos. All this was in the process, making it impossible for most to seek consensus and peaceful resolution of conflicts.


G. G.
UN GOLPE AL PROCESO DEMOCRÁTICO A BLOW TO THE DEMOCRATIC PROCESS


Si no fuera por el drama provocado por el golpe de Estado, la detención y expulsión del Presidente de la República, la represión de manifestantes, las violaciones a las garantías individuales y los controles a la libertad de expresión, provocaría hilaridad la forma en que los políticos hondureños definen la democracia, el orden democrático y el fortalecimiento institucional. If not for the drama caused by the coup, the detention and expulsion of the President, the repression of demonstrators, violations of individual rights and controls on freedom of expression, hilarity lead the way in which Honduran define political democracy, and democratic institution building.
Mantienen el viejo concepto ideologizado de democracia que colocaba a los militares como sus máximos defensores, consideran orden democrático al castigo impuesto al Presidente de un poder del Estado por atreverse a desafiar al Congreso Nacional y denominan fortalecimiento institucional a la rapidez con que nombran a su sustituto ya su nuevo gabinete. Ideologized maintain the old concept of democracy that places the military as its greatest defenders, democratic order to consider punishment to the President the power of the state for daring to challenge the National Congress and called for strengthening the speed with which his replacement is named and his new cabinet.
La situación se volvería más hilarante si los escuchamos razonando sobre porqué lo sucedido no puede definirse como un golpe de Estado: no lo es, dicen, porque siguen existiendo los tres poderes, no se ha roto el orden constitucional y no hay militares al frente de las instituciones del Estado. The situation would become more hilarious if you listen to the reasoning about why it happened can not be defined as a coup d'etat: no, they say, because there are still the three powers, has not broken the constitutional order and there is at the forefront of military State institutions.


Los políticos hondureños le han dado un fuerte golpe al proceso de construcción democrática que se ha venido gestando en los últimos 28 años, demostrando intolerancia, irrespeto a la independencia de poderes, autoritarismo, ignorancia de los cambios que se han producido en el contexto internacional, ambiciones desmedidas, subordinación a los grupos económicos y un profundo irrespeto al Estado de Derecho. Honduran politicians have given a strong blow to the democratic process of building that has been brewing over the past 28 years, demonstrating intolerance, disrespect for the independence of power, authoritarianism, ignorance of the changes in the international context, inordinate ambitions, subordination to the economic groups and a profound disrespect for the rule of law.


Las Fuerzas Armadas se volvieron cómplices del rompimiento del orden constitucional y le provocaron un profundo daño a su imagen institucional, sustituyendo su condición profesional, apolítica y no deliberante, por la condición peyorativa de gorilas con que se les conocía hasta la década de los ochenta. The Armed Forces have become accomplices of breaking the constitutional order and caused a deep hurt your image, replacing its professional, apolitical and non-deliberative, the pejorative status of gorillas that were known until the eighties.
Se sumaron al juego de los protagonistas de la alianza político-económica y mediática, y se convirtieron en instrumento para que ellos lograran sus objetivos y se quedaran con la gloria, mientras la institución se quedaba con la ignominia. Joined the game of the protagonists in the political and economic alliance, and media and became a tool for them to achieve their goals and they were the glory, while the institution is left with the shame.


Todas las personas, grupos y políticos tienen derecho a apoyar o rechazar sistemas ideológicos que caracterizan a los países de nuestro continente; a lo que no tienen derecho es a imponer su criterio particular como criterio general de la sociedad, a impedir que un presidente termine su mandato constitucional porque no comparten con él sus simpatías personales con otros presidentes ya impedir que la ciudadanía sea consultada sobre cualquier tema, incluyendo la elaboración de una nueva Constitución. All persons, groups and politicians are right to support or reject ideological systems that characterize the countries of our continent, what is not entitled to impose its particular approach as a general criterion of society, to prevent a president finished his constitutional because it did not share with him their personal sympathy with other presidents and to exclude the public is consulted on any issue, including development of a new constitution.
Manifestarse sobre estos y otros temas, es también un derecho de todos, pero expresar públicamente nuestras preferencias y gritarlas con toda la fuerza que podamos, no nos hace superiores a los otros. Comment on these and other issues, is also a right for all, but to publicly express our preferences and shouted with all the strength that we can not make us superior to others.


• Consultar a la ciudadanía no puede ser nunca un acto ilegal: cuando los integrantes de la alianza política-económica y mediática asuman el significado de esta frase, será un gran indicador de avance en cultura política democrática. • Consult the public can never be an illegal act when members of the economic and political alliance-media assume the meaning of this phrase, it will be a great indicator of progress on democratic political culture.

• Reconocer y respetar la coexistencia de personas, partidos y países que son o piensan diferentes, será un gran indicador de que las Fuerzas Armadas hondureñas superaron su condición primitiva y atrasada. • Recognize and respect the existence of people, parties and countries that are different or think will be a major indicator of the Honduran armed forces overcome their primitive and backward.

• Emitir una opinión no implica obligatoriamente estar a favor o en contra, cuando la sociedad hondureña asuma este criterio, será un gran indicador de su capacidad para debatir y proponer. • To issue an opinion not necessarily mean being in favor or against, when the Honduran society to assume this approach will be a great indicator of their ability to discuss and propose.



Tegucigalpa, Honduras, 29 de junio de 2009 Tegucigalpa, Honduras, June 29, 2009


Leticia Salomón es socióloga y economista, profesora-investigadora del Leticia Salomon is a sociologist and economist, professor and researcher of

Departamento de Ciencias Sociales de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Department of Social Sciences at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de

Honduras e investigadora asociada del Centro de Documentación de Honduras Honduras and researcher at the Documentation Center of Honduras

(CEDOH). (CEDOH).
Autora de varios libros de análisis político-social. Author of several books on political and social analysis.

Magda Hassan
07-04-2009, 11:25 AM
Well, in keeping with their entry into the twilight zone the Honduran dictator has expelled the OAS from Honduras so there is no need for the OAS to consider whether or not to have Honduras expelled. Totally isolated and filled with their own delusions and hallucinations they would rather persist with their fantasy than deal with the fact that they are soon going to come to a grinding halt. Chavez has suspended oil exports to Honduras Borders are closed to trade. Food shortages are already happening. Honduras has a narrow production base mainly bananas and coffee. There is only so many bananas the coffee growers will buy and vis a versa before they need outsiders to trade with them. The oligarchy will be screaming in self inflicted pain soon. If the dictator and his littler soldier helper have half a brain between them they will be making arrangements with the US ambassador for a long holiday in Miami and slink out the back door before Zelaya, Insulza, Correa and Kirchner arrive. But are they really that bright?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Well, it's official! The Organization of American States (OAS) doesn't need to bother suspending Honduras from the OAS because the coup government has decided it is withdrawing from the most important regional body in the Americas. Roberto Micheletti, the dictator who was sworn in as de facto president in Honduras on Sunday, after the democratically elected president Manuel Zelaya was kidnapped at gunpoint by masked soldiers and forced into exile, has said, "to hell with you OAS", "we don't need you either!" During Secretary General of the OAS, Jose Miguel Insulza's visit to the Central American nation to hand deliver the 72-hour ultimatum demanding the coup government step down or face suspension (the most severe sanction the OAS can impose), coup leader Roberto Micheletti gave a speech before supporters and later issued a formal statement withdrawing Honduras from the OAS, declaring, "we don't have to respond to anybody, we are a sovereign nation". The OAS visit was intended to reach some kind of dialogue or solution to the crisis in Honduras since the coup occurred on early Sunday morning, yet the coup government held tight to its position of power.

On Saturday, the OAS will convene a new meeting to review the results of its failure in Honduras and the decision of the coup government to defiantly ignore the regional body's intentions to resolve the conflict peacefully (if that is even possible at this point). Several presidents, such as Cristina Fernandez of Argentina and Rafael Correa of Ecuador will travel to Washington for the special OAS follow up meeting to the Honduran crisis.

President Zelaya had hoped to return Saturday to his elected post, yet the situation in his country, post-coup, is more complicated than originally imagined. Hondurans supporting Zelaya marched cross the nation to the capital, Tegucigalpa, on Friday to send a message to the OAS General Secretary that they are waiting for their legitimate president to return.

If the Obama administration doesn't formally sanction the coup government in Honduras and suspend all relations, as every other country around the world has done so far, a terrible precedent will be set in the hemisphere, allowing for coups that produce "friendly" results for Washington. The United States is pleased with the outcome of Sunday's coup, which deposed a leftist president aligned with countries like Venezuela, Cuba and Bolivia, but at the same time is not happy with the method - a military coup- to achieve the end goal. However, if Washington continues without firmly condemning the coup government's actions and withdrawal from the OAS, Obama will lose all credibility in Latin America.
http://www.chavezcode.com/2009/07/day-7-coup-government-in-honduras.html

Peter Lemkin
07-04-2009, 03:45 PM
I have a bad feeling if he attempts a return.....something out of 'Jonestown'....I hope I'm wrong.......

Magda Hassan
07-05-2009, 08:49 AM
Statement of Pres. Zelaya on his Return Tomorrow, Calls for Non-Violent Demonstrations (http://americasmexico.blogspot.com/2009/07/statement-of-pres-zelaya-on-his-return.html)

Here is the translation to English of the Statement of President Manuel Zelaya, issued July 4:

Compañeros and compañeras, fellow Hondurans, your president, Manuel Zelaya Rosales, speaks to you. I want to tell you that my destiny is tied to the destiny of the Honduran people. On the morning of June 28, while I was preparing to exercise my vote in a nationwide survey, I was the victim of assaults, abuses, violations and kidnapping, I was taken captive and expelled from my country by Honduran military forces. By these military forces that today have put themselves in the service of and in complicity with the voracious elite that squeezes and asphyxiates our people, obeying their orders and not defending our nation or our democracy. This is a blow to the Honduran nation and has made clear to the world that in Honduras there is still a kind of barbarity, and people who are unaware of the harm they cause to our country and to future generations.

Through these means of communication, I call for you to continue the participation of the people. The people are the principle actors of our democracy and of the solutions that must be found to the grave problems of poverty and inequality in our country.

As Hondurans, we have faced major problems and we have always know how to come together to move forward, and this is a huge opportunity to show the world that Hondurans are capable of confronting these problems in spite of the attacks by a criminal sector that today seeks to appropriate the fate of our nation and of our children.

I speak to the coup leaders, traitors, Judases that kissed me on the cheek to then carry out this major strike against our country and democracy: You must rectify your actions as soon as possible. You are surrounded, the world has isolated you, all the nations of the world have condemned you, without exception. There is general repudiation of your actions, your actions will not be ignored because international tribunals will hold you accountable for the genocide you are carrying out in our country by repressing basic freedoms and by repressing our people.

I am organizing my return to Honduras and I ask all campesinos, housewives, city-dwellers, indigenous peoples, youth and all the groups of workers, businesspeople and politicians that I have throughout the nation--mayors, legislators--that you accompany me on my return to Honduras. This is the return of the elected president, elected by the sovereign will of the people, which is the only form of electing presidents in Honduras. Let us not lose our rights and not permit that certain individuals begin to make decisions that should be made by the Honduran people, through their legitimacy and their popular will.

I am willing to make any effort and sacrifice to obtain the freedom that our country needs. We will either be free or we will be permanent slaves unless we have the courage to defend ourselves. Do not take arms, practice what I have always taught-- non-violence. Let them be the ones who bring violence, arms and repression. Make the coup responsible for every life of every person, for the physical integrity and dignity of the Honduran people.

We are going to arrive in the International Airport of Honduras in Tegucigalpa with several presidents and members of the international community. On Sunday we will be in Tegucigalpa, we will be accompanying you and embracing you to defend what we have always defended, which is the will of God through the will of the people.

Greetings fellow countrymen and women, may God protect you and bless you all.
http://americasmexico.blogspot.com/2009/07/statement-of-pres-zelaya-on-his-return.html

Magda Hassan
07-05-2009, 08:51 AM
Honduras Coup General Was Charged in 1993 Auto Theft Ring


Posted by Al Giordano (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/al-giordano) - July 4, 2009 at 4:15 pm By Al Giordano
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/vasquez1.jpeg
General Romeo Vásquez Velásquez, who appeared on stage this week with Honduran coup “president” Roberto Michiletti, and who ordered the kidnapping and forced deportation of P resident Manuel Zelaya last Sunday, was charged with grand auto theft in 1993, Narco News has learned.
On February 2, 1993, the front page of the Tegucigalpa daily El Heraldo included this headline: “Eleven Members of the Gang of 13 Go to Prison”:

“Eleven individuals arrested for their alleged participation in the theft of 200 luxury automobiles… were sent to prison yesterday… (including) Colonel Wilfredo Leva Caborrea and Major Romeo Vásquez Velásquez, accused as alleged participants…”
(Narco News makes the document available for download by press and public here (http://www.narconews.com/docs/DEFENSOR-DE-LA-DEMOCRACIA.pdf), including two interior pages of the newspaper that report on the case, each mentioning the then-major, now commander of the military coup in Honduras.)
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/blue-graphs-LG.jpg
The newspaper report further stated:

“…Major Romeo Vásquez Velásquez, connected to the theft of luxury cars in the ‘Gang of 13,’ will be imprisoned in the Central Penitentiary (PC, in its Spanish initials).”
Prior to his criminal acts, Vásquez attended (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romeo_V%C3%A1squez_Vel%C3%A1squez) the US School of the Americas in 1976 and 1984, when the school was located in Panama, but he did not graduate.
It was the same Honduran Congress that endorsed, after the fact, last Sunday’s military coup, and named Roberto Micheletti as the country's "president," that promoted this common car thief as head of the Armed Forces.
Memo to the General: Objects in the rear view mirror are closer than they appear...


http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/al-giordano/2009/07/honduras-coup-general-was-charged-1993-auto-theft-ring

Magda Hassan
07-05-2009, 08:54 AM
Snipers positioned in the vicinity of the airport (http://66.249.89.132/translate_c?hl=en&u=http://hondurasresistencia.blogspot.com/2009/07/francotiradores-apostados-en-las.html&rurl=translate.google.com&usg=ALkJrhiTKDipOXI8drDYAzvcA4BRMXGQHQ)


Publicado por espectrods on 7/4/09 Published by espectrods on 7/4/09

Etiquetas: cardenal (http://66.249.89.132/translate_c?hl=en&u=http://hondurasresistencia.blogspot.com/search/label/cardenal&rurl=translate.google.com&usg=ALkJrhg3ovSxCupvawmcxS6LnVncazjF6w) , gopistas (http://66.249.89.132/translate_c?hl=en&u=http://hondurasresistencia.blogspot.com/search/label/gopistas&rurl=translate.google.com&usg=ALkJrhgsz13DdMGvlYBqdvOLJbPw7l1nPw) , HOnduras (http://66.249.89.132/translate_c?hl=en&u=http://hondurasresistencia.blogspot.com/search/label/HOnduras&rurl=translate.google.com&usg=ALkJrhj-XwjZa0cMqprErO8MLAqBdEbrlw) , michelleti (http://66.249.89.132/translate_c?hl=en&u=http://hondurasresistencia.blogspot.com/search/label/michelleti&rurl=translate.google.com&usg=ALkJrhiOrId7lFMDtFmaItW56wIs1jGKug) , resistencia (http://66.249.89.132/translate_c?hl=en&u=http://hondurasresistencia.blogspot.com/search/label/resistencia&rurl=translate.google.com&usg=ALkJrhiChUVMtPgUHHO3I8kpMVgKDa8G3Q) Tags: cardinal, (http://66.249.89.132/translate_c?hl=en&u=http://hondurasresistencia.blogspot.com/search/label/cardenal&rurl=translate.google.com&usg=ALkJrhg3ovSxCupvawmcxS6LnVncazjF6w) gopistas, (http://66.249.89.132/translate_c?hl=en&u=http://hondurasresistencia.blogspot.com/search/label/gopistas&rurl=translate.google.com&usg=ALkJrhgsz13DdMGvlYBqdvOLJbPw7l1nPw) Honduras, (http://66.249.89.132/translate_c?hl=en&u=http://hondurasresistencia.blogspot.com/search/label/HOnduras&rurl=translate.google.com&usg=ALkJrhj-XwjZa0cMqprErO8MLAqBdEbrlw) michelleti, (http://66.249.89.132/translate_c?hl=en&u=http://hondurasresistencia.blogspot.com/search/label/michelleti&rurl=translate.google.com&usg=ALkJrhiOrId7lFMDtFmaItW56wIs1jGKug) resistance (http://66.249.89.132/translate_c?hl=en&u=http://hondurasresistencia.blogspot.com/search/label/resistencia&rurl=translate.google.com&usg=ALkJrhiChUVMtPgUHHO3I8kpMVgKDa8G3Q)


El gobierno de facto dirigido por nuestro Dinosaurio golpista ha apostado a sus franco tiradores en las cercanías de el aeropuerto internacional toncontin de Tegucigalpa , los mismos fueron vistos el día de hoy cuando los manifestantes se acercaban al mismo, estos mismos se esperan sigan en su misma posición de inmediación solo que esperamos no dirijan o mejor aun que no se les gire una orden desde los golpistas y dirijan sus rifles en dirección al pueblo, y hagan lo que adelanta lo que la iglesia (que mas que iglesia parece voceros del gobierno, hasta cadenas nacionales les brindan) católica "si vuelve mel esto sera un baño de sangre" si esto es lo que hace el gran cardenal Oscar Rodriguez , como es posible que un clérigo haga semejantes aseveraciones y aun así tenga conciencia para dirigir un a iglesa ...y habla de paz cuando queremos denunciar que se ha confirmado con un periodista de Radio Progreso fue victimado pro las fuerzas golpistas compañero tu vida no se perderá en el olvido... The de facto government headed by our Dinosaur coup franc has bet their shooters in the vicinity of the international airport in Tegucigalpa Toncontin, they were seen today when the protesters came to it, these are expected to continue in the same position of immediacy that we hope will not only direct or better still they are not turn an order from the putschists and direct their guns toward the town, and do it advances what the church (which seems more than church government spokesmen to give them national chains) Catholic "if it will be back mel a bloodbath" if this is what makes the great Cardinal Oscar Rodriguez, as a cleric may make such statements and still have a conscience to lead a church .. . and talk about peace when we claim that is confirmed by a journalist for Radio Progreso was the victim of the coup forces your life partner will not be lost in oblivion ...


Esperamos que para el dia de mañana retorne el presidente constitucional a la nación , y este sera acompañado con pro diferentes mandataros del continente y mas que ellos el pueblo de HONDURAS tambien estara presente como el mejor y puro comite de bienvenida. We hope that by tomorrow to return the nation to constitutional president, and this will be accompanied by pro mandataros different continent and most of the people they HONDURAS also be present as the best pure and welcoming committee.



Como el presidente Correa menciono Honduras es el mejor lugar para dejar la vida, esta la tierra de Moraban , la patria de Lempira , así están SIETE MILLONES Y MEDIO de HONDUREÑOS dispuestos ha dejar sus ideales plasmados en piedra con su propia vida con el propósito de expulsar de este mundo si es posible a estos dinosaurios que han querido no mas que asegurar sus intereses económicos en el país . As the president mentioned Honduras Correa is the best place to leave life, dwelt in this land, the homeland of Lempira, and are seven and a half million has HONDURAN willing to leave their ideals embodied in stone with his own life with the purpose of out of this world if it is possible that these dinosaurs have wanted no more to secure its economic interests in the country.



Los hondureños ya no estamos en la época antigua, no nos quedamos callados, encerrados y solo asintiendo nuestras cabezas... Hondurans and not in ancient times, we were not silent, locked up and only our heads nodding ...
la renitencia popular acompañada por la razón le quitara la cabeza al tirano dictador que con violencia y sin respetar el estado de derecho y las luchas históricas ha querido saciar su sed de poder tomando al presidencia del país , derrocando al único candidato que fue electo por la población . accompanied by the popular renitencia reason you remove the head to the tyrant dictator who violently and without the rule of law and the historical struggles wanted to quench their thirst for taking the presidency of the country, overthrowing the only candidate who was elected by the population.



Honduaras unido jamas sera vencido, Zelaya amigo el pueblo esta contigo, gorilas bastardos su tumba no esta largo, tiranos traidores EL PUEBLO SON LOS POBRES Hondu united will never be defeated, Zelaya friend is with you people, gorillas bastards his grave is not long, treacherous tyrants PEOPLE ARE POOR


Se que es casi imposible que la comunidad Hondureña se de cuenta de lo que realmente sucede puesto que el cerco mediatico sigue levantado... It is almost impossible for the Honduran community to realize what actually happens as the media continues to fence up ...
esto se lo dedicamos a la comunidad internacional que tienen acceso a el.. This is dedicated to the international community to have access to the ..
mi pueblo de honduras podrá verlo cuando la justicia prevalezca y los golpistas desaparezcan del país ... honduras my people can see it when justice prevails and the putschists disappear in the country ...



Honduras sera libre, Michelleti sera consumido por su propia consciencia ... Honduras will be free Michelleti will be consumed by his own conscience ...
http://hondurasresistencia.blogspot.com/2009/07/militares-reprien-con-armas-largas-el.html

Magda Hassan
07-05-2009, 09:12 AM
Honduras Coup Chooses Path of Rogue Narco-State

Posted by Al Giordano (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/al-giordano) - July 4, 2009 at 9:57 am By Al Giordano
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/hondurasgerman.jpg
This photo (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/04/world/americas/04honduras.html?_r=1&hp) of Honduran coup “president” Roberto Micheletti rallying his supporters, above, from yesterday’s New York Times includes a creative act of protest against it. In the lower left hand corner of the photo, there are two placards in the crowd that are not in Spanish, but in German: "Ein Reich, Ein Volk, Ein Stimme" and "Arbeit Macht Uns Frei".
Field Hand DK points out in the comments section: “The first was a prominent Nazi slogan (one Reich, one people, one voice); the second (work makes us free) was inscribed at the entrance to the Auschwitz concentration camp.”
(Note: Not being a German-speaker, I can't confirm the commenter's translation, but another Field Hand, Lucidamente, now offers an alternative translation in the comments section that is similar but not an exact match with this one.)
Which only goes to prove that employers can force their workers to attend a pro-coup rally but they can’t control what signs they hold.
Now, on to today’s significant news out of Honduras:
Last night, around 10 p.m. Tegucigalpa time, CNN Español interrupted its sports news programming for a live press conference announcement ("no questions, please") by coup “president” Micheletti.
There, he announced that his coup “government” of Honduras is withdrawing from the Democratic Charter of the Organization of American States (OAS). The Friday night press conference was meant to preempt this morning’s OAS meeting in Washington (at which various heads of state, including Presidents Cristina Kirchner of Argentina and Rafael Correa of Ecuador deemed important enough to attend) where the OAS will surely expel the Honduras coup regime for its flagrant violations of said Democratic Charter. Thus, the late Friday night press conference to say “You can’t fire us! We quit!”
The Honduras coup’s behavior virtually assures that come Monday, the US government will define it as a “military coup,” triggering a cut off of US aid, joining the World Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank, PetroCaribe, the UN and the rest of the world in withdrawing economic support for the coup regime. (The US had already put all funds on "pause" this week, so the boycott has already begun and merely awaits formal moves to become permanent.)
This is very significant because of Honduras’ annual $3.5 billion budget, $2.3 billion – 65 percent - comes from those foreign sources.
This seemingly suicidal maneuver by the coup government can be partially explained by what I described yesterday as the “shared hallucinatio n” of those in the Honduras oligarchy’s ten owning families and those elites in their orbit.
But something else is at work: Greedy people don’t just cast away 65 percent of their national budget unless they believe they can get it from other sources.
One of the big backers of the coup d’etat has been an international terrorist network of ex-Cubans, who have financed the dirty work of jet plane bomber Luis Posada Carriles (http://www.narconews.com/Issue56/article3472.html) over the years and have set up business interests in Honduras. These forces are desperate now that Washington is making the moves to ease and end the embargo of Cuba. Investigative journalist Guy Jean-Allard reports, via TeleSur (http://www.telesurtv.net/noticias/opinion/1079/socio-de-posada-carriles-entre-los-mas-firmes-apoyos-de-los-golpistas/), that Ralph Nodarse – ex-Cuban owner of Channel 6 in San Pedro Sula, Honduras – and arms-and-drug trafficker Rafael Hernández Nodarse are knee deep behind he coup-plotters in Honduras. The latter aided and abetted Posada Carriles to hide out in Panama in 2004.
There was likewise a strong nexus between the Honduras government and military and the 1980s Iran-Contra drugs-for-arms-for-Nicaraguan-paramilitaries scandal, where much of the illegal covert US cocaine smuggling operation was headquartered during the Reagan and Bush Senior presidencies.
The government of Venezuela has accused that former State Department official and anti-Castro ex-Cuban Otto Reich is involved with the current coup regime in Honduras. Reich, at State during the 2002 coup in Venezuela, was the US official that called ambassadors from throughout Latin America into his office when the coup was taking place to instruct them that the US supported the coup and expected the same from them (that move backfired when Latin American nations delivered the first-ever rebuke to the US via the OAS). He was also at State in the mid-1980s heading up Latin American operations and has been strongly linked to the cocaine-smuggling activities then.
Those who think that when the US cuts off funds, as it will surely do in the coming days, that the sanctions will starve the Honduran coup regime into surrender, are forgetting that in this asymmetrical world there are non-government entities – which is to say, organized crime, terrorist, and narco-trafficking organizations – that seek a safe haven in Central America, so important in the route between the South American coca plant and the noses of North America.
The historic overlap between the ex-Cuban terrorist networks and cocaine trafficking is well documented.
Last night, “president” Micheletti made it clear that his regime seeks to run a rogue state, unbeholden to the Democratic Charter of the OAS or international law. He is thus setting up an oasis that will prove irresistible to large narco-trafficking organizations as a protected base of operations, from whom he will extract the funding to make up the significant $2.3 billion shortfall caused by economic sanctions against his coup regime, plus additional “tips” to line the pockets of all who share in his power structure.
This opens up a new chapter not only in Latin American governmental history, but also in the drug war. It was clear that when Plan Mexico began its assault along the US-Mexico border that certain trafficking organizations would simply move to other geographic spaces through which to operate (and thus all the carnage and depravation of human rights cause by Plan Mexico would end up having zero impact stemming the flow of cocaine). The only question - to where? - has now been answered.
Now enters the Honduras coup "government" in its bid to become the cocaine trafficking capital of the hemisphere, the new gangster regime.
Update: This AP report (http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5jAkMGKIUDg_ngUiZboxQbYj5_DPwD9977F6G0) sheds some light on the honesty or dishonesty of coup "president" Micheletti:

Micheletti's government is so eager to find a friend that it announced it had been recognized by Israel and Italy — surprising the governments of those countries. Italy withdrew its ambassador to protest the coup, and Israeli Foreign Ministry spokesman Yigal Palmor said: "All rumors about Israeli recognition of the new president are wholly unfounded."
And contrary to Micheletti's assertion, Interpol on Friday released a statement saying it had not received any request to issue an arrest warrant for Zelaya.
In other words, he's just making it up as he goes along, apparently unaware that in a world of globalized communications such false claims can be shot down rather quickly. Maybe he was too hasty in blocking Internet access in his own land?
Update II: President Manuel Zelaya just broadcast an audio message to the people of Honduras, aired on Telesur, confirming that he returns tomorrow, Sunday, to his country, and urging the people to go to the international airport in Tegucigalpa to join him in his return (you can watch Telesur's livestream at this link (http://www.telesurtv.net/noticias/canal/senalenvivo.php), which has been showing frequent images of the massive marches from distinct points heading toward the airport already). Zelaya also stressed his appeal that the people arrive unarmed and subscribe to "nonviolence," even if coup forces turn violent against them.
Update III: Telesur reports at 12:40 (hour Tegucigalpa) that the mass peaceful march against the coup is now just one kilometer from the airport, its destination.
Update IV: Brazil Press Agency (Agência Brasil) estimates the crowd size of the anti-coup march to be "close to 50,000," (http://www.agenciabrasil.gov.br/noticias/2009/07/03/materia.2009-07-03.5104274428/view) and it's still a day before its culmination tomorrow. The television images certainly suggest a crowd of at least that size, too.
The coup regime already has a new problem: whether try to enforce its "curfew" (suspension of constitutional rights) tonight as such a large group of citizens remains surrounding the airport in anticipation of the return of their president. (The Coup "Congress" just extended the state of siege a second time, now through Tuesday morning.)
Update V: Here's a BBC photo of just one of the multitudinous marches arriving and surrounding the international airport in support and defense of President Zelaya's return tomorrow:
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/july4honduras.jpeg
(As the umbrellas indicate, they're arriving under some rain.)
Update VI: I've just filed a new report for Narco News:
Honduras Coup General Was Charged in 1993 Auto Theft Ring (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/al-giordano/2009/07/honduras-coup-general-was-charged-1993-auto-theft-ring)
Everyone knows he's a thug. Now they know he's a two-bit crook, too.
Update VII: Radio Globo (broadcasting from clandestinity after coup soldiers invaded and destroyed their broadcasting equipment) reports that there are now 200,000 Honduran citizens surrounding the Toncontin International Airport (http://www.larepublica.es/spip.php?article16148) in Tegucigalpa in protest against the coup and awaiting the arrival of their president. This, in spite of a massive military and police operation to block citizens on all roads leading to Tegucigalpa from throughout the country.
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/thefield/honduras-coup-chooses-path-rogue-narco-state

Peter Lemkin
07-05-2009, 09:25 AM
It is going to be an 'interesting' day there today, I fear....I just hope no one is hurt or killed....somehow I sense it is building to that. LIHOP :flute:

Magda Hassan
07-05-2009, 09:58 AM
If Obama had any cojones he'd be sending Hilary (or himself) along with the Presidents of Paraguay, Ecuador, Argentina and the OAS when Zelaya returns. But we all know where he stands. Where ever he is told.

Yes, it will be an interesting day. You can watch it on Telesur I believe. It will be live.
Herre is the link:
http://www.telesurtv.net/noticias/canal/senalenvivo.php

Peter Lemkin
07-05-2009, 10:22 AM
If Obama had any cojones he'd be sending Hilary (or himself) along with the Presidents of Paraguay, Ecuador, Argentina and the OAS when Zelaya returns. But we all know where he stands. Where ever he is told.

Yes, it will be an interesting day. You can watch it on Telesur I believe. It will be live.
Herre is the link:
http://www.telesurtv.net/noticias/canal/senalenvivo.php

I assume if there is a flight no one will be arrested because no one will be allowed off the plane...if they are even allowed to land. Yes, Obama should send someone and a USAF escort...but I think he talks the talk and walks a different path than his speech indicates on most things. Yes, he 'stands' where he is told to stand. JFK was the last President who had any thoughts of having the power of the Presidency...and 'they' showed him!....

Hillary is too busy getting tickets for the Michael Jackson extravaganza to deal with this petty matter....

By the way the other German sign says 'The truth makes us free'...ain't that the truth.....!

Magda, are you following how this whole 'scenario' is playing in C and S. America? I imagine it is BIG news and sending a very all-too-familiar cold-shiver down their backs....thinking who's next on the 'list'.....

Obama had fulfilled all of my worst fears as 'good cop' to W as 'bad cop' [a cop is a cop]and is only the 'rachet' being pulled-back for the next 'squeeze' to choke the democracy out of us all......

I'm so sick and tired of being sick and tired....F.L. Haimer

Peter Lemkin
07-06-2009, 06:18 AM
What next? I was right - they didn't allow them to land. The USA put zero pressure on the coup faction - sickening. We did the same with Aristide...US military hustled him abord a plane out of Haiti and then said it wasn't a coup and we had nothing to do with it....new technique...just physically remove the duely elected President and put in one's prefered puppets to take over using whatever illegal cover they care to spout....Somewhere in D.C. is a list with a check-mark after Honduras....the list has all of the new centrist-populist and leftist governments in Central and South America....who's next?

Honduras slides toward greater instability

By WILL WEISSERT and JEANNETH VALDIVIESO – 21 minutes ago

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras (AP) — Already volatile Honduras slid toward greater instability after soldiers blocked an airport runway to keep ousted President Manuel Zelaya from returning, and protests that had remained largely peaceful yielded their first death.

Police and soldiers blanketed the streets of the capital overnight Monday — enforcing a sunset-to-sunrise curfew with batons and metal poles.

The extended curfew added to the tension after a turbulent Sunday that saw soldiers clash with thousands of Zelaya backers who massed at the airport in hopes of welcoming home their deposed leader.

Zelaya's plane, on loan from Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, arrived to find the runway blocked by military vehicles and soldiers under the command of the government that has ruled this Central American country since Zelaya's ouster last weekend.

His Venezuelan pilots circled around the airport and decided not to risk a crash.

Zelaya instead headed for El Salvador, and vowed to try again Monday or Tuesday in his high-stakes effort to return to power in a country where all branches of government have lined up against him.

"I call on the Armed Forces of Honduras to lower their rifles," he said late Sunday at a news conference, flanked by the presidents of El Salvador, Argentina, Paraguay and Ecuador, and the secretary-general of the Organization of American States, Jose Miguel Insulza, who flew there from Washington.

"I am risking myself personally to resolve the problems without violence," said Zelaya, who planned to fly later to Nicaragua. He urged the United Nations, the OAS, the United States and European countries to "do something with this repressive regime."

Insulza said he "is open to continuing all appropriate diplomatic overtures to obtain our objective."

But interim Honduran President Roberto Micheletti said he won't negotiate until "things return to normal."

"We will be here until the country calms down," Micheletti said. "We are the authentic representatives of the people."

Clashes broke out Sunday afternoon between police and soldiers and the huge crowd of Zelaya supporters surrounding Tegucigalpa's international airport. At least one man was killed — shot in the head from inside the airport as people tried to break through a security fence, according to an Associated Press photographer at the scene. At least 30 people were treated for injuries, the Red Cross said, after security forces fired warning shots and tear gas.

When Zelaya's plane was turned away, his supporters began chanting "We want blue helmets!" — a reference to U.N. peacekeepers.

Karin Antunez, 27, was in tears.

"We're scared. We feel sad because these coup soldiers won't let Mel return, but we're not going to back down," she said. "We're the people and we're going to keep marching so that our president comes home."

Zelaya won wide international support after his ouster, but several presidents who originally were to accompany him decided it was too dangerous to fly on Zelaya's plane, which carried only his close advisers and staff, two journalists from the Venezuela-based network Telesur and U.N. General Assembly President Miguel D'Escoto Brockmann, a leftist Nicaraguan priest and former foreign minister.

Honduras' new government has vowed to arrest Zelaya for 18 alleged criminal acts including treason and failing to implement more than 80 laws approved by Congress since taking office in 2006. Zelaya also refused to comply with a Supreme Court ruling against his planned referendum on whether to hold an assembly to consider changing the constitution.

Critics feared Zelaya might try to extend his rule and cement presidential power in ways similar to what his ally Chavez has done in Venezuela — though Zelaya denied that.

But instead of prosecuting him or trying to defeat him at the ballot box, masked soldiers flew the president out of the country at gunpoint, and Congress installed Micheletti in his place.

The military solution drew international condemnation, and Honduras was suspended by the OAS. Many called the coup a huge step backward for democracy, and no nation has recognized the new government. President Barack Obama has united with Chavez and conservative Colombian President Alvaro Uribe in insisting on Zelaya's return.

Speaking on condition of anonymity under ground rules set by the State Department, senior U.S. officials said the United States and other OAS member countries are coordinating contacts to facilitate a resolution, despite their insistence on having no formal relations with the interim government.

Without OAS membership, Honduras faces trade sanctions and the loss of hundreds of millions of dollars in subsidized oil, aid and loans for the impoverished nation.

Moments after Zelaya's plane was turned away, trucks filled with police ordered everyone off the streets.

"This is a war," said Matias Sauceda, 65, a human rights activist. "Imagine — things are so bad, that the president is in the air and they don't let him land."
--------------------------------------------
By Kim Ghattas
BBC News, Washington



Mr Obama has condemned his Honduran counterpart's removal


US President Barack Obama has called the removal of Honduran president Manuel Zelaya on Sunday a "coup".

The ousted leader has been meeting US officials in Washington.

But the US State Department has not recalled its ambassador from Tegucigalpa and it is still reviewing whether to cut off aid to Honduras.

So while Washington's reaction has been strong and swift, when it comes to statements, its actions have so far been measured.

This is a signal that Washington is not keen to use its clout to help Mr Zelaya return to power, shying away from any action that could be seen as interventionism in a region where the US has a long, complex history.

The reaction is also in line with the promise President Obama made to Latin America at the Organization of American States summit in April, not to dictate US policy on the continent anymore but to be an equal partner.

Political shift

But the careful approach also underscores how awkward it can be for a US president to follow through on his declared desire to "stand on the side of democracy, sovereignty and self-determination" when the overthrown leader is someone with whom Washington has recently had cool relations.
The region has made enormous progress over the last 20 years in establishing democratic traditions... We don't want to go back to a dark past
Barack Obama


"Whatever political disagreements you might have, there are democratic norms that have to and should be followed," White House spokesperson Robert Gibbs said.

Honduras is a strong US ally and gets a considerable amount of development and military aid. The US is also Honduras's biggest trading partner.

But Mr Zelaya, who came to power in 2006 as a centre-right leader, turned into a supporter of Venezuela's Hugo Chavez halfway through his term.

He then joined the Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas, a leftist alliance led by Venezuela.

Mr Chavez has long been Washington's bete noire, even though relations have thawed somewhat since Mr Obama came to office.

Mr Zelaya's recent attempts to amend the constitution are reminiscent of those Mr Chavez and other populist presidents have taken to extend their time in office.

His call for a referendum to determine whether there was popular support to rewrite the constitution put him at odds with his country's Congress, military and Supreme Court.

It is probably not a path that Washington wanted to see Honduras take, but the military removal of Mr Zelaya was an even worse direction for the country in the eyes of the US administration.

"On the one instance, we're talking about conducting a survey, a non-binding survey; in the other instance, we're talking about the forcible removal of a president from a country," said a state department official on Sunday, speaking on conditions of anonymity.

US involvement

Echoing the condemnation by Latin American leaders, President Obama also said that "it would be a terrible precedent if we start moving backwards into the era in which we are seeing military coups as a means of political transition rather than democratic elections".

"The region has made enormous progress over the last 20 years in establishing democratic traditions in Central America and Latin America. We don't want to go back to a dark past," he added.

And while Washington has - oddly - found itself on the same side as Mr Chavez in condemning the removal of Mr Zelaya and calling for his return to power, it has also had to reject allegations by Mr Chavez that it had a hand in the coup.

General Romeo Vasquez, Honduras' top military chief, who led the coup, is one of the hundreds of Honduran officers who have received military training from the US.

He was sacked by Mr Zelaya for refusing to carry out the referendum.

On Tuesday White House spokesperson Robert Gibbs said that the US had spoken out on the Honduran situation to put to rest "any rumours that we were in any way involved in this".

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton indicated that Washington was perhaps hoping that the situation could still be resolved, which explains why the US is still only reviewing its financial assistance to Honduras and has not cut off aid just yet.

She said the US was "withholding any formal legal determination" of the incident as a coup, which would trigger an end to US aid.

"Much of our assistance is conditioned on the integrity of the democratic system.

"But if we were able to get to a status quo that returned to the rule of law and constitutional order within a relatively short period of time, I think that would be a good outcome," she said on Monday.

It is still unclear whether that outcome will be possible.

Mr Zelaya has garnered impressive international support, including a unanimous condemnation of the coup at the UN, but Honduras's new leaders, while isolated, have vowed to arrest Mr Zelaya if he tries to return.

Judica Bosquesillo
07-06-2009, 09:04 AM
Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner President of Argentina has been the first to offer herself to go to Honduras with President Zelaya on Thursday when he returns. In a press conference following his speech to the United Nations General Assembly, Zelaya stated that Ecuadoran President Rafael Correa will also accompany him.

My guess [and only that] is they won't allow anyone off the plane...it will sit there for many days and then leave....they can't afford to let him off the plane with such high-profile persons and UN backing. Let's hope there is no airline 'accident'....

Hello,

My opinion is if the 'interim' people had any thoughts of a trial they would not have conveniently deported him out of the country. Now, they refuse to let him land even though they say he has detainment papers to answer for crimes.

Such strange occurrences.

Magda Hassan
07-06-2009, 09:43 AM
Yes, their behaviour is at odds with their statements. They made it impossible for Mel to return and answer their charges.

Magda Hassan
07-06-2009, 03:21 PM
I thought now would be a good time to give a summary of the Honduran events till now. All or most references are in the previous post here.

This is, as most of these things are, a class issue. The elite cannot bear to have their exclusive power distributed to the people of Honduras.

A member of Honduras' Congress has just admitted that in discussions with the US Ambassador in Honduras, the US Ambassador suggested they just let the opinion poll take place and then vote against the Constitutional Assembly in November, but, said the congressmember, "we can't just allow 'these people' to do this with the help of Venezuela and Cuba."

"we can't have a constitution that allows the 'people' to elect members on the supreme court and allows the 'people' to be involved in government".......

The current constitution, written in 1982 during the height of the Reagan Administration’s dirty war in Central America, was designed to ensure those in power, both economic and political, would retain it with little interference from the people.

What Zelaya has done.
Through out all these events President Zelaya has conducted himself with integrity and in accordance with the law. He certainly has the high moral ground and truth, justice and the people on his side. The Honduran people should be proud that he is their President.

Well, what is touted by the elites and coup mongers as Zelaya's power grab is not one at all but a desperate grab to keep power in the hands of the Honduran elite and to keep the Honduran people from getting involved in any political and policy decisions. The Honduran Supreme Court of Justice, Attorney General, National Congress, Armed Forces and Supreme Electoral Tribunal have all falsely accused Manuel Zelaya of attempting a referendum to extend his term in office. What President Zelaya intended to perform was a non-binding public consultation, about the conformation of an elected National Constituent Assembly. This is perfectly legal under article 5 of the Honduran “Civil Participation Act” of 2006. It allows all public functionaries to be able to perform non-binding public consultations to inquire what the population thinks about policy measures.

The Honduran Congress and the courts ruled against holding the poll. The rulings sparked a crisis when the head of the armed forces, General Romeo Vasquez, refused to allow the army to distribute the urns and other materials for the June 28 poll. The president of Honduras is Commander in Chief and has the final say on the military’s actions, and so he ordered the General’s removal. For disobeying an order to distribute the voting material Zelaya had Vasquez removed on June 24. Zelaya also accepted the resignation of Minister of Defense Edmundo Orellana. The commanders of the other branches of the Armed Forces, Military, Navy, and Air Force, quit in solidarity. A caravan of citizens and President Zelaya then went to the military base to recover the voting materials and to begin disributing them. The army then occupied strategic points in the streets of the capital city Tegucigalpa, reportedly including the presidential residence. The Supreme Court ordered that Vasquez be reinstated.

In the early morning of the day of voting for the poll Zelaya's guards were overwhelmed by 200 military soldiers who arrived at the Presidential Palace who were firing shots. The President was beaten and kidnapped and his family was threatened with death. He was taken to a military airfield where he was kept under guard by Honduran soldiers and according to Wayne Madsen, US soldiers. He was flown to Costa Rica. He did not request asylum despite what was reported in some media. He did request the U.S. Government make a public statement condemning the coup, otherwise, it would indicate their compliance.

International response.
The kidnapping of President Zelaya and the illegal take over of the government of Honduras has been universally denounced by the international community. President Zelaya is the only person recognised as the legitimate Presdient of Honduras by the international commiunity. Borders have been closed to trade by its neighbours. Money has been with-held by the World Bank and the USA. Venezuela has cut off oil supplies. No one in the present government is considered able to speak or act for Honduras (hence they were not able to resign from the OAS and why they were expelled from the organisation by the members of the OAS) and it is now a pariah state and completely isolated under an economic and political blockade. This will soon lead to severe economic consequences for Honduras and may result in splits within the ruling elite. The only way for Honduras to continue economically would be to become a criminal-narco state which may well be attractive to some players inside and outside Honduras.

Who is in the Honduran government now?
The current dictator is Roberto Micheletti. He was previously Speaker of the House and in Zelaya's party. Many of the parliamentarians has been scattered, arrested or have just not turned up. Micheletti is unable to fill may of the seat in his parliament with suitably pliant stooges. William Hall Micheletti, Micheletti's nephew, was installed as mayor of Honduras second biggest city. There has been wholesale arrests and removal of local political and community leaders who are nor supportive of the coup. Micheletti claims Zelaya had resigned and provided a fake letter of resignation from Zelaya. He was 'voted' in by those who remained and were permitted to attend in congress. Other members of parliament are saying they have been forcibly prevented from attending parliament and therefore any decisions made have not been legal. This has also been upheld by some of the Honduran judiciary and are mounting legal challenges against the coup mongers. Other judges have supported the coup and its actions. Zelaya has been charged with several offeces but was a) not arrested but deported and b) prevented from returning to answer those charges. Roberto Micheletti as the coup "president" passed an emergency law stripping Hondurans of the following rights from the country's constitution: 1. The right to protest.
2. Freedom in one's home from unwarranted search, seizure and arrest.
3. Freedom of association.
4. Guarantees of rights of due process while under arrest.
5. Freedom of transit in the country.


So much for the democracy and freedom that the oligarchy claim to want so much that they had to remove Zelaya.



The military.
Heavily dependant on US money and training and closely aligned with protecting the interests of the local elites. It has a long association with the US and the School of the Americas. The last overt involvement in Honduras by the US was during the Iran Contra events of the 1980's. The US funded death squads and paramilitaries to eliminate any potential “communist threats” in Central America. At the time, John Negroponte, was the U.S. Ambassador in Honduras and was responsible for directly funding and training Honduran death squads that were responsable for thousands of disappeared and assassinated throughout the region.

Reports have come in that several batalions--specifically the Fourth and Tenth-- rebelled against coup leadership. Both Zelaya and his supporters have been very conscious that within the armed forces there are fractures. Instead of insulting the army, outside the heavily guarded presidential residence many protesters chant, "Soldiers, you are part of the people."

Pres. Zelaya has been remarkably respectful in calling on the army to "correct its actions" It is likely the coup will continue to lose its grip on the army as intensifying mobilizations force it to confront its own people.

General Romeo Vásquez Velásquez, who ordered the kidnapping and forced deportation of President Manuel Zelaya is also a common car theif. On February 2, 1993, the front page of the Tegucigalpa daily El Heraldo included this headline: “Eleven Members of the Gang of 13 Go to Prison”:



“Eleven individuals arrested for their alleged participation in the theft of 200 luxury automobiles… were sent to prison yesterday… (including) Colonel Wilfredo Leva Caborrea and Major Romeo Vásquez Velásquez, accused as alleged participants…”



Prior to these criminal acts he attended the S.O.A. but did not graduate.


The role of the US in these events.
There are many who are pleased with the response of the US to the events of the coup and who believe that the Obama administration is not involved and is acting in a qualititatively different manner than it has in the past.



Others see the hand of the US in this coup. Many do not think that because of the close relationship of the Honduran military and elite to the US and its interests that it would have acted with out the tacit if not explicit aproval of the US.


The US ambassador was 'unavailable' when the Foreign Minister Patricia Rodas realised that a coup was taking place and tried to contact him. She too was kidnapped, beaten and dumped in Mexico. The Cuban, Venezuelan and Nicaraguan ambassadors had tried to protect her from being kidnapped and were themselves kidnapped and beaten and dumped. A crime under internatioanl law and a pretext for war.


The US admits it knew of the coup attempt before it happened but did nothing to prevent it. It had been "working for several days" with the coup planners in Honduras to halt the illegal overthrow of President Zelaya but did nothing like tell them it would cut off all money and supplies if they went ahead.



It public statements since the coup have been ambiguous and it appears to be playing two games. On the one hand it signs the OAS and UN strongly worded statements against the coup. But there is no statement from the Whitehouse yet calling it a 'coup d'etat'. Nor have they called for President Zelaya's immediate reinstatement and specifically said they had not called for his reinstatement. They are also willing to 'work' with all parties- including the coup mongers. Which gives them unwarranted legitimacy. Obama has just pollywaffled like we have come to expect from him now.


Wayne Madsen states that US miliatary were at the base where Zelaya was taken to after being kidnapped and were involved in his arrest and deportation.



Time is yet to tell what Obama will do or if he will just remain 'concerned'. Time is running out.



Media.
The coup is not being televised in Honduras. There is total media black out on it. Like it never happened. Go back to sleep. In fact that is what one of the big media owners said. There has been no coup. He also said that there is no censorship. However only media in support of the coup are allowed to operate. All other media have been shut down by the military. TV stations are playing cooking shows and cartoons. There is also major disruptions to mobile phone services, electricity and internet services.



The Telesur journalist and crew and some UP journalists and crew were arrested and about to be deported (all this against international law) but because of a rapid response from different governments, the OAS, the UN and other international actors, they have been released.


CNN Espanol has sided with the coup and much of the MSM has had a very strange grasp of the events happening and is mixed at best and deceptive and complicit at worst.



On the other hand there has been excellent coverage on the internet. Narco News and Postcards from the Revolution and even InkaCola news have done some great cover. There are a couple of local Honduran blogs who post intermittently when they can.



The twittering oligarchy class have launched themselves into the propaganda campaign but they have been countered by more informed voices too.


Despite the media blackout and the massive military repression between 200,00 to 500,000 people heard the call and went to meet Zelaya at the airport.


I'll add more tomorrow. It is late here.

Peter Lemkin
07-06-2009, 07:07 PM
IF Madson is correct and US Forces were involved, it is a parallel to events in Chile [and a few other South-of-the-border-overthrows].....and if this is so, Obama's meaning of 'Change' is only worth a bucket of ****! :marchmellow:

Magda Hassan
07-07-2009, 01:20 AM
The two faces of the US in the coup

http://www.granma.cubaweb.cu/2009/07/06/interna/artic07.html

In Honduras, Two Political Lines of the USA at work, states Jose
Vicente Rangel



Venezuelan Journalist Jose Vicente Rangel reported this sunday that
in Honduras two political lines of the United States were at work
before the coup plot was hatched against the constitutional president
of the country, Manuel Zelaya.

"In Honduras two distinct lines of north american politics revealed
themselves, one coming from the White House and the other through the
machinery put in place by the administration of George W. Bush at the
military base of Palmarola", he said.

Rangel explained that this became apparent on the morning of June 28,
when two important functionaries of the State Department, James
Steimberg and Tom Shannon, contacted the US embassy in Tegucigalpa
and the military base in Palmarola to discuss the coup d'etat and to
impede any intention to support it.

"In Honduras, in addition to the political slant of the State
Department, the line of the Pentagon operates through the military
base, whose chief, General Douglas Fraser, just days before the coup,
made two declarations against President Chavez. Fraser's
pronouncement was adopted at once by the coup regime of Micheletti",
commented Rangel.

He indicated this is why the US ambassador, Hugo Llorens, was forced
to pronounce opposition to the coup, at first with a certain reserve,
and later more emphatically.

En Honduras actuaron dos l?neas pol?ticas de EE.UU.,
afirma Jos? Vicente Rangel

El periodista venezolano Jos? Vicente Rangel denunci? este domingo
que en Honduras actuaron dos l?neas pol?ticas de Estados Unidos antes
de que se fraguara el golpe de Estado contra el presidente
constitucional de ese pa?s, Manuel Zelaya.

"En Honduras se hicieron presentes dos niveles de la pol?tica del
gobierno nor-teamericano, una proveniente de la Casa Blanca y otra de
la maquinaria que dej? montada la administraci?n de George W. Bush a
trav?s de la base militar implantada en la poblaci?n hondure?a de
Palmarola", sostuvo.

Rangel explic? que la raz?n es que en la madrugada del domingo 28 de
junio dos importantes funcionarios del Departamento de Estado, James
Steimberg y Tom Shannon, contactaron la embajada estadounidense en
Tegucigalpa y la base militar de Palmarola para advertir del golpe y
disuadir cualquier intento de apoyo.

"En Honduras operar?a, adem?s del Departamento de Estado, la l?nea
del Pent?gono a trav?s de la base militar cuyo jefe, el general
Douglas Fraser, d?as antes del golpe en ese pa?s, hizo declaraciones
contra el presidente (Hugo) Ch?vez, las cuales asumi? de inmediato el
gobierno usurpador de (Roberto) Micheletti", coment? Rangel.

Indic? que fue por esa situaci?n que el embajador estadounidense,
Hugo Llorens, se vio forzado a pronunciarse en contra de lo ocurrido,
con reservas al principio y luego en forma m?s categ?rica. (YVKE
Mundial)

Magda Hassan
07-07-2009, 02:55 AM
One journalist killed and another wounded by hired assassins in Honduras

• Confirmed by Andrés Pavón by phone link to YVKE Mundial • Murdered journalist is Gabriel Ciro Noriega, from San Juan Pueblo municipality

Luigino Bracci and Patricia Rivas
GABRIEL Ciro Noriega, a journalist from San Juan Pueblo, was killed on Friday night after leaving a television program, according to Andrés Pavón Murillo, president of the Human Rights Defense Committee in Honduras.
He added that thugs strafed the Radio Sonaguera broadcasting station in La Ceiba, Solaya municipality, Colón department, with machine guns and that another journalist, whose last name is Montero, received serious bullet wounds. When he was taken to hospital the hired killers followed to try and finish him off, but he was removed elsewhere in time for his protection. His state of health is unknown.
Pavón also detailed the human rights situation in the country since President Manuel Zelaya was deposed on June 28. He said that more than 400 people had been detained, some have been released and others held and charged with sedition and material damage.

Since the coup was executed, five people have been killed including the murdered journalist: a labor leader run over by a military vehicle on Sunday and a person who died of a heart attack brought on by teargas. In addition, two people with heavy bruising were taken to the morgue: one was killed in one place and then left in a barrel, with severe injuries but no gunshot wounds, and the other one – according to witnesses – was dumped by a police patrol in a place known as La Montañita on the outskirts of Tegucigalpa, and then brought to the morgue in a similar condition.

He stated that the civilian coup perpetrators are controlling Tegucigalpa, San Pedro Sula and La Ceiba, but the rest of the country is under the exclusive control of the military, who have usurped mayors, judges and are taking direct decisions: “they have control of all the rural areas, where they are recruiting young people” for military service, in violation of Honduran legislation.
Translated by Granma International

Magda Hassan
07-07-2009, 04:09 AM
The Role of the International Republican Institute (IRI) in the Honduran Coup (http://www.chavezcode.com/2009/07/role-of-international-republican.html)

The International Republican Institute talks of “coup” in Honduras, months before
By Eva Golinger

The International Republican Institute (IRI), considered the international branch of the U.S. Republican Party, and one of the four “core groups” of the congressionally created and funded National Endowment for Democracy (NED), apparently knew of the coup d’etat in Honduras against President Zelaya well in advance. IRI is well known for its role in the April 2002 coup d’etat against Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez and its funding and strategic advising of the principal organizations involved in the ouster of President Jean Bertrand Aristide of Haiti in 2004. In both cases, IRI funded and/or trained and advised political parties and groups that were implicated in the violent, undemocratic overthrow of democratically elected presidents.

After the 2002 coup d’etat occured in Venezuela, IRI president at the time, George Folsom, sent out a celebratory press release claiming, “The Institute has served as a bridge between the nation’s political parties and all civil society groups to help Venezuelans forge a new democratic future…” Hours later, after the coup failed and the people of Venezuelan rescued their president, who had been kidnapped and imprisoned on a military base, and reinstalled constitutional order, IRI regretted its premature, public applause for the coup. One of its principal funders, the National Endowment for Democracy (NED), was furious that IRI had publicly revealed the U.S. government had provided funding and support for the coup leaders. NED President Carl Gershman was so irritated with IRI’s blunder, that he sent out a memo to Folsom, chastising him: “By welcoming [the coup] – indeed, without any apparent reservations – you unnecessarily interjected IRI into the sensitive internal politics o Venezuela”. Gershman would have much prefered that NED and IRI’s role in fomenting and supporting the coup against President Chávez have remained a secret.

IRI, chaired by Senator John McCain, was created in 1983 as part of the National Endowment for Democracy’s mission to “promote democracy around the world”, a mandate from President Ronald Reagan. In reality, one of NED’s founders, Allen Weinstein, put it this way in a 1991 interview with the Washington Post, "A lot of what we do today was done covertly 25 years ago by the CIA." IRI’s own history, according to its website (www.iri.org) (http://www.iri.org/) also explains that its original work was in Latin America, at a time when the Reagan administration was under heavy scrutiny and pressure from the U.S. Congress for funding paramilitary groups, dictatorships and death squads in Central and South America to install U.S.-friendly regimes and supress leftist movements. “Congress responded to President Reagan’s call in 1983 when it created the National Endowment for Democracy to support aspiring democrats worldwide. Four nonprofit, nonpartisan democracy institutes were formed to carry out this work – IRI, the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs (NDI), the Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE), and the American Center for International Labor Solidarity (ACILS).”“In its infancy, IRI focused on planting the seeds of democracy in Latin America. Since the end of the Cold War, IRI has broadened its reach to support democracy and freedom around the globe. IRI has conducted programs in more than 100 countries.”

In its initial days, IRI, along with the other coup groups of the NED, funded organizations in Nicaragua to foment the destabilization of the Sandinista government. Journalist Jeremy Bigwood explained part of this role in his article, “No Strings Attached?” (http://www.inthesetimes.com/main/article/3697/), "’When the rhetoric of democracy is put aside, NED is a specialized tool for penetrating civil society in other countries down to the grassroots level’ to achieve U.S. foreign policy goals, writes University of California-Santa Barbara professor William Robinson in his book, A Faustian Bargain. Robinson was in Nicaragua during the late ‘80s and watched NED work with the U.S.-backed Nicaraguan opposition to remove the leftist Sandinistas from power during the 1990 elections.”

The evidence of IRI’s role in the 2002 coup d’etat in Venezuela has been well documented and investigated. Proof of such involvement, which is still ongoing in terms of IRI’s work, funding, strategic advising and training of opposition political parties in Venezuela, is available through documents obtained under the Freedom of Information Act posted here (http://venezuelafoia.info/iri.html): , and also available in my book, The Chávez Code: Cracking U.S. Intervention in Venezuela (Olive Branch Press 2006). None of the claims or evidence regarding IRI’s role in fomenting and supporting the April 2002 in Venezuela and its ongoing support of the Venezuelan opposition has ever been disclaimed by the institution, primarily because all evidence cited comes from IRI and NED’s own internal documentation obtained under FOIA.
Hence, when the recent coup d’etat occured in Honduras, against democratically-elected President Manuel Zelaya, there was little doubt of U.S. fingerprints. IRI’s name appeared as a recipient of a $700,000 Latin American Regional Grant in 2008-2009 from NED to promote “good governance” programs in countries including Honduras. An additional grant of $550,000 to work with “think tanks” and “pressure groups” in Honduras to influence political parties was also given by the NED to IRI in 2008-2009, specifically stating, IRI will support initiatives to implement [political] positions into the 2009 campaigns. IRI will place special emphasis on Honduras, which has scheduled presidential and parliamentary elections in November 2009.” That is clear direct intervention in internal politics in Honduras.

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) also provides approximately $49 million annually to Honduras, a large part of which is directed towards “democracy promotion” programs. The majority of the recipients of this aid in Honduras, which comes in the form of funding, training, resources, strategic advice, communications counseling, political party strengthening and leadership training, are organizations directly linked to the recent coup d’etat, such as the Consejo Nacional Anticorrupción, the Archbishop of Tegucigalpa, the Honduran Private Enterprise Council (COHEP), the Council of University Deans, the Confederation of Honduran Workers (CTH), the National Convergence Forum, the Chamber of Commerce (FEDECAMARA), the Association of Private Media (AMC), the Group Paz y Democracia and the student group Generación X Cambio. These organizations form part of a coalition self-titled “Unión Cívica Democrática de Honduras” (Civil Democratic Union of Honduras) that has publicly backed the coup against President Zelaya.

IRI’s press secretary, Lisa Gates, responded to claims that IRI funded or aided (which also involves non-monetary aid, such as training, advising and providing resources) groups involved in the Honduran coup as “false reports”. However, there are several interesting links between the republican organization and the violent coup d’etat against President Zelaya that do indicate the institute’s involvement, as well as to the above mentioned funding that exceeds $1 million during just this year. In addition to its presence on the ground in Honduras as part of its “good governance” and “political influence” programs, IRI Regional Program Director, Latin America and the Carribean, Alex Sutton, has recently been closely involved with many of the organizations in the region that have backed the Honduran coup. Sutton was a featured speaker at a recent 3-day conference held in Venezuela by the U.S.-funded ultraconservative Venezuelan organization CEDICE (Centro para la Divulgación de Conocimiento Económico). CEDICE’s director, Rocío Guijarra, was one of the principal executors of the 2002 coup d’etat against President Hugo Chávez, and Guijarra personally signed a decree installing a dictatorship in the country, which led to the coup’s overthrow by the people and loyal armed forces of Venezuela. The conference Sutton participated in, held from May 28-29 in Venezuela was attended by leaders of Latin America’s ultra-conservative movement, ranging from Bolivian ex president Jorge Quiroga, who has called for President Evo Morales of Bolivia’s overthrow on several occasions, Peruvian Mario Vargas Llosa and his son Alvaro, both of whom have publicly expressed support for the coup against President Zelaya in Honduras, and numerous leaders of the Venezuelan opposition, the majority of whom are well known for their involvement in the April 2002 coup and subsequent destabilization attempts. The majority of those present at the CEDICE conference in May 2009, have publicly expressed support for the recent coup against President Zelaya.

But a more damning piece of evidence linking IRI to the Honduran coup, is a video clip posted on the institute’s website at http://www.iri.org/multimedia.asp. The clip or podcast, features a slideshow presentation given by Susan Zelaya-Fenner, assistant program officer at IRI, on March 20, 2009, discussing the “good governance” program in Honduras. Curiously, at the beginning of the presentation, Zelaya-Fenner explains what she considers “a couple of interesting facts about Honduras.” These include, “Honduras is a very overlooked country in a small region. Honduras has had more military coups than years of independence, it has been said. However, parodoxically, more recently it has been called a pillar of stability in the region, even being called the U.S.S. Honduras, as it avoided all of the crisis that its neighbors went through during the civil wars in the 1980s.”

Important to note is that what Zelaya-Fenner refers to as “U.S.S. Honduras” and “avoid[ing] all of the crisis that its neighbords went through during the civil wars in the 1980s” was because the U.S. government, CIA and Pentagon utilized Honduras as the launching pad for the attacks on Honduras’ neighbors. U.S. Ambassador at the time, John Negroponte, and Colonel Oliver North, trained, funded and planned the paramilitary missions of the death squads that were used to assassinate, torture, persecute, disappear and neutralize tens of thousands of farmers and “suspected” leftists in Nicaragua, El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras.

Zelaya-Fenner continues, “Thus, Honduras has been more recently stable, and it’s always been poor, which means that it’s below the radar, and gets little attention. The current president, Manuel Zelaya and his buddies, the leftists in the Latin American region have caused a lot of political destabilization recently in the country. He is a would-be emulator of Hugo Chavez and Hugo Chavez' social revolution. He has spent the better part of this administration trying to convince the Honduran people, who tend to be very practical and very 'center' that the Venezuelan route is the way to go. Zelaya's leftist leanings further exarcerbate an already troubled state. Corruption is rampant, crime is at all time highs. Drug trafficking and related violence have begun to spill over from Mexico. And there's a very real sense that the country is being purposefully destabilized from within, which is very new in recent Honduran history. Coups are thought to be so three decades ago until now (laughs, audience laughs), again.”

Did she really say that? Yes, you can hear it yourself on the podcast. Is it merely a coincidence that the coup against President Zelaya occured just three months after this presentation? State Department officials have admitted that they knew the coup was in the works for the past few months. Sub-secretary of State Thomas Shannon was in Honduras the week before the coup, apparently trying to broker some kind of deal with the coup planners to find another “solution” to the “problem”. Nevertheless, they continued funding via NED and USAID to those very same groups and military sectors involved in the coup. It is not a hidden fact that Washington was unhappy with President Zelaya’s alliances in the region, principally with countries such as Venezuela and Nicaragua. It is also public knowledge that President Zelaya was in the process of removing the U.S. military presence from the Soto Cano airbase, using a fund from the Bolivarian Alliance of the Americas (ALBA – Bolivia, Cuba, Ecuador, Dominica, Honduras, Nicaragua, St. Kitts, Antigua & Barbados and Venezuela) to convert the strategically important Pentagon base into a commercial airport.

IRI’s Zelaya-Fenner explains the strategic importance of Honduras in her presentation, "Why does Honduras matter? A lot of people ask this question, even Honduran historians and experts. Some might argue that it doesn't and globally it might be hard to counter. However, the country is strategic to regional stability and this is an election year in Honduras. It's a strategic time to help democrats with a small “d”, at a time when democracy is increasingly coming under attack in the region.”
There is no doubt that the coup against President Zelaya is an effort to undermine regional governments implementing alternative models to capitalism that challenge U.S. concepts of representative democracy as “the best model”. Countries such as Venezuela, Bolivia and Ecuador, are building successful models based on participatory democracy that ensure economic and social justice, and prioritize collective social prosperity and human needs over market economics. These are the countries, together now with Honduras, that have been victims of NED, USAID, IRI and other agencies’ interventions to subvert their prospering democracies.
http://www.chavezcode.com/2009/07/role-of-international-republican.html

Magda Hassan
07-07-2009, 04:14 AM
COUP LEADERS IN WASHINGTON TO GIVE PRESS CONFERENCE AT NATIONAL PRESS CLUB, TUESDAY JULY 7 AT 3PM (http://www.chavezcode.com/2009/07/coup-leaders-in-washington-to-give.html)

FOR THOSE OF YOU IN WASHINGTON, D.C., TRY YOUR BEST TO PROTEST AND MAKE YOUR VOICES HEARD AGAINST THE COUP IN HONDURAS!!

IT'S UNACCEPTABLE THAT THE STATE DEPARTMENT ALLOWED COUP LEADERS AND PARTICIPANTS TO ENTER THE UNITED STATES AND ENGAGE IN POLITICAL ACTIVITIES, CONSIDERING THE U.S. GOVERNMENT ALLEGEDLY CONDEMNS THE COUP...

"Contact: Tom O'Neill, The Cormac Group, +1-202-467-4700, cormacinfo@thecormacgroup.com, for Honduran National Congress

WASHINGTON, July 6 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Leading members of the Honduran National Congress and private sector and former members of the Honduran Judiciary will hold a press conference in Washington, D.C., to speak on recent events in Honduras. The press conference will be held Tuesday, July 7, 2009, at 3:00 p.m. in the Murrow Room of the National Press Club (529 14th Street, NW).

The delegation will be traveling to Washington for several days of meetings with United States policymakers to clarify any misunderstandings about Honduras' constitutional process and to discuss next steps to ensure the preservation of the country's democratic institutions.

Contact: Tom O'Neill
The Cormac Group
Phone: (202) 467-4700
cormacinfo@thecormacgroup.com

SOURCE Honduran National Congress"

Peter Lemkin
07-07-2009, 04:37 AM
COUP LEADERS IN WASHINGTON TO GIVE PRESS CONFERENCE AT NATIONAL PRESS CLUB, TUESDAY JULY 7 AT 3PM (http://www.chavezcode.com/2009/07/coup-leaders-in-washington-to-give.html)

FOR THOSE OF YOU IN WASHINGTON, D.C., TRY YOUR BEST TO PROTEST AND MAKE YOUR VOICES HEARD AGAINST THE COUP IN HONDURAS!!

IT'S UNACCEPTABLE THAT THE STATE DEPARTMENT ALLOWED COUP LEADERS AND PARTICIPANTS TO ENTER THE UNITED STATES AND ENGAGE IN POLITICAL ACTIVITIES, CONSIDERING THE U.S. GOVERNMENT ALLEGEDLY CONDEMNS THE COUP...

"Contact: Tom O'Neill, The Cormac Group, +1-202-467-4700, cormacinfo@thecormacgroup.com, for Honduran National Congress

WASHINGTON, July 6 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Leading members of the Honduran National Congress and private sector and former members of the Honduran Judiciary will hold a press conference in Washington, D.C., to speak on recent events in Honduras. The press conference will be held Tuesday, July 7, 2009, at 3:00 p.m. in the Murrow Room of the National Press Club (529 14th Street, NW).

The delegation will be traveling to Washington for several days of meetings with United States policymakers to clarify any misunderstandings about Honduras' constitutional process and to discuss next steps to ensure the preservation of the country's democratic institutions.

Contact: Tom O'Neill
The Cormac Group
Phone: (202) 467-4700
cormacinfo@thecormacgroup.com

SOURCE Honduran National Congress"

Surreal and sick! Has the feel of the 1950s to it...maybe Chicita Brands will change its name back to United Fruit. Shame on the the US to even let them in; more so to meet with them. They should be deported, not welcomed. I guess that's the proof it is really a coup with out blessings. Obama really was a Trojan Horse - can't believe more don't see it. Sigh.

Magda Hassan
07-07-2009, 05:31 AM
But Peter, they need to come to the leader of the 'Free World' TM to have their press conference because they have shut down all the media in their own thiefdom. No one is there to listen to them explain why all this is Chavez fault and as a result forced them to install Democracy TM in Honduras and why it is the legal responsibility of the military to enforce Democracy TM on all Hondurans through death and imprisonment and disappearance and curfews and media blackout and control and terrorism and slavery so they can be free.

Magda Hassan
07-08-2009, 06:09 AM
Micheletti Blinks: Zelaya's Return Not Barred from Costa Rica Mediation


Posted by Kristin Bricker (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/kristin-bricker) - July 7, 2009 at 11:21 pm
Micheletti Backed Down from Previous Statements that Zelaya's Return is "Not Negotiable"

All eyes were on Washington on Tuesday as dueling Honduran commissions vied for the international community's support. On one side, ousted President Manuel Zelaya met with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. On the other side, Honduran businessmen and politicians who support the coup government--but did not "officially" represent it--attempted to "clean up Honduras' image at the international level (http://www.elheraldo.hn/Ediciones/2009/07/07/Noticias/Primera-reunion-Micheletti-Zelaya-tras-los-hechos-del-28-de-junio-sera-en-Costa-Rica)." They got nowhere.

Both Zelaya and coup-imposed President Roberto Micheletti have agreed to mediations led by Costa Rican President Óscar Arias Sánchez. The mediation will begin on Thursday in President Arias' house in Costa Rica. Zelaya will arrive in Costa Rica on Wednesday night, and Micheletti is scheduled to arrive on Thursday morning. One crucial sticking point is on the table: Zelaya's return to power--something that prior to now was "not negotiable" according to Micheletti.

In One Corner: Zelaya

Before entering a closed-door meeting with Clinton, Zelaya told reporters, "Have no doubt, I will return to Honduras. But I won't say how, because otherwise they will wait for me in any town or state."

The LA Times (http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-honduras7-2009jul07,0,2588314.story) reports that Zelaya cabinet member Luis Roland Valenzuela hinted that Zelaya's next attempt to enter Honduras would be over land: "This time he won't fly into the lion's mouth." Valenzuela told the LA Times that Zelaya would make a second attempt to re-enter Honduras as early as this Wednesday. Zelaya did not give an exact date for his return in speaking with the press. However, Zelaya's return date appears to have been postponed pending the outcome of Thursday's mediation, which he agreed to after meeting with Clinton on Tuesday.

Zelaya has already postponed one attempt to return to Tegucigalpa to allow diplomatic processes to play out. He had originally scheduled his first return attempt for last Thursday, July 2, but postponed it to this past Sunday in order to let the Organization of American States (OAS) 72-hour ultimatum to the Micheletti government expire.

Neither Clinton nor Zelaya have released any details about what they discussed during their meeting. However, the AP reports:

A senior U.S. official said one option being considered would be to forge a compromise under which Zelaya would be allowed to return and serve out his remaining six months in office with limited powers.

Zelaya, in return, would pledge to drop his aspirations for a constitutional change that might allow him to run for another term, according to the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitive nature of the diplomatic exchanges.
The second paragraph quoted above is ambiguous due to widespread misunderstanding that surrounded the opinion poll Zelaya wished to carry out on June 28. It has been widely reported that Zelaya was pushing for a new Constitution so that he could run for a second term in office. Honduras' Constitution currently prohibits presidents from running for a second term. However, as Narco News reported on June 27 (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/kristin-bricker/2009/06/honduras-prepares-sundays-controversial-opinion-poll), it was Zelaya opponents, not Zelaya himself, who raised the issue of re-election in a new Constitution. Zelaya has never said that he would seek re-election; on the contrary, he has repeatedly stated that his term ends on January 27, 2010, when his current term expires.

Given this widespread confusion regarding Zelaya's true intentions in the June 28 opinion poll, the AP's report that the State Department might want Zelaya to agree to "drop his aspirations for a constitutional change that might allow him to run for another term" can be read two ways:


That he may have to add a clause to any future attempt to re-write the Constitution prohibiting changes to the current Constitution's article that bars presidents from running for re-election. Or
That he may have to completely drop his campaign to re-write the Constitution.


It is important to note that the State Department official's statements represent one of several options reportedly floated by his or her department. Regardless of what possible solutions the State Department might have proposed, the US government will not participate in the Costa Rica mediation.

Zelaya, for his part, insists that Thursday's mediation is by no means a "negotiation." He told a press conference following his meeting with Clinton, "We are not holding a negotiation. There are things that are non-negotiable—the restitution of constitutional order in Honduras," meaning his return to power.

Zelaya sent a direct message to his supporters to keep up the protests as he goes into mediation with Micheletti, "You have to keep up the struggle so that your opinion is respected, we've always won our civil rights through struggle." Even though he does not consider the mediation to be negotiation, sustained protests and direct action will give him considerably more power to assure that the will of the people is respected and that his powers as President aren't limited upon his return.

[B]In the Other Corner: The Golpistas

Whereas Zelaya hasn't publicly agreed to any conditions going into the mediation, the Micheletti regime has found itself eating a big serving of humble pie. Up until now, Micheletti's government had insisted that Zelaya's return "is not negotiable. (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/thefield/honduras-coups-preconditions-leave-nothing-negotiate)"

The Christian Science Monitor (http://www.csmonitor.com/2009/0708/p02s01-usfp.html) reports that all possible solutions to the crisis floated by the US State Department include Zelaya's return to power. US State Department spokesman Ian Kelly told the press (http://www.reuters.com/article/vcCandidateFeed1/idUSN06236987) that the United States is urging a "peaceful, constitutional, and lasting solution to the serious divisions in that country through dialogue.... In the most immediate instance it means the return of the democratically elected president to Tegucigalpa."

Clinton, for her part, said (http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5jTirTr7eUMzFRXPVAD3Qq12O6MPgD999RVQG0) "It is our hope that through this dialogue mechanism overseen by President Arias that there can be a restoration of democratic, constitutional order, a peaceful resolution of this matter that will enable the Honduran people to see the restoration of democracy and a more peaceful future going forward."

These statements mean that Micheletti, whose government has made it clear that it will not negotiate Zelaya's return to power, is now entering into a mediation where Zelaya's return is most certainly on the table.

The big question going into the mediations, then, is whether Micheletti will take advantage of an opportunity to negotiate a way out of his current predicament--being the leader of the one of the most universally unpopular coups ever--or whether he'll continue to hold on for dear life to his "coup and me against the world (http://www.google.com.mx/url?sa=t&source=web&ct=res&cd=1&url=http%3A%2F%2Fnarcosphere.narconews.com%2Fthefi eld%2Fcoup-and-me-against-world&ei=DCVUSqfdFIfDtwf_ktyaCA&usg=AFQjCNG5vYM-daXjWqCTbyXhfX6bRJo4ag)" stance, as Narco News' Al Giordano so eloquently put it.

Micheletti's hand is looking increasingly weaker. In a move that was severely over-hyped in Honduras' pro-coup press, a delegation of pro-coup Honduran businessmen and politicians went to Washington on Monday in an attempt to "clean up Honduras' image." Their goal: get US press with international reach to cover their version of the Honduran crisis. So far they've been very unsuccessful, judging from the deafening silence in the media regarding their presence in the US.

Their other goal is to meet with representatives of the OAS. A similar delegation sent by the coup government last week came back empty-handed. Even the pro-coup Honduran press (http://www.elheraldo.hn/Ediciones/2009/07/07/Noticias/Primera-reunion-Micheletti-Zelaya-tras-los-hechos-del-28-de-junio-sera-en-Costa-Rica) had to admit that "it is speculated that the OAS didn't receive them due to the fact that that organism does not recognize Roberto Micheletti's government." As much as the pro-coup press tried to soften the blow of rejection, OAS Secretary General made it very clear that the delegation's rejection wasn't simple speculation; he told the press (http://www.reuters.com/article/worldNews/idUSTRE56011N20090701) that he had no intentions of meeting with the coup's delegation.

The new pro-coup commission that arrived on Monday claims that OAS representatives have agreed to dialogue with them. Given the OAS' outright rejection of the coup and its refusal to recognize the coup government, if the coup commission's claims of an OAS dialogue are true, it's not likely it will be very fruitful.
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/kristin-bricker/2009/07/micheletti-blinks-zelayas-return-not-barred-costa-rica-mediation

Magda Hassan
07-08-2009, 06:14 AM
Honduras: Enter Oscar Arias

Posted by Al Giordano (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/al-giordano) - July 7, 2009 at 10:39 pm By Al Giordano

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaL-INcX6ZY&feature=player_embedded

Costa Rican President Oscar Arias Sanchez, 69, will mediate the first (it could well end up being the only) face-to-face encounter since the June 28 coup d’etat between Honduran President Manuel Zelaya and the gorilla coup "president" Roberto Micheletti on Wednesday in San José. Costa Rica.
Arias is best known for his 1987 Nobel Peace Prize for his role in mediating negotiations to end civil wars in Nicaragua and El Salvador. The Central American left and right both have ambivalent feelings toward him, a social democrat turned neoliberal capitalist but one with very strong tendencies regarding democracy and human rights, tendencies that have built-in conflicts with each other. The paradox is that it is the fact that neither ideological pole completely trusts him that makes him strangely palatable as mediator to both. That’s what happened in the 1980s and it will be attempted again tomorrow in San José.
Last weekend, Arias broadcast the above five-and-a-quarter-minutes message to Costa Ricans on national TV. If his voice sounds a little bit funny, it may be because, last year, he was diagnosed with cyst on his vocal chords.
In that video he said (I'll translate these key passages):
In the dawn of Sunday June 28 President Jose Manuel Zelaya was taken by force and expelled from Honduras by soldiers of the army. From any point of view, that is unjustifiable. What happened before it loses all relevance in light of this coup d’etat.
And then at 58 seconds into his talk, ominous music begins to play under his voice, as the broadcast shows images of the military coups in Latin America in the 60s and 70s. Arias continued:
For those that don’t remember, there was an era in Latin America when the armies decided who was president, how, and until when. It was the darkest era of our history.
Thousands died or were tortured. Millions had to flee from their country. Force was more important than the law. Fear more powerful than the popular will. Our people were never more unhappy and less free than when the capacity to govern was in the hands of the military…
It is unacceptable that in the 21st century some celebrate a coup d’etat… To topple him by violent means it was Honduran democracy and not him who suffer from a mortal coup…
We have called to reestablish the Coinstitutional order and restore the elected president…
The whole world, without exception, has repudiated this coup d’etat…
We’ll see what, if anything, happens when Zelaya and Micheletti (they once were political allies) come face to face in the presence of Arias on Wednesday.
I certainly can’t predict what, if anything, will ensue. This is not like an election day with a fixed yes or no outcome on a certain deadline.
This is the path that the legitimate president of Honduras, Mel Zelaya, has chosen. If we believe that the Honduran people's choice for president is the only legitimate president no matter what one's opinion about that president may be, as we do, then that therefore extends to the decisions he makes in this process. And so far, we haven’t heard complaint from Insulza or Chávez or any other leader in América about this next step, which is your first indication that Zelaya is pleased with it, and the rest are as curious as we are to see whether anything comes of it.
And so we wait… It could be an adventure in futility... Or it could be the face-saving pretext for the Simian Council behind the coup to give up their illegitimate grasp on the country after their coup-in-clown-shoes in which everything that could go wrong did.
Update: I'll add another well-informed thought to this analysis.
Some are scratching their heads, asking, "how can it be possible that both the United States - and its allies - and Venezuela - and its allies - say they oppose this coup?"
And a related question: "What can the coup plotters be thinking that they can do without US and World Bank and PetroCaribe funds?"
The answer is that there is indeed a powerful network behind this coup. It is an attempt by a certain element of organized crime to resurrect the Batista experiment of Cuba in the 1950s - a safe haven for narco-trafficking, money laundering and right-wing terrorism in the hemisphere, with billions of dollars already in its combined coffers. That is the power behind Micheletti and his Simian Council.
There is a scene from The Godfather Part II that portrays what was attempted in the late 1950s to set up just such a safe haven in Cuba:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PYUqxHwYg7Y&feature=player_embedded
Understand that governments are secondary players in this globalized uber-state of capitalism. There are organized crime groups that have far more money at their disposal today than the $3.5 billion dollar annual budget of Honduras. This is not something that is viewed as positive in either Washington, or Caracas, or in any other national capital in this hemisphere (except among some, apparently, in Tegucigalpa). This coup is a play by a twenty-first century mafia to win itself a flag to fly over its banks and business interests, and render them untouchable by any legitimate government. The stakes are, thus, high for all aspiring democracies, not just that in Honduras.


http://narcosphere.narconews.com/thefield/honduras-enter-oscar-arias

Magda Hassan
07-08-2009, 08:15 AM
INTERPOL media release
07 July 2009





INTERPOL will not issue Red Notice for arrest of President Manuel Zelaya
LYON, France – The INTERPOL General Secretariat headquarters in Lyon, France has refused a request by the Honduran authorities to issue a Red Notice (http://www.interpol.int/Public/Wanted/Default.asp), or international wanted persons notice for President Manuel Zelaya.
Following a review, INTERPOL’s Office of Legal Affairs concluded that the request is in contravention of Article 3 (http://www.interpol.int/Public/ICPO/LegalMaterials/constitution/constitutionGenReg/constitution.asp#constitution) of INTERPOL’s Constitution under which it is ‘strictly forbidden for the organization to undertake any intervention or activities of a political, military, religious or racial character.’ This prohibition is taken extremely seriously by INTERPOL.
The charges against President Zelaya of ‘misuse of authority; usurpation of public functions; offences against the system of government; and treason’ were assessed as being of a political nature with no ordinary-law crime element.
In addition, an INTERPOL Red Notice is a request to provisionally arrest a person for the purpose of extradition to the country concerned. According to media reports, a plane carrying President Zelaya was turned away from an airport in Tegucigalpa, where Honduran authorities would have been able to directly serve a national arrest warrant.
If the reports are accurate and the national authorities deliberately failed to carry out the arrest on their own soil, this would also attest to the existence of motives other than the promotion of international police co-operation.
INTERPOL’s National Central Bureau (http://www.interpol.int/Public/Icpo/NCBs/default.asp) in Tegucigalpa has been informed of the decision to refuse their Red Notice request for President Zelaya.
http://www.interpol.int/Public/ICPO/PressReleases/PR2009/PR200965.asp

Judica Bosquesillo
07-09-2009, 08:16 PM
Yes, their behaviour is at odds with their statements. They made it impossible for Mel to return and answer their charges.
It seems they violate their own Constitution while insisting they are upholding the Constitution.

Magda Hassan
07-10-2009, 06:43 AM
Yes, their behaviour is at odds with their statements. They made it impossible for Mel to return and answer their charges.
It seems they violate their own Constitution while insisting they are upholding the Constitution.
Absolutely Judica. They have no regard for the law or for Honduras. Just out for their own interests and that's not going too well.

Magda Hassan
07-10-2009, 06:50 AM
There really is nothing to negotiate except how long it will take Micheletti and his little car thief helper to back their suitcase and move to Miami.

The Two Men Didn't Talk to Each Other in Costa Rica Talks

Honduran president Manuel Zelaya and de facto president Roberto Micheletti both participated in the beginning of a mediation session in Costa Rica today. The men had separate meetings with Costa Rican president and mediator Oscar Arias where they explained their positions to him. However, the two Honduran leaders did not sit down to talk face-to-face today. Rather, they each left delegations empowered to continue talks.

El Heraldo (http://www.elheraldo.hn/Especiales/Honduras%20en%20contra%20de%20la%20ilegalidad%20de l%2024%20de%20junio%20de%202009/Ediciones/2009/07/09/Noticias/Oscar-Arias-No-nos-hagamos-ilusiones-esto-tomara-mas-tiempo-de-lo-que-hubiera-imaginado) reports that Zelaya's delegation is composed of Foreign Affairs Minister Patricia Rodas, former Foreign Affairs Minister Milton Jimenez, Congresswoman Sylvia Ayala from the Democratic Unification Party, and Lenca indigenous leader Salvador Zuñiga.

On Micheletti's commission is former Foreign Affairs Minister Carlos Lopez Contreras, businessman and politician Arturo Corrales from the Democratic Christian party, Liberal Party leader Mauricio Villeda, and former Supreme Court Justice Vilma Morales.

The commissions are not yet complete. El Heraldo reports that each commission will eventually contain eight people. Notwithstanding, the commissions met together today in Arias' home to begin talks.

Upon leaving the talks, none of the presidents spoke about what was discussed that day behind closed doors. However, Micheletti read a statement after his discussion with Arias. In the statement, he said that elections would occur in Honduras. He did not state when they would occur.

Micheletti's government has proposed holding early elections (as opposed to reinstating Zelaya as president) as a possible way to end the conflict. US intellectuals sent a letter (http://www.democraticunderground.com/discuss/duboard.php?az=view_all&address=405x18514) to US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton today opposing any proposal that would allow the coup government to hold elections. "Elections currently would take place under a coup regime that has suspended civil liberties, and where the conditions for free elections do not exist," the letter, signed by Noam Chomsky and other prominent thinkers, states. "Democracy has to be restored before a legitimate election can take place.... Anything less than the urgent restoration of President Manuel Zelaya to office would be an usurpation of the will of the Honduran people."

The intellectuals' letter also argued that "the U.S. must ensure his prompt restoration by enacting forceful economic sanctions against the regime." Thus far the US State Department has not cut off economic relations with Honduras.

Micheletti and Zelaya have reportedly decided to allow their commissions to make progress in the mediation before potentially sitting down to talk face-to-face. This move will likely free up Zelaya to keep working towards a solution to the crisis, rather than allowing the Micheletti government to drag its feet in talks until elections roll around. Zelaya has approximately six months left in his term.

Upon leaving today's talks, Arias said he thought the talks would not end any time soon. "It's possible that this is going to take more time than we could have imagined," he told the press (http://www.telesurtv.net/noticias/secciones/nota/53785-NN/arias-es-dificil-hablar-de-una-negociacion-exitosa-si-no-se-restituye--a-zelaya/). This is in part due to the fact that "it is difficult to talk about a successful negotiation if President Manuel Zelaya is not reinstated." Micheletti has stated that he believes talks should "start from the understanding that Zelaya's return is not open to negotiation (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/kristin-bricker/2009/07/tough-odds-costa-rica-mediation)."

http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/kristin-bricker/2009/07/zelaya-and-micheletti-leave-delegations-continue-mediation

Peter Lemkin
07-10-2009, 07:34 AM
There really is nothing to negotiate except how long it will take Micheletti and his little car thief helper to back their suitcase and move to Miami.

The Two Men Didn't Talk to Each Other in Costa Rica Talks

Honduran president Manuel Zelaya and de facto president Roberto Micheletti both participated in the beginning of a mediation session in Costa Rica today. The men had separate meetings with Costa Rican president and mediator Oscar Arias where they explained their positions to him. However, the two Honduran leaders did not sit down to talk face-to-face today. Rather, they each left delegations empowered to continue talks.

El Heraldo (http://www.elheraldo.hn/Especiales/Honduras%20en%20contra%20de%20la%20ilegalidad%20de l%2024%20de%20junio%20de%202009/Ediciones/2009/07/09/Noticias/Oscar-Arias-No-nos-hagamos-ilusiones-esto-tomara-mas-tiempo-de-lo-que-hubiera-imaginado) reports that Zelaya's delegation is composed of Foreign Affairs Minister Patricia Rodas, former Foreign Affairs Minister Milton Jimenez, Congresswoman Sylvia Ayala from the Democratic Unification Party, and Lenca indigenous leader Salvador Zuñiga.

On Micheletti's commission is former Foreign Affairs Minister Carlos Lopez Contreras, businessman and politician Arturo Corrales from the Democratic Christian party, Liberal Party leader Mauricio Villeda, and former Supreme Court Justice Vilma Morales.

The commissions are not yet complete. El Heraldo reports that each commission will eventually contain eight people. Notwithstanding, the commissions met together today in Arias' home to begin talks.

Upon leaving the talks, none of the presidents spoke about what was discussed that day behind closed doors. However, Micheletti read a statement after his discussion with Arias. In the statement, he said that elections would occur in Honduras. He did not state when they would occur.

Micheletti's government has proposed holding early elections (as opposed to reinstating Zelaya as president) as a possible way to end the conflict. US intellectuals sent a letter (http://www.democraticunderground.com/discuss/duboard.php?az=view_all&address=405x18514) to US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton today opposing any proposal that would allow the coup government to hold elections. "Elections currently would take place under a coup regime that has suspended civil liberties, and where the conditions for free elections do not exist," the letter, signed by Noam Chomsky and other prominent thinkers, states. "Democracy has to be restored before a legitimate election can take place.... Anything less than the urgent restoration of President Manuel Zelaya to office would be an usurpation of the will of the Honduran people."

The intellectuals' letter also argued that "the U.S. must ensure his prompt restoration by enacting forceful economic sanctions against the regime." Thus far the US State Department has not cut off economic relations with Honduras.

Micheletti and Zelaya have reportedly decided to allow their commissions to make progress in the mediation before potentially sitting down to talk face-to-face. This move will likely free up Zelaya to keep working towards a solution to the crisis, rather than allowing the Micheletti government to drag its feet in talks until elections roll around. Zelaya has approximately six months left in his term.

Upon leaving today's talks, Arias said he thought the talks would not end any time soon. "It's possible that this is going to take more time than we could have imagined," he told the press (http://www.telesurtv.net/noticias/secciones/nota/53785-NN/arias-es-dificil-hablar-de-una-negociacion-exitosa-si-no-se-restituye--a-zelaya/). This is in part due to the fact that "it is difficult to talk about a successful negotiation if President Manuel Zelaya is not reinstated." Micheletti has stated that he believes talks should "start from the understanding that Zelaya's return is not open to negotiation (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/kristin-bricker/2009/07/tough-odds-costa-rica-mediation)."

http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/kristin-bricker/2009/07/zelaya-and-micheletti-leave-delegations-continue-mediation

For the coup leaders their tactic IMO is to just drag this out until Zelaya's term is over and all is moot. Again the USA is doing nothing. One phone call saying all trade was to be shut off [more than half of all GDP is US-based] would get a response in a day...but this is not to be forthcoming, I fear....meaning silent support of the coup by the US. We haven't even had our Ambassador there speak to the coup leaders and express displeasure or cut-off of trade, etc. Pathetic and doesn't bode well for the other countries of the Americas......

Magda Hassan
07-10-2009, 08:04 AM
For the coup leaders their tactic IMO is to just drag this out until Zelaya's term is over and all is moot. Again the USA is doing nothing. One phone call saying all trade was to be shut off [more than half of all GDP is US-based] would get a response in a day...but this is not to be forthcoming, I fear....meaning silent support of the coup by the US. We haven't even had our Ambassador there speak to the coup leaders and express displeasure or cut-off of trade, etc. Pathetic and doesn't bode well for the other countries of the Americas......

Yes Peter. That is my thought that they want to drag this out. Micheletti's people have also raised the possibility of holding 'early elections' as if the have a right to do so. Chomsky and others have signed a protest letter about this saying that there should be no early election. If the US was serious about 'democracy' they would demand Zelays's return, offer a US plane to return him, withdraw their ambassador and military, cut military and other funding and not fund any NGO's like the NED etc. It's quite simple. Obama is watered down water. Eva Golinger says that the ALBA countries should be taking a more direct role in the restoration of Zelaya as it sure ain't going to come from the US.

Magda Hassan
07-10-2009, 11:55 AM
The racist Enrique Ortez has already been replaced as foreign minister. Maybe because of these little diplomatic gems:

"I have negotiated with queers, prostitutes, leftists, blacks, whites. This is my job, I studied for it. I am not racially prejudiced. I like the little black sugar plantation worker who is president of the United States."
and

In a TV interview, Ortez said Obama "is a little black man who doesn't know where Tegucigalpa is located."
The new person designated to make coup pig shit taste nice for foreign consumption is Robert Flores Bermudez.

Magda Hassan
07-11-2009, 03:21 AM
Micheletti Tried to Change the Honduran Constitution 1985 (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/kristin-bricker/2009/07/micheletti-tried-change-honduran-constitution-1985)

Posted by Kristin Bricker (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/kristin-bricker) - July 10, 2009 at 9:02 pm He Wanted to Extend President Roberto Suazo Córdoba's Term

by TeleSUR (http://www.telesurtv.net/noticias/secciones/nota/53844-NN/micheletti-intento-cambiar-la-constitucion-hondurena-en-1985/)
translated by Kristin Bricker

In the rallies that were held this Friday in the Honduran capital of Tegucigalpa, a fact rarely discussed in national and international press--but well-known throughout the Honduran population--was made public: Roberto Micheletti's attempt to modify this Central American country's Constitution in 1985.

Popular organizations, teachers union members, union leaders, and the general public, in addition to demanding the reinstatement of Honduras' legitimate and constitutional president, Manual Zelaya, vocalized coup leader Roberto Micheletti's public attempt [to change the Constitution].

In 1985, he tried to turn the Honduran National Congress into a National Constitutional Assembly in order to reform the same Magna Carta that the coup leaders are now defending as their transcendental symbol during the current political crisis.

Members of Congress and politicians accuse Manuel Zelaya of trying to extend his term and change the Honduran Constitution, but what he tried to do was hold a non-binding opinion poll. Micheletti, on the other hand, did want to [extend the president's term and change the Constitution] 24 years ago.

Zelaya's proposal is far from what happened in 1985 when then-congressman Roberto Micheletti (who has been a member of Congress for 28 years) called a Constitutional Assembly to extend the mandate of the president of that era, Roberto Suazo Córdoba.

On October 24, 1985, two years after the current Constitution was approved, various members of Congress, lead by Micheletti, tried to introduce a proposal calling for a National Constitutional Assembly.

The legislators requested the suspension of various constitutional articles, the same ones that, ironically, are now used by the coup authorities to legitimize Zelaya's ouster. Those articles are 373, 374, and 375, which refer to the mechanisms for reforming and defending the Constitution.

As the Bolivarian News Agency's special correspondent in Tegucigalpa, Antonio Nuñez Aldazoro, describes, in that era the proposal caused a commotion and was suspended, due to the fact that at that time Micheletti's actions were considered treason, and opposition legislators from the Nationalist Party knew that the Constitutional Assembly's only goal was to extend Liberal President Suazo Cordoba's presidency.

It's worth noting that 24 years ago the effects of the low-intensity war were still being felt, as well as the so-called "Contra" scandal and US President Ronald Reagan's security doctrine. At that time Honduras was still considered to be the United States' base of operations in Central America.
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/kristin-bricker/2009/07/micheletti-tried-change-honduran-constitutoin-1985

Magda Hassan
07-11-2009, 03:31 AM
Oh, the irony just keeps on coming!




Honduras Newspaper Impressed that Daughter of Pinochet Backs Coup

Posted by Al Giordano (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/al-giordano) - July 10, 2009 at 9:08 am

http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/Lucia-Pinochet-Zelaya-pretendia-dar-golpe-hija-de-Pinochet_noticia_full.jpg.jpeg
Here in the newsroom, we wondered if the website of the daily El Heraldo in Honduras (part of the same newspaper chain as La Prensa, which now enjoys the infamy of having photoshopped the blood out of the iconic photo of assassinated teenager Isis Obed Murillo) had been hacked by creative coup opponents.
But, apparently not: the newspaper (part of the Inter American Press Association) published a story yesterday titled: Pinochet's Daughter: "Zelaya Attempted a Coup." (http://www.elheraldo.hn/Especiales/Honduras%20en%20contra%20de%20la%20ilegalidad%20de l%2024%20de%20junio%20de%202009/Ediciones/2009/07/09/Noticias/Zelaya-pretendia-dar-golpe-hija-de-Pinochet)
I don't know what is weirder: that a pro-coup newspaper would think that quoting the daughter of the Chilean military general, Augusto Pinochet, somehow adds to its already bombastic portrayal of a military coup as a legal or "constitutional" action, or that Ms. Lucia Pinochet Hiriart (in the photo, above) has a constituency among the coup-defenders to the extent that she would be making public statements in praise of it, and those statements would somehow be newsworthy.
It was her father, the disgraced General Pinochet, who fomented the bloody 1973 military coup against the elected government of President Salvador Allende in Chile, which launched a dark era of similar authoritarian coups in countries throughout Latin America.
But there she is, Ms. Pinochet, instructing the Honduran people:

"The one that wanted to cause a coup was (elected Honduran President Manuel) Zelaya... Right now, he's the victim, but he is no victim...."
No, it's not parody. Rather, it's instructive of the state of mind of the coup defenders. (You can see it in repeated online comments on Twitter and elsewhere attacking Organization of American States chairman Jose Miguel Insulza because he was part of the elected Allende government before Allende was assassinated by Pinochet's forces.) They see the Pinochet coup of 36 years ago as a heroic act, and long for the bad old days when they could simply stamp out democratic will by rounding all dissenters into a stadium and assassinating more than 3,000 in a single week, which is what happened after September 11, 1973 in Santiago de Chile.
It is another proof positive that they are trying to start that ball rolling all over again throughout the hemisphere. And it demonstrates exactly why not a single government in América or in the entire world recognizes their illegitimate regime.
Update: And so it not be forgotten...
The 1973 coup d'etat in Chile, just like today in Honduras, was "justified" through a series of legaloid arguments that it was "constitutional" and such. Here's a typical piece of right-wing revisionist history (http://www.josepinera.com/pag/pag_tex_nuncamas_en.htm) with that spin.
Of course, what the world saw after that coup was successful was the Pinochet military coup regime proceed to violate every single one of the laws that its supporters had accused Allende of breaking, only more violently and on a much more massive scale than even what they had alleged (but not proved). And the same is occurring today.


http://narcosphere.narconews.com/thefield/honduras-newspaper-impressed-daughter-pinochet-backs-coup

Peter Lemkin
07-11-2009, 07:09 AM
Oh, the irony just keeps on coming!




Honduras Newspaper Impressed that Daughter of Pinochet Backs Coup

Posted by Al Giordano (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/al-giordano) - July 10, 2009 at 9:08 am

http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/Lucia-Pinochet-Zelaya-pretendia-dar-golpe-hija-de-Pinochet_noticia_full.jpg.jpeg
Here in the newsroom, we wondered if the website of the daily El Heraldo in Honduras (part of the same newspaper chain as La Prensa, which now enjoys the infamy of having photoshopped the blood out of the iconic photo of assassinated teenager Isis Obed Murillo) had been hacked by creative coup opponents.
But, apparently not: the newspaper (part of the Inter American Press Association) published a story yesterday titled: Pinochet's Daughter: "Zelaya Attempted a Coup." (http://www.elheraldo.hn/Especiales/Honduras%20en%20contra%20de%20la%20ilegalidad%20de l%2024%20de%20junio%20de%202009/Ediciones/2009/07/09/Noticias/Zelaya-pretendia-dar-golpe-hija-de-Pinochet)
I don't know what is weirder: that a pro-coup newspaper would think that quoting the daughter of the Chilean military general, Augusto Pinochet, somehow adds to its already bombastic portrayal of a military coup as a legal or "constitutional" action, or that Ms. Lucia Pinochet Hiriart (in the photo, above) has a constituency among the coup-defenders to the extent that she would be making public statements in praise of it, and those statements would somehow be newsworthy.
It was her father, the disgraced General Pinochet, who fomented the bloody 1973 military coup against the elected government of President Salvador Allende in Chile, which launched a dark era of similar authoritarian coups in countries throughout Latin America.
But there she is, Ms. Pinochet, instructing the Honduran people:

"The one that wanted to cause a coup was (elected Honduran President Manuel) Zelaya... Right now, he's the victim, but he is no victim...."
No, it's not parody. Rather, it's instructive of the state of mind of the coup defenders. (You can see it in repeated online comments on Twitter and elsewhere attacking Organization of American States chairman Jose Miguel Insulza because he was part of the elected Allende government before Allende was assassinated by Pinochet's forces.) They see the Pinochet coup of 36 years ago as a heroic act, and long for the bad old days when they could simply stamp out democratic will by rounding all dissenters into a stadium and assassinating more than 3,000 in a single week, which is what happened after September 11, 1973 in Santiago de Chile.
It is another proof positive that they are trying to start that ball rolling all over again throughout the hemisphere. And it demonstrates exactly why not a single government in América or in the entire world recognizes their illegitimate regime.
Update: And so it not be forgotten...
The 1973 coup d'etat in Chile, just like today in Honduras, was "justified" through a series of legaloid arguments that it was "constitutional" and such. Here's a typical piece of right-wing revisionist history (http://www.josepinera.com/pag/pag_tex_nuncamas_en.htm) with that spin.
Of course, what the world saw after that coup was successful was the Pinochet military coup regime proceed to violate every single one of the laws that its supporters had accused Allende of breaking, only more violently and on a much more massive scale than even what they had alleged (but not proved). And the same is occurring today.


http://narcosphere.narconews.com/thefield/honduras-newspaper-impressed-daughter-pinochet-backs-coup

Once a fascist, always a fascist. Sick stuff. The foreign minister for the de facto Honduran government, Enrique Ortez Colindres, called President Obama (in true diplomatic style) a "little black man* who knows nothing"...and worse!!!! Nice bunch....and you can tell from the company they keep - like Pinoshit's kith and kin.

*He used the most pejorative term here! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S_sPLcERER8

"He negociado con maricones, prostitutas, con ñángaras (izquierdistas), negros, blancos. Ese es mi trabajo, yo estudié eso. No tengo prejuicios raciales, me gusta el negrito del batey que está presidiendo los Estados Unidos."
"I have negotiated with queers, prostitutes, leftists, blacks, whites. This is my job, I studied for it. I am not racially prejudiced. I like the little black sugar plantation worker who is president of the United States."

I wonder if he went to the School Of The America's Diplomacy College? :flute: :thefinger:

Peter Lemkin
07-11-2009, 12:07 PM
Honduran Coup: Damning Indictment of Capitalism

by Dennis Rahkonen / July 10th, 2009

Since he’s spending his summer vacation at our home, I recently washed my 11-year-old grandson’s dirty clothes.

As I later folded them, small tags told me they were manufactured in the Philippines, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Guatemala, and Honduras.

Not one item bore a “Made in USA” label, which is very sad, considering that the unionized needle trades were once a bastion of our country’s labor movement, and that finding attire produced overseas was a rarity just a few decades ago.

All this relates closely to the despicable coup that deposed Honduras’ democratically elected president, Manuel Zaleya.

Although the coup’s initiators say they were motivated by other factors, what really spurred their reactionary ire was Zaleya promoting better pay and conditions for Honduran workers in general, but particularly for the virtual sweatshop slaves whose cruel exploitation by mostly U.S. garment firms has been an utterly obscene profit generator for shameless owners residing in luxury in the North.

It would be extremely naive to think those “foreign” companies, along with others involved in banana and fruit growing, did not facilitate the coup in more than minor ways. It goes without saying, also, that U.S. political conservatives, with operative ties to covert Central American intrigues dating back to the Reagan years, are now malevolently present in Tegucigalpa.

Our nation’s anti-democratic, imperialist role in Central America is nothing new.

Countless religious activists, teachers, clinic workers, union organizers, and ordinary campesinos were brutalized by sordid contras secretly armed and trained by the U.S. under illegal Reagan administration aegis during the ’80s.

Much earlier, however, Yankee pillage of Latin America (as well as other world locales) was already standard operating procedure, as starkly exposed by former Marine Corps Commandant Smedley Butler:

I spent 33 years (in the Marines)…most of my time being a high-class muscle man for Big Business, for Wall Street and the bankers. In short, I was a racketeer, a gangster for capitalism…

I helped purify Nicaragua for the international banking house of Brown Brothers in 1909-1912. I helped make Mexico and especially Tampico safe for American oil interests in 1914. I brought light to the Dominican Republic for the American sugar interests in 1916. I helped make Haiti and Cuba a decent place for the National City (Bank) boys to collect revenues in. I helped in the rape of half a dozen Central American republics for the benefit of Wall Street…

In China in 1927 I helped see to it that Standard Oil went on its way unmolested. I had a swell racket. I was rewarded with honors, medals, promotions. I might have given Al Capone a few hints. The best he could do was operate in three city districts. The Marines operated on three continents.

Progressives familiar with people’s history know about the titanic struggle it took to unionize U.S. labor, lifting largely immigrant masses out of deep poverty, winning them the pay, benefits, and conditions that would shape the contours of our storied “good life”.

They know, too, that the most militant unions were purged and broken during the McCarthyite Red Scare, allowing class-collaborationist tendencies to rise, making the decimation of American labor in the aftermath of Reagan’s firing of the air traffic controllers essentially a cake walk, much to the profitable delight of corporate parasites.

Now our working class — the backbone of society and the creator of all productive wealth — is losing its jobs, homes, health care, pensions, and collective temper on an unprecedented scale.

The savagely exploitative, intensely destructive Walmart labor relations model dominates U.S. life, and everything we buy is produced abroad in oppressive settings where women and children toil long hours for mere pennies. We (and certainly they) are being ground into the dust as a tiny minority of private “entrepreneurs” live high on the hog, via stolen wealth that properly should be used to improve everyone’s living standards.

But capitalism can’t do that.

It’s unable to function in anything but an increasingly rapacious way, shafting majority wage earners ever more painfully, whether through the acute injustice that leaves evicted families on the street in U.S. cities, or Hondurans fearfully facing military repression and a drastic deterioration of their already desperate existence.

As its growing resort to super-exploitation, dictatorial harshness, violence and war clearly proves, capitalism is the intrinsic enemy — not the ballyhooed champion — of fair play, democracy, simple decency, and peace.

Humanity will have no future worth aspiring to if it stays tied to capitalism’s irreparable flaws and fiercely down-pulling restraints.

The rest of this pivotal century clearly must be devoted to building truly democratic, broadly uplifting socialism on a global scale.

It’s the great moral imperative of our era.

Jan Klimkowski
07-11-2009, 05:50 PM
Honduras Newspaper Impressed that Daughter of Pinochet Backs Coup

:mad:

Magda Hassan
07-13-2009, 02:28 PM
After the kidnapping, after the coup, after the disappearances, after the media shut down the assassinations begin.
http://www.prensa-latina.cu/index.php
Honduran Militant Assassinated in Sane Pedro Sula


Popular leader and leftist militant Roger Bados was killed by unknown
persons in the northern city of San Pedro Sula, according to sources
within the anti-coup movement.

Initial versions indicate that an unknown number of men entered
Bados' home at 8:00 pm, locatedin the May 6th neighborhood, and shot
him.

Bados was a member of the opposition Party Of Democratic Unification
and the Popular Bloc of San Pedro Sula, located 250 kilometers north
of the capital, and was ex-predident of a cement company in the city.

Honduras has been in the middle of a serious political crisis since
june 28, when a military coup overthrew president Manuel Zelaya.

Magda Hassan
07-13-2009, 02:35 PM
Two Militants of a left party in Honduras are Murdered


Tegucigalpa, July 12 (EFE).-Two Militants of the Democratic Union
(UD, leftist), were murdered this saturday in the north and west of
San Pedro Sula, Honduras, EFE was informed today by a leader of this
party.

The president of one of the two currents of the UD, Renan Valdes,
said the victims are Roger Bados, 54 years old, and Ramon Garcia
(40). He said currently "the motives behind both crimes are unknown".

He added that Bados, who was president of the UD local branch, was a
well known educator and member of the Popular Bloc, which is made up
of 30 workers' organizations. He was killed last night in the densely
populated neighborhood "Rivera Hernandez", a few kilometers from San
Pedro Sula, the second most important city in the country.

He said that Garcia "was thrown from a bus by unknown persons" at
16.00 pm on saturday. in the Callejones sector, to the west in the
department of Santa Barbara.

In the case of Bados, continued Valdes, a sister and wife of a nephew
were also wounded.

According to witnesses, said Valdes, a man arrived at the house "and
asked for his nephew", and "when he responded that he would go look
for him, the assailant shot him in the back three times".

The presumed assassin fled on a bicycle. Valdes continued by saying
that the UD is investigating both crimes to discover if they were
common violence or rather of a political nature due to the crisis in
Honduras, which began after president Manuel Zelaya was deposed by
soldiers this past june 28.

With regard to Ramon Garcia, Valdes said he had participated in
demonstrations in the western part of the city demanding the return
of Zelaya to power. Since the military coup his post has been
occupied by Roberto Micheletti, as designated by Congress. Micheletti
had been the leader of Congress until assuming his new post.

Magda Hassan
07-15-2009, 07:37 AM
Who's behind Lanny Davis' putsch paycheck?


Posted by Bill Conroy (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/bill-conroy) - July 14, 2009 at 9:13 pm
Following the money trail in the Honduran coup

Going to bat for an illegal coup used to be the job of shadowy CIA operatives back in the good ol' days of the Cold War.
But that is bygone era. Today’s junta-enablers no longer have to work in secret. In fact, illegal usurpers can now shop openly in Washington for a hired gun of their choosing to grease the wheels of Congress and commerce to assure their coup d'état remains a fait accompli.
Enter Lanny Davis — a long-time friend and Yale Law School chum of Hillary Clinton and former White House Counsel to Bill Clinton [as well as a consummate shill for their agendas].
Davis also is a lawyer and lobbyist now employed by the D.C. office of global law firm Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe. In that capacity, Davis was recently retained by the Business Council of Latin America (CEAL) to hawk for the coup in Honduras — or as is the preferred description among the pushers of simulation, the administration of “de facto” Honduran President Roberto Micheletti [elected by virtue of having cast the most bullets in deposing the people’s choice in Honduras, President Manuel Zelaya).
Davis is now scampering about the Hill setting up meetings with Congressional insiders and throwing money around on advertising and other such frills to build a case for supporting the new militarily elected Honduran regime.
Davis may be many things, but one thing he is not is cheap. So the question is begged: Whose paying for this charade?http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/davis.lanny.jpg
The best way to get a peek under those covers most certainly should be to take a look at who is in bed with CEAL, Davis’ current contract employer.
Well, here’s the scoop on the pecuniary bedfellows (http://www.ceal-int.org/ENG/capitulos/honduras.html):
Camilo Alejandro Atala Faraj, president of the Honduras chapter of CEAL, also happens to be a vice president of a major banking institution in Honduras, Banco Financiera Comercial Hondurena S.A [or Banco Ficohsa), which is part of the financial holding company Grupo Financiero Ficohsa.
The president of the lender is an individual named Jorge Alejandro Faraj Rishmagui, and at least three other bank managers have last names indicating they are likely related to the Faraj clan (http://www.equilibrium.com.pe/ficohsaset08.pdf).
Current information on the bank is a bit hard to come by, at least in English, but it seems the lender did make a filing (http://www.federalreserve.gov/boarddocs/press/orders/2005/20050420/attachment.pdf) with the U.S. Federal Reserve System in 2005, that states, in part, the following:
Order Approving Establishment of a Representative Office
Banco Financiera Comercial Hondurena, S.A. (“Bank”), Tegucigalpa, Honduras, a foreign bank within the meaning of the International Banking Act (“IBA”), has applied under section 10(a) of the IBA (12 U.S.C. § 3107(a)) to establish a representative office in Mi ami, Florida. The Foreign Bank Supervision Enhancement Act of 1991, which amended the IBA, provides that a foreign bank must obtain the approval of the Board to establish a representative office in the United States.
The Bank, with total consolidated assets of approximately $612 million, is the fourth largest commercial bank in Honduras and provides wholesale and retail banking services through a network of domestic branches.
In the United States, [the] Bank has licenses to operate nonbank subsidiaries in Florida, Georgia, New York, North Carolina, and Virginia that engage in money remittance services.
So, it seems Banco Ficohsa has both Honduran and U.S. interests to protect in throwing its lot in with the new usurper regime.
And interestingly, one of the criticisms of the Zelaya government is that it has not been sufficiently pro-business — tending toward friendly relations with that pesky populist Hugo Chavez.
The Honduran banking community is not all that large, at least by U.S. standards, with only a couple dozen banks operating in the country — and only a small slate of foreign-owned banks, one of which happens to be Citigroup. That famous brand name bank, of course, was once home to Robert Rubin, who served as its director, executive committee chair and briefly as chairman — after a stint as Treasury Secretary under Bill Clinton and before that as a suit at Goldman Sachs.
Citigroup, under its subsidiary Citibank Overseas Investment Corp., operates Banco Citibank de Honduras S.A. (http://www.google.com/finance?q=BCV:CUSCATLAN) Now, given the cozy size of Honduras’ banking industry, it’s likely Citigroup and Banco Ficohsa officials have shared some wine and cheese over discussions of global politics and free trade, but there is no indication at this point that any Citigroup money is in the pot to pay Davis’ lobbying expenses on behalf of CEAL.
Another player in CEAl, listed as the vice president of the Honduran Chapter, is Jesus Canahuati, who is an executive vice president (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Pan_American_Development_Foundatio n) with a Honduran company called Elasticos Centroamericanos y Textiles, which is part of a Honduran conglomerate called Grupo Lovable. (http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0OQC/is_2_1/ai_100541544/)
Founded by an entrepreneur named Juan Canahuati in the 1960s, Grupo Lovable now ranks as one of Honduras’ largest employers and has operations in textiles, water and sewage treatment, industrial parks and even an electric plant. Canahuati is credited as being one of the nation’s visionaries in pushing for free-trade and opening up Honduras to U.S. investment.
And yet another player in CEAL, listed as its “coordinator,” is an individual named Miguel Mauricio Facusse Saenz, who lists his corporate affiliation as being with Corporación Dinant S.A., which is a subsidiary of another Honduran mega-business called the Grupo Dinant Cos. — which produces snacks, agricultural products and food products.
Just this past June, the Inter-American Investment Corp. (http://www.iic.int/newsrelease/view.asp?id=656&printview=1) (IIC) provided Grupo Dinant with a loan package worth up to $7 million. The IIC is part of the Inter-American Development Bank, which is based in Washington, D.C., and is charged with fostering economic and social development in Latin America. Luis Alberto Moreno, a Colombian diplomat, currently heads the bank.
But it appears the IIC isn’t the only entity that has lent Grupo Dinant money. A short news item carried by Summa News (http://www.centralamericadata.biz/en/search?q=Corporaci%C3%B3n+Dinant&q1=content_en_le%3A%22BAC-Bamer%22) (http://www.centralamericadata.biz/en/search?q=Corporaci%C3%B3n+Dinant&q1=content_en_le%3A%22BAC-Bamer%22)indicates that a syndicate of banks, including Banco Financiera Comercial Hondurena, last spring provided Grupo Dinant subsidiary Corporación Dinant with a $77 million loan.
So, it seems the business interests behind CEAL are flush with cash, enough of it anyway to line Davis’ pockets for the foreseeable future as he seeks to legitimize the bloody Honduran coup in the eyes of Congress and, apparently, for the benefit of commerce.
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/bill-conroy/2009/07/whos-behind-lanny-davis-putsch-paycheck

Magda Hassan
07-17-2009, 02:05 AM
A brave man with integrity and one with more cojones than Hilary and Obama combined.

ZELAYA ON ROUTE TO HONDURAS (http://www.chavezcode.com/2009/07/updates-zelaya-on-route-to-honduras-us.html)

Honduran Foreign Minister (constitutional) Patricia Rodas has announced that President Manuel Zelaya is currently on route to Honduras to reunite with the people in resistance to the coup regime, now on its third week.

On Tuesday, President Zelaya issued an "ultimatum" to the coup regime, warning that if they do not step down by Saturday - during the next scheduled "mediation" meeting in Costa Rica - then he will consider the dialogue process, imposed by Washington, as a failure. And he will return and rescue constitutional order, along with the masses in the streets, by any means necessary.

The Department of State responded to Zelaya's statements, calling on him to have patience and "let the mediation process work". But as the Obama White House calls on a democratically elected president, who was violently kidnapped and forced into exile by a military force trained, armed and commanded by the Pentagon, the US Government continues to do absolutely nothing to tighten the pressure on an increasingly repressive coup regime in Honduras.

The Committee of Family Members of Detained and Disappeared in Honduras published a report today detailing more than 1155 cases of Human Rights violations committed by the coup regime since June 28, 2009. Of those, there have been 4 political assassinations, 6 gravely injured, 16 threatened with death, 59 injured, 13 media outlets closed or censored, 14 journalists detained, of which the majority have been expelled forcefully from the country, and 1046 arbitrary detentions. Where are the State Department reports on human rights violations now? They are always quick to condemn Venezuela for made up violations in order to demonize the government, but when real violations and crimes are committed by a repressive regime favored by Washington, then the policy is silence.
http://www.chavezcode.com/2009/07/updates-zelaya-on-route-to-honduras-us.html

Magda Hassan
07-17-2009, 02:55 AM
Cesar Ham has returned to the country and it seems that Zelaya is on his way back. The military have cordoned off his home and those of his family and other polititians. There are road block all over the country. Some civillian made other military. Military jets have been circling Catacamas today, Zelaya's home town. Additional troops are at Aguacate airbase.
The curfew has been ordered again.

Magda Hassan
07-17-2009, 04:11 AM
The Hired Gun of Roberto Micheletti: History of the Torturer Joya Améndola http://upsidedownworld.org/main/images/M_images/printButton.png (http://upsidedownworld.org/main/index2.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1993&pop=1&page=0&Itemid=68) http://upsidedownworld.org/main/images/M_images/emailButton.png (http://upsidedownworld.org/main/index2.php?option=com_content&task=emailform&id=1993&itemid=68) Written by Gennaro Carotenuto, Giornalismo Partecipativo. Translation by Adrienne Pine Wednesday, 15 July 2009 Source: Quotha.net (http://www.quotha.net/)

The blood of those who lived through the dirty wars of the 80s in Central America will freeze on hearing the news that the special adviser to the de facto Honduran president is named Billy Joya Améndola.

In order to understand the political culture of the coup junta over which Roberto Michalatti resides is necessary to review the CV of Joya Améndola.

In the 80s Billy Joya Améndola was one of the principal leaders of the Intelligence Battalion 316, in charge of the kidnapping and disappearance of political opponents and founder of the "Lince" and "Cobra" death squads. In this capacity he became one of the principal perpetrators of kidnappings, tortures and assassinations in Honduras, and he has been accused with certainty of at least eleven extrajudicial executions under the pseudonym "Doctor Arranzola."

Furthermore, he is accused of the kidnapping and torture of six students, four of which continue to be disappeared. The students were kidnapped the 27th of April of 1982 from the house of the assistant of the Attorney General of the country, Rafael Rivera, violating the immunity of the second most powerful judge in the country, using methods from the Argentinian dictatorship.

Even if there isn't definitive proof that Joya Améndola received instruction in the United States, there is proof that he worked in Argentina under the orders of one of the principal repressors, Guillermo Suárez Mason, known among other things for being the principal organizer of child-kidnappings during the last dictatorship. Furthermore he obtained a scholarship from the Honduran army to study in Augusto Pinochet's Chile.

Afterwards, from 1984 to 1991 he served as a go-between for the Honduran army, the Argentinian repressors and the United Statesians during the dirty war.

The Spanish government has sought the extradition of Joya Améndola various times since 1985 through Interpol, but nonetheless the Honduran judicial system (the same one that has filed 18 legal complaints against Mel Zelaya) never once responded. Despite this, when a judge in Tegucigalpa accused him of kidnapping and torture in 1994 and issued an arrest order for him in 1995, it was in Spain where he took refuge and remained as an asylum applicant until he was expelled in 1998. During those years he worked as a catechizer in a school in Seville.

Today he is the right arm of Roberto Micheletti.
http://upsidedownworld.org/main/content/view/1993/68/

Magda Hassan
07-18-2009, 05:23 AM
Chiquita in Latin America

By NIKOLAS KOZLOFF
July 17, 2009 "Counterpunch (http://www.counterpunch.org/kozloff07172009.html)" -- When the Honduran military overthrew the democratically elected government of Manuel Zelaya two weeks ago there might have been a sigh of relief in the corporate board rooms of Chiquita banana. Earlier this year the Cincinnati-based fruit company joined Dole in criticizing the government in Tegucigalpa which had raised the minimum wage by 60%. Chiquita complained that the new regulations would cut into company profits, requiring the firm to spend more on costs than in Costa Rica: 20 cents more to produce a crate of pineapple and ten cents more to produce a crate of bananas to be exact. In all, Chiquita fretted that it would lose millions under Zelaya’s labor reforms since the company produced around 8 million crates of pineapple and 22 million crates of bananas per year.
When the minimum wage decree came down Chiquita sought help and appealed to the Honduran National Business Council, known by its Spanish acronym COHEP. Like Chiquita, COHEP was unhappy about Zelaya’s minimum wage measure. Amílcar Bulnes, the group’s president, argued that if the government went forward with the minimum wage increase employers would be forced to let workers go, thus increasing unemployment in the country. The most important business organization in Honduras, COHEP groups 60 trade associations and chambers of commerce representing every sector of the Honduran economy. According to its own Web site, COHEP is the political and technical arm of the Honduran private sector, supports trade agreements and provides “critical support for the democratic system.”
The international community should not impose economic sanctions against the coup regime in Tegucigalpa, COHEP argues, because this would worsen Honduras’ social problems. In its new role as the mouthpiece for Honduras’ poor, COHEP declares that Honduras has already suffered from earthquakes, torrential rains and the global financial crisis. Before punishing the coup regime with punitive measures, COHEP argues, the United Nations and the Organization of American States should send observer teams to Honduras to investigate how sanctions might affect 70% of Hondurans who live in poverty. Bulnes meanwhile has voiced his support for the coup regime of Roberto Micheletti and argues that the political conditions in Honduras are not propitious for Zelaya’s return from exile.
Chiquita: From Arbenz to Bananagate
It’s not surprising that Chiquita would seek out and ally itself to socially and politically backward forces in Honduras. Colsiba, the coordinating body of banana plantation workers in Latin America, says the fruit company has failed to supply its workers with necessary protective gear and has dragged its feet when it comes to signing collective labor agreements in Nicaragua, Guatemala and Honduras.
Colsiba compares the infernal labor conditions on Chiquita plantations to concentration camps. It’s an inflammatory comparison yet may contain a degree of truth. Women working on Chiquita’s plantations in Central America work from 6:30 a.m. until 7 at night, their hands burning up inside rubber gloves. Some workers are as young as 14. Central American banana workers have sought damages against Chiquita for exposing them in the field to DBCP, a dangerous pesticide which causes sterility, cancer and birth defects in children.
Chiquita, formerly known as United Fruit Company and United Brands, has had a long and sordid political history in Central America. Led by Sam “The Banana Man” Zemurray, United Fruit got into the banana business at the http://www.counterpunch.org/kozrevol.jpg (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0230600573/counterpunchmaga)turn of the twentieth century. Zemurray once remarked famously, “In Honduras, a mule costs more than a member of parliament.” By the 1920s United Fruit controlled 650,000 acres of the best land in Honduras, almost one quarter of all the arable land in the country. What’s more, the company controlled important roads and railways.
In Honduras the fruit companies spread their influence into every area of life including politics and the military. For such tactics they acquired the name los pulpos (the octopuses, from the way they spread their tentacles). Those who did not play ball with the corporations were frequently found face down on the plantations. In 1904 humorist O. Henry coined the term “Banana Republic” to refer to the notorious United Fruit Company and its actions in Honduras.
In Guatemala, United Fruit supported the CIA-backed 1954 military coup against President Jacobo Arbenz, a reformer who had carried out a land reform package. Arbenz’ overthrow led to more than thirty years of unrest and civil war in Guatemala. Later in 1961, United Fruit lent its ships to CIA-backed Cuban exiles who sought to overthrow Fidel Castro at the Bay of Pigs.
In 1972, United Fruit (now renamed United Brands) propelled Honduran General Oswaldo López Arellano to power. The dictator was forced to step down later however after the infamous “Bananagate” scandal which involved United Brands bribes to Arellano. A federal grand jury accused United Brands of bribing Arellano with $1.25 million, with the carrot of another $1.25 million later if the military man agreed to reduce fruit export taxes. During Bananagate, United Brands’ President fell from a New York City skyscraper in an apparent suicide.
Go-Go Clinton Years and Colombia
In Colombia United Fruit also set up shop and during its operations in the South American country developed a no less checkered profile. In 1928, 3,000 workers went on strike against the company to demand better pay and working conditions. At first the company refused to negotiate but later gave in on some minor points, declaring the other demands “illegal” or “impossible.” When the strikers refused to disperse the military fired on the banana workers, killing scores.
You might think that Chiquita would have reconsidered its labor policies after that but in the late 1990s the company began to ally itself with insidious forces, specifically right wing paramilitaries. Chiquita paid off the men to the tune of more than a million dollars. In its own defense, the company declared that it was merely paying protection money to the paramilitaries.
In 2007, Chiquita paid $25 million to settle a Justice Department investigation into the payments. Chiquita was the first company in U.S. history to be convicted of financial dealings with a designated terrorist organization.
In a lawsuit launched against Chiquita victims of the paramilitary violence claimed the firm abetted atrocities including terrorism, war crimes and crimes against humanity. A lawyer for the plaintiffs said that Chiquita’s relationship with the paramilitaries “was about acquiring every aspect of banana distribution and sale through a reign of terror.”
Back in Washington, D.C. Charles Lindner, Chiquita’s CEO, was busy courting the White House. Lindner had been a big donor to the GOP but switched sides and began to lavish cash on the Democrats and Bill Clinton. Clinton repaid Linder by becoming a key military backer of the government of Andrés Pastrana which presided over the proliferation of right wing death squads. At the time the U.S. was pursuing its corporately-friendly free trade agenda in Latin America, a strategy carried out by Clinton’s old boyhood friend Thomas “Mack” McLarty. At the White House, McLarty served as Chief of Staff and Special Envoy to Latin America. He’s an intriguing figure who I’ll come back to in a moment.
The Holder-Chiquita Connection
Given Chiquita’s underhanded record in Central America and Colombia it’s not a surprise that the company later sought to ally itself with COHEP in Honduras. In addition to lobbying business associations in Honduras however Chiquita also cultivated relationships with high powered law firms in Washington. According to the Center for Responsive Politics, Chiquita has paid out $70,000 in lobbying fees to Covington and Burling over the past three years.
Covington is a powerful law firm which advises multinational corporations. Eric Holder, the current Attorney General, a co-chair of the Obama campaign and former Deputy Attorney General under Bill Clinton was up until recently a partner at the firm. At Covington, Holder defended Chiquita as lead counsel in its case with the Justice Department. From his perch at the elegant new Covington headquarters located near the New York Times building in Manhattan, Holder prepped Fernando Aguirre, Chiquita’s CEO, for an interview with 60 Minutes dealing with Colombian death squads.
Holder had the fruit company plead guilty to one count of “engaging in transactions with a specially designated global terrorist organization.” But the lawyer, who was taking in a hefty salary at Covington to the tune of more than $2 million, brokered a sweetheart deal in which Chiquita only paid a $25 million fine over five years. Outrageously however, not one of the six company officials who approved the payments received any jail time.
The Curious Case of Covington
Look a little deeper and you’ll find that not only does Covington represent Chiquita but also serves as a kind of nexus for the political right intent on pushing a hawkish foreign policy in Latin America. Covington has pursued an important strategic alliance with Kissinger (of Chile, 1973 fame) and McLarty Associates (yes, the same Mack McLarty from Clinton-time), a well known international consulting and strategic advisory firm.
From 1974 to 1981 John Bolton served as an associate at Covington. As U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations under George Bush, Bolton was a fierce critic of leftists in Latin America such as Venezuela’s Hugo Chávez. Furthermore, just recently John Negroponte became Covington’s Vice Chairman. Negroponte is a former Deputy Secretary of State, Director of National Intelligence and U.S. Representative to the United Nations.
As U.S. Ambassador to Honduras from 1981-1985, Negroponte played a significant role in assisting the U.S.-backed Contra rebels intent on overthrowing the Sandinista regime in Nicaragua. Human rights groups have criticized Negroponte for ignoring human rights abuses committed by Honduran death squads which were funded and partially trained by the Central Intelligence Agency. Indeed, when Negroponte served as ambassador his building in Tegucigalpa became one of the largest nerve centers of the CIA in Latin America with a tenfold increase in personnel.
While there’s no evidence linking Chiquita to the recent coup in Honduras, there’s enough of a confluence of suspicious characters and political heavyweights here to warrant further investigation. From COHEP to Covington to Holder to Negroponte to McLarty, Chiquita has sought out friends in high places, friends who had no love for the progressive labor policies of the Zelaya regime in Tegucigalpa.

Magda Hassan
07-18-2009, 11:28 PM
http://www.diariodigitalglobal.com.ar/noticias/noticia.php?cod_noticia=4096&tabla=internacionales

According to reporter Sergio Miranda who has close links with Zelaya and the Nicaraguan leadership, Mel Zelaya has returned to Honduras and is setting up a base of operations somewhere in the country . He has the support of some military officers and is in contact with people involved in the resisitence to the coup. He is waiting for the results of the mediation meeting with the Costa Rican president.

Magda Hassan
07-20-2009, 03:06 AM
El Libertador is the only Honduran paper that I have found that is printing stuff against the coup. All the others are hopelessly complicit.


A google translation of the article below:




These are the coup, the sovereign judge!


18/07/2009 18:05:00 El Libertador (http://66.102.11.132/translate_c?hl=en&u=http://ellibertador.hn/author/BelkisG/&rurl=translate.google.com&usg=ALkJrhjLx2lPtT7RWRZp8ibIy_Z4arv8wA) 18/07/2009 18:05:00 The Liberator (http://66.102.11.132/translate_c?hl=en&u=http://ellibertador.hn/author/BelkisG/&rurl=translate.google.com&usg=ALkJrhjLx2lPtT7RWRZp8ibIy_Z4arv8wA)



http://ellibertador.hn/thumbnail.php?file=ESTOS13.gif&size=article_medium

Estos son los golpistas: 1) Carlos Flores Facussé; 2) Rafael Leonardo Callejas; 3) Cardenal Óscar Andrés Rodríguez; 4) Adolfo Facussé; 5) Armida de López Contreras; 6) Schucry Kafie; 7) Elvin Santos; 8) Emilio Larach; 9) Enrique Ortez Colindres; 10) Pastor Evelio Reyes; 11) Felícito Ávila; 12) José Alfredo Saavedra; 13) Jorge Canahuati; 14) Jorge Yllescas; 15) Juan Ferrera; 16) Juan Ramón Martínez; 17) Carlos López Contreras; 18) Billy Joya; 19) Ana Abarca; 20) Rafael Ferrari; 21) Juan José Pineda; 22) Vilma Morales; 23) Marcia Villeda; 24) Renato Álvarez; 25) Ramón Custodio; 26) Rafael Pineda Ponce; 27) Olban Valladares; 28) Pastor Oswaldo Canales; 29) Ricardo Maduro; 30) Romeo Vásquez Velásquez; 31) Porfirio Lobo Sosa; 32) Ricardo Álvarez; 33) Antonio Rivera; 34) Guillermo Pérez Cadalso; 35) Mauricio Villeda; 36) María Martha Díaz; 37) Antonio Tavel Otero; 38) Luis Rubí; 39) Toribio Aguilera; 40) Ramón Velásquez Nassar; 41) Elán Reyes Pineda; 42) Luz Ernestina Mejía; 43) Martha Lorena Casco; 44) Rodolfo Irías Navas; 45) Rigoberto Chang Castillo; 46) Mirna Castro; 47) Gabriela Núñez; 48) Hugo Llorens. These are the putschists: 1) Carlos Flores Facussé 2) Rafael Leonardo Callejas, 3) Cardinal Oscar Andrés Rodríguez, 4) Adolfo Facussé; 5) Armida de Lopez Contreras, 6) Schucry Kafi; 7) Elvin Santos; 8) Emilio Larach 9) Enrique Ortez Colindres, 10) Pastor Evelio Reyes, 11) Felicito Avila, 12) José Alfredo Saavedra, 13) Jorge Canahuati, 14) Jorge Yllescas 15) Juan Ferrera, 16) Juan Ramon Martinez, 17) Carlos López Contreras ; 18) Billy Joya, 19) Ana Abarca, 20) Rafael Ferrari, 21) Juan Jose Pineda, 22) Vilma Morales, 23) Marcia Villeda, 24) Renato Alvarez, 25) Ramon Custodio, 26) Rafael Pineda Ponce, 27) Olban Valladares, 28) Pastor Oswaldo Canales; 29) Ricardo Maduro, 30) Romeo Vasquez Velasquez, 31) Porfirio Lobo Sosa, 32) Ricardo Alvarez, 33) Antonio Rivera, 34) Guillermo Perez Cadalso; 35) Mauritius Villeda, 36) Mary Martha Diaz, 37) Antonio Tavel Otero, 38) Luis Rubí; 39) Toribio Aguilera, 40) Ramon Velasquez Nassar, 41) Elan Reyes Pineda, 42) Luz Ernestina Mejia, 43) Martha Lorena Casco; 44) Rodolfo Irías Navas, 45 ) Chang Rigoberto Castillo, 46) Mirna Castro, 47) Gabriela Nunez, 48) Hugo Llorens.


1 Cada una de estas personas desde su posición maquinó, motivó o financió la ruptura del orden constitucional con el secuestro y extradición del Presidente Zelaya, consumando así el golpe de Estado. 1 Each of these people from your machine, motivated or financed the break of the constitutional order with the kidnapping and extradition of President Zelaya, consumption and the coup.
2 Son responsables directos de los muertos, heridos, encarcelados y de la zozobra impuesta a la sociedad hondureña; son los que destruyeron la democracia y la imagen del país en el ámbito nacional e internacional. 2 are directly responsible for the dead, wounded, imprisoned and anxiety imposed on Honduran society, are destroying democracy and the country's image both nationally and internationally.
3 Los golpistas reactivaron la organización antiterrorista y anticomunista que funcionó en la década de 1980 llamada Alianza para el Progreso de Honduras (APROH). 3 putschists and reactivated the anti-terrorist organization that operated in the 1980s Alliance for Progress of Honduras (APROH).
La falta de cultura y avaricia les impide razonar que los pueblos son libres de elegir el sistema político e ideológico que le ofrezca seguridad y bienestar. The lack of a culture of greed and prevents them from thinking that people are free to choose the political and ideological system that offers safety and welfare.

Redacción / EL LIBERTADOR Editorial / The Liberator


Tegucigalpa. Esta vez los nombres y los rostros quedarán para siempre para que la historia y los hondureños y el mundo los conozca, y sean llevados al juzgado de la sanción moral de los ciudadanos ya los tribunales de justicia nacionales e internacionales. Tegucigalpa. This time the names and faces remain forever to the history and the Hondurans and the world knows, and are brought to court the moral sanction of the citizens and courts of justice nationally and internationally.

Los urdidores del golpe de Estado contra Zelaya pusieron en marcha una variante de la maquinaria que en la década de 1980 utilizó la Alianza para el Progreso de Honduras (APROH) que bajo un disfraz aparentemente empresarial, pero debajo escondía líneas políticas doctrinarias claras de “guerra de baja intensidad contra los opositores a la represión contra el gobierno sandinista y el descontento social en Honduras. Urdidores of the coup against Zelaya launched a variant of the machinery in the 1980s used the Alliance for Progress of Honduras (APROH) that appeared in a costume business but hid beneath clear doctrinal lines policies of "war against low-intensity repression against opponents of the Sandinista government and the social unrest in Honduras.
El financiamiento de la organización lo trasladaba la inteligencia de Estados Unidos a través de la secta Moon”. Funding for the organization moved to the United States intelligence through the Moon sect.



“EMPRESARIOS LABORIOSOS” "EMPRESARIOS Laborie"

En los estatutos de APROH no aparece nada especialmente "sospechoso". The statutes of APROH do not see anything particularly "suspect".
Un grupo de empresarios se asocian para estudiar sus problemas, con una proyección asistencial hacia otros sectores. A group of entrepreneurs to discuss their problems associated with a projection to other sectors of care.
El modelo económico que defendían asociados era claro: presionar por políticas de libre empresa con escasos mecanismos de control y con múltiples mecanismos para maximizar la ganancia. The economic model associated defending was clear: to push for policies of free enterprise with few control mechanisms and multiple mechanisms to maximize the gain.

A los socios se les exigía "guardar la debida confidencialidad sobre los documentos o informaciones que conocieran mediante su participación en las actividades de APROH y que la divulgación pudiera causarles perjuicios a sus miembros. The partners were required to "keep the confidentiality of the documents or information available through its involvement in APROH and that the disclosure would cause harm to its members.

Recién creada, en el primer semestre de 1983, APROH no llamó la atención de nadie. Newly created in the first half of 1983, APROH no attention from anyone.
Se veía como un nuevo intento de cohesionar a los sectores más conservadores de Honduras. It looked like another attempt to bring together the most conservative sectors of Honduras.
En noviembre de ese año, diario "Tiempo" publicó uno de esos "documentos" de uso interno: APROH recomendaba a la Comisión Kissinger, a través de un amigo personal y asesor de éste, la solución militar para Centroamérica. In November of that year, the daily "Tiempo" published one of these "documents" for internal use: APROH Kissinger recommended that the Commission, through a personal friend and adviser of it, the military solution for Central America.



LA VERDAD DE AYER Y HOY THE TRUTH OF YESTERDAY AND TODAY
http://ellibertador.hn/files.php?file=Rata.gif
En APROH se reúnen el fascismo militar que representaba en aquel entonces el general Álvarez -presidente de la Asociación y, ahora Romeo Vásquez. In APROH meet military fascism was then the general Álvarez-president of the Association, and now Romeo Vasquez.
Estaba integrada como ahora por la ultraderecha empresarial del país, aunque en verdad más que ideología son empresarios corruptos enriquecidos porque lo se hace o no en el país lo determinan ellos. It was composed as far by the business wing of the country, although in truth rather than ideology is corrupt businessmen because it is enriched or not in the country is determined by them.
Son los eternos vividores de prebendas fiscales, son los que obtienen concesiones y perdones de deudas millonarias con el Estado. Vividores the eternal Son of tax privileges, which are obtained concessions and forgive billions of debt to the State.
Son los que financian y controlan a los partidos políticos e influyen para colocar sus cuadros en el Congreso Nacional y en el Poder Judicial. Which are financed and controlled the political parties and have to sell their paintings in the National Congress and the Judiciary.
En suma, son los que tienen atrapado el país y niegan la superación a otros empresarios y marginan al pueblo porque para ellos es negocio que siga ignorante y con hambre, así les resulta fácil manipularlo con sus medios de comunicación como pasa en este momento con el golpe de Estado. In short, they have caught the country and deny the passing to other employers and marginalize people because for them to continue business is ignorant and hungry, and easy to manipulate the media now as in the coup.

A fines de 1983, los rumores sobre la preocupación con que la embajada de Estados Unidos veía el consolidamiento de un grupo de presión tan conservador y tan vulnerable a la crítica al interior del país, igual que ahora, los golpistas se han vuelto un problema para los mismos Estados Unidos. In late 1983, rumors about the concern with which the United States embassy was to consolidate a pressure group as conservative and as vulnerable to the criticism inside the country, as now, the coup has become a problem for the same United States.
Entonces la APROH fue dormida por muchos años, pero la despertaron en la madrugada del 28 de junio de 2009 para consumar su trabajo: botar al Presidente, manipular a través de los medios de comunicación, ejecuciones extra judiciales que nadie sabrá, represión a propios y extraños y guerra sicológica para confundir al pueblo. Then APROH was asleep for many years, but awoke on the morning of June 28, 2009 to complete his work: bounce to the President, through manipulation of the media, extra judicial executions that nobody knows, repression of its own and strange and psychological warfare to confuse the people.



¿QUIÉNES ERAN LOS MIEMBROS? WHO WERE THE MEMBERS?

El general Gustavo Alvares era el jefe, el hombre a la cabeza de la APROH, Rafael Leonardo Callejas reconoció que cuando era secretario de asuntos obreros y estudiantiles de la Aproh –que enarbolaba la bandera del anticomunismo, se impulsó a Oswaldo Ramos Soto para que llegara a la rectoría de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Honduras (UNAH). Gen. Gustavo Alvares was the boss, the man leading the APROH, Rafael Leonardo Callejas acknowledged that when he was secretary of labor and student affairs of-Aproh flying the banner of anticommunism, it led to Oswaldo Ramos Soto arrived the stewardship of the National Autonomous University of Honduras (UNAH).

Es de señalar que la APROH fue creada en el gobierno de Roberto Suazo Córdova por Álvarez Martínez, máximo precursor de la Doctrina de Seguridad y responsable de decenas de asesinatos y desapariciones políticas en el país. It is noteworthy that the APROH was created in the government of Roberto Suazo Córdova by Álvarez Martínez, a precursor of the maximum Security Doctrine and responsible for dozens of political murders and disappearances in the country.

Esta organización contaba con la colaboración de la “Secta Moon”, una organización religiosa conocida en todo el mundo. This organization had the cooperation of the Moon sect, a religious organization known around the world.

Es de señalar que la Aproh fue creada en el gobierno de Roberto Suazo Córdova por Álvarez Martínez, máximo precursor de la Doctrina de Seguridad y responsable de decenas de asesinatos y desapariciones políticas en el país. It is noteworthy that the Aproh was created in the government of Roberto Suazo Córdova by Álvarez Martínez, a precursor of the maximum Security Doctrine and responsible for dozens of political murders and disappearances in the country.
En la Aproh también estaban José Rafael Ferrari, Miguel Facussé, Fernando Casanova, Rigoberto Espinal Irías, Benjamín Villanueva y los ex dirigentes sindicales Andrés Víctor Artiles y Mariano González. In Aproh also José Rafael Ferrari, Facussé Miguel, Fernando Casanova, Rigoberto Espinal Irías, Benjamin Villanueva and former union leaders and Artiles Víctor Andrés Mariano Gonzalez.

Esta organización también tenía entre sus miembros a Osmond Maduro, hermano del ex Presidente y golpista Ricardo Maduro Joest. This organization also had among its members Osmond Maduro, and brother of former President Ricardo Maduro Joest coup.
Los personajes de la banca nacional y extranjera, los de las industrias química y textil, los de la agroindustria y la televisión y los de la tecnocracia. The characters in the domestic and foreign banks, those of the chemical and textiles, agribusiness and the television and the technocracy.
Todos estaban representados en APROH. All were represented in APROH.

Ahora usted mire en esta página a los golpistas más representativos, son los miembros de la nueva APROH. Now you look at this page to the putschists representative are members of the new APROH.
No hay diferencia con los del pasado, es más, algunos son los mismos: Miguel Facussé, Rafael Leonardo Callejas y José Rafael Ferrari. No difference with the past, moreover, some are the same: Facussé Miguel, Rafael Leonardo Callejas, José Rafael Ferrari.


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Conozca el “código de palabras lava cerebros” Meet the "code words" brain washed "

de golpistas para manipular a los hondureños putschists of Hondurans to manipulate


La feroz guerra sicológica de los golpistas a través de sus medios de comunicación, que son la mayor fuerza mediática del país, reproduce en la mente de la población códigos de manipulación de masa, por ejemplo, es legal secuestrar al Presidente, porque es amigo de Chávez; y micheletti es bueno, porque odia a Fidel a Daniel ya Chávez. The vicious psychological warfare of the coup through its media, which are the strongest media in the country, playing in the minds of the population code of mass manipulation, for example, it is legal to kidnap the president, because he is a friend of Chavez and Micheletti is good, because they hate Fidel and Daniel Chavez.


Redacción / EL LIBERTADOR Editorial / The Liberator


Tegucigalpa. El prototipo de la democracia hondureña en clave que los golpistas reproducen el cerebro de los hondureños, se descifra como ver lo malo como bueno. Tegucigalpa. The prototype of Honduran democracy in the coup played key brain Hondurans, decrypted see as evil as good.
Al ilegal como legal, al usurpador como necesario porque ama el país. The illegal and legal, the usurper as necessary because she loves the country.

El golpe de Estado como “sucesión constitucional”, el odio contra Hugo Chávez, Daniel Ortega y Fidel Castro justifica el rompimiento del Estado de Derecho y el salvajismo de los militares contra los protestantes que reclaman la vuelta al orden constitucional. The coup d'etat as a "constitutional succession," the hatred of Hugo Chávez, Daniel Ortega and Fidel Castro justify breaking the rule of law and the savagery of the military against protesters demanding the return to constitutional order.
Los que buscan el camino de un país donde se respeten las leyes son chusma y vándalos, y los que apoyan la dictadura se visten de blanco porque son puros, son patriotas porque cantan el Himno Nacional y claman democracia, eso es igual a defender a Micheletti porque comparte el deseo de paz y armonía en Honduras, pero para muchos la incapacidad de entender que así se manipula a las masas mediante la técnica conocida como “atrapabobos” y otros igual de mentes débiles pertenecen a familias que se han lucrado con la miseria de mayor parte de la población. Those who seek the path of a country where laws are respected mob and vandals, and they support the dictatorship because they are dressed in pure white, they are patriots because they sing the National Anthem and claim democracy, that is equal to defending Micheletti because they share the desire for peace and harmony in Honduras, but the inability for many to understand that it manipulates the masses through the technique known as "atrapabobos" and other equally weak minds are from families who have profited from the misery of Most of the population.


LA DEMOCRACIA EN CLAVE DE LOS GOLPISTAS: DEMOCRACY IN THE KEY OF putschists:

Democracia = no Chávez-no Fidel-no Ortega; Democracy = no-no Chavez Fidel Ortega-no;

Democracia = Rico inocente, Pobre culpable; Democracy = Rico innocent guilty Poor;

Democracia = Sí al que viola la Ley por nuestro bien, no a Mel que viola la Ley por el bien. = Yes to democracy that violates the law for us, not Mel violating the law for the good.

Democracia = Yo por Micheletti soy conciliador, tú, por Mel rompes vidrios; Democracy = I am a conciliator by Micheletti, you break glass by Mel;

Democracia = yo amo al Cardenal, tú, olvidas el padre nuestro (y ofendes al Cardenal); Democracy = I love the Cardinal, you forget our father (and offend the Cardinal);

Democracia = corrupto, mayor o que Mel, pero odia a Chávez y odia a Fidel; Democracy = corrupt, more or Mel, but hates hates Chavez and Fidel;

Democracia = El secuestro de Mel es bueno, el derrame de sangre de los opositores es bueno y la represión es buena, el comunismo es malo: Mel es comunista; los golpistas NO respetan la vida ni la ley porque nos protegen del mal. Democracy = The abduction of Mel is good, the bloodshed of the opponents and the suppression is good is good, communism is bad: Mel is a communist; the putschists no respect for life nor the law because they protect us from evil.

Democracia= Mel es peligroso por Chávez, Daniel y Fidel, Micheletti sólo busca el bien de todos; Micheletti es bueno, Mel es malo. Mel = Democracy is dangerous for Chavez, Fidel and Daniel, Micheletti only seeks the good of all; Micheletti is good, bad Mel.

Democracia= Chávez y Fidel quieren imponernos ideologías extrañas a los hondureños; Mel es amigo de Chávez y Fidel; aborrecer a Mel, a Chávez ya Fidel es bueno porque somos hondureños. Democracy = Chavez and Fidel want to impose alien ideologies Hondurans, Mel is a friend of Chavez and Fidel; hates Mel, Chavez and Fidel is good because we are Hondurans.

Fuente: Source:
Fundacion Popol Nah Tun Para el Desarrollo Local Popol Nah Tun Foundation for Local Development


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Aline Flores, ha jugado un papel vital Aline Flores has played a vital role

antes y después del golpe de Estado before and after the coup d'état


A La Cámara de Comercio e Industrias de Tegucigalpa (CCIT), cuya presidenta es la empresaria Aline Flores, admite que los empresarios han obligado a su personal a marchar de blanco contra el Presidente Zelaya. A Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Tegucigalpa (CCIT), whose chairman is the entrepreneur Aline Flores admits that employers have required their staff to go from white to President Zelaya.

B El gobierno de Zelaya le dio un golpe bajo a la empresa Corporación Flores (representante exclusiva de la marca Toyota en Honduras), propiedad del padre de Aline Flores, y donde ella es la gerente general, al descubrir y demandarla ante los tribunales por la venta de automóviles con dispensas falsificadas el caso sólo lo publicó este periódico con el título “Toyotazo”. B Zelaya's government gave him a low blow to the company Corporación Flores (exclusive representative of the Toyota brand in Honduras), owned by the father of Aline Flores, where she is the general manager, to find and sue in court by selling cars with counterfeit waivers only if the newspaper published it under the title "Toyotazo.

C El padre de Aline Flores, Alan Flores, enfrenta un juicio desde hace más de dos décadas por parte del hermano menor Valentín Flores, que lo acusado de haberse apropiado de manera indebida de la participación accionaria que el papá le dejó y que la influencia de Aline y Alan en el sistema judicial y medios tradicionales de comunicación ha impedido que hasta hoy se haya emitido sentencia final. C Aline Flores's father, Alan Flores, faces a trial for over two decades by the younger brother Valentin Flores, who has been accused of improperly appropriated the shares that the father left him and that the influence of Aline and Alan in the judicial system and traditional media has prevented so far final ruling is issued.


Redacción EL LIBERTADOR Drafting The Liberator

http://ellibertador.hn/files.php?file=ALINE.gif
Tegucigalpa. La Cámara de Comercio e Industria de Tegucigalpa ha jugado un papel importante antes y después del golpe de Estado. Tegucigalpa. The Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Tegucigalpa has played an important role before and after the coup.
Esta cámara es una versión de federación de cámaras hondureñas. This camera is a version of the Honduran Federation of Chambers.
Dos días antes del secuestro del Presidente Zelaya, la presidenta de la cámara, Aline Flores, envió esta nota a personajes de dinero solicitando un apoyo que iba de 1,000 a 3,000 dólares y les dijo: “es necesario que el sector privado de Honduras, tome acciones urgentes encaminadas a apoyar la defensa de la democracia y de las libertades sociales y económicas”. Two days before the kidnapping of President Zelaya, president of the chamber, Aline Flores, sent this note to people asking for money to support that ranged from 1,000 to $ 3,000 and told them: "it is necessary that the private sector in Honduras, take urgent action to support the defense of democracy and economic and social freedoms. "

Además, esa cámara repartió panfletos entre sus afiliados exhortándolos a acudir a un "gran plantón" contra Zelaya, quien según ellos "atenta contra tu libertad". Moreover, this camera distributed leaflets urging its members to attend a "great plants against Zelaya, who according to them violates your liberty."
El panfleto dice: "Esperamos que las empresas se hagan presentes con todo su personal". The pamphlet says: "We hope that companies will make presentations to all staff."


LA CAMARA, ANTES DEL GOLPE The camera, before the coup

Diferentes dirigentes sociales y otras fuentes privadas en contra del golpe denunciaron que muchas de las marchas realizadas en oposición a Manuel Zelaya antes y después del golpe de Estado han estado llenas de empleados a quienes se les obligaba a marchar, con la amenaza latente que de no hacerlo serán despedidos. Various community leaders and other private sources in the coup against alleged that many of the marches in opposition to Manuel Zelaya before and after the coup d'état have been filled with employees who were forced to march with the threat that failure doing so will be dismissed.

Esta versión, desestimada por la prensa tradicional hondureña y algunos medios internacionales, en realidad es muy fácil de confirmar: La Cámara de Comercio e Industria de Tegucigalpa (CCIT), lo confirma en su grupo de contactos en línea por Facebook . This version, rejected by the traditional Honduran press and some international media, it is actually very easy to confirm: The Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Tegucigalpa (CCIT), confirms its contact group on Facebook online.

En Facebook hallamos un panfleto que convoca a los empresarios afiliados a un "gran plantón" el 26 de junio (dos días antes del golpe de Estado) en contra de la encuesta promovida por el Presidente Manuel Zelaya, donde dice: "Participa con tu personal en defensa de la democracia". Facebook find a pamphlet that encourages entrepreneurs affiliated with a "large plant" on June 26th (two days before the coup d'état) in breach of the survey was promoted by President Manuel Zelaya, where it says: "Join with your personal in defense of democracy. "



LA CAMARA, DESPUÉS DEL GOLPE THE CHAMBER, THE AFTERMATH OF THE COUP

Después del golpe de Estado, la Cámara de Comercio de Tegucigalpa llamó de nuevo "a todos los empresarios y empresarias afiliadas: se les invita a participar en el Gran Plantón a realizarse el día Martes 30 de Junio de 2009 a las 10:00 am en el Parque Central de la Ciudad Capital" en apoyo al gobierno dictatorial de Roberto Micheletti. After the coup, the Tegucigalpa Chamber of Commerce called back "to all businessmen and businesswomen affiliated are invited to participate in the Grand Plantón which will take place on Tuesday June 30 2009 at 10:00 am Central Park in the Capital City "in support of the dictatorial government of Roberto Micheletti.
En el mismo, indican: " esperamos que las empresas se hagan presentes con todo su personal ". In the same show: "We hope that companies will make presentations to all staff."

Estas protestas fueron mostradas por los medios locales y las cadenas internacionales como una muestra del "respaldo popular" que supuestamente tenía el gobierno golpista de Micheletti. These protests were shown by local media and international chains as a sign of "popular" government that was supposed to putschist Micheletti.

Magda Hassan
07-21-2009, 03:42 PM
Honduran Defense Ministry’s List of Drug Traffickers Links Micheletti to the Cali Cartel (http://www.cubadebate.cu/especiales/2009/07/17/micheletti-vinculado-al-cartel-de-cali-en-una-lista-de-narcos-del-ministerio-de-la-defensa/) Jean-Guy Allard – Cubadebate
Translation: Machetera
The name of the leader of the Honduran coup d’etat, Roberto Micheletti, appears on a long undated list of drug traffickers drawn up by a senior official in the Honduran Ministry of Defense and Public Security, showing his relations with the Cali Cartel, the Colombian drug trafficking network.
The document, signed by infantry Colonel Rene Adalberto Paz Alfaro on Ministry letterhead shows ROBERTO MICHELLETI BAIN (misspelled), number SN-FF. AA. 060 – with a connection to the Cali Cartel, and under the column headed “Location,” the word “Yoro.”
Micheletti’s biographical notes indicate that he began his political career in the 1980’s, when he held the post of Local Council President in Yoro, where he was always selected as a deputy to the National Congress.
Son of an Italian citizen, Umberto Micheletti, and Donatella Bain, the present usurper of the Honduran presidency was born on August 13, 1948 in the town of El Progreso (Yoro).
He studied Business in the United States in order to dedicate himself later on to his own business, Empresa de Transporte TUTSA (TUTSA Transportation) in his hometown.
The appearance of Micheletti’s name on this list of drug traffickers leaves no doubt about the presence of his name in the files of the DEA, the U.S. anti-drug agency.
However, up to now, nothing has leaked from the North American source.
It’s worth noting that a few days ago, a group of extreme right-wing U.S. congressional representatives, headed by the Florida representatives Mario and Lincoln Diaz-Balart, tried to sully the name of the constitutional president of Honduras, Manuel Zelaya, by asking President Barack Obama to investigate his supposed “links with drug traffickers,” through the DEA. Obama didn’t bother to answer.
The Diaz-Balarts have a long record of dubious relations with Colombian circles tied to drug trafficking.
On the other hand, in an interview with Pacifica Radio on July 10, Andres Pavon, the Honduran human rights leader, stated that General Vazquez Velazquez, the chairman of the Honduran Chiefs of Staff, has known ties to drug trafficking.
“He is someone from the Latin American intelligence community, close to the DEA and CIA [intelligence] framework,” he explained, in a telephone interview with the journalist Fernando Velazquez, reporting for Radio Mundial de Venezuela.
Pavon added that he had “evidence that the U.S. Embassy itself, through the DEA, has been involved in drug trafficking operations.”
http://machetera.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/micheletti-cartel-cali-2.jpg?w=499&h=886http://machetera.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/micheletti-cartel-cali-7.jpg?w=499&h=526
Machetera is a member of Tlaxcala (http://www.tlaxcala.es/), the network of translators for linguistic diversity. This translation may be reprinted as long as the content remains unaltered, and the source, author, and translator are cited.

Peter Lemkin
07-21-2009, 06:23 PM
AMY GOODMAN: Nikolas Kozloff, you’ve been following the coup very closely right now. Talk about the latest developments and who you feel is behind it. And what exactly is the US role here? If the US cut off aid, economic and military aid, do you feel that would end the coup?

NIKOLAS KOZLOFF: I don’t think so. I think there’s this revolving door of Washington insiders that are supporting companies like Chiquita banana. I just wrote an article about Chiquita, formerly known as the United Fruit Company. And, you know, throughout history, Chiquita banana has had enormous sway and power over Central American nations.

And we know that prior to the coup d’état in Honduras, Chiquita was very unhappy about President Zelaya’s minimum wage decrees, because they said that this would cut into their profits and make it more expensive for them to export bananas and pineapple. And we know that they appealed to the Honduran Business Association, which was also opposed to Zelaya’s minimum wage provisions.

And we also—and what I find really interesting is that Chiquita is allied to a Washington law firm called Covington, which advises multinational corporations. And who is the vice chairman of Covington? None other than John Negroponte, who your previous guest mentioned in regards to the rampant human rights abuses that went on in Honduras throughout the 1980s. So I think that’s a really interesting connection.

AMY GOODMAN: You talk about the money and the support, Chiquita, then and now. It’s interesting, this is so reminiscent of the coup against the Haitian president Jean-Bertrand Aristide. He wasn’t in office but a year, 1990, 1991, when he was ousted, and one of his first acts when he became president was to increase the minimum wage, as Zelaya has done.

NIKOLAS KOZLOFF: Well, right, and this is nothing new, as I point out in a recent article. Throughout the twentieth century, Chiquita, formerly known as United Fruit, was associated with some of the most backward, retrograde political and economic forces in Central America and indeed outside of Central America in such countries as Colombia. And we know that United Fruit Company played a very prominent role in the coup d’état against democratically elected President Jacobo Arbenz in Guatemala in 1954. And, you know, after that, that ushered in a very turbulent period in Guatemalan history, rampant human rights abuses, genocide against the indigenous people of Guatemala. And so, Guatemala is only now recovering from that.

But, you know, Chiquita has played a role in such countries as Guatemala and also Colombia, and now it maintains these ties to Covington, this law firm in Washington, to this day. And there is this revolving door, as I say before, of these Washington insiders. Covington, in turn, is tied to McLarty and Kissinger Associates, McLarty being President Clinton’s former Chief of Staff and envoy to Latin America, who was pushing the free trade agenda in Latin America, and Kissinger, who doesn’t even need an introduction. His ties to the coup in Chile in 1973 are well known. And so, it’s disturbing that there is this history of abuses in Central America throughout the twentieth century with Chiquita and the fruit companies, which continues to this day.

AMY GOODMAN: And then you have—well, we played Lanny Davis’s testimony before Congress, Lanny Davis, who we were speaking to Ken Silverstein about last week, the superb investigative reporter, about his representing the Chamber of Commerce, which is very much on the side of the coup regime right now. Lanny Davis is the former White House counsel for President Clinton.

NIKOLAS KOZLOFF: Right, and there’s these—there’s the circle of Clintonites that are still around. And as I mentioned before, you have Mack McLarty, who’s now associated with a law firm which is defending Chiquita. Also, as I point out in my recent article, you have the current Attorney General, Eric Holder, who was also Deputy Attorney General under Clinton, who defended Chiquita and its actions in Colombia, when Chiquita was allied to right-wing paramilitary death squads in the 1990s, was found guilty of paying off paramilitaries. And Eric Holder, the current Attorney General, who was also in the Clinton administration, was the lead counsel for Chiquita.

AMY GOODMAN: And explain the significance of what he was representing Chiquita around. I mean, we know the story of the Cincinnati Enquirer that did this remarkable exposé of Chiquita, which they were forced to apologize for, not because they were wrong, but because the reporter had gotten access to voicemail system within Chiquita, and they said that it was illegal how he had gained access to that voicemail system. But what he exposed was quite astounding.

NIKOLAS KOZLOFF: Right. Well, Chiquita claimed that it was merely paying protection money to the paramilitaries in Colombia. But the victims of the paramilitary violence in Colombia claim otherwise. They say that Chiquita was engaged in this systematic campaign to control banana production in Colombia and terrorize the population. And Chiquita was the only company in US history to be found guilty of paying bribes to a terrorist organization, as defined by the United States.

Eric Holder was the lead counsel defending Chiquita. He’s the top justice official in the United States with ties to this fruit company that was complicit in right-wing paramilitary violence.

AMY GOODMAN: So, the latest right now—the developments of the EU dropping support for Honduras, the talks with Oscar Arias breaking down. Though the elected president, Zelaya, has fully accepted what he proposed, the coup regime has said no. What’s going to happen? Oscar Arias said there could be a civil war, the President of Costa Rica and the Nobel Prize winner.

NIKOLAS KOZLOFF: Well, I don’t really—I don’t see how this is going to be resolved, because he’s already tried to come back militarily—I mean, not militarily, but force his way back into the country.

And I think that the problem is that, you know, up until recently, Honduras was a very—had very traditional right-wing politics, was one of the most reliable countries, most compliant regimes in Central America towards the United States. And now you see the resurgence of these right-wing forces. And so, there is this vibrant—these vibrant social movements in Honduras—for example, the Garifuna people, the Afro-Honduran, the indigenous people, and labor. But I think perhaps this could be the resurgence of these right-wing forces that really haven’t gone away, that it seemed for a while that we had the pink tide from South America, the rise of the left spreading into Central America. This could be, perhaps, a disturbing sign that those old retrograde forces are now trying to prove that they can stage a comeback. And I think that’s disturbing for other countries that are, say, allied to Venezuela, you know, such as small nations in the Caribbean, and this could be a very disturbing message to other countries that are following and trying to cultivate ties to Venezuela.

AMY GOODMAN: Nikolas Kozloff, I want to thank you for being with us, author of the book Revolution!: South America and the Rise of the New Left. His latest piece, “From Arbenz to Zelaya: Chiquita in Latin America.”

Jan Klimkowski
07-21-2009, 06:29 PM
Magda, Peter - how very depressing.

When They get a bit of journalistic attention, these scumbags just change Their name.

Blackwater becomes Manchurian Global. Sorry Xe.

United Fruit Company becomes Chiquita.

And carry on implementing the same old coups, assassinations and rigging of elections.

With Their bought and paid for political front men and women.

Of course, whilst never being a looker, Kissinger became too grossly physically repulsive to be seen in primetime holding an official government position...

Peter Lemkin
07-21-2009, 06:44 PM
Magda, Peter - how very depressing.

When They get a bit of journalistic attention, these scumbags just change Their name.

Blackwater becomes Manchurian Global. Sorry Xe.

United Fruit Company becomes Chiquita.

And carry on implementing the same old coups, assassinations and rigging of elections.

With Their bought and paid for political front men and women.

Of course, whilst never being a looker, Kissinger became too grossly physically repulsive to be seen in primetime holding an official government position...

...and don't forget the School of the Americas (http://books.google.com/books?id=IqPqwx0SXfMC&dq=school+of+the+americas&printsec=frontcover&source=bl&ots=niZxZNwxm8&sig=OTjh1PkK9jVgYRNQX6lhjSWPVBs&hl=en&ei=vRtmSv3NG5CangPo1Zj4Dw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10) changed its name, as well to the "Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation"....a PR firm attached to every entity of the Oligarchy! :angel: Orwellian 'Newspeak' :y:

Magda Hassan
07-24-2009, 01:10 AM
Zelaya Heads Home to Honduras on the Anniversary of Bolívar’s Birth

Posted by Al Giordano (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/al-giordano) - July 23, 2009 at 9:26 am By Al Giordano
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/honduras_map_4.jpg.jpeg
Honduras’ legitimate President Manuel Zelaya yesterday told reporters that he will cross back to the country that elected him on Friday, July 24 (http://www.lanueva.com/hoy/nota/d16d819c3e/21/32547.html), via land, a date that also marks 215 years from the birth of the Great Liberator, Simon Bolívar:
“I leave (Managua, Nicaragua) for Estelí, then Somoto and through Ocotal, and the next day (Friday) cross the border,” Zelaya told reporters yesterday. Members of his family and many, many journalists will accompany him on that voyage.
The announcement could be a “head fake” to throw the regime off his path and allow him to more easily enter by another route, but if President Zelaya does choose that location to cross, the Las Manos border crossing, in the Honduran state of El Paraiso, is open from six a.m. to six p.m. and, on a normal day, staffed by the National Police and the Honduras Immigration Service. The border crossing is about 144 kilometers (89 miles) from the capital city of Tegucigalpa.
“President Zelaya will come through here, of this I have no doubt,” Mayor Carlos Ovidio Seguro, of El Paraiso, Honduras told the Argentine daily El Clarin (http://www.clarin.com/diario/2009/07/22/elmundo/i-01962993.htm), which reported some other notable quotes:
“All of Honduras will be in El Paraiso awaiting the President,” announced the newsman on Channel 20, the regional TV station.
“We have no order to arrest him,” Lieutenant Colonel Gavilán Soto told the newspaper. “We’re not here for that. We’re only here for public safety and to avoid disturbances… May God shine and he not pass through here!”
Presuming that thousands of Hondureños and Hondureñas will flock to the border to accompany their President, a land crossing like this presents various dilemmas to the coup regime, which claims to have 18 criminal charges lined up to imprison Zelaya, but blinked from the opportunity to arrest him on July 5, when it blocked a runway to prevent his airplane from landing. To arrest him, the regime would have to violently break through a multitude of its country's own citizens. If it does arrest Zelaya, he will become an even more powerful symbol from prison inspiring greater resistance to the coup.
Meanwhile, yesterday in Costa Rica, President Oscar Arias made his final mediation proposal – one in which Zelaya would return on Friday but with weakened presidential powers – and told the coup regime that it would be his last effort. If the regime wants more negotiations, it will have to go to the Organization of American States (OAS) to mediate them, he said.
The evident refusal of the coup regime to treat the talks seriously will likely have blowback against those – most importantly, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton – who had gambled the most on them. Secretary Clinton may not be a trustworthy friend to democracy in the hemisphere, but as anyone who closely observed her 2008 presidential campaign saw, her ego isn’t set up in a way as to forgive the kind of public insult that the coup regime offered to talks that she had set up for its very benefit. If she had illusions before that she or anyone could do business with the unstable criminal gang behind the coup, those illusions have shattered on the rocks of reality.
Meanwhile, the social movements of Honduras have never been better organized than they are today, 26 days after the June 28 coup d’etat. Today begins another round of highway blockades and strikes by workers and farmers throughout Honduras in protest of the coup. A week ago, these same movements demonstrated their organizational and tactical ability to successfully shut down commerce and transport throughout the country. A week later, their capacity to mobilize is even greater.
Two hundred and fifteen years ago tomorrow, the man known as “El Libertador” – the Great Liberator – Simon Bolívar was born, the George Washington of Latin America. He was the general that helped to free Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Panamá, Perú and Venezuela from colonial rule. It is his sentence – Nuestra Patria se llama América - “The name of our country is América” – that has been the motto of this online newspaper since its own birth nine years ago.
What’s that sound you hear in the distance? It is the gallop of Bolívar’s horse, alive and well and today heading toward the Honduras border.
Update: As if the coup regime in Honduras didn't have enough problems hanging on to power already... Narco News has learned that the country's police forces have decided to go on strike in the coming hours. Recall that on July 5, after the Armed Forces shot into the crowd of anti-coup protesters, the national police commander pulled his cops out from the airport zone because he did not want the police to share in the infamy of repressing the Honduran people. The timing of this police strike - purportedly for better wages - may share similar motivations.
Update II: The coup military stopped seven buses with anti-coup citizens traveling through the Zamorano Valley from the northern state of Colón to Danlí - see map above, 14 kilometers north of El Paraiso - and, Narco News has learned, the bus riders simply got off and continued their journey on foot.
Update III: From Jonathan Treat, reporting from Honduras:

Today, the 26th day popular nonviolent resistance to the military coup and the de facto regime in Honduras, is a key day in the struggle. Hopes of a negotiated settlement, for the moment, have been dashed. The Micheletti regime’s continued intransigence and unwillingness to accept the return to Honduras of deposed President Manuel “Mel” Zelaya to assume the presidency—a unanimous demand by governments around the world, the UN, and OAS—leaves Hondurans vulnerable to the very real threat of violence and bloodshed. One of the principal leaders of the pro-democracy movement said this morning, “The people can’t take much more of this.”


Caravans of people in pro-democracy movement headed to the Nicaraguan border in hopes of forming a protective human shield to accompany President Zelaya back into the country—have been stopped by military troops.
The northern entrance of the Panamerican highway into Tegucigalpa has been taken by pro-democracy protestors.
Members of the National Preventative Police have announced that they are participating in a strike in protest of exploitative conditions since the coup, including not being paid. Official reports put the number of police on strike at 80; the actual numbers are very likely much higher.
The air controllers are reportedly in strike. At present, flights are continuing to leave from the Tonkotin Airport in Tegucigalpa.
There are report s that pro-democracy protesters have closed entrances to some of the principal ports, as well as other main highways in the country.
Many public institutions have also been taken by the popular movement: the Social Security office, the National Agrarian Institute, the Civil Aeronautic office, the National Honduran Electric offices, various schools and universities, the telecommunications offices, and others.
In the southern region of the country military operations, including the use of small tanks, have been initiated. There are reports of army troops detaining people and confiscating their identification documents.
Large numbers of Hondurans reportedly have been displaced along the southern Honduran borders with Nicaragua and El Salvador.
The Honduran military is reportedly occupying various public institutions: the national union of the national telephone network Hondutel, hospitals, and others.

More to come…
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/thefield/zelaya-heads-home-honduras-anniversary-bol%C3%ADvar%E2%80%99s-birth

Peter Lemkin
07-24-2009, 05:10 AM
Another interesting day lining-up. Much of the 'thanks for all this needs to go the SOA, Chiquita, Negroponte and the US Secret Government's CA/SA 'rollback' plans.
Hey, they are even rolling-back the 'Homeland'....:shot:

Magda Hassan
07-24-2009, 11:28 AM
Ambassador “recovers” Honduras embassy in Mexico for Zelaya

Honduran diplomat Rosalinda Bueso Asfura recovered Wednesday control of the Honduras embassy in Mexico City which had been taken over by adepts to the de facto government of interim President Roberto Micheletti.

http://www.mercopress.com/photos/article/742372b9bb51acda06f0ca610fee0da0.jpg With help from Mexico and Latam ambassadors Rosalinda Bueso Asfura was returned to control of the embassy. Zoom Image (http://mercopress.com/images/uploads/742372b9bb51acda06f0ca610fee0da0.jpg)

Ambassador Bueso walked into the embassy building following a confirmation from the Mexican Foreign Affairs ministry that she was recognized as the ambassador of Honduras, as well as receiving the support from 21 Latinamerican and Caribbean peers.
She was able to accomplish the takeover after Mexican security guards impeded access to the building of Rigoberto Lopez, Chargé d’Affaires named by de facto president Micheletti, and four other Honduran officials.
Ambassador Bueso was not allowed into the Honduras embassy compound in Mexico City for two days, but once in control of the situation she underlined she never ceased to be the Honduras ambassador since “the only person that can cease her in the job is President Manuel Zelaya”.
Apparently the ambassador has requested the Mexican government to eliminate the diplomatic accreditation of four members of the embassy staff and have them leave the country since they are no longer considered Honduran diplomats.
The ambassadors from Costa Rica, Bolivia, Brazil and Haiti as well as the Chargé d’Affaires from Venezuela and 16 other diplomatic representatives from Latinamerican and the Caribbean subscribed a statement backing Ambassador Bueso.
The document expresses support for the resolutions on the Honduras issue, from multilateral organizations and forms the region such as UN, OAS, ALBA, Rio Group and SICA

http://en.mercopress.com/2009/07/24/ambassador-recovers-honduras-embassy-in-mexico-for-zelaya

Magda Hassan
07-24-2009, 10:26 PM
Zelaya is in Honduras.
Here is live feed from Telesur for any one who understands Spanish.
http://www.telesurtv.net/noticias/canal/senalenvivo.php

Magda Hassan
07-24-2009, 10:36 PM
Zelaya is again in Nicaragua and will once again return to Honduras when his wife and family who are about 20 km away meet at the border. He spent about 2 hours in Honduras.

Magda Hassan
07-25-2009, 01:42 AM
From Eva Golinger:





UPDATE: ZELAYA ENTERED HONDURAS AND HAS RETURNED TO THE NICARAGUAN SIDE IN LOS MANOS (http://www.chavezcode.com/2009/07/update-zelaya-entered-honduras-and-has.html)

Apparently, President Zelaya, after having entered Honduras this afternoon, was forced back to the Nicaraguan side of the border, after a Honduran Colonel from the armed forces approached him and informed him communication was in process with the high level army command and the coup regime to figure out what to do. The army has a large group of Zelaya supporters and coup regime protesters on lockdown a few miles from the border, preventing their reuniting with their constitutional president. Zelaya's wife and children are amongst those presently retained by the armed forces in El Paraiso, approximate 5 miles from the border with Nicaragua.

IT is unclear what is happening at this point or where things are heading.....

Personally, I think he needs to just continue inside Honduras, despite all risks, and fight to reunite with his family and his people, who have been risking their lives now for almost one month, struggling to defeat the coup regime.

Peter Lemkin
07-25-2009, 05:45 AM
From Eva Golinger:





UPDATE: ZELAYA ENTERED HONDURAS AND HAS RETURNED TO THE NICARAGUAN SIDE IN LOS MANOS (http://www.chavezcode.com/2009/07/update-zelaya-entered-honduras-and-has.html)

Apparently, President Zelaya, after having entered Honduras this afternoon, was forced back to the Nicaraguan side of the border, after a Honduran Colonel from the armed forces approached him and informed him communication was in process with the high level army command and the coup regime to figure out what to do. The army has a large group of Zelaya supporters and coup regime protesters on lockdown a few miles from the border, preventing their reuniting with their constitutional president. Zelaya's wife and children are amongst those presently retained by the armed forces in El Paraiso, approximate 5 miles from the border with Nicaragua.

IT is unclear what is happening at this point or where things are heading.....

Personally, I think he needs to just continue inside Honduras, despite all risks, and fight to reunite with his family and his people, who have been risking their lives now for almost one month, struggling to defeat the coup regime.

I didn't know the Coup Cabal had his wife and children as hostages. I'd like to hear who was with him. It seems from the reports I heard no high-visibility leaders from other countries were [as they had promised for the flight - then most backed-off]. Very sad show of non-solidarity, except in words. Worst of all was Clinton admonishing Zalaya for stepping into the country in which he is still the only duely elected President - as 'reckless'....what was she saying/thinking? I guess could set a bad precident for Aristide and others the USA have removed illegally.

Magda Hassan
07-25-2009, 07:02 AM
Well, we can expect no better from the wicked witch of the North. She has always been quite clear where she stands on this matter. Her very good friend Lanny is representing the coupmongers before the US congress and others. If the US really supported 'democracy' she should be offering to return with him on a US military jet and landing at the US military base and escort him back to the palace instead she blames the victim of the criminals for any outcomes.

It is my understanding that previous to his return an emissary went for reconnaissance. There are parts of the military not supporting the coup. The police like most of the country are presently on strike. It is a matter of sorting which parts of the military are on side and which can be won over and which are on the other side and where they are located. Basically everyone else is in support except the oligarchy.

He had a lot of media with him. Personally I think it was a mistake to return to Nicaragua but I am not on the ground there so don't have a clear picture of the event as it happened. I don't think he is suicidal. Nor are the reporters. But the fact that his family and many supporters are now hostages needs to be known far and wide and must be condemned by the US - followed by action against the coup puppets. Nothing else will suffice.

Peter Lemkin
07-25-2009, 08:17 AM
Well, we can expect no better from the wicked witch of the North. She has always been quite clear where she stands on this matter. Her very good friend Lanny is representing the coupmongers before the US congress and others. If the US really supported 'democracy' she should be offering to return with him on a US military jet and landing at the US military base and escort him back to the palace instead she blames the victim of the criminals for any outcomes.

It is my understanding that previous to his return an emissary went for reconnaissance. There are parts of the military not supporting the coup. The police like most of the country are presently on strike. It is a matter of sorting which parts of the military are on side and which can be won over and which are on the other side and where they are located. Basically everyone else is in support except the oligarchy.

He had a lot of media with him. Personally I think it was a mistake to return to Nicaragua but I am not on the ground there so don't have a clear picture of the event as it happened. I don't think he is suicidal. Nor are the reporters. But the fact that his family and many supporters are now hostages needs to be known far and wide and must be condemned by the US - followed by action against the coup puppets. Nothing else will suffice.

Despite all the rhetoric, I can't remember the last time the USA used its might for something positive. All the USA would have to do is call the Coup-ers and say, Listen you undemocratic thugs, the President will be back in Honduras escorted by the Sec. of State and a squadron of American fighter planes, fully armed, which will land at the US Airfield. Vacate all offices of government or face the consquences....

...instead we get handwringing and monday morning quaterbacking...and calls for 'negotiations'! These people are too transparent. I think the Native Americans had it about correct, when they said the European invaders spoke with a forked tongue!

Keith Millea
07-25-2009, 04:35 PM
http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2009/07/25-6


Clinton Calls Zelaya's Return 'Reckless', Rights Groups Respond

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has called a move by ousted Honduran President Manuel Zelaya to cross the border into his homeland "reckless."

Zelaya briefly crossed the Honduran border on Friday before quickly returning to neighboring Nicaragua to avoid arrest. The incident occurred almost a month after the country's military sent him into exile.

The Honduran military is known to be trained by the US military before Zelaya elected as president in the Latin American state and ended his country's alliance with Washington, its traditional ally, and teamed up with Venezuela, Ecuador and other anti-US leftist leaders in the region.The military has a history of dictating governmental policies and legislations.

Clinton called the act "reckless", adding that it would not help restore democratic and constitutional order in Honduras.

She also stressed the Obama administration's support for the proposal put forth by Costa Rican President Oscar Arias, which includes an 11-point plan to reinstate Zelaya and offer amnesty to the leaders of the coup.

Zelaya, however, said he was forced to act on his own after the US-backed talks failed to reach an agreement with the coup-installed government to reinstate him.

The interim government has vowed to arrest him if he tries to return.

Earlier in the day, security forces fired tear gas at dozens of pro-Zelaya supporters trying to reach the border to greet the president near the coffee town of El Paraiso.

Several people have reportedly been wounded in the clashes.

According to a Press TV report, the Honduran Army has also imposed a curfew on the entire district near the Nicaraguan border crossing.

Meanwhile, Mark Weisbort of the Washington-based Center for Economic and Policy Research told Press TV that Honduras-based human rights groups are worried that the interim government is adopting a repressive policy of selective assassination, similar to the one incorporated in the 1980's.

Some regional leaders believe that the US -- despite its condemnation of the incident -- was actually behind the June 28 military coup against Zelaya in a bid to undermine the new alliance formed by socialist heads-of-state in Latin America.

Hillary and Lanny will soon have warm indigenous blood all over themselves.May their nightmares be eternal...........:banghead:

Magda Hassan
07-26-2009, 04:32 AM
Well, aparently Zelaya has once again returned to Honduras. Here is Eva Golinger's latest info on these events:


President Zelaya is at the Honduran border again, reinitiating his attempt to enter the country, which although he passed through briefly yesterday afternoon, his reentry was prevented by military forces under orders from the coup regime. He is hoping to reunite today with his wife and children, who have been detained since yesterday several miles from the border in El Paraíso, Honduras, by police and army forces. There are approximately 3000 police and army forces at the border preventing Zelaya's reentry and interaction with supporters on the Honduran side.

Meanwhile, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton called Zelaya's behavior "reckless" in statements yesterday afternoon. Her specific statement was, "President Zelaya’s effort to reach the border is reckless. It does not contribute to the broader efforts to restore democratic and constitutional order in the Honduras crisis. So we urge President Zelaya and all other parties to reaffirm their commitment to a negotiated, peaceful solution to the integrity of Honduran democracy and the safety and well-being of the Honduran people. In fact, we urge both parties to accept the proposal put forth by President Arias. It is the basis for a peaceful solution, and that is what the United States supports."

Right, but the coup regime's repression of the Honduran people, political assassinations, tortures, detentions of over 1000 Zelaya supporters, violent kidnapping and forced exile of Zelaya, illegal usurpation of the presidency and executive functions, censoring of media, expulsion of foreign journalists, amongst other crimes, is "good behavior" that "contributes to democracy"??? Because we haven't heard any clear condemnations from Clinton or her spokesmen regarding all of the above. Zero, zip, nothing.

The whole Arias negotiation is a trap to buy time and consolidate the coup regime, or return Zelaya to the presidency with no power. Clinton advisor Kevin Casas-Zamora, Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institute (the most influential "democrat" think-tank in Washington) and former Vice President of Costa Rica under President Arias (hmmm, maybe that's why he is the designed negotiator) laid out the terms that Arias/Clinton are trying to impose on Zelaya in an article on July 9, 2009, at least one week before Arias presented his first proposal to resolve the Honduran conflict. Casas-Zamora said,

"First of all that Zelaya should return to the presidency, though not necessarily to power. The presidency and power are two different things. Number two, he has to end his plans to amend the constitution, which won't be much of a problem. Number three, he has to put some distance between himself and Chavez. That's essential. Number four, there has to be some kind of power-sharing agreement, whereby Zelaya remains at the helm of the government but some other people chip-in in the main decisions that are to be made between now and the next election in November. Number five, there has to be some kind of amnesty, for lack of a better word, where everybody turns a blind eye on the pervasive illegal behavior of all the parties involved, because all of them have acted with illegal behavior and have acted with total disregard for the rule of law. Sadly for Honduras, they will have to turn a blind eye to all of that. At this point, no party is in a position to demand accountability from anybody. There's no such thing as high moral ground in Honduras at this point." (http://www.cfr.org/publication/19753/careful_us_diplomacy_on_honduras.html)

So, let the coup regime off the hook and turn Zelaya into a limp president. This is the "smart power" solution of the Obama-Clinton administration. Save the empire's face and its interests too!

Zelaya's "reckless" return to Honduras and his reunification with his people is the only way to restore dignity to the Central American nation.
http://www.chavezcode.com/

Peter Lemkin
07-26-2009, 05:00 AM
Well, aparently Zelaya

The whole Arias negotiation is a trap to buy time and consolidate the coup regime, or return Zelaya to the presidency with no power. Clinton advisor Kevin Casas-Zamora, Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institute (the most influential "democrat" think-tank in Washington) and former Vice President of Costa Rica under President Arias (hmmm, maybe that's why he is the designed negotiator) laid out the terms that Arias/Clinton are trying to impose on Zelaya in an article on July 9, 2009, at least one week before Arias presented his first proposal to resolve the Honduran conflict. Casas-Zamora said,

"First of all that Zelaya should return to the presidency, though not necessarily to power. The presidency and power are two different things. Number two, he has to end his plans to amend the constitution, which won't be much of a problem. Number three, he has to put some distance between himself and Chavez. That's essential. Number four, there has to be some kind of power-sharing agreement, whereby Zelaya remains at the helm of the government but some other people chip-in in the main decisions that are to be made between now and the next election in November. Number five, there has to be some kind of amnesty, for lack of a better word, where everybody turns a blind eye on the pervasive illegal behavior of all the parties involved, because all of them have acted with illegal behavior and have acted with total disregard for the rule of law. Sadly for Honduras, they will have to turn a blind eye to all of that. At this point, no party is in a position to demand accountability from anybody. There's no such thing as high moral ground in Honduras at this point." (http://www.cfr.org/publication/19753/careful_us_diplomacy_on_honduras.html)


http://www.chavezcode.com/

Good pieice above, but that quote [or is it 'declaration'?] by Casas-Zamora is a sickening, amoral, meddling, arrogant, imperialistic, illegal, pro-Coup, anti-Zamora, anti-Guatemala piece of Monroe Doctrine crap. Its like the bad-old days supporting Apartied S.A. but giving lip-service to rights for the majority non-White polulation there, etc. Business as usual for Chiquita, Corporate expoiters and America.....sick stuff. Some 'change' Mr. Obama! Pillory Hillary!

Magda Hassan
07-26-2009, 05:02 AM
Well, it's continuity 'they' can believe in. Chump change for us.

Magda Hassan
07-26-2009, 02:52 PM
http://resistenciamorazan.blogspot.com/2009/07/militares-patriotas-se-ponen-del-lado.html>

Check out the url above to listen to a communique called in by an
anonymous military officer, declaring the existence of a strong and
organized group of lower-ranking officers who are strongly opposed to
the coup and the repression dictated by the General Vasquez and the
current military leadership inside Honduras. The officer was calling
in from El Paraiso, but said his group is national in scope.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~

Military in Honduras Backs Plan on Zelaya
By GINGER THOMPSON and BLAKE SCHMIDT
Published: July 25, 2009
WASHINGTON ? The Honduran armed forces issued a communiqu? on
Saturday indicating that they would not stand in the way of an
agreement to return Manuel Zelaya, the country?s ousted president, to
power.

Meanwhile, in Las Manos, a town along the border between Nicaragua
and Honduras, Mr. Zelaya made his second symbolic appearance in two
days, defying calls from foreign leaders to avoid any moves that
might provoke violence in his politically polarized country.

The communiqu? was drafted in Washington after days of talks between
mid-level Honduran officers and American Congressional aides. Posted
on the Honduran Armed Forces Web site, it endorsed the so-called San
Jos? Accord that was forged in Costa Rica by delegates representing
President Zelaya and the man who heads the de facto Honduran
government, Roberto Micheletti.

The accord, supported by most governments in the hemisphere, would
allow Mr. Zelaya to return as president, although with significantly
limited executive powers. Mr. Micheletti has steadfastly rejected Mr.
Zelaya?s return as president.

In its communiqu?, the Honduran military added its support to the
proposal. Officials involved said it was meant to dispel any
perceptions that the military would block civilian efforts to resolve
the crisis.

The officials said the military communiqu? was significant because it
was the first sign of support for the San Jos? Accord by a powerful
sector of the de facto government. And the officials said it could
make it more difficult for the Honduran Congress and Supreme Court to
reject the accord when they consider it.

American officials who met here with the Hondurans said that they
were two colonels who were concerned about the tensions generated by
the political conflict.

Joy Olson, executive director of the Washington Office on Latin
America, a nonprofit human rights group, said she was told that the
officers were showing Congressional aides a recording of the day Mr.
Zelaya was detained, as evidence that no abuses had been committed
against him.

In the meantime, however, thousands of troops had been deployed to
tighten security along the border to prevent Mr. Zelaya from
returning. And thousands of his supporters defied government curfews
and military roadblocks, by abandoning their cars and hiking for
hours to reach the remote border post to see him.

Mr. Zelaya vowed to try a third time to re-enter Honduras. "We are
ready to take this to its final consequences," he told his
supporters. "We are not afraid.?

Ginger Thompson reported from Washington, and Blake Schmidt from Las
Manos, Nicaragua.

Magda Hassan
07-29-2009, 07:52 AM
Now we will start to see action. US and German capital is screaming because of the strikes and boycotts. From Bill Conroy:

Letter to Secretary Clinton Regarding Honduras (http://www.nikebiz.com/responsibility/2009SecretaryClintonHondurasLetter.html)


July 27, 2009


The Honorable Hillary R. Clinton

Secretary of State
2201 C St NW
Washington, DC 20520
Dear Secretary Clinton:
As companies that have products made in Honduras, we are deeply concerned about recent events in that country. We understand that serious disagreements exist between the elected President, Congress and the Supreme Court, but these should be resolved through peaceful, democratic dialogue, rather than through military action.
While we do not and will not support or endorse the position of any party in this internal dispute, we feel it is necessary in this case to join with the President of the United States, the governments of countries throughout the Americas, the Organization of American States, the UN General Assembly and the European Union in calling for the restoration of democracy in Honduras.
We are also very concerned about the continuation of violence if this dispute is not resolved immediately, and with restrictions on civil liberties under the July 1 Emergency Decree. We urge for an immediate resolution to the crisis and that civil liberties, including freedom of the press, freedom of speech, freedom of movement, freedom of assembly, and freedom of association be fully respected.
We welcome the participation of the contending parties in mediation talks and are hopeful they will achieve a prompt and just solution to all issues in dispute.
Sincerely,

NIKE, Inc. The adidas Group Gap Inc. Knights Apparel

Copy: Assistant Secretary of State Thomas Shannon
OAS Secretary General Jose Miguel Insulza

Magda Hassan
07-29-2009, 07:55 AM
At last something positive, even if for all the wrong reasons, comes from the US State Department.


US Revokes Diplomatic Visas of Honduran Coup Members

Posted by Al Giordano (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/al-giordano) - July 28, 2009 at 11:53 am By Al Giordano
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/iankelly.jpeg
Well, this is a start (http://www.state.gov/r/pa/prs/ps/2009/july/126552.htm):

Revocation of Diplomatic Visas

Ian Kelly
Department Spokesman, Office of the Spokesman
BUREAU OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS
Washington, DC
July 28, 2009
The Department of State is currently reviewing the diplomatic (A) visas of individuals who are members of the de facto regime in Honduras, as well as the derivative visas for family members of these individuals. We have already revoked diplomatic visas issued to four such individuals who received their diplomatic visas in connection with positions held prior to June 28 under the Zelaya administration, but who now serve the de facto regime.
Developing...

Update: There was a strange set of contortions in today's State Department press briefing in which spokesman Ian Kelly claimed he couldn't reveal the names of those whose visas were revoked. (I doubt very much he has any legal footing for that argument because immigration laws give zero rights to foreign citizens on US soil.)
Anyway, the New York Times (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/29/world/americas/29briefs-Honduras.html?_r=5) has two of the names of the soon to be dearly deported:

State Department spokesman, Ian Kelly, declined to identify the officials but Honduran officials identified two of them as Tomás Arita, a Supreme Court justice who signed the detention order that led to Mr. Zelaya’s removal by the military, and José Alfredo Saavedra, president of Congress.
If true, that's a hopeful sign, given the centrality of the Supreme Court judge and Micheletti's replacement in Congress to the coup. At first glance, it sounded more like the revocation of visas of lower level functionaries. But these guys are the scum de la scum of the coup and making an example of them is exactly the right move.
Update II: The other shoe that falls with the expulsion of coup collaborators from Washington is that representatives of the legitimate Zelaya government are re-taking the Honduran Embassy. Elizabeth Dickinson of Foreign Policy (http://blog.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2009/07/28/the_plot_thickens_in_honduras) reports that Zelaya's Communications Minister Enrique Reina has come to Washington to take on the role of Honduran Ambassador to the US:

When Honduras's minister of communications, Enrique Reina, learned that his president had been ousted in a coup, he immediately tried to get to the state television station to send the people a message. He never made it -- but he did make it to the United States, where I spoke to him tonight, and where he has just been nominated to be ambassador of Honduras here in Washington. His predecessor's visa was revoked by the State Department today, due to his having supported the coup.
Update III: Add four major apparel manufacturers with factories in Honduras to the mounting voices that Washington can and should do more to isolate and boycott the coup regime. This Open Letter to Secretary Clinton (http://www.nikebiz.com/responsibility/2009SecretaryClintonHondurasLetter.html) was signed by Nike, The Gap, Adidas and Knights Apparel. Here's an excerpt:


While we do not and will not support or endorse the position of any party in this internal dispute, we feel it is necessary in this case to join with the President of the United States, the governments of countries throughout the Americas, the Organization of American States, the UN General Assembly and the European Union in calling for the restoration of democracy in Honduras.
We are also very concerned about the continuation of violence if this dispute is not resolved immediately, and with restrictions on civil liberties under the July 1 Emergency Decree. We urge for an immediate resolution to the crisis and that civil liberties, including freedom of the press, freedom of speech, freedom of movement, freedom of assembly, and freedom of association be fully respected.
It's interesting that they directed their letter to the Secretary. Clearly, they too can see that Clinton has been the most problematic and double-talking member of the US administration regarding restoration of democracy in Honduras. And over at Foggy Bottom and the rest of Clinton Inc., they're starting to feel the blowback.
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/thefield/us-revokes-diplomatic-visas-honduran-coup-members

Magda Hassan
07-31-2009, 07:16 AM
An update.

The curfew remains in place from 6 pm till 6 am in most places except the border regions near Nicaragua where there has been a 24 hour curfew in the last week. This has greatly affected trade and commerce in those areas and caused millions of dollars damage. The curfew has been eased in these areas now.

President Zelaya is meeting with the US ambassador, the Cuban-American Hugo Llorens, and a delegation of US officials, to Honduras in Nicaragua. No details about the meeting as yet. The legitimate First Lady of Honduras, Xiomara Castro has realised that the military were going to expatriate her by taking her to the border and now she and her group have returned to the capital where she will make an announcement tonight. You can listen to it here at Radio Globo: http://www.radioglobohonduras.com/index.html

Coup supporters (los perfumados) arranged to import 2 bus loads of 'locals' from the capital city Tegucigalpa into Zelayas home town to make it look as if there was grass roots support for the coup there. The real locals got wind of it and set up a peaceful road block and the imported 'locals' never made it to Zelayas town.

Thursday was a deadly day in Honduras. There were protests all over the country and there was violent repression in many of those places. Roger Abraham Vallejo Cerrado, 38, secretary of the San Martín high school (below) was shot in the head and died. Twenty five other people were wounded and 88 people arrested at the same protest.
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/thursday3.jpeg

The presidential candidate, Carlos Reyes, was badly beaten by the military which resulted in a broken arm and a bloodied ear for him. Juan Barahona, the national union leader was arrested at the protest. He claimed to Presna Latina that “They treated us like animals,” whilst under arrest. TV crews from Venezolana de Televisión (VTV) were attacked by the police, so I guess the police are no longer on strike as they were a couple of days ago.

Roberto Micheletti, according to multiple press reports, ordered the police and military forces to “put a stop” to the peaceful blockades.
Now seen on much of the money in Honduras: http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_7Se7iswAanA/SnBaVnJnpXI/AAAAAAAAIgw/jiuHIKOJeOc/s400/lempiras_golpe.png

The military is far from united and more splits are becoming apparent daily. Below is one



PRONUNCIAMIENTO

Nosotros, un Grupo de Oficiales Superiores y Subalternos(no damos nombres por razones obvias y no por cobardía) ante la situación en que los políticos en contubernio con la junta de comandantes han involucrado a las Fuerzas Armadas y que han deteriorado la buena imagen que teníamos ante el pueblo hondureño nos pronunciamos y denunciamos lo siguiente:·

El Señor Jefe del Estado Mayor Conjunto Gral. Vásquez politizó la institución, contraviniendo el mandato constitucional de ser apolíticas.·

El Gral. Vásquez comprometió a las F.F.A.A. en un principio por apoyar al Sr. Mel Zelaya y después cambió de ámbito político en vez de retirar sus tropas a sus respectivos cuarteles y mantenerlos al margen de los políticos que sólo las están usando.·

Se menciona que un grupo de empresarios reunió 30 millones de Lempiras y los repartió a la junta de comandantes, algo que va en contra del decoro y principios del militar, así como también declaramos que las F.F.A.A. no son gendarmes de ningún grupo económico elite, sino que estamos con el pueblo porque la mayoría de sus miembros tanto oficiales como tropa venimos de las entrañas del pueblo, no somos un ejército de casta.·

El General Vásquez hace dos años debe estar de baja, pero el Señor Mel Zelaya lo dejó, infringiendo las leyes vigentes, en aquella ocasión dijo “entendido acepto Sr. Presidente” y ahora porque no le dijo también entendido, infringiendo la Ley como hace dos años, se vendió al mejor postor. Falta de principios como persona, hay algo de traición en su accionar, ha perjudicado a dos promociones en la sucesión de mando.·

Hace dos años cuando el Sr. Zelaya lo reeligió; removió unas semanas antes a varios comandantes que no estaban de acuerdo con el continuismo y cuando Don Mel reunió en Casa Presidencial a todos los Comandantes Militares, el General mandó a misión fuera de Tegucigalpa a unos oficiales que presentía le iban a cuestionar la decisión al Sr. Mel Zelaya.·

El Gral. Vásquez ha desnaturalizado el grado de General ascendiendo a ese grado a oficiales que han tenido una trayectoria negra en la vida militar pero han sido sus aduladores sin ninguna capacidad operativa. Ejemplo:·

Ascendió a un compañero, al Gral. Retirado Gerónimo Pérez, un oficial que en estado de ebriedad deshizo dos carros militares y no se le dedujeron responsabilidades, embarazó a una estudiante alférez de la Academia Militar y él influyó para que la graduaran así, ahora el Gral. Vásquez lo tiene trabajando por contrato en Colegio de Defensa ganando Lps. 30,000.00 mensuales.·

El Gral. Fuentes Gonzales, es un Oficial cleptómano que en una ocasión siendo Comandantes del Batallón los Militares Norteamericanos, haciendo una acción cívica en el occidente del país, dejaron en calidad de depósito una madera y materiales de construcción y cuando regresaron a traerla él ya la había vendido, los norteamericanos recomendaron baja deshonrosa y ahora es un flamante General.·

El General Cuéllar, excelente persona pero como oficial nunca conoció un batallón de frontera, no sabe lo que es patrullar una frontera, sólo ha sido oficinista cosa inaudita, pero es todo un general y no ha sudado fatiga.·

General Padget, un oficial problema desde que es subalterno, se graduó en México y allá dejó mal record, con su faltas al decoro(mejor indaguen ustedes).·

General Cervantes, Prince y contra-Almirante Rodríguez, sin comentarios negativos sobre su vida militar y particular, pero no han tenido carácter como militares para aclarar las cosas con el Sr. Jefe del Estado Mayor Conjunto.Sr. General Vásquez, cuando usted le dijo al Sr. Mel Zelaya que no le cumpliría la orden de la cuarta, allí le hubiera presentado su renuncia, no que cambió de bando político, como si las F.F.A.A. estuvieran para servir a grupos políticos.

Mejor renuncie, está a tiempo, recuerde que también en 1993 conoció las celdas de la P.C. MOSUSU

STATEMENT



We, a group of senior and subaltern officers (we do not give names for obvious reasons, and not due to cowardice) in the face of the situation in which the politicians in collusion with the joint command involved the Armed Forces, and that has eroded the good image that we had before the Honduran people, state and denounce the following:



The Head of the Joint Chiefs, General Vásquez, politicized the institution, contravening the constitutional mandate to be apolitical.



General Vásquez committed the Armed Forces in the beginning to aid Sr. Mel Zelaya and afterward changed political scope, in place of retiring his troops to their respective barracks and maintaining them on the periphery of the politicians who are only using them.



It is mentioned that a group of businessmen collected 30 million Lempiras and doled it out to the group of commanders, something that goes against the decorum and values of the military, and we declare that the Armed Forces are not gendarmes of any elite economic group, rather we are with the people because the majority of its members, both officers as well as troops come from the entrails of the people, we are not a thoroughbred army.



General Vásquez should have stepped down two years ago, but Sr. Mel Zelaya left him, infringing the laws in force, on that occasion he said "understood I accept Sr. President"; and now because he did not say again "understood", infringing the Law as he did two years ago, he sold to the highest bidder. A lack of principles as a person, there is something of betrayal in his actions, he has prejudiced two promotions in the succession of of command.



Two years ago when Sr. Zelaya re-elected him; some weeks before various commanders were removed who were not in agreement with the continuity and when Don Mel brought together all the Military Commanders in the Casa Presidencial, the General sent some officers that if present were going to question the decision with Sr. Mel Zelaya on a mission outside of Tegucigalpa.



General Vásquez has denaturalized the rank of General, raising to this rank officers that have had a black path in military life, but have been his admirers, without any operational capacity.


Example:


Promoting a friend, Retired General Gerónimo Pérez, an officer who in a state of inebriation wrecked two military cars and did not have responsibilities removed, made pregnant a student ensign in the Military Academy and influenced it so that they graduated her, now General Vásquez has him working on contract in the Defense College earning 30,000 Lempiras monthly.



General Fuentes Gonzales is a kleptomaniac officer that on one occasion, there being Commanders of the North American Military battalion, carrying out a civic action in the west of the country, left construction materials and some wood, and when they returned to get it he had already sold it, the North Americans recommended a dishonorable discharge and now he is a brand-new General.



General Cuéllar, an excellent person but as an officer never knew a frontier battalion, doesn't know what it is to patrol a frontier, has only been an invisible clerical worker, but is completely a general and hasn't sweated fatigued.



General Padget, a problem officer since he was a junior officer, graduated in Mexico and left a bad record there, with his failures of decorum (better you investigate).



General Cervantes, Prince, and counter-admiral Rodriguez, without negative commentaries about their private and military life, but they have not had the character as military to clarify things with the Head of the Joint Chiefs.


Sr. General Vásquez, when you said to Sr. Mel Zelaya that you would not carry out the order of the "cuarta" [urna], you should have presented your resignation, not changed your political camp, as if the Armed Forces existed to serve political groups. Better to resign, it is time, remember that in 1993 you also knew the cells of the P. C.
http://hibueras.blogspot.com/2009/07/los-militares-comienzan-sacar-la.html

Peter Lemkin
07-31-2009, 09:19 AM
Would I love to see Clinton, Obama and the USA [not to mention the Oligarchs in Honduras and the America corporations behind them!] get a black-eye over this - and soon! We can hope!!!!.....

Magda Hassan
08-02-2009, 09:24 AM
Lobbying records reveal his firm is targeting State Department and National Security Council

Lanny Davis, a long-time doorman for the Clinton agenda, has an interesting bedfellow in his latest lobbying assignment on behalf of the business interests behind the illegal putsch regime of Honduras.
Davis, a lawyer, neo-liberal Democrat and now a lobbyist employed by the D.C. office of global law firm Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe, was recently retained (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/bill-conroy/2009/07/whos-behind-lanny-davis-putsch-paycheck) by the Business Council of Latin America (CEAL in its Spanish initials) to hawk for the coup interests in Honduras,
A sister business coalition of textile manufacturers and exporters with common leadership to CEAL, the Asociacion Hondureña de Maquiladores (http://www.ahm-honduras.com/) (AHM), however, is looking to the other side of the U.S. political landscape for its lobbying push in Washington, D.C., and has recently retained a George W. Bush-era neoconservative named Roger Noriega.http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/RogerNoriega.jpg
Though Davis and Noriega, a former high-ranking U.S. diplomat in Latin America, represent different sides of the U.S. bipolar political system, in their manic pursuit of unbridled capitalism and support for the oligarchical interests in Latin America that control the capital (including Tegucigalpa, Honduras), they are very much cut from the same cloth.
But in the case of Noriega, as has often been the case with Bush-era players, it appears some corners might have been cut in his Honduran lobbying assignment that may run counter to the letter of the U.S. statute governing that activity.
Unfortunately, the U.S. law governing lobbying activity might itself fall short of addressing the realities on the ground in Honduras. That law, the Lobbying Disclosure Act (http://lobbyingdisclosure.house.gov/) (LDA), requires all agents, or lobbyists, representing “foreign entities” to declare as such on forms they are required to file with the Clerk of the U.S. House and the Secretary of the U.S. Senate.
In the case of Davis, that declaration, and associated disclosures, is included in his filings with respect to the foreign entity CEAL. However, Noriega’s lobbying firm, Vision Americas (http://www.visionamericas.com/), for whatever reason, failed to indicate on those forms that the Honduran-based AHM is, in fact, a foreign entity. This shortcoming in Vision Americas’ public LDA filings is in sharp contradiction to the disclosure made by another lobbying firm, The Cormac Group (http://www.thecormacgroup.com/), which also has been retained by AHM to hawk for the business interests now propping up the putsch president of Honduras, Roberto Micheletti.
The Cormac Group, which lists as one of the firm’s founding partners John Timmons, a former legislative counsel for Sen. John McCain, does disclose in its LDA filing that AHM is, in fact, a foreign-controlled entity.
A reading of the LDA statute indicates that any agent (lobbyist) representing a foreign entity must disclose that fact through fil ings made under the Foreign Agents Registration Act (http://www.usdoj.gov/criminal/fara/) (FARA), which is administered by the Department of Justice, if that foreign entity is a government or political party. However, a lobbyist for a foreign commercial entity, such as a business group, is exempt from the FARA requirements if that lobbyist registers under the LDA.
Now, AHM seems to qualify as a commercial entity, which would exempt Noriega, and his lobbying firm, Vision Americas, from the FARA requirements. But given that the business interests in Honduras are, in essence, the puppet masters pulling the strings of “de facto” President Micheletti, and given that the putsch government itself has been deemed as “not legal” by the president of the United States, the definition of an agent of the “government,” for the purposes of LDA and FARA, seems to become a quagmire for lawyers’ play.
In its LDA filing, The Cormac Group states that the “specific lobbying issues” AHM has retained the firm to hype are related to “U.S.-Honduran relations.”
In its filing related to CEAL, Davis’ firm, Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe, indicates on the LDA registration form, for the same item, that it is lobbying “on behalf of private Honduran business organizations, providing facts relating to the removal of Mr. Zelaya.”
Noriega’s firm, Vision Americas, includes the following explanation on its LDA registration form, again without disclosing that AHM is a “foreign entity”: “Support the efforts of the Honduran private sector to help consolidate the democratic transition in their country.”
Reasonable people may disagree on this, but those explanations advanced by the lobbying firms, given the role business leaders in Honduras are now playing in propping up the illegal coup regime, might be construed as more in line with supporting the interests of the Honduran government than with any specific business agenda.
At a minimum, it would seem the interests of the coup regime and the business players supporting it are inseparable, and the LDA and FARA statutes seem poorly constructed to deal with that situation — which involves U.S. lobbyists hawking for an illegal business-backed government.
The nexus of the Honduran putsch government and business agendas is clearly exposed in the following July 6 press release (http://news.prnewswire.com/ViewContent.aspx?ACCT=109&STORY=/www/story/07-06-2009/0005055211&EDATE=)sent out by The Cormac Group as part of its effort to color the situation in Honduras in the favor of its client, AHM:
Leading members of the Honduran National Congress and private sector and former members of the Honduran Judiciary will hold a press conference in Washington, D.C., to speak on recent events in Honduras. The press conference will be held Tuesday, July 7, 2009, at 3:00 p.m. in the Murrow Room of the National Press Club (529 14th Street, NW).
The delegation will be traveling to Washington for several days of meetings with United States policymakers to clarify any misunderstandings about Honduras' constitutional process and to discuss next steps to ensure the preservation of the country's democratic institutions. [Emphasis added.]
A search of the Justice Department’s online FARA registration database did not produce any matches for The Cormac Group or Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe, which would seem to indicate they are not registered as being agents of foreign governments or political parties.
However, both Noriega and Vision Americas do show up as being registered under FARA. However, those filing do not list AHM among the credits. Instead, they indicate only that Vision Americas is registered to represent the interests of a Moroccan government entity called the Moroccan American Center for Policy and a Pakistan company called Kestral Holdings Ltd.
But none of this apparent legal ambiguity surrounding lobbying disclosure and the current situation in Honduras gets around the fact that, with respect to specific questions on two separate LDA filings — the initial registration and a follow-up quarterly report — Noriega’s Vision Americas indicated that AHM is not a foreign entity, defined as follows on the LDA form:
14. Is there any foreign entity [that]
a) holds at least 20% equitable ownership in the client [AHM] …;
b) directly or indirectly, in whole or in major part, plans, supervises, controls, directs, finances or subsidizes activities of the client …;
c) is an affiliate of the client … and has a direct interests in the outcome of the lobbying activity?
To that specific question on the LDA registration form, Vision Americas checked the “No” box.
That check might be deemed an errant mark due to an oversight by the chief of staff at Vision Americas who signed the registration form, dated July 14, if the same mistake was not repeated in a separate LDA quarterly report filed on July 20.
On that latter report, on line 19, the lobbying firm is asked to explain what the “interest of each foreign entity” is in the specific issues — in this case, supporting “the efforts of the Honduran private sector to help consolidate the democratic transition in their country,” which, translated, means helping to consolidate the power of the coup regime.
Of importance in this case is the fact that the quarterly report also reveals that Vision Americas, including Noriega, will be lobbying on behalf of AHM in the area of “foreign relations” not only in the U.S. House and Senate, but also in the State Department and before the National Security Council.
That begs the question: What possible interest would the U.S. National Security Council have in the business interests of an organization representing apparel-goods manufactures and exporters?
The failure of Vision Americas to disclose that AHM is a foreign entity, as well as its failure to describe the “interest” of AHM in lobbying the State Department and National Security Council is significant, because it effectively shields from public view the full agenda of a foreign entity seeking to affect, presumably, U.S. national security. It remains significant even if the failure to disclose was an honest mistake, or can somehow be justified with tortured legal logic.
Narco News contacted the U.S. House Office of the Clerk, which is a repository for the LDA records, seeking some insight into Vision Americas’ filings. A spokesman for the Clerk’s office, who asked not to be identified, concurred that an organization like AHM, for the purposes of LDA, would likely be considered a foreign entity, and it should have been disclosed as such in the public filings.
However, the spokesman added that his office “only receives the forms, but it is not an enforcement agency.”
“In a case like this, a referral would have to be made to an executive branch enforcement agency [the Department of Justice]” for further investigation, and action, if warranted, he added.
The penalties (http://lobbyingdisclosure.house.gov/amended_lda_guide.html) for violating the LDA are potentially severe, if those violations are deemed to be intentional fraud:
Whoever knowingly fails: (1) to correct a defective filing within 60 days after notice of such a defect by the Secretary of the Senate or the Clerk of the House; or (2) to comply with any other provision of the Act, may be subject to a civil fine of not more than $200,000, and whoever knowingly and corruptly fails to comply with any provision of this Act may be imprisoned for not more than 5 years or fined under title 18, United States Code, or both.
Narco News also attempted to reach Noriega via his Vision Americas’ phone line, leaving a message on his office’s answering service. To date, he has not returned the call.

Roger’s Vision
Roger Noriega may not be a household name in most of America, but he likely will be a subject for the history books for years to come due to his role in undermining democracy and the rule of law in Latin America to the advantage of crony capitalism. His track record dates back to the 1980s when, as part of U.S. Agency for International Development, he played a questionable role (http://www.texasobserver.org/article.php?aid=1278) (http://www.texasobserver.org/article.php?aid=1278)in allegedly moving around money in the shadows of the Iran/Contra scandal.
His fingerprints also mark the failed U.S.-backed coup carried out in Venezuela in 2002 and the successful U.S.-sponsored effort to oust President Jean-Bertrand Aristide from power in Haiti in 2004. Those efforts were undertaken while Noriega served in increasingly powerful roles within the State Department during the Bush administration.
Noriega, a former Latin American adviser for the arch-conservative and now-deceased Republican Senator Jesse Helms, served as U.S. Permanent Representative to the Organization of American States between 2001 and 2003 before being named Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs. In taking that higher post, he replaced Otto Reich, another Iran/Contra retread brought into the Bush administration to carry out an extremist, pro-oligarch agenda in Latin America.
Reich went on to serve as the U.S. Special Envoy to the Western Hemisphere as well as on the board of WHISC (better known as the School of the Americas) before leaving the White House in 2004 to launch his own consulting firm, Otto Reich Associates LLC (http://www.ottoreich.com/). (http://www.ottoreich.com/) During his recent presidential bid, Sen. John McCain tapped Reich to serve as a policy adviser on Latin America. At a July 10 House hearing on “The Crisis in Honduras,” (http://www.internationalrelations.house.gov/111/rei071009.pdf) Reich offered testimony designed to bolster the standing of the putsch junta that seized power from that nation’s democratically elected president, Manuel Zelaya.http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/ReichMccain.jpg
Noriega served in the Assistant Secretary of State post until October 2005, and after a stint with a law firm, he went into the lobbying business through Vision Americas. Like Reich, Noriega has been an outspoken proponent of the June 28 coup d'état in Honduras, penning numerous op/eds, in publications such as Forbes (http://www.forbes.com/2009/06/29/zelaya-chavez-coup-honduras-opinions-contributors-roger-noriega.html), to that effect.
Another key figure of the Bush administration’s Latin American team was the current U.S. Ambassador to Honduras, Hugo Llorens (http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/biog/111033.htm), who, from 2002 through 2003, served as national security advisor to Bush on matters related to several South American nations, including Colombia, Bolivia and Venezuela.
So Reich, Llorens and Noriega were all playing in the same sandbox when the U.S. lined up behind the failed Venezuelan coup coup d'état, and now, coincidentally or by design, all three show up behind the scenes pulling various strings as the current Honduran putsch plays out.

The Battle Line
But the strange web of connections doesn't end on the Washington stage of this tragic usurpation of democracy, that has, and is continuing to, cost the lives of innocent citizens in Honduras as the rule of law in that nation has been replaced by the rule of the gun under the direction of a powerful junta of business and political elites.
As the connections to the U.S. lobbyists employed by CEAL and AHM are unraveled in Honduras, one family name seems to rise to the top. What that means is not clear, at this point, but if Shakespeare’s McBeth can be used as a guide, it would not be a stretch to speculate that, in Honduras, the coup was about far more than ideology.
Clinton insider Davis was hired by CEAL — and his LDA lobbying forms show, and he has admitted in the press (http://www.prospect.org/cs/articles?article=our_man_in_honduras)— that a key contact and paying party for that contract is Organizacion Publicitaria, which is a media company controlled by Jorge Canahuati Larach, owner of the pro-coup Honduran newspapers La Prensa and El Heraldo. Another key player in CEAL (http://www.ceal-int.org/ENG/capitulos/honduras.html) is Jesus Canahuati, who serves as its vice president and who, according to press reports, is the son Juan Canahuati (http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0OQC/is_2_1/ai_100541544/), the founder of Honduran textile manufacturing giant Grupo Lovable.
Jesus Canahuati also happens to be the brother of Mario Canahuati (http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0BEK/is_12_12/ai_n8686497/), who served as Honduran ambassador to the U.S. from 2002 to 2005, at the same time Noriega was the top gun for the Western Hemisphere at State under Bush II — and Noriega and Mario Canahuati both were big backers of a free-trade, pro-oligarch agenda for Latin America, embodied for Honduras at the time in CAFTA (http://www.caftaintelligencecenter.com/subpages/What_is_CAFTA.asp). While ambassador to the U.S., Mario Canahuati even testified in support (http://waysandmeans.house.gov/hearings.asp?formmode=printfriendly&id=782) of the free-trade pact CAFTA before the Congress.
Mario Canahuati also recently made a bid for the presidency (http://www.hondurasthisweek.com/national/628-primary-elections-2008) of his nation and sought his National Party’s nomination last November to stand as its candidate in the general election slated for this fall — pre-coup that is. He lost badly to Porfirio “Pepe” Lobo Sosa — who himself was defeated by Zelaya in the 2005 presidential election.http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/MarioCanahuati.jpg
Current putsch President Micheletti also sought his party’s nomination for the upcoming presidential ballot, running on the Liberal ticket. He too lost, yet now finds himself as the supposed leader of Honduras despite that rejection by his own party only months prior to the coup.
In addition, AHM, which has retained both Noriega’s Vision Americas and The Cormac Group as lobbyists, is touched by the Canahuati clan as well. AHM's current president is Daniel Facusse, but Jesus Canahuati served as president of the group prior to Facusse and still sits on the organization’s board of directors (called the Junta Directiva) along with his father and oligarch supreme Juan Canahuati.
And as an indicator of where this group of Honduran business elites stands on the presidency of Zelaya and his recent violent overthrow, the words of Juan Canahuati are of value, since they seem to show he has blurred the lines between business and government interests — which may go a long way in explaining the murky legality of the lobbying now underway in Washington by the likes of Davis and Noriega.
From a July 3 article in the Latin Business Chronicle (http://www.latinbusinesschronicle.com/app/article.aspx?id=3518):
"For the past…months, since our ex-president tried to change the constitution ], everybody was nervous," says Juan M. Canahuati, president of Grupo Lovable, a major textile and apparel exporter and one of the largest employers in Honduras. “There was no more investing, no more business growth. Everybody was trying to see what would happen.”
… Zelaya's policies were also increasingly hurting business. "He was against capitalism," Canahuati told Latin Business Chronicle in a telephone interview.
… Zelaya’s ouster was largely self-inflicted, he argues. “He used to be my friend,” Canahuati says. “But he committed the biggest mistake in his life. He followed advice from [Venezuelan president Hugo] Chavez [about changing the constitution and running for re-election].
Maybe Canahuati’s distain for Chavez explains why Noriega — an equally virulent critic of the Venezuelan president — is now seeking to bend the ear of the U.S. National Security Council with an agenda that seems to be hidden from public view, or at least not articulated adequately in his firm’s LDA filings.
Maybe, even in the United States, in the shadows of official Washington, a battle to define this era of Latin American history is being waged.
On one side are foreign oligarchs seeking to cloak their self-interested pecuniary agenda under the mantle of U.S. national security and from that concealed, disingenuous platform are working to trump even democracy.
On the other side, in the streets of Honduras, and from below all across the Americas, are the forces of authentic democracy, fighting back the only way they can — with their hearts, minds and the blood of their convictions.
Stay tuned ….

Links to Lobbying Records
• The Cormac Group (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/Cormac.pdf)
• Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP [Lanny Davis] (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/davisl-lob.pdf)
Vision Americas LLC [Roger Noriega]
• Lobbying Registration (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/NoriegaReg.pdf)
• Quarterly Report (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/Noriega.Quarter.Report.pdf)
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/bill-conroy/2009/08/former-us-ambassador-roger-noriega-hired-push-honduran-putsch-agenda
(http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/Noriega.Quarter.Report.pdf)

Magda Hassan
08-03-2009, 02:05 AM
A quick update.
The US have canceled the diplomatic visa for the coup mongers US Honduran embassy and those of their dependents. They have not however canceled any other visas such as tourist visas etc to visit co-conspirators and enablers such as Lanny Davis and Otto Reich etc. In any case it seems to have pissed to the coup mongers as they are now talking about the reciprocal right to cancel the visas of the US embassy staff in Honduras. They tried to cancel the visas of the Venezuelan embassy representatives but this was rejected by the Venezuelan mission who do not recognise the right of the coup mongers to do anything in the name of the Honduran government. So it is business as usual at the Venezuelan embassy.

The other day after Zelayas meeting in Nicaragua with the US ambassador to Honduras and other US agents First Lady of Honduras addressed the people of Honduras from the back of a truck. She said that the US State Department has given an ultimatum to the coup leaders to vacate within one week. Or else what I am not sure.

Magda Hassan
08-05-2009, 12:34 PM
Otto Reich and the Honduran Coup D’Etat: The Provocateur, his Protege, and the Toppling of a President – Part One

July 30, 2009 · [/URL]

The story of Otto Reich’s role in fomenting the June coup d’etat in Honduras is not a brief one. This report will be posted over two days.
http://machetera.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/arcadia.jpg?w=252&h=240
OTTO REICH AND THE HONDURAN COUP D’ETAT:
The Provocateur, his Protégé, and the Toppling of a President (Part One)

By Machetera*
The very same day that the coup d’etat in Honduras began, in an emergency session of the Organization of American States (OAS) in Washington D.C., Roy Chaderton, the Venezuelan ambassador to the OAS, spoke with a simmering fury as he looked directly at Hector Morales, the U.S. Ambassador to the OAS.
“There’s a person who’s been very important within U.S. diplomacy, one who has re-connected with old friends and colleagues and helped encourage the coup perpetrators,” he said.

“The gentleman’s name is Otto Reich, former Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs during the government of George [W.] Bush. We in Venezuela have suffered this man, as the U.S. Ambassador in Venezuela, as an interventionist, we suffered him later in his position as Assistant Secretary of State…we had the First Reich, later, the Second Reich, now unfortunately we’re facing the Third Reich, moving within the Latin American ambit through an NGO [non-governmental organization], to fan the flames of the coup.”
Following Chaderton’s furious denunciation, Reich penned a strange non mea-culpa opinion piece (http://machetera.wordpress.com/2009/07/30/otto-reich-and-the-honduran-coup-detat-the-provocateur-his-protege-and-the-toppling-of-a-president-part-one/#comments) which the Miami Herald obligingly printed, complete with Reich’s deliberate misspellings of Chaderton’s name. He said that he was not the coup’s “architect,” which is quite some distance from a total denial.
Shortly thereafter, news reports began to circulate about an unusual guest making the rounds in Tegucigalpa. He had checked into the Plaza Libertador Hotel under the pseudonym Armando Valladares, and was seen making frequent visits to the Presidential Palace and the National Congress. Armando Valladares was the Cuban prisoner who faked paralysis to gain worldwide support for his release, and went on to become chairman of a CIA-linked non-profit front group (http://www.granma.cu/ingles/2009/mayo/vier15/Valladares.html) in New York: the Human Rights Foundation, until he resigned this July (http://www.nicaraguahoy.info/dir_cgi/topics.cgi?op=view_topic;cat=Documentos;id=57239), angry that the Foundation had not supported the coup. The man traveling under his name was actually Robert Carmona-Borjas, Reich’s protégé and the notorious figurehead for yet another “non-profit” front group: the Arcadia Foundation. This was the NGO Chaderton was talking about. Until now, a detailed summary of Arcadia’s activities in Honduras has not been reported outside Latin America.
The story that emerged outside Honduras about Zelaya’s insistence on holding a public opinion poll being the trigger for the coup is only a partial one, because the effort to undermine Zelaya was proceeding on several tracks in the years leading up to the coup. A whispering campaign about corruption was one of them. Juiced with Reich’s contacts at the highest levels of the U.S. government, the Arcadia Foundation coordinated a farcically one-sided media campaign against the Honduran state telephone company, Hondutel, in order to create the public perception, similar to the accusations made some years ago against Haiti’s deposed president, Jean Bertrand Aristide, that Zelaya’s government was hopelessly corrupt from the top on down, and that Zelaya was unfit for the presidency.
Reich’s history in U.S./Latin American relations is a repellent one. He has worked tirelessly in support of the U.S. economic blockade of Cuba, helped the anti-Cuban terrorist Orlando Bosch find shelter in the United States, and produced domestic anti-Sandinista propaganda for the Reagan White House, http://machetera.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/reich.jpg?w=224&h=240through the State Department Office of Public Diplomacy for Latin America. In that post, he worked with a non-profit front group called Citizens for America to spread that propaganda (http://redbook.gao.gov/13/fl0061375.php) throughout the U.S. press. He came to his final State Department post under such a cloud of controversy due to these activities and so many others just like them, that Bush II was forced to install him through a one-year recess appointment in 2001, in order to avoid a Congressional confirmation process that was likely to fail, not to mention dredge up unpleasant reminders. Once installed, Reich busied himself supporting the unsuccessful 2002 coup against Hugo Chávez in Venezuela and the successful 2004 coup against Jean Bertrand Aristide in Haiti.
Carmona-Borjas is a Venezuelan attorney who drafted the Carmona decree, named not for himself but for Pedro Carmona, to http://machetera.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/rcb2.jpg?w=200&h=217whom he bears no evident relation. Pedro Carmona seized power in Venezuela during the two days of the unsuccessful 2002 coup d’etat against Hugo Chávez. The Carmona decree was the document that dissolved the Constitution, the Congress and all other democratic institutions in Venezuela during those two days. Following his involvement in the failed coup, Carmona-Borjas sought and easily received political asylum in the United States.
Just as there were remarkable similarities in the kidnapping of President Aristide in 2004 in Haiti, and President Zelaya in Honduras, both being put on planes with the shades drawn and flown to unannounced destinations, there were similarities in the use of telecom as a propaganda tool to turn public opinion against them and set the groundwork for them to be prematurely removed from office, and once out, kept out.

A Brief History of Washington’s Relationship to Telecom
From a neoliberal political point of view there are two advantages to a propaganda offensive centered upon telecom corruption. The first is obvious. If telecom corruption can be tied directly to a leader who is not following Washington’s agenda, it promotes public support for the leader’s removal. The second is a little less obvious, but equally as important. It promotes the argument that telecom companies under state control really ought not to be, especially in underdeveloped countries, and would be better off privatized.
To make that argument, one must of course ignore the abundant evidence of telecom corruption in the United States, where men like Bernie Ebbers and Joseph Nacchio, who became telecom kingpins thanks to privatization (called “deregulation” in the U.S.) are serving federal prison terms for accounting fraud and insider trading. The fact is that telecom, as an essential service in the modern world, has always been a kind of money printing press, and the fight over state control vs. private control is all about who gets to control the switch, and what will be done with the profits.
ITT, which owned the Cuban phone company at the time of the revolution in 1959, was the first foreign owned property to be nationalized in Cuba, in 1961. In 1973, ITT was so fearful of repeating the experience in Chile that John McCone, a board member and former http://machetera.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/allende2.jpg?w=300&h=223CIA man promised Henry Kissinger a million dollars to prevent Salvador Allende’s election. According to the U.S. Ambassador to Chile at the time, Edward Korry, ITT did pay $500,000 (http://www.gregpalast.com/a-marxist-threat-to-cola-sales-pepsi-demands-a-us-coup-goodbye-allende-hello-pinochet/) to a member of the compensation committee for expropriated properties in Chile, until Allende found out about the payments and nixed the compensation entirely.
In Venezuela in 2007, privatization was also reversed, and Verizon was paid $572 million for its share in the Venezuelan phone company, Cantv. This sent chills down the spine of every U.S. politician and telecom executive or consultant (like Reich) invested in expanding telecom privatization extra-territorially. And the chill was bipartisan. Democrats as well as Republicans had benefited equally from global privatization of the telecom mint.
As someone who counted AT&T and Bell Atlantic (Verizon) among his former (acknowledged) clients and a proven antipathy for leftist governments, Reich had plenty of motive (http://blog.buzzflash.com/contributors/2021). A front group disguised as a foundation would provide the opportunity.
A Brief History of Washington Front Groups
Political front groups are a relatively recent Washington phenomenon, at least on an overt basis. The CIA of course, has been in the front group business since its inception. But during the Reagan years, public front groups with pleasant names and non-profit status began to flourish. The National Endowment for Democracy (NED), is the largest federally funded non-profit front group, set up to funnel enormous amounts of money to the International Republican Institute (IRI) and the National Democratic Institute (NDI). Allan Weinstein, one of the NED’s founders, said “A lot of what we [NED] do today was done covertly 25 years ago by the CIA. (http://www.thirdworldtraveler.com/Blum/TrojanHorse_RS.html)” The NED was formed in 1983, the same year as the corporate funded non-profit Citizens For America (http://www.rightweb.irc-online.org/articles/display/Citizens_for_America), which received contributions from Northrup, Shell Oil, Chase Manhattan and a variety of right-wing tycoons to drive its anti-communist agenda.
The IRI and NDI provide money and resources to foreign groups working in support of U.S. foreign policy, which basically means that in non-capitalist countries or those with non-capitalist leanings, they fund whoever is in opposition. The corporate supported non-profit front group on the other hand usually has a domestic agenda and is above all, a propaganda tool, used to facilitate favorable press coverage that in turn drives policy. Relatively unencumbered by burdensome government reporting requirements, they are quite a bit more agile and can be comparatively opaque, both useful qualities in the propaganda business. In Latin America, where the press is highly concentrated in the hands of a small oligarchy, the front group provides a unique opportunity. When an oligarchy is eager to topple a leftist president, a front group can be a third-party source of useful allegations which can be printed without question, as well as a distanced, albeit fake, source of comment on reaction to those allegations, adding fuel to the fire. It’s a kind of self-licking ice-cream cone, and it is exactly the role Arcadia has played in Honduras.
The one thing this type of front group must be certain to do is file for non-profit status in the U.S. They therefore must make at least a passing effort to put together a plausible board of directors and a credible mission statement, and comply with tax and other public disclosure requirements. The Arcadia Foundation has the mission statement – a rambling treatise on democracy and civil society, but little else. Carmona-Borjas shares billing (http://www.arcadiafoundation.org/founders.html) at the group with Betty Bigombe, a Ugandan World Bank consultant who appears to have lent Arcadia nothing beyond her name. Although Carmona-Borjas has insisted the group’s activities are entirely legal, he has concealed the documents he is required to make available to any member of the public upon request and is reportedly hostile to those who ask to see them.
Both Reich and Carmona-Borjas have denied Reich’s connection to the group, but a legal connection would have been both unnecessary and inconvenient. Reich could have worked the same way with Arcadia as he did with “Citizens For America,” without being legally tied to the group, and based on the available evidence it seems likely that this is exactly what he did.

The Launch

In the fall of 2007, the El Universal newspaper in Mexico printed a story based on a report it had received from the Arcadia Foundation. Interestingly, the report itself is not available at the Arcadia website, but there are clues to its contents and objectives in the newspaper stories which followed.
The report evidently contained allegations about corruption in the Honduran phone company, peppered with innuendo, a Reich trademark. It claimed that income to Honduras’s phone company, Hondutel, had declined by nearly 50% between 2005 and 2006. Out of the dozens, if not hundreds of companies involved in Honduran telecom, Arcadia exclusively targeted one: Cable Color, a company owned by the wealthy and influential Honduran family, the Rosenthals, for diverting calls away from Hondutel, thereby depriving the phone company of revenue.
It was an old horse that had seen service once before, in Haiti, against Aristide.
Interconnection and the Haiti Case
All international telecom traffic is subject to interconnection fees with the phone company in the country where the call is terminated. These interconnection fees are split 50/50 between the company sending the call and the company receiving the call so that they are only paid if there is an excess of traffic in one direction or another.
With underdeveloped countries such as Honduras or Haiti, there is an overwhelming excess of one-way traffic as a result of emigrants to the U.S. or http://machetera.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/tcm4.jpg?w=225&h=300other Western countries calling their families back home. It is precisely in these extremely poor countries, where the telephone company has not been privatized, that interconnection settlements represent a vital source of revenue to the state. Until recently, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) intervened on behalf of the multiple carriers who’d emerged as a result of privatization (deregulation) in the United States, to negotiate interconnection rates with other countries that would apply equally to all carriers. In 2004 the FCC’s intervention began to be phased out, and since 2006 it has vanished entirely except for a short list (http://www.fcc.gov/ib/pd/pf/isp_non_exempt.html) of countries that does not include Haiti or Honduras.
During the fixed-rate years, some U.S. companies still tried to get a better deal regardless, and while state owned companies such as Haiti’s Teleco and Honduras’s Hondutel were free to offer lower interconnection rates than those set by the FCC, they were supposed to be offering them equally to all carriers, not just a privileged few, so as not to make a mockery of the FCC’s system. If payments from the U.S. carrier were involved in securing the discount it would also be a violation of the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA).
This appears to be what occurred with IDT, a New Jersey telecom company that negotiated a special rate to interconnect with Haiti’s Teleco. The FCC’s rate at the time was supposed to be 23 cents per minute for connections to Haiti, but IDT negotiated and received a contract for 9 cents a minute. When a former IDT employee claimed that part of that fee was a kickback to Aristide, the anti-Aristide lobby went crazy.
The Wall Street Journal’s Mary Anastasia O’Grady, followed by Lucy Komisar writing for another non-profit front group sponsored by a Haitian oligarch, the Haiti Democracy Project (http://www.haitiaction.net/News/HL/7_29_8/7_29_8.html), claimed that http://machetera.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/jba.jpg?w=243&h=300Aristide knew of and personally benefited from the kickback. Before, corruption allegations against Aristide had tended to be confined to equally unproven insinuations about profiting from drug trafficking, such as those Reich provided to O’Grady when he sat down with her for an interview (http://www.wehaitians.com/otto%20reich.html) in 2002.
None of the defamatory allegations about Aristide’s involvement in any of the schemes could be proven, and a much publicized court case brought against Aristide by the Haitian (U.S.) puppet government was quietly shelved. But proving the case was secondary to floating the allegations, both as a propaganda tactic against Aristide, and political intimidation of his supporters in the U.S. Congress.

Grey Traffic
In Honduras, Arcadia had no “whistleblower” to rely on, like Michael Jewett, the ex-IDT employee who originally smeared Aristide and whose wrongful dismissal case provided much of the fuel for O’Grady’s and Komisar’s strident accusations. Carmona-Borjas would have to be a little more creative. The report he fed El Universal claimed that the Rosenthal’s company, Cable Color, had diverted the incoming international calls and turned them into “grey traffic.”
Grey traffic means that a call is being diverted to an Internet (IP) network rather than a switched one. Voice over IP (VoIP) which is essentially telecom over a broadband connection works this way – Skype and Vonage are both well-known varieties of this kind of service.
Theoretically, an internet service provider (ISP) could purchase lines from a regular phone company like Hondutel, but then use those lines to sell cheap international phone calls to its own customers, providing international phone service at a vastly discounted rate. This is said to be an exploding practice in Africa. The only problem with it is that it is usually illegal for an ISP to offer such a service – when phone calls are handled this way, the state or incumbent telephone company, quite naturally, prefers to make an interconnection agreement with whoever is buying the lines for voice purposes, so as not to completely lose out on the revenue.
Carmona-Borjas wasn’t claiming that Cable Color was ending up with the termination fees, as this would have been impossible. He just mentioned Hondutel’s traffic decline, pointed to Cable Color, said “grey traffic” and left the rest to the reader’s imagination. And he threw in a few extra details.
http://machetera.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/yr.jpg?w=188&h=228“According to the report,” said El Universal, “the Cable Color business is owned by the prominent Rosenthal family, with strong political and financial interests, and according to the document, is presently headed by Jaime Rosenthal, proprietor of the El Tiempo newpaper, the television Channel 11, and father of Yani Rosenthal, a presidential minister and someone who is considered in Honduras to be a potential presidential candidate.”
The report was likely fed first to the Mexican paper rather than the Honduran papers, because with the exception of El Tiempo, all are owned by Zelaya’s bitter opponents (http://www.glayiu.org/?accion=ver&tipo=analisis&id=1771), the Canahuati Larach family, (Roberto Micheletti, the president of the Honduran National Congress, who would later rise to dictator in the 2009 coup, owns La Tribuna (http://www.greenleft.org.au/2009/803/41344)) and the self-interest in publishing such a report was a bit too obvious. Once the story had been safely floated in Mexico however, El Heraldo, La Prensa and La Tribuna were delighted to run with it and over the next two years, would go on to print Carmona-Borjas’s allegations whenever they surfaced (with frequency), always describing him as the “Vice President of an NGO based in Washington” and raising no questions whatsoever about his funding or other “anti-corruption” projects.
Jaime Rosenthal sent a letter to El Universal which said that the Arcadia report had been “planted” by someone “interested in divulging in Honduras what couldn’t or wasn’t convenient to publish directly within [Honduras itself].” Rosenthal pointed out that the decline in Hondutel’s revenues between 2005 and 2006 was directly attributable to the end of its monopoly on terminating international calls, which disappeared on December 31, 2005, when Hondutel opened contracts with two international cellphone service providers. International calls were valued at 16 U.S. cents per minute, he said, “but wireless providers don’t pay anything to Hondutel.”
In a subsequent radio debate between Carmona-Borjas and the Rosenthals, they also explained that Cable Color was in the business of selling phone lines to ISPs and whenever it found that the ISPs were illegally repackaging the service as telephone service rather than internet service, without the benefit of an interconnection agreement, it notified Hondutel, whose responsibility it was to take action.

Arcadia vs. Rosenthal
In that radio debate (http://archivo.elheraldo.hn/nota.php?nid=82864&sec=12&fecha=2007-09-13) on September 12, 2007, Yani Rosenthal asked why, if Otto Reich had nothing to do with the Arcadia Foundation, his name had appeared on the foundation’s website until September 10th, and was then erased on September 11th? Carmona-Borjas initially avoided answering the question, insisting that the Foundation was legally set up within the United States and it had nothing against Yani personally – “…caramba! We congratulate him [on his campaign] and wish him the best…” returning to his accusation that Cable Color had 340 lines connected to Hondutel that were causing great losses for the phone company because they were being used for grey traffic.
Yani responded: “… yesterday when Mr. Roberto Carmona spoke with Channel 5, he said unequivocally that the honorable Otto Reich, whom he respects and deeply admires for being a fighter for democratic principles in the region had nothing to do with the Arcadia Foundation. These were his words, here you can see what he said last night on Channel 5 and here I’m showing you Arcadia’s website until September 10, where Otto Reich appeared. And then I show you that here, on September 11, the erasure of the list of the Arcadia Foundation’s members begins and also the report here that Robert Carmona himself signed and sent to Hondutel on July 14, 2006 was also copied to Ambassador Otto Reich. So, if Mr. Carmona will lie so shamelessly and obviously on something as simple as this where the lie can so easily be seen, what else will he lie about?….I can also show you communication between Cable Color and Hondutel, and how Cable Color cooperated with Hondutel so that Cable Color’s clients who dedicated themselves to this [illegal grey traffic] operation were punished. And Hondutel even knows about it, there were two businesses who had these numbers and their equipment was confiscated…”
Carmona-Borjas insisted again that Arcadia had nothing whatsoever to do with Reich, qualifying the statement by adding, “from a legal point of view,” and said that any columns that appeared at the Arcadia website were not even necessarily related to Arcadia, which was really more or less an open bulletin board, where even Rosenthal could express his ideas if he wished. (The only media reports on the Arcadia site then, and now, are those generated by Carmona-Borjas.)
The Rosenthals said they’d been forced to go to the U.S. Embassy in Tegucigalpa to explain the situation, since Carmona-Borjas, a Venezuelan/U.S. citizen, had so helpfully gone there first, supplying the Embassy with a copy of his Arcadia report.
Rasel Tomé, the president of the Honduran telecom regulatory authority CONATEL, joined in, adding that there were no complaints on record at CONATEL against Hondutel or Cable Color for grey traffic, to which Carmona-Borjas repeated that grey traffic was the only possible explanation for such a serious decline in revenue, insinuating that Tomé’s position was based on the fact that he had been the Rosenthal’s attorney for many years.
Tomé would find later find himself the focus of Carmona-Borjas’s unique contacts within the Honduran justice system, when shortly before the coup d’etat http://machetera.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/tome.jpg?w=257&h=220on June 28, 2009, he was ordered not to leave the country as a result of an investigation prompted by Carmona-Borjas and a business called Eldi, that had complained that Tomé, along with two other commissioners had illegally granted the license for television channel 12 to the Rosenthals, rather than Eldi.
The previous fall, Carmona-Borjas also filed a complaint at the Public Ministry against Tomé for illegal enrichment, based on the fact that he believed Tomé’s advertising campaign for a seat in the National Congress was so massive that Tomé could not possibly have afforded it.
In yet another radio debate, Tomé called Carmona-Borjas “an international blackmailer, a mercenary, who was being investigated for money laundering and was paid by powerful groups.” Tomé was running for Congress under the Micheletti wing of the Liberal Party.


[B]The Circling Sharks


“What is going to happen in this country if the government no longer receives the important revenues that are going to be generated through Hondutel? We’ve come to this company with one mission from President Manuel Zelaya Rosales: We have to go out and defend this company, because they want to eat it like sharks, and that’s what we’re doing, defending it tooth and nail and only with the collaboration of certain friends who are opening this kind of space for us.”
- Marcelo Chimirri, Hondutel Director, September 13, 2007 (From an interview conducted 5 days after Arcadia’s corruption accusations were first reported.)
Arcadia would wage its “grey traffic” crusade in Honduras from September 2007 until the present. Carmona-Borjas first targeted the Rosenthal media family, but his focus and passion quickly began to shift to the fertile territory offered by Marcelo Chimirri Castro, Hondutel’s director.
http://machetera.files.wordpress.com/2009/08/chim.jpg?w=226&h=169If you were to look for the colorful personification of a character from a Latin telenovela, it would be hard to find a better candidate than Marcelo Chimirri. Born in Sicily to an Italian father and Honduran mother who later returned to Honduras, he bears a passing resemblance to Antonio Banderas and has a fondness for thoroughbred horses, luxury vehicles, Harley Davidsons and beautiful women. He did appear in Arcadia’s original report, in a deeply slanderous way: “despite having been considered innocent, [Chimirri] remains the object of attention by the Honduran http://machetera.files.wordpress.com/2009/08/chim2.jpg?w=173&h=260attorney general for the death of his ex-girlfriend Yadira Miguel Mejia, and for threats and aggressive behavior toward journalists.” Another man was convicted for that crime, and there are no indications new evidence exists, yet Arcadia had no qualms about trying to connect him to a brutal murder. Chimirri is also the nephew of Zelaya’s wife, Xiomara Castro.
Like Zelaya, he is plainspoken, and appears to have a sense of humor. After many months of being hounded by Carmona-Borjas, Chimirri finally told El Heraldo that the reason Carmona-Borjas could not stop talking about him was that he was fatally attracted to him.
Arcadia’s contacts within the Honduran justice system may have been unusual but they were trivial compared with its connections to the U.S. Justice Department and Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Carmona-Borjas informed La Prensa that two small U.S. telecom companies who had interconnection contracts with Hondutel had transferred $70,000 to the bank account of a business owned by Chimirri: Inversiones Chicas, or Inverchicas (Little Investments), and helpfully supplied (http://archivo.laprensa.hn/ez/index.php/laprensa_user/ediciones/2007/09/14/arcadia_senala_ahora_a_chimirri) the dates of the transfers and the bank account number. The newspaper had no questions about how Carmona-Borjas would have come by such specific information, which Chimirri denied, explaining that Inverchicas had long since closed by the time of the supposed transfers.
Carmona-Borjas insisted that Chimirri had overseen not only the grey traffic diversion, which he claimed had robbed Hondutel of some $48 million dollars, but also that the payments to Inverchicas were indicative of a bribe of some kind.
Micheletti, who at that time presided over the Honduran Congress and had held Chimirri’s important position as director of Hondutel in the late 1990’s, weighed in early (http://archivo.elheraldo.hn/nota.php?nid=83302&sec=12&fecha=2007-09-19) on Carmona-Borjas’s accusations. “Those responsible for grey traffic deserve to go to jail, just like any other criminal,” he said.
The Cobra Raid and the Wiretapping
It wasn’t long before Arcadia’s whispering campaign bore fruit, and in early November, 2007, the state-sponsored Cobra paramilitary force launched http://machetera.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/cb3.jpg?w=280&h=194dramatic and violent raids on Hondutel’s offices, as well as Chimirri’s home. Chimirri said guns had been pointed at his children’s heads. A year and a half later, TeleSUR’s president, Andrés Izarra, would identify the Cobra squadron (http://machetera.wordpress.com/2009/07/13/welcome-to-honduras-dont-mind-the-masked-men/) as the force responsible for monitoring and threatening TeleSUR journalists reporting on the aftermath of the coup, that is, until they were thrown out of the country.
The justification for the raid was that Chimirri was accused of “abuse of authority, illegal weapons possession, and revelation of secrets.” Zelaya was furious about it, and called it a brutal assault on Chimirri’s family, that better belonged in a terror film, and said that a simple citation summoning the Hondutel officials to court would have sufficed.
A couple of weeks earlier, on October 22, President Zelaya had filed a complaint for telephone espionage, after his phone was illegally tapped without his knowledge and he was taped speaking to subordinates, including Chimirri, about strategies to control hostile press coverage and emerging problems with Micheletti. Two other Hondutel employees were charged with participation in the wiretapping: Oscar Danilo Santos, and Luis Alejandro Arriaga.
Arcadia helpfully posted the criminally obtained recordings on YouTube.

The Mounting Accusations
The U.S. Embassy in Tegucigalpa didn’t wait for the case against Chimirri to work its way through the Honduran courts. On January 24, 2008 it announced that Chimirri was no longer allowed to enter the United States, because of his links to “serious cases of public corruption.” With an Italian passport, Chimirri had never needed a visa but now even that would not get him through U.S. customs. Visas had always been a Reich specialty.
Then the dead bodies showed up. On Friday, February 8, four people were found dead inside a truck with Guatemalan license plates, under a bridge. They had been shot and later set on fire.
Again, Carmona-Borjas surged forward with an explanation. Two of the bodies were Guatemalan, a third was unidentifiable, and the last was said to have been a computer technician by the name of Alejandro Laprade Rodriguez. According to Carmona-Borjas, Laprade had come to Washington on March 27, 2007 to deliver a 49 minute tape recording which he claimed was proof of an extortion attempt by Hondutel employees. Laprade claimed that they had raided his business for no reason whatsoever and demanded $100,000 so as not to be hauled directly to jail. This too was posted by Arcadia to YouTube.
The fact that the crime scene looked very much like a drug deal http://machetera.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/comy.jpg?w=300&h=221gone bad was for Carmona-Borjas only proof of the opposite and he insisted it was all a big show. Having no ability to oblige Carmona-Borjas to come to Honduras, and with Carmona-Borjas, (like his mentor) refusing to come anyway because of what he called “the prevailing climate of insecurity in the country,” the Public Prosecutor who was responsible for investigating the supposed extortion spoke of going to Washington to interview Carmona-Borjas.
By the end of March, La Prensa published a report (http://archivo.laprensa.hn/ez/index.php/laprensa_user/ediciones/2008/03/29/laprade_si_fue_asesinado_y_quemado_confirma_fiscal ia) that said that forensic specialists had positively ID’d one of the burned bodies as Laprade, with 21 matches between the teeth of one of the cadavers, and a mold that Laprade’s dentist happened to have on hand. But several days later, the head of the Honduran Police Detective Force (DGIC), Francisco Murillo Lopez, said not so fast (http://archivo.elheraldo.hn/ez/index.php/plain_site_user/ediciones/2008/03/31/policia_tiene_reservas_en_caso_laprade). “A dental analysis is credible when 75 points coincide,” not 21, he said, “and when it is done by a dental forensic specialist…As a police detective I respect the position of the Public Ministry, but I believe that this case ought to be examined further and as a detective, I have my doubts,” he added. He also asked to see the preliminary DNA results for all four cadavers.
Carmona-Borjas shot back, dismissing Murillo’s comments and throwing some new information into the mix. He claimed that just days before Laprade was murdered, he had called Carmona-Borjas again, claiming this time to have a tape of Marcelo Chimirri confessing his involvement in grey traffic. Unfortunately, Laprade’s computer expertise did not appear to extend to YouTube uploads, and Carmona-Borjas did not have a copy of the tape because he claimed that Laprade had been looking for a way to deliver it to him without raising suspicion, when he disappeared.
With his fondness for the collective pronoun combined with strategic insinuation, Carmona-Borjas said, “We told him that he should be extremely careful considering that…Marcelo Chimirri had been linked at one time between 1997 and 1998 to the crime against the young girl, Yadira Mejia.” After that, he said, he did not hear from Laprade again. The tape has never been proven to exist.
Over the summer and fall of 2008, Carmona-Borjas would continue to stalk Chimirri, but he also began to turn up the heat against Arcadia’s real target. At the end of July, he reportedly presented a formal complaint against President Zelaya, at the Honduran embassy in Washington, accusing him of acting against the legal order in Honduras and against democratic principles. It was a shot across the bow.
Real Corruption of No Interest Whatsoever to Arcadia
Suddenly, at the beginning of April, 2008, the tension between the Public Prosecutor’s office (Public Ministry, in Honduras) and the http://machetera.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/dscn5977.jpg?w=237&h=178National Congress erupted into something extraordinary. Four prosecutors began a hunger strike on April 6, which they held on the ground floor of the National Congress building. The motive for the strike had its origins in 14 records of supposed corruption involving “well known figures, influential in the country’s political and economic sector” which had been shelved for years without any follow-up or investigation, let alone public revelation of their names.
As the hunger strike continued, it gained sympathizers and by the time a month had gone by, 22 additional people from a wide variety of organizations had joined the original four prosecutors, among them two priests and the evangelical Pastor Evelio Reyes.
After Pastor Reyes interceded, the Honduran Congress named a commission to mediate, consisting of Ramón Custodio, the commissioner for Human Rights and the executive secretary of the National Anti-Corruption Council, Juan Ferrera. The fasting prosecutors rejected the idea of mediation. Both Ferrera and Custodio went on to support the illegal coup government of Roberto Micheletti the following year.
Micheletti’s own proposal for resolving the standoff involved bringing the complaint to the Organization of American http://machetera.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/dscn6022.jpg?w=188&h=250States (OAS); a proposal that was also rejected by the prosecutors, who insisted that the problem be addressed in Honduras. The prosecutors were also demanding that the current Attorney General, Leonidas Rosa Bautista and the Assistant Attorney General, Omar Cerna, step down, for having engaged in illegal activities.
President Zelaya supported the group, visiting them at the National Congress and also asking that Cerna resign, saying “The real problem in Honduras is that the law is not applied to those who break it.”
The Honduran press and those allied with the Attorney General characterized the strike as an attempt by the president to replace the AG and his assistant with people from his own Liberal Party, rather than the National Party that the two belonged to. The prosecutors rejected this, insisting that they simply wanted an investigation into the reasons for the Public Ministry’s weakness, and a review of the cases of organized crime, corruption and environmental and human rights abuses which had never been punished.
Cerna refused to resign, saying that it would be a terrible precedent, and in a refrain that would come to be repeated by the putschists a year later, added that his decision to reject the president’s request, was really a “strengthening of institutions and democracy .”
For his part, the astonishingly arrogant Rosa Bautista denied that he had done anything improper, and anyway, if he had, he had done it while in private practice as a trial lawyer, and not as an administrator. Therefore, Decree 49-2008, http://machetera.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/lrb.jpg?w=233&h=210which was passed by the Congress the previous year to provide sanctions for administrative offenses did not apply to him. Furthermore, he said that people were confusing the issue, that he was actually more like a judge, not a run of the mill administrator, and as a sort-of-judge, he was subject to the Supreme Court rather than the National Congress. He threatened to go to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights to ask that precautionary measures be taken to guarantee his freedoms as well as the freedoms of the Public Ministry.
Despite his declarations, the public demonstrations in support of the hunger strikers were clearly beginning to unnerve Rosa Bautista, and he began traveling in cars provided by the Secretary of Defense. “If the people’s protests for the benefit of the media had taken place within the framework of the Constitution, something would have been done a long time ago,” he said. “But these threats to the peace, to the freedom of the press, the demonstrations, the irresponsible accusations of everyone…we should return to peace and tranquility.”
It ought to have been a prime opportunity for the anti-corruption crusader from Washington to weigh in, and finally Carmona-Borjas did. He was convinced the whole hunger strike was nothing but theatre and accused the hunger strikers of lounging on comfortable Coleman brand camping mattresses, sustaining themselves with energy drinks, energy bars and Evian. Why all the fuss over a few corruption cases when there was grey traffic to be dealt with and Chimirri on the loose?
Carmona-Borjas directed most of his wrath at Pastor Reyes however, an interesting choice considering that http://machetera.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/dsc_0077.jpg?w=203&h=226Reyes came out in support of the coup a year later, but like many sectors in Honduras, the evangelical’s relation to politics is complicated and cannot be distilled into a simple right-wing/left-wing narrative. No stranger himself to the charms of an expensive suit, Carmona-Borjas lashed out in a radio “debate” at the pastor for his luxurious attire worth “hundreds of thousands of dollars” (sic) and gold Rolex.
In return, Reyes delivered what must have been a far more cutting insult to Carmona-Borjas. He had never heard of him.
A month and a half after it began, the hunger strike ended, when a commission of congressional representatives was named to investigate Rosa Bautista and Cerna. The commission went nowhere. One of the four original hunger strikers, Jari Dixon Herrera, said that the commission’s report “did not surprise us much, it’s what they were going to do [all along], they were never going to allow those cases to be reviewed.” Referring to Rosa Bautista and Cerna, he added, “Nor were they going to allow their best two workers inside the Public Ministry to be exposed, seeing as they’ve protected so many.”
Latinode
In April of 2009, Arcadia’s accusations against Hondutel finally gained traction when a $2 million fine was leveled by the U.S. federal court (http://skaddenpractices.skadden.com/fcpa//attach.php?uploadFileID=133) for the Southern District of Florida http://machetera.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/miamicourt.jpg?w=300&h=158against Latinode, a telecom company that was fined under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) for supposedly paying more than a million dollars in bribes to “third parties” that were then to pass “some or all of those funds” to Hondutel employees in order to receive a discount on their interconnection rates. (IDT on the other hand was sanctioned by the FCC in the Haitian telecom case, but no FCPA case has ever been brought against it.)
Latinode had been under investigation by the FBI and the Miami office of U.S. Immigration & Customs Enforcement (ICE). According to the Department of Justice (DOJ) news release (http://www.usdoj.gov/opa/pr/2009/April/09-crm-318.html) on the settlement, Latinode also bribed officials in Yemen to receive interconnection discounts. DOJ said that Latinode received interconnection discounts between 2004 and 2007, and that the payments were meant to eventually go to five Hondutel employees. The “intended payment recipients” were not named, but the “deputy general manager (who later became the general manager)” could only be Chimirri.
Hondutel denied it, and said that an internal audit performed between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2007 had revealed discrepancies in Latinode’s traffic that eventually reached $4.6 million dollars owed to Hondutel. Paying a $2 million fine (over a three year period, according to DOJ) in Miami and shutting Latinode down was therefore a no-brainer, especially for eLandia, the Coral Gables telecom firm that had paid $25 million to purchase Latinode in 2007.
But the DOJ news release had another curious note. It said “The resolution of the criminal investigation of Latinode reflects, in large part, the actions of Latinode’s corporate parent, eLandia International Inc. (eLandia), in disclosing potential FCPA violations to the Department of Justice after eLandia’s acquisition of Latinode and post-closing discovery of the improper payments. “
Similarly to Arcadia, the made-in-Washington front group, the Latinode case has the flavor of a made-in-Miami event. Despite the DOJ English language press release, neither Arcadia nor the Latinode case are very important for U.S. consumption, yet they are playing significant political roles in Honduras. Although the DOJ’s settlement with Latinode does not prove the guilt of any Hondutel employee, that is exactly how Arcadia and the coup government have interpreted it, and spread it through the media. When Chimirri and other officials of the Zelaya administration were arrested on July 2, 2009, the sole evidence cited by the pro-coup press (http://www.latribuna.hn/web2.0/?p=15493) relates to the Latinode accusations made public by the U.S. court settlement. The same federal court in Miami tried the Cuban Five (http://www.freethefive.org/) case and the recent “suitcase scandal (http://www.borev.net/2008/06/valijagate_update_i_1.html)” case, demonstrating that the DOJ there is not above politicizing events in order to serve hard-right foreign policy objectives in Latin America.
The New Third Reich

“[This] huge network of people who are going after communications, not just in Honduras but in Central America – the same who achieved their objective in Guatemala, El Salvador and Nicaragua where they managed to totally privatize the telecommunications sector without a single benefit to the people…So they already have a perfectly planned out scheme through which they are taking over all telecoms in Central America.”

- Marcelo Chimirri, September 13, 2007 interview
Emerging from the shadows, Reich could not resist the opportunity to comment on the Miami case: “President Zelaya http://machetera.files.wordpress.com/2009/08/reich.jpg?w=176&h=176has allowed or encouraged these kinds of practices and now we’ll see that he’s behind this as well,” he told Miami’s [I]El Nuevo Herald. He also referenced Chimirri for the first time in the U.S. press, casually mentioning the family connection (to the Zelayas) and the fact that he’d been accused in Honduras of a series of illegal acts in regard to his management of Hondutel contracts. He did not mention Chimirri’s accuser.
For Zelaya, it was the last straw. Two members of his cabinet as well as his personal secretary were sent to the U.S. to hire legal counsel to sue Reich for defamation. The secretary, Enrique Reina, said that Reich was upset because Hondutel had cancelled the interconnection contract of a firm he represented.
Carmona-Borjas weighed in, repeating his accusation to the Honduran media that Zelaya had acted “unconstitutionally.”
Zelaya would have little time to press the case. Two months later he was awoken by the Cobra paramilitary force which shot its way into his house and put him on a plane to Costa Rica, still wearing his pajamas.
In his strange non-denial op-ed for the Miami Herald, Reich taunted Zelaya, claiming that a little thing like a coup d’etat was no reason for him not to proceed with his defamation lawsuit, and in floating the accusations against Chimirri, inflated the amount of missing Hondutel funds from $48 to $100 million.
The CAFTA Link
The explanation for the wild price inflation may have less to do with Reich’s penchant for hyperbole than it does with CAFTA, the Central American Free Trade Agreement. The pressure to privatize Hondutel did not materialize until CAFTA was implemented. It is a key piece of the neoliberal puzzle, even expanding multinational corporations’ rights in Central America to include the ability to sue for http://machetera.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/17.jpg?w=300&h=199“lost” or “future” profits under a clause that protects companies from “measures equivalent to expropriation.” (CAFTA-DR Treaty, Article 10.7)
CAFTA clearly states that legitimate state actions such as the enacting of environmental and consumer protection laws, may trigger Article 10.7 and allow U.S. corporations to sue signatory countries for all of the money that they might have made otherwise. Illegitimate government actions such as corruption are therefore definitely covered, and mere accusations of corruption could provide the fulcrum to pressure governments into settling in the secret tribunals of ICSID, the World Bank’s arbitration court. But that may not be necessary, since Reich is a self-proclaimed expert in handling “anti-corruption activities, political risk analysis and non-litigious dispute settlement” for US multinationals in Latin America. His backdoor expertise can make it so that multinationals never have to publicly make these immoral and reputation-damaging arguments.
Given Reich’s telecom ties, not to mention those of the Cormac Group (http://www.thecormacgroup.com/success.htm) and http://machetera.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/ld2.jpg?w=149&h=221those of Hillary Clinton’s friend, Lanny Davis (http://www.orrick.com/practices/intellectual_property/software.asp), who set up a press and congressional lobbying tour in Washington for the Honduran coup regime, the possibility of a future lawsuit of this type cannot be discounted. CAFTA’s rules regarding such lawsuits are broader than NAFTA’s infamous Chapter 11, and such threats are already being utilized by multinationals to pressure (http://www.investmenttreatynews.org/cms/news/archive/2008/12/12/el-salvador-warned-of-cafta-dr-lawsuit-by-mining-company.aspx) the cash-strapped governments of El Salvador and Guatemala into handing over millions.
The Aftermath
Reich admitted to having engaged in “pointing to Zelaya as the enabler of the corruption in Honduras” and added, “had I really been the ‘architect’ of Zelaya’s removal, I would had (sic) advised that he be charged with the almost 20 crimes with which the Honduran Judiciary has now charged him, and be arrested by civilian authorities. I would have urged that the constitutional process be followed: the elevation to the presidency of the next-in-line, President of the Congress Roberto Micheletti, and the continuation of the electoral process, culminating in a November election.”
Except for omitting the part about flying the president to Costa Rica, this was how the coup played out, to the letter, although Reich coyly insisted these events unfolded “without my involvement.”
To La Prensa in Honduras, Reich once again denied any legal association with Arcadia. “I’m not a member of the Arcadia Foundation. I know the Arcadia Foundation very well and the work it has done.” It was exactly the kind of statement he could have made 25 years earlier about Citizens For America.
For his part, Carmona-Borjas fulminated to what was left of the Honduran press about how kicking TeleSUR out of Honduras was not really restricting anyone’s freedom of expression, adding jabs at CNN en Español for not completely ignoring demonstrations in support of Zelaya, and of course, his pet target, Chimirri.
In Honduras, with Zelaya safely out of the way, the new putschist leaders would crank up the witch hunt, nabbing Chimirri and other Zelaya officials post-haste and sending them directly to the national penitentiary, but not without personally introducing Carmona-Borjas at a pro-coup rally and commending him for being the first to incriminate Hondutel and thanking him for Chimirri’s arrest.


An order was issued to Interpol for the capture of the Hondutel employees implicated in the Latinode case: Jorge Alberto Rosa, Julio Daniel Flores, and Oscar Danilo Santos. Charges were also concocted against Rixi Moncada, who was one of the people Zelaya had earlier sent to Miami to hire the firm to sue Reich, and who would play a visible role at the mediation talks with Oscar Arias, arranged by Hillary Clinton. Rebeca Santos, and Aristides Mejía, formerly associated with the state electric company were also targeted.
Although Arcadia’s role was unreported and therefore unknown outside Honduras, the Venezuelans and Hondurans understood it completely. Ambassador Chaderton promised to forward a dossier on the matter to the U.S. mission to the OAS, and in an interview with La Jornada following his remarks to the OAS, Chaderton said they had “absolutely no doubts about it.”
In Latin America, there are many more important state companies to be targeted for privatization, and if not, many more leftist leaders who remain to be convinced or toppled. Meanwhile in Washington, the Arcadia Foundation still exists, like a sleeper cell, awaiting its master’s voice.
[url]http://machetera.wordpress.com/2009/08/02/otto-reich-and-the-honduran-coup-d%E2%80%99etat-the-provocateur-his-protege-and-the-toppling-of-a-president-%E2%80%93-part-two/

Magda Hassan
08-05-2009, 01:39 PM
I have recently heard that Ivan Marovich is in Honduras giving workshops in 'How to Remove a Dictator' or some such thing. Before he was in Honduras he was in Iran during the post election debacle running similar workshops. He originally got started in Otpor a group in Serbia and a NED front, of which he was a co-ordinator, which was instrumental in the overthrow of Milosevic. Now, Ivan, if it is indeed the same one, may just be a man who is generous with his time and skillls in helping other overthrow their governments and has a family who can pay for all this travel and accommodation and expenses. Let's hope so. When I asked who was funding him and who he worked for over at Narco News site my post was removed from the comments section. Perhaps my post did not conform with their rules. I don't know. I just know that when I worked in community work it was next to impossible to get the money one would need to that sort of workshop all over the world. I would love to access his network, assuming it come string free. God knows the world sure does need more real democracy and freedom and justice.

I sure would hate the current Honduran popular resistance to be led right up the garden path away from its chance at true sovreignty and democracy by the National Endowment for Democracy, an organisation which is so far from trasparent and democratic in practice and outcome. None of its colour revolutions have ever delivered the real democracy and freedom for the people of any country in which they have been imposed and manipulated. However, the NED has always some how managed to deliver for the State Department a pliant local right wing clique who are willing to do Washington's bidding. I am wondering if the NED's interest in Honduras may be to guide the Honduran resistence to help impose the lesser of two evils by removing the current golpistas and having ready a nicer kinder more photogenic post-modern neo-liberal friendly clique to insert into government instead and all the while still being able to shaft the majority of Honduran people and keep them in the underclasses and away from real power over their country.

Some info about Otpor:
http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Otpor

Otpor

From SourceWatch


[/URL]
Otpor was a Serbian political youth group formed ahead of the 2000 elections. The group has a wesbite ([url]www.otpor.com (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Otpor#searchInput)), but it is a single page with the group's symbol and nothing else.


From Wikipedia

Otpor! (Cyrillic (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Cyrillic&action=edit): ?????!) was a pro-democracy youth movement in Serbia which is widely credited for leading the eventually successful struggle to overthrow Slobodan Milosevic in 2000. It was formed in October 1998 as a response to repressive University and Media laws that were introduced that year. In the beginning Otpor had activities at Belgrade University. In the aftermath of NATO airstrikes against Yugoslavia, Otpor started a political campaign against Yugoslav president Slobodan Milosevic. This resulted in nation wide police repression against Otpor activists during which almost 2000 of them were arrested and some beaten. During the presidential campaign in September 2000 Otpor launch "Gotov je" (He's finished) campaign that galvanized Serbian discontent with Milosevic and resulted in his defeat. Some students who led Otpor (whose name means "Resistance" in the Serbian language) used Serb translations of Gene Sharp's writings on nonviolent action as a theoretical basis for their campaign.
…
Otpor was instrumental in inspiring and training several other civic youth organizations in Eastern Europe, including Kmara (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Kmara) in the republic of Georgia (itself partly responsible for the downfall of Eduard Shevardnadze), Pora (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Pora) in Ukraine (currently involved in protests following the Ukrainian presidential election, 2004), Zubr (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Zubr_%28political_organization%29&action=edit) in Belarus (opposing president Alexander Lukashenko), and MJAFT! (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=MJAFT%21&action=edit) in Albania.
From Diana Johnstone, Fool's Crusade

The U.S. NED provided millions of dollars and training in "methods of nonviolent action" to a network of young activists calling itself Otpor (resistance) with no political program other than the desire to "be normal" on Western terms. Otpor youth plastered walls with posters of clenched fists and tried to get arrested in order to denounce the "regime" as repressive.
In the first round held on 24 September 2000, Milosevic failed to gain re-election. Official results gave Kostunica over 48 per cent of the vote in a five-man race. This fell slightly short of the 50 per cent required to win, but indicated an almost certain landslide in the runoff against Milosevic, who trailed by some ten percentage points. (Yugoslav electoral law calls for a second round if no candidate wins an absolute majority in the first round.) Not satisfied with this prospect of a certain victory at the ballot box, DOS (democratic opposition of Serbia) claimed a first round victory and announced it would boycott the second round. This heightened tension and provided an opportunity for the Otpor agitators to take matters into their own hands. The DOS thereby moved the contest from the ballot box onto the streets. The result was the spectacle of the 5 October 'democratic revolution', when a large crowd stormed the Skupstina, the parliament building in the center of Belgrade. Presented to the world public in the as a spontaneous act of self-liberation, the event was staged for television cameras, which filmed and relayed the same scenes over and over again: youths breaking through windows, flags waving, flames rising, smoke enveloping the parliament building, described as "the symbol of the Milosevic regime". —Fool's Crusade (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Fool%27s_Crusade), p. 257.

Training and the players

The training and organizing of the Otpor agents was a lengthy and costly operation. This article summarizes how it was done and who was involved:
While NDI worked closely with Serbian opposition parties, IRI focused its attention on Otpor, which served as the revolution's ideological and organizational backbone. In March, IRI paid for two dozen Otpor leaders to attend a seminar on nonviolent resistance at the Hilton Hotel in Budapest, a few hundreds yards along the Danube from the NDI-favored Marriott.
During the seminar, the Serbian students received training in such matters as how to organize a strike, how to communicate with symbols, how to overcome fear and how to undermine the authority of a dictatorial regime. The principal lecturer was retired U.S. Army Col. Robert Helvey (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Robert_Helvey), who has made a study of nonviolent resistance methods around the world, including those used in modern-day Burma and the civil rights struggle in the American South.
Helvey, who served two tours in Vietnam, introduced the Otpor activists to the ideas of American theoretician Gene Sharp, whom he describes as "the Clausewitz of the nonviolence movement," referring to the renowned Prussian military strategist.[1] (http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn?pagename=article&contentId=A18395-2000Dec3&notFound=true)

Otpor Activities

Otpor type of activities entail organizing a militant section of society to instill cynicism in the government, drown out the government's message, and convey the impression that there is broad based support for the opposition. Its activities amount to disrupting the government's message and tarnish its image. NB: the same formula has been re-used in Ukraine, Georgia, Albania and Belarus. Otpor's principal activities were:


graffiti encouraging cynism against those in power. Or as Michael Dobbs put it: "U.S. taxpayers paid for 5,000 cans of spray paint used by student activists to scrawl anti-Milosevic graffiti on walls across Serbia, and 2.5 million stickers with the slogan 'He's Finished,' which became the revolution's catchphrase."[Dobbs op. cit.]
leafleting
massed concentrations with flags for the benefit of foreign (CNN) camera crews
Organizing student groups
Shouting down government speakers at public events
Hostile questioning of government officials and demanding resignation; booing…



Funding Sources and Training (alpha order)



Freedom House (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Freedom_House) (Mowat, op. cit.)
International Republican Institute (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=International_Republican_Institute ) (IRI) (Mowat, op. cit.)
National Endowment for Democracy (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=National_Endowment_for_Democracy)
Open Society Institute (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Open_Society_Institute)
USAID (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=USAID) – Financed T-shirts, stickers, spray-paint (Ackerman, quoted in Mowat, op. cit.)
United States Institute of Peace (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=United_States_Institute_of_Peace) (Dobbs, op. cit.)



SourceWatch Resources



Swarming Youths (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Swarming_Youths)
Nenad Belcevic (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Nenad_Belcevic)



References about Otpor



PBS series, Bringing Down a Dictator (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Bringing_Down_a_Dictator), PBS, 2002. NB: this documentary portrays Optor in a positive light — no references to its origin or possible CIA relationship. Note that the director of the film is Jack DuVall (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Jack_DuVall), the producer is Peter Ackerman (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Peter_Ackerman), and the film was produced for ICNC (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=ICNC). Read the history of this film under DuVall's biography.
Roger Cohen, "Who Really Brought Down Milosevic?", New York Times Sunday Magazine, Nov. 26, 2000.
Michael Dobbs, ""U.S. Advice Guided Milosevic Opposition (http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn?pagename=article&contentId=A18395-2000Dec3&notFound=true): Political Consultants Helped Yugoslav Opposition Topple Authoritarian Leader", Washington Post, December 11, 2000.
Interview with Srdja Popovic of Otpor (http://freshair.npr.org/guest_info_fa.jhtml?name=srdjapopovic), National Public Radio, March 20, 2002.
Diana Johnstone, Fool's Crusade (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Fool%27s_Crusade): Yugoslavia, NATO and Western Delusions, Pluto Press, 2002, p. 257.
Stephen Mulvey, Behind the scenes at Kiev's rally (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/4050187.stm), BBC Online, Nov. 28, 2004. States: "Natalia is the deputy leader for the Kiev region of a student protest group called Pora, modelled on the Serbian group Otpor, which played a key role in the ousting of Slobodan Milosevic. In spring she attended lectures in Kiev by Otpor leader Alexander Maric".
Brian Pozun, Planning for an Uncertain Future (http://www.ce-review.org/01/8/pozun8.html), CE Review, Feb. 26, 2001. References to Otpor post-Milosevic. (CE Review has been renamed TOL).
Daan van der Schriek, Georgia: How good the revolution has been! (http://worldpress.org/article_model.cfm?article_id=1805&dont=yes), World Press Review, Dec. 7, 2003
Jonathan Mowat, "The new Gladio in action? (http://www.onlinejournal.com/Special_Reports/031905Mowat-1/031905mowat-1.html): Ukrainian postmodern coup completes testing of new template", Online Journal, March 19, 2005. Contains descriptions of the operators behind the manipulation of Otpor, and who financed this.


My small dog always chases after the bus and barks madly at it. When the bus drives away up the street he returns home and is very pleased with himself that he has managed to chase that really big thing away from his territory. If a bunch of students want to think that they were responsible for the overthrow of a dictator out of favor with the US who am I to shatter their illusions.

Magda Hassan
08-09-2009, 02:58 AM
...as he attempts to defend the indefensible. Made my day.
http://casa-del-duderino.blogspot.com/2009/08/lanny-davis-traincrash.html

Peter Lemkin
08-09-2009, 05:21 AM
...as he attempts to defend the indefensible. Made my day.
http://casa-del-duderino.blogspot.com/2009/08/lanny-davis-traincrash.html

The very fact he represents the Honduran Business Elite which are the surrogates in large part for the US Multinationals who do business there and treat the country as part of our 'backyard' - says it all. He might as well be working for Chicita...and in fact is...and other such. Nice traincrash. I wish him many more.

Magda Hassan
08-10-2009, 01:21 PM
U.S. aid agency, established under Bush, seeks to promote “economic freedom”

The coup d'état that rocked Honduras in late June and removed democratically elected President Manuel Zelaya from office, sending him into exile in Costa Rica, was preceded by a multi-million dollar build-up of foreign aid from a U.S. agency that includes on its board of directors the president of the International Republican Institute as well as Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.
That taxpayer-funded agency, called the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC), oversees a multi-billion dollar foreign-aid fund called the Millennium Challenge Account. It was established in 2004 under the Bush administration as means of combating terrorism by funding development in poor nations under a strict neo-conservative free-trade model.http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/hillaryclinton.jpg
A review of publicly available financial records reveals that between April 1 and July 31 of this year, nearly $17 million in aid was disbursed to Honduras through the MCC program. That money flowed into Honduras after President Zelaya called for a national referendum in March to decide whether a ballot question should be included in that nation’s November 2009 general elections — which would have asked voters to decide if a national assembly should be convened to amend the Honduran constitution.
But Zelaya had fallen out of favor with the Honduran business class that controls the country well before that point. He was accused of becoming too intertwined with the agenda of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, a long-time nemesis of the Washington political class and Wall Street capital interests. That drift toward the left was marked by Zelaya’s decision to join the Chavez-led, Latin American-centered Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas (ALBA (http://www.venezuelanalysis.com/analysis/339) in its Spanish initials) — a move ratified by the Honduran Congress in October 2008.
At the time, media reports (http://www.economist.com/world/americas/displaystory.cfm?story_id=12522958)warned that Honduras’ decision to join ALBA might result in the MCC rescinding its five-year, $250 million aid compact with Honduras — inked in 2005. But it seems quite the opposite happened.
In fact, since Oct. 1, 2008, according to public records, a total of $45.3 million in MCC aid has been pumped into Honduras, representing 56 percent of all aid disbursed under the program through July 31 of this year. (Even though the MCC compact with Honduras calls for an aid package of $250 million to be distributed between 2005 and 2010, as of July 31, 2009, according to MCC records, a total of only $80.3 million in aid has been disbursed to the country — more than half, as mentioned, since October 2008.)
The MCC Honduras program (http://www.mcc.gov/mcc/countries/honduras/index.shtml) is designed to fund agricultural and transportation projects that “will increase the productivity and business skills of farmers and their employees who operate small- and medium-sized farms, and will reduce transportation costs between targeted production centers and national, regional, and global markets,” according to the MCC’s description of the aid compact.
But a criticism of the MCC program is that, though designed in theory to help the poor, its programs actually do more to benefit the wealthy and business class.
A 2007 U.S. Government Accountability Office report (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/MCC.GAO.07.Overstated.pdf) focused on the MCC’s aid program in the South Pacific island nation of Vanuatu spells out that criticism:
MCC states that the [Vanuatu] compact is expected to benefit approximately 65,000 poor, rural inhabitants “living nearby and using the roads to access markets and social services.” According to the MCC’s underlying documentation, 57 percent of the compact’s monetary benefits will accrue to tourism services providers, transport providers, government workers, and local businesses and 43 percent of the benefits will go to the local population — that is, local producers, local consumers, and inhabitants of remote communities. However, MCC does not establish the proportion of local-population benefits that will go to the rural poor.
The MCC’s overtly neo-conservative, pro-oligarch underpinnings are further illuminated by its strongest proponents, including the conservative Heritage Foundation think tank.
From an article (http://www.heritage.org/Research/ForeignAid/wm2574.cfm) on the Heritage Foundation’s Web site:
The MCC has a number of advantages over traditional assistance. MCC programs encourage and allocate aid to countries that embrace policies linked to economic growth and development. The objective indicators used by the MCC to determine which countries will receive funding —"based on their performance in governing justly, investing in their citizens, and encouraging economic freedom" — mirror those used by The Heritage Foundation in preparing its Index of Economic Freedom.
Among the indicators (http://www.mcc.gov/mcc/selection/indicators/index.shtml) established under MCC for providing, or continuing to provide, aid to a foreign nation, include: business start-ups, trade policy, fiscal policy, and land rights and access.
Whether the MCC’s approach to doling out taxpayers’ money is appropriate, or not, really is not the point in this case, however. The question here is why would a taxpayer-funded federal agency with a conservative, free-market/free-trade agenda suddenly start ramping up aid to Honduras after it’s president, Zelaya, clearly took a turn to the left toward Venezuela’s Chavez, a perceived arch-enemy of that conservative agenda?
One possible explanation is that the huge flow of MCC money into Honduras had nothing to do with the agency's objectives in Latin American and everything to do with its budget agenda in Washington.
MCC has a terrible track record of disbursing funds under its control — preferring instead to keep them stashed away in its own coffers. And so to overcome that image, it may have simply began rapidly ramping up disbursements to secure additional funding from Congress — the old trick of spending down your old budget to assure your new budget isn’t cut.
Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vermont, in a statement made on the Senate Floor in November 2008, seems to verify that this is, in fact, one possible scenario in play in the case of MCC.
From Leahy’s Floor statement (http://leahy.senate.gov/press/200811/111908c.html) justifying the Senate’s move to cut President Bush’s $2 billion funding request for MCC to $254 million for fiscal 2009:
We also considered the fact that Congress had appropriated $7.5 billion for the MCC, and by July 18 only $235 million had been disbursed of which a significant portion was for administrative expenses. While we made clear that we were not advocating faster disbursements, we do not support additional [foreign aid] compacts until more of the funds we have already appropriated produce sustainable results.
In the wake of Leahy’s chastisement, the MCC, it can be aruged, took action to address its bloated books by ramping up disbursements under the aid program — resulting in some $45.3 million in MCC funds being disbursed to Honduras alone between Oct. 1, 2008, and July 31, 2009 — again, representing 56 percent of all funds disbursed under the MCC Honduras compact as of July 31 of this year.
But, there are some who might see a more cynical motive for the rapid unleashing of MCC funds in Honduras, given that it is a hard case to make that those funds would have been distributed if they were deemed to be assisting Zelaya’s perceived alliance with Chavez. Surely, the MCC could have ramped up its disbursements in other regions of the world outside Chavez' reach to address the concerns raised by Leahy, no?

Funding Change
Once MCC funds are provided to a foreign nation, such as Honduras, under the agency’s guidelines (http://www.mcahonduras.hn/documentos/otrosdoc/adquisiciones/Guidance%20on%20Contractor%20Past%20Performance%20 Reporting%20System%201-7-09%20Final.pdf), the further distribution of that money is overseen and managed by the receiving county. In the case of Honduras, the entity in charge of spending the MCC funds (under the terms and reporting guidelines established by the MCC) is called MCA-Honduras (http://www.mcahonduras.hn/) — which is overseen by a board that includes presidential ministers from that nation.
A review of documents (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/MCC.Honduran.FundingRequest.pdf) obtained from MCA-Honduras outlining its projections for future MCC funding reveals that a total of $28.5 million in MCC funds are slated for delivery between July and September 2009. And, for the following three quarters (through June 2010) the MCC is scheduled to disburse nearly $80 million in funding to MCA-Honduras under the Honduran foreign-aid compact.
That money, if it comes through, would go into the coffers of the putsch regime now in control of Honduras — assuming it remains behind the wheel of power. Whether by design or coincidence, that represents a hefty nest egg for the putsch leadership to tap — even if in violation of MCC rules — as those usurpers seek to ride out the worst of the world’s short-term memory over their illegal coup.
In addition, the $45 million in MCC funds already taken in since October 2008 surely gave a lift to the coup plotters — to the extent that not all of that money was actually distributed to grant targets within Honduras, or to the extent it was distributed to players in line with the coup regime’s interests.
A thorough accounting of what happened to those funds, vetted outside the MCC or the putsch Honduran government, seems to be in order given recent developments in that nation.
Now, there have been a few media reports indicating that some of the MCC funds targeted for Honduras post-coup are on hold — to the tune of $11 million, according to a report by The Hill.com. (http://thehill.com/business--lobby/honduras-disarray-spurs-lobbying-2009-07-28.html)
But, based on a review of proceeding transcripts and press releases posted on the MCC Web site (http://www.mcc.gov/), the agency’s board has taken no official action, to date, to either suspend or terminate its Honduran foreign-aid compact — as the MCC has done recently in other cases where it has determined the receiving nations have violated the agency's rules.
For example, in early June, the MCC partially terminated its’ foreign-aid compact with Nicaragua (http://www.mcc.gov/mcc/press/releases/release-061009-boardmeets.shtml) after alleging that nation (which borders Honduras and has a left-leaning government) had violated the agency’s rules with respect to “economic freedom,” “democracy” and the “rule of law.” And in May, the MCC board terminated its compact with Madagascar (http://www.mcc.gov/mcc/press/releases/release-051909-mccboardauthorizes.shtml) in the wake of the coup (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/01/world/africa/01madagascar.html) in that nation.
Maybe a similar fate is in store for Honduras down the road, if the current coup regime fails to find a path to MCC-style democracy. But just how that will be judged by the MCC remains a mystery — other than it seems clear that democratic path will be good for business interests.http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/lorne-craner.jpg
That pursuit by the MCC of a vibrant corporate-centered slant to democracy in Honduras (which by definition would be anti-Chavez in tone) seems to be a given, since the current board of the MCC (http://www.mcc.gov/mcc/about/boardofdirectors/index.shtml) includes not only Secretary of State Clinton and Secretary of the Treasury Timothy Geithner — both sensitive to Wall Street concerns — but also former Republican Sen. William Frist; venture capitalist Alan Patricof; and Lorne Craner, the president of the International Republican Institute (http://www.iri.org/board.asp) — which is chaired by Republican Sen. John McCain.
The MCC board also includes the president of Catholic Relief Services, Ken Hackett. That is of note since the Catholic archbishop of Honduras, Oscar Andres Rodriguez Maradiaga, has been very vocal in his opposition to Zelaya. Archbishop Rodriquez Maradiaga has warned, as reported by the conservative American Spectato (http://spectator.org/archives/2009/07/10/honduran-church-leaders-sympat)r (http://spectator.org/archives/2009/07/10/honduran-church-leaders-sympat), that Zelaya’s return to power could lead to a “blood bath” and he has demanded that the Organization of American States investigate the alleged “illegal deeds” carried out under Zelaya’s administration — referring, it seems, to Zelaya’s call for a ballot referendum on the matter of convening a constitutional convention.
As Secretary Clinton put it (striking a more diplomatic note) when asked about the future of MCC funding at a press briefing (http://www.state.gov/secretary/rm/2009a/06/125487.htm)on June 29, the day after the coup in Honduras played out (and first reactions are normally the most honest):
... Much of our [foreign] assistance is conditioned on the integrity of the democratic system. But if we were able to get to a status quo that returned to the rule of law and constitutional order within a relatively short period of time, I think that would be a good outcome.
So the end game for the putsch regime now headed by President Robert Micheletti and backed by the oligarchical business interests of Honduras must entail holding out until the nation’s general election in November. With those elections, the illegal regime, and the business oligarchs propping it up, can attempt to put the glossy sheen of the “status quo” and “rule of law” on their raw, undemocratic power grab.
Clinton and the MCC have invested a lot of political and economic capital, to date, in ensuring that is the outcome, it appears.
The civil society in Honduras now working nonviolently from below to assert authentic democracy — not linked to MCC or U.S. State Department preconditions — clearly sees a different landscape ahead.
The fate of Latin America, in many ways, will be revealed in that as yet undiscovered country.
Stay tuned….

MCC Spending Records for Honduras
• Fiscal 2009 First Quarter Disbursements (http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2009/E9-4255.htm)
• Fiscal 2009 Second Quarter Disbursements (http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2009/E9-15308.htm)
• Total Disbursements as of March 31, 2009 (http://www.mcc.gov/mcc/countries/honduras/hn-mande/index.shtml)
• Total Disbursements as of July 31, 2009 (http://www.mcc.gov/mcc/bm.doc/qsr-imp-honduras.pdf)
• MCA-Honduras Funding Disbursement Projections (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/MCC.Honduran.FundingRequest.pdf)


http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/bill-conroy/2009/08/millennium-challenge-corp-poured-millions-honduras-months-leading-putsc

Magda Hassan
08-12-2009, 02:29 AM
US Secretary of State Clinton’s Micro-Management of the Corporation that Funds the Honduras Coup Regime

Records Demonstrate that the Secretary Has Hands-On Control of the Fund that Gave $6.5 Million to the Regime After the June 28 Coup


By Bill Conroy and Al Giordano
Special to The Narco News Bulletin

August 11, 2009
In recent days, Narco News has reported that, in the three months prior to the June 28 coup d’etat in Honduras, the US-funded Millennium Change Corporation (MCC) gave at least $11 million US dollars (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/bill-conroy/2009/08/millennium-challenge-corp-poured-millions-honduras-months-leading-putsc) to private-sector contractors in Honduras and also that since the coup it has doled out another $6.5 million (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/thefield/too-cute-half-honduras-mr-president).
The latter revelation – that the money spigot has been left on even after the coup – comes in spite of claims by the State Department that it has placed non-humanitarian funding “on pause” pending a yet-unfinished review.
Narco News has further learned – based on a review documents available on the websites of the Millennium Challenge Corporation and the US State Department – that Secretary Clinton, as chairman of the MCC board, is not just a figurehead in name only. She has played an extremely active role in governing and promoting the fund and its decisions.
An August 6 statement by MCC acting chief executive officer Darius Mans (http://www.mcc.gov/blog/ceo/) praises Clinton and President Obama for their balls-out support of MCC:

Now, well into a new administration and era, I am encouraged by the level of support MCC has been given by Congress and senior government leaders. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, chair of MCC’s board, confirms, “President Obama supports the MCC, and the principle of greater accountability in our foreign assistance programs.” The Secretary herself has referred to Millennium Challenge grants as a “very important part of our foreign policy. It is a new approach, and it’s an approach that we think deserves support.” Deputy Secretary of State Jack Lew has said, “MCC is getting off the ground and making real progress. Secretary Clinton’s official “blog” at the State Department reveals that the June 10 meeting of MCC’s board (http://secretaryclinton.wordpress.com/2009/06/10/) – just 18 days before the Honduras coup – was on the Secretary’s schedule:

Here’s what Hillary has on her plate for today, June 10th:?10:00 a.m. Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) Board Meeting and Luncheon.? Last March, the previous MCC acting executive director Rodney Bent wrote (http://www.mcc.gov/blog/ceo/page/2/):

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton chaired her first MCC Board meeting this week. I was pleased to be part of this historic transition, and I welcomed Secretary Clinton’s active participation at the meeting. Her presence and the presence of Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner and other public and private sector Board members signal the importance of MCC’s ongoing commitment to delivering change in the lives of the world’s poor. A recent move by the Clinton-led MCC board documents that the US-funded corporation has already discussed the cutting of funds to another Central American country, Nicaragua, based on criticism of its government, and that this was the topic of MCC’s June 10 session, chaired by Secretary Clinton. The Christian Science Monitor (http://www.csmonitor.com/2009/0609/p06s10-woam.html) reported:

LEÓN, NICARAGUA - US concerns over last year’s questionable municipal elections in Nicaragua could be strong enough to cause leftist President Daniel Ortega, a cold-war nemesis of the US, to lose $64 million in development aid. In a Wednesday meeting with the board of directors of the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC), an international development initiative started during the Bush administration, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton will discuss whether to cancel the remaining portion of a $175 million compact awarded in 2006.
In December, the US government froze new aid after expressing serious concern about “the government of Nicaragua’s manipulation of municipal elections and a broader pattern of actions inconsistent with the MCC eligibility criteria.”
At the June 10 meeting, the MCC board approved partially terminating the agency’s foreign-aid compact with Nicaragua (http://www.mcc.gov/mcc/press/releases/release-061009-boardmeets.shtml) — resulting in some $62 million in U.S. foreign aid being withheld from that nation, which shares a border with Honduras. And in May o f this year, the Clinton-led MCC board approved the termination of the agency’s compact with Madagascar (http://www.mcc.gov/mcc/press/releases/release-051909-mccboardauthorizes.shtml) in the wake of a coup (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/01/world/africa/01madagascar.html?_r=1) in that nation. However, no such action has been taken by the MCC board, to date, in the wake of the Honduran coup.
In the context of President Obama’s statement last weekend that those who urge the US to take stronger action against the Honduras coup regime “think that it’s appropriate for us to suddenly act in ways that in every other context they consider inappropriate,” calling it “hypocrisy.” The revelation that Clinton and MCC have already sanctioned the elected government of Nicaragua and its private sector in ways that it so far refuses to sanction the illegal coup regime of Honduras and its private backers has revealed one important fact: That Washington has already determined that “it’s appropriate” to deny MCC funds to a country for lighter and more transient reasons than those that exist to sanction a coup regime in another.
Didn’t a certain US President, last weekend, speak the word “hypocrisy” in the context of the US and the Honduras coup?
If “it’s appropriate” to sanction Nicaragua for lesser reasons, why not apply the sanction of denying MCC funds to a criminal coup regime in Honduras that Washington claims it has “paused” giving money, but that it continues to fund?
http://www.narconews.com/Issue59/article3760.html

Jan Klimkowski
08-12-2009, 05:35 PM
Magda - more excellent information.

Deep black hypocrisy.

Hillary Rodham Clinton may not be channelling her husband. But her ass is certainly owned........

Keith Millea
08-12-2009, 06:58 PM
Magda - more excellent information.

Deep black hypocrisy.

Hillary Rodham Clinton may not be channelling her husband. But her ass is certainly owned........

Who would want to own that ass??????:vroam:

Peter Presland
08-20-2009, 03:24 PM
From Amnesty International


Posted: 19 August 2009

Amnesty International today published a series of exclusive photos (http://www.amnesty.org/en/news-and-updates/report/Honduras-photos-and-protestor-testimonies-show-extent-of-police-violence-20090819) and testimonies (http://www.amnesty.org/en/news-and-updates/report/Honduras-photos-and-protestor-testimonies-show-extent-of-police-violence-20090819) revealing serious ill-treatment of peaceful protesters by police and military in Honduras' capital, Tegucigalpa. The organisation warned that beatings and mass arrests are being used as a way of punishing people for voicing their opposition to the military-backed coup in June.

See the photos (http://www.amnesty.org/en/news-and-updates/report/Honduras-photos-and-protestor-testimonies-show-extent-of-police-violence-20090819)

Amnesty stated that as human rights violations increase in Honduras there is an urgent need for the international community to seek a solution to the political crisis.

Amnesty International interviewed many of the 75 people detained at the Jefatura Metropolitana Nº3 police station in Tegucigalpa after security forces broke up a peaceful demonstration on 30 July.
Most detainees had injuries after police beat them with batons and threw stones and other objects at them. When they were arrested none of the group were told where they were being taken, the reasons for their detention or the charges against them. All detainees were released a few hours later.
Amnesty International's Central America Researcher, Esther Major said:
'Detention and ill-treatment of protestors are being used as form of punishment for those openly opposing the de facto government and also as a deterrent for those contemplating taking to the streets to peacefully show their discontent with the political turmoil the country is experiencing.'
Amongst those detained on 30 July were ten students who were beaten by police with batons on the back, arms and backs of the legs. One of them said:
'The police were throwing stones; they cornered us, threw us on the floor, on our stomachs and beat us. They took our cameras from us, beat us if we lifted our heads and even when we were getting into the police wagons.'
Several of those interviewed told Amnesty that during the demonstration police officers wore no visible identification. They said some officers had told them 'do not look at us, sons of bitches' and that others wore bandanas to hide their faces.
F.M., a 52-year-old teacher also detained on 30 July said:
'We were demonstrating peacefully. Suddenly, the police came towards us, and I started running. They grabbed me and shouted 'why do you (all) support Zelaya's government?' They beat me. I have not been informed as to why I am detained.'
Esther Major continued:
'Using excessive force and mass arbitrary detentions as a policy to repress dissent only serves to inflame tensions further and leads to serious human rights violations.

'Force must only be employed in the most extreme of circumstances, and certainly not as a method to prevent people's legitimate right to peacefully demonstrate.'
Amnesty is also concerned at harassment and intimidation of human rights defenders in Honduras; limits imposed on freedom of expression and the number of attacks against journalists - including the closure of media outlets and the confiscation of equipment and physical abuse of journalists and film crews covering the protests.
The human rights situation outside of Tegucigalpa is believed to be equally or even more serious. The checkpoints along the primary roads in Honduras are currently manned by military and police who often delay or refuse entry to human rights organisations to areas where human rights violations are reportedly occurring.

Background information
Concerns about human rights in Honduras have intensified since the democratically-elected President José Manuel Zelaya Rosales was forced from power on 28 June. He was expelled from the country by a military-backed group of politicians led by Roberto Micheletti, former leader of the National Congress.
There has been widespread unrest in the country since the coup with frequent clashes between the police, military and civilian protestors. At least two people have died after being shot during protests.
Read the full report: "Honduras: Human rights crisis threat as repression increases (http://www.amnesty.org.uk/uploads/documents/doc_19620.pdf)" (PDF)

Peter Lemkin
08-20-2009, 04:52 PM
Obama/Clinton are just going to stall until the next elections...then back the Corporate-Pro-American candidates...it is very sick stuff....50's, 60's and 70's stuff in the new millenium [ha!]

Magda Hassan
08-24-2009, 04:18 AM
Cuban connection


It's well known that one of the largest supporters of the coup against Honduran president Manuel Zelaya, was a Cuban multi-millionaire named Rafael Hernández Nodarse; more commonly know by his alias "Ralph H. Nodarse." He is the owner of San Pedro Sula's most popular TV station, Channel 6, which has played a decisive role in the justification of the coup and in the campaign to support Micheleti and the other insurrectionists.

Perhaps slightly less well known is that, before the coup, Ralph Nodarse was an active participant in assassination attempts against president Zelaya. And it may not be common knowledge, outside of Honduras, that his name came to light in a bombing attempt against former Honduran president Carlos Roberto Reina.

Outside of Honduras people probably don't know about the meetings Nodarse held in his San Padro Sula house with members of the Miami mafia to plan action against President Zelaya and his chancellor, Patricia Rodas, for their pro- Cuba posture in the meetings in Trinidad and Toago in April; two months before Micheleti's coup in June.

Nodarse's links to the Miami mafia are nothing new, its just old friendly ties and political acquaintances. After Luis Posada Carriles (a CIA trained anti-Cuban terrorist) was released from a Panamanian prison in1994, pardoned in the middle of the night by president Mireya Moscoso hours before the end of his term, Nodarse took him in. Four years before in 1990, Posada was shot while leading a Death Squad in Guatemala and went right to San Pedro Sula.

Nodarse has a very long trajectory in Miami mafia circles that do not act only against Cuba, but also against Central America, most recently Honduras. None is safe from the long murderous arm of the counterrevolutionary Cubans of Miami. The fragile democratic institutions of Central America will serve as easy targets for Posada and Nodarse.

One can assume that President of the United States Barak Obama and his Secretary of State Hillary Clinton know about these public travesties, but still allow Nodarse and his family onto U.S. soil.

This doesn't prove that Obama or Clinton are patrons or accomplices in the coup or to these terrorist circles, but it does show their hypocrisy and double standards concerning their public condemnation of terrorism. A few US visas to known international terrorists say more than a million words.
http://www.thenews.com.mx/home/tnArticulo.asp?cve_cont=365988

Keith Millea
09-05-2009, 07:20 PM
US Cuts More Aid to Honduras as Zelaya Meets Clinton in Washington

http://www.democracynow.org/images/story/35/18035/zelaya-clinton-web.jpg
On Thursday, the Obama administration formally cut more than $30 million in aid to Honduras and suggested it will not recognize the Honduran elections scheduled for November unless the vote is free and open. The announcement came as ousted Honduran leader Manuel Zelaya was in Washington for talks with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. We speak with NYU professor of Latin American studies, Greg Grandin.

http://www.democracynow.org/2009/9/4/us_cuts_more_aid_to_honduras

My NEW thoughts on Manuel Zelaya.GOOD BYE!!!!!!!!!!!

It's clear to me now that Manuel Zelaya is an empty person.Here is a guy who pretended to be a leader.He talked his talk but forgot to walk his walk.He called on his poor supporters to gather with him and march to take back the country.Well,the people gathered and were treated with harsh punishment.Zelaya ran back over the border.Next he sends his wife over to tell the people that he is with them.He is not with them.Zelaya is after all a rich land owner.Too rich apparently to get his hat soiled or god forbid a few bloodstains on his jeans.

I just love it when a butthead bows and shakes hands with the very person that is trying to destroy you.Why would Zelaya even consider talking to Hillary.She has stabbed him in the back,and he thinks it's just a love tap.Sick dummy!How about this Manny.The next time let your wife run for President,cause she has more NADS than you could ever hope to own.:bootyshake:

Magda Hassan
09-22-2009, 12:04 AM
http://switch.atdmt.com/action/agencyrep_bbc_usa_americas_home http://stats.bbc.co.uk/o.gif?%7ERS%7Es%7ERS%7ENews%7ERS%7Et%7ERS%7EHighWe b_Story%7ERS%7Ei%7ERS%7E8267775%7ERS%7Ep%7ERS%7E44 261%7ERS%7Ea%7ERS%7EInternational%7ERS%7Eu%7ERS%7E/2/hi/americas/8267775.stm%7ERS%7Er%7ERS%7E%28none%29%7ERS%7Eq%7E RS%7E%7ERS%7Ez%7ERS%7E16%7ERS%7E
Page last updated at 23:29 GMT, Monday, 21 September 2009 00:29 UK


Ousted leader returns to Honduras


http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/46418000/jpg/_46418790_007995055-1.jpg Hundreds of Mr Zelaya's supporters rushed to the Brazilian embassy


Ousted Honduran President Manuel Zelaya has returned to his country, nearly three months after being deposed.
Mr Zelaya has sought refuge inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa and hundreds of his supporters have gathered outside.
Mr Zelaya said he had crossed mountains and rivers to return to the capital, where he said he was seeking dialogue.
Honduran authorities, who have threatened to arrest Mr Zelaya, have imposed a curfew on the country.
In images broadcast on national television, a smiling Mr Zelaya wearing his trademark white cowboy hat appeared on the balcony of the Brazilian embassy waving to crowds of his supporters.
Witnesses said a military helicopter flew overhead.
Shortly afterwards officials imposed the 15-hour curfew, starting at 1600 (2200 GMT) on Monday.
http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/shared/img/o.gif http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/nol/shared/img/v3/start_quote_rb.gif [We travelled] for more than 15 hours... through rivers and mountains http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/nol/shared/img/v3/end_quote_rb.gif


Manuel Zelaya
Ousted Honduran President

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/nol/shared/img/v3/inline_dashed_line.gif

Zelaya interview in full (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/8267982.stm)

The left-leaning president has been living in exile in Nicaragua since being ousted at gunpoint on 28 June.
The crisis erupted after Mr Zelaya tried to hold a non-binding public consultation to ask people whether they supported moves to change the constitution.
The US has backed Mr Zelaya during his exile and criticised the de facto leaders for failing to restore "democratic, constitutional rule" and the Organization of American States (OAS) has demanded Mr Zelaya's reinstatement.
Dialogue
Speaking to the BBC from inside the Brazilian embassy, Mr Zelaya said he had received support from various quarters in order to return.
http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/shared/img/o.gif TIMELINE: ZELAYA OUSTED
28 June: Zelaya forced out of country at gunpoint
5 July: A dramatic bid by Zelaya to return home by plane fails after the runway at Tegucigalpa airport is blocked
25-26 July: Zelaya briefly crosses into the country at the land border with Nicaragua on two consecutive days, in a symbolic move to demand he be allowed to return
21 Sept: Zelaya appears in the Brazilian embassy in Tegulcigalpa

"[We travelled] for more than 15 hours... through rivers and mountains until we reached the capital of Honduras, which we reached in the early hours of the morning," he said.
"We overtook military and police obstacles, all those on the highways here, because this country has been kidnapped by the military forces."
He said he was consulting with sectors of Honduran society and the international community in order "to start the dialogue for the reconstruction of the Honduran democracy".
Brazilian Foreign Minister Celso Amorim confirmed that Mr Zelaya had been given refuge inside the embassy.
But he said neither his country nor the OAS had played any part in Mr Zelaya's return, Associated Press news agency reported.
Thousands of Zelaya supporters converged on the embassy, after gathering outside UN buildings where he was initially reported to be.
"The government has declared the curfew for the entire country from four in the afternoon until six in the morning to conserve calm in the country," a spokesman for the leadership, Rene Zepeda, told Reuters.
The interim government has repeatedly threatened to arrest Mr Zelaya should he return.
Call for calm
Mr Zelaya urged the armed forces not to use violence against demonstrators.
http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/46418000/jpg/_46418491_007994163-1.jpg Supporters of Mr Zelaya initially gathered outside the UN building

OAS chief Jose Miguel Insulza also called for calm, telling Honduran authorities they were responsible for the security of Mr Zelaya and the Brazilian embassy.
As reports that Mr Zelaya had surfaced in Tegucigalpa began to come through, de facto leader Mr Micheletti appeared to be caught off-guard, insisting Mr Zelaya had not left neighbouring Nicaragua.
"It's not true. He is in a hotel suite in Nicaragua," Mr Micheletti told a news conference.
Mr Micheletti has vowed to step aside after presidential elections are held as scheduled on 29 November. But he has refused to allow Mr Zelaya to return to office in the interim.
Shortly after June's coup, Mr Zelaya attempted to fly back to Honduras, but failed when the authorities blocked the runway at Tegucigalpa airport.
In July, talks in Costa Rica on resolving the crisis hosted by the country's President Oscar Arias broke down without the parties reaching an agreement.
Later that month, Mr Zelaya briefly crossed into Honduras from Nicaragua - a symbolic move the US described as "reckless".

Magda Hassan
09-22-2009, 12:17 AM
By Al Giordano
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/zelaya1_0.jpeg
The first to break the news in English was the Honduran Campesino (http://www.hondurancampesino.org/) blog:

Honduran president Manuel Zelaya is in Tegucigalpa…
The United Nations is protecting Mel…
TeleSur (http://www.telesurtv.net/noticias/canal/senalenvivo.php) confirms the report, as does Reuters (http://www.reuters.com/article/worldNews/idUSTRE58K3JY20090921):

"I am here in Tegucigalpa. I am here for the restoration of democracy, to call for dialogue." he told Honduras' Canal 36 television network.
As occurred during the first hours of the June 28 coup d'etat, the Internet signals of Channel 36 and Radio Globo are blocked, as is cell phone service in the capital (I've yet to confirm that there is any Internet or cell phone access in Tegucigalpa at all right now - it all appears to be jammed - but we do have reporter Belén Fernández reporting right this moment from that city and the information blockade will be broken soon enough.) We can take that extreme of censorship as additional confirmation that the President has indeed returned and the illegitimate coup regime is panicking.
Developing... We'll update here as we're able to report and confirm more...
Update: 12:08 p.m. Tegucigalpa (2:08 p.m. ET): TeleSur confirms that the President is in Tegucigalpa but adds that it cannot confirm reports that he is in the United Nations building there. It anticipates a press conference from Zelaya this afternoon...
12:24 p.m. Tegucigalpa (2:24 p.m. ET): One of our correspondents just got an email message from Tegucigalpa which reports that not all cell phone service is blocked.
12:28 p.m.: Via TeleSur: The Spaniard news agency EFE reports that the President is in the Brazilian Embassy in Tegucigalpa.
12:29 p.m.: The US State Department confirms that Zelaya is in Honduras (via AP (http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5jAkMGKIUDg_ngUiZboxQbYj5_DPwD9ARS7TO0)).
12:39 p.m.: The web page of the coup regime's "president" leads with a loud denial: "Micheletti denies the presence of 'Mel' in the country." (http://www.presidencia.gob.hn/) Meanwhile AFP reports that the Brazilian government has confirmed Zelaya's presence in its Embassy in Tegucigalpa, according to TeleSur.
12:47 p.m.: TeleSur is showing images of uniformed National Police members, with billy clubs, shields, helmets and guns, surrounding the zone near the Brazilian Embassy, apparently to close access to the area, blocking anti-coup demonstrators from entering or leaving. The network is also broadcasting live images, from Channel 36, of two helicopters circling over the Embassy.
12:51 p.m.: TeleSur reporter Adriana Sívori is now inside the Brazilian Embassy and confirms President Zelaya's physical presence there.
1:57 p.m.: We now have phone contact with Narco News correspondent Belén Fernández, who in Tegucigalpa this morning walked into the Radio Globo headquarters just as the news broke that Zelaya had returned. She's going to have one hell of a story for us later today.
2:04 p.m.: Connecting the dots... The return of Zelaya has all the markings of a very well coordinated operation by the Honduran civil resistance and the member countries of the Organization of American States (OAS). The choice of Brazil's embassy - the Latin American country with the largest Air Force - pretty much guarantees that the coup regime can't possibly think it can violate the sovereignty of that space. That the US State Department confirmed, this morning, that Zelaya is in Honduras while the coup regime denied it strongly suggests it had advance knowledge that this would happen today (if not active participation).
This is a textbook example of what we've referred to before as "dilemma actions." It puts the coup regime on the horns of a dilemma, in which it has no good options. It can leave Zelaya to put together his government again from the Brazilian embassy with the active support of so many sectors of Honduran civil society, or it can try to arrest the President, provoking a nonviolent insurrection from the people of the kind that has toppled many a regime throughout history. Minute by minute, hour by hour, and, soon, day by day, the coup regime is losing its grip. At some point it will have to choose either to unleash a terrible violent wave of state terrorism upon the country's own people - which will provoke all out insurrection in response (guaranteed by Article 3 of the Honduran Constitution) - or Micheletti and his Simian Council can start packing their bags and seeking asylum someplace like Panama. Meanwhile, the people are coming down from the hills to meet their elected president. This, kind readers, is immediate history.
2:24 p.m.: Some other consequences of today's breaking development: President Zelaya today erases any of the talk or speculation that he did not have the courage to put himself at risk in this struggle, which will also have an emboldening effect on every single individual among the hundreds of thousands in the civil resistance. The effect is causing all to think: If he's willing to risk all, then so am I.
This move also makes a laughing stock out of Micheletti and his security forces. Remember our reports about how airfields throughout the country were blocked by buses and other vehicles, so paranoid was the regime about Zelaya's potential return? That Zelaya slipped through the security net demonstrates that the coup regime does not have the control it claims to have. Micheletti - the usurper dictator - has also helped elevate his status as a national buffoon with his early claims today that Zelaya hadn't really returned. He accused the media that reported his return of lying and of "media terrorism." (http://www.laprensahn.com/Ediciones/2009/09/21/Noticias/Micheletti-acusa-de-terrorismo-mediatico) Well, now the same pro-coup newspapers that reported his tantrum have this photo, taken today, of President Zelaya and his cabinet members inside the Brazilian Embassy:
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/zelayareturns.jpeg
There you have it. Countdown to complete mental breakdown by Micheletti and his dwindling core of supporters (and, yes, that includes a grouplet of US expats that have been blogging constant disinformation from Honduras - their self-delusion and dishonesty to all is now crashing on the rocks of reality, too).
2:56 p.m.: Ivan Marovic - who as a young man played a major role in strategizing the civil resistance that toppled the Serbian dictator Milosevic, and who spent a few days in Honduras this summer at the invitation of the civil resistance - and I just had a chat online about our observations of what is happening and how it changes everything in Honduras.
With his permission, I'll share with you an excerpt:

me: So, let's put ourselves in Micheletti's shoes. What options does he have at this point?
Ivan: It's a tough one. He can arrest Zelaya, but Zelaya said he's here to call for dialogue. That would be bad. Micheletti can enter a dialogue, but then he's screwed.
me: Well, I don't think he can send troops into the Brazilian Embassy, which is sovereign territory. Brazil has the biggest air force in Latin America. Brazil is the coordinating nation of the UN security forces in Haiti...
Ivan: This is important, because with Zelaya in the country, the momentum has shifted. Stalling doesn't work anymore.
me: It's a textbook "dilemma action."
Ivan: Yes.
me: The regime can either leave him there to reassemble his government with broad popular support, or it can unleash a wave of violence and terror, which would provoke all out insurrection. Now that Zelaya has demonstrated he is willing to risk his own freedom and safety, that becomes contagious to hundreds of thousands that will decide to do the same.
Ivan: Yes, this has a big symbolic value. That's why no regime is afraid of the government in exile. But in the country, that's a different thing.
It's a game changer, folks.
3:05 p.m.: Here's transcript from today's US State Department briefing in Washington DC with spokesman Ian Kelly and reporters:

QUESTION: Do we know if President Zelaya has come home? And what does it signal?
MR. KELLY: Well, you know, literally, as I was about to come down, I saw the news report and I was able to talk to my colleagues in the Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs. It does seem to be true that he has returned to Honduras. And the Embassy is still seeking details about what he hopes to achieve and what his next steps are.
I think that at this point, really, all I can say is reiterate our almost daily call on both sides to exercise restraint and refrain from any kind of action that would have any possible outcome in violence, refrain from activities that would – could provoke violence.
QUESTION: How did he come in, and where is he? What --
MR. KELLY: Don’t know.
QUESTION: When did it happen?
MR. KELLY: Like I say, the Embassy is trying to find out these details. But I do know that we have confirmed that he’s in Honduras. Where exactly he is, I don’t know. And we’re just trying to find out more details.
QUESTION: Last time we tuned in, he was under threat of arrest if he came home. Is that still what’s in play right now?
MR. KELLY: I’d have to refer you to the de facto regime in Tegucigalpa. Of course, we believe that he’s the democratic – democratically elected and constitutional leader of Honduras.
I'll ask you, kind readers, the same question I asked Ivan Marovic, above: If you are coup "president" Roberto Micheletti, what is your next move? It's hard to predict, because he's not always a rational player on the field.
3:37 p.m.: The coup regime makes its first move, declaring a military curfew in effect from 4 p.m. to 7 a.m. What's not clear is whether it will be obeyed by the crowds converging around the Embassy, and what the regime's next move will be if the public disregards its curfew.
4:21 p.m.: The military curfew began 21 minutes ago, but a multitude of citizens continue to congregate in front of the Brazilian embassy, making and listening to speeches against the coup regime. In other words: What if they called a curfew and nobody stayed home?
4:31 p.m.: Brazilian Foreign Minister Celso Amorim says (http://www.operamundi.net/noticias_ver.php?idConteudo=1314) that he doubts very much that the Honduran coup regime would commit "a flagrant violation of International Law" by invading his country's embassy in Tegucigalpa.
4:56 p.m.: The regime is trying everything. Cell phone service is being screwed with again for the past hour. Channel 36 has gone off the air. Radio Globo's Internet site is down. Here is an alternate link to Radio Globo's live stream (http://96.9.147.21:8213/). Keep storming the gates of the information blockade.
5:06 p.m.: Radio Globo reports that a caravan of more than 2,000 vehicles filled with coup opponents is en route from the state of El Paraiso to the national capital. Also reports massive traffic jams in Tegucigalpa now, an hour after curfew took effect.
5:21 p.m.: Coup "president" Micheletti just spoke on a "cadena nacional" (in which all TV, radio and cable stations are required to broadcast his message). He confirmed that Zelaya is in the country, insisted that the June 28 coup was "legal," said Zelaya will have to face charges against him, insisted that the country is in complete calm (if so, then why the military curfew?), attacked the government of Brazil for protecting Zelaya in its Embassy, and told everyone that the National Police and the National Army are behind him. He ended with shouts of "Viva Honduras" to a small group of coup functionaries. He sounds frightened, but is digging in his heels.
Upon the termination of his broadcast, a woman on Radio Globo mocked him mercilessly, saying "no one owes obedience to an order by a de facto regime," and noted that the curfew was called just ten minutes before it took effect, leaving millions of Hondurans to have to get home from work but without enough time to do it. "Nobody is obeying the order," she said. "Nor should they."
5:30 p.m.: I'll be live on Flashpoints radio (available at the KPFA website (http://www.kpfa.org/home)), hosted by Dennis Bernstein, at the top of the hour (8 p.m. ET, 5 p.m. PT) to talk about the situation in Honduras. There will also be a report from Tim Russo - professor at the upcoming Narco News School of Authentic Journalism - who was in front of the Brazilian Embassy in Tegucigalpa today when President Zelaya appeared from the balcony to greet the crowd, and took audiotape of the moment.
5:42 p.m.: Leaders of the Liberal Party bloc that turned against the coup have now signed a public letter calling on party members "in all the popular barrios" of Tegucigalpa and throughout the country to converge on the Brazilian Embassy to protect President Zelaya. Radio Globo just read the letter live on the air.
5:50 p.m.: The coup regime has just cut electricity to entire neighborhoods surrounding the Brazilian Embassy and Channel 36 TV. How long do you think it will take the people to install a generator in each place? The same will happen when the regime cuts the water, the next likely step coming from that form of logic. And the people will usher in water trucks to refill the tanks. Hell, they'll bring it cup by cup if they have to! This is a losing gambit by the Micheletti regime because it does not have control of the street.
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/thefield/3439/live-blog-president-zelaya-has-returned-honduras

Magda Hassan
09-22-2009, 02:39 PM
Call the State Department (202-647-4000) and the White House (202-456-1111)
http://www.soaw.org/img/zelayabrasil.jpg
Photo: Honduran President Manuel Zelaya addresses thousands of supporters who have gathered in front of the Brazilian embassy on Monday, September 21, 2009 in Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

President Manuel Zelaya, after over eighty days in exile, has returned to Honduras. In a BBC interview, Zelaya said "[We travelled] for more than 15 hours... through rivers and mountains until we reached the capital of Honduras, which we reached in the early hours of the morning. We overtook military and police obstacles, all those on the highways here, because this country has been kidnapped by the military forces."

The coup regime has imposed a curfew for the entire country from 4pm yesterday afternoon until 6pm this afternoon. Media outlets are being silenced and cell phone and email correspondence is being limited, in a repeat of the tactics immediately following the June 28 military coup by SOA graduates. Thousands defied the orders and gathered in front of the Brazilian embassy, where Zelaya is currently staying. Radio Globo reported from the convergence in front of the Brazilian embassy: "We are here peacefully, unarmed because we are the people and don't fear the military. The military must serve the people and their democratically elected president, Mel Zelaya."

However, the SOA graduate-led Honduran military and the police moved this morning against the peacefully http://www.soaw.org/img/embassy.jpgassembled crowd in front of the Brazilian Embassy and disbursed them with bullets and water tanks. Supporters of the constitutional president of Honduras are being attacked and beaten. The embassy is now surrounded by the military. The coup regime leader, Roberto Micheletti, threatened to cancel the embassy's immunity if Zelaya were not handed over to the de facto regime. An overall atmosphere of insecurity is now being imposed. President Zelaya called on the armed forces not to attack their own people and encouraged the Honduran people to continue mobilizing for peace and the restoration of constitutional order. The National Resistance Front Against the Coup has sent out a call for a national strike today, and for people to come from all parts of the country to the capital to continue the show of popular support for the return of the democratically elected president.

Our fear that the coup authorities would crack down even harder, now that their end is near, is materializing.

Click here to contact your Member of Congress (http://salsa.democracyinaction.org/dia/track.jsp?v=2&c=mldDKaXqMb10hNaRnoI6rtUTJHQD8XIQ) to demand that they take a stand for democracy and against the SOA-graduate-led military coup.

Please take a couple minutes and call the State Department at 202-647-4000 to deliver the following message: "Work for the unconditional immediate reinstatement of President Zelaya and pressure the SOA graduate-led Honduran military to stop the violence against the people and their democratically elected president, Mel Zelaya. Ensure that the coup plotters will be held responsible for their actions. Any bloodshed will be on the hands of the coup government and security forces."

Call the White House comment line at 202-456-1111 with the same message.

Magda Hassan
09-26-2009, 12:23 AM
Honduran Coup Regime Mocks UN Security Council with Embassy Attacks

Posted by Al Giordano (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/al-giordano) - September 25, 2009 at 3:23 pm By Al Giordano
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/lradrx.jpg
After today’s emergency session of the United Nations Security Council in New York, US Ambassador Susan Rice emerged (http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/breaking/2009/0925/breaking73.htm) to read a warning to the Honduras coup regime:

"We condemn acts of intimidation against the Brazilian embassy and call upon the de facto government of Honduras to cease harassing the Brazilian embassy.”
The wording is unequivocal. After investigating the claims (and the de facto regime’s denials) of constant technological and chemical attacks on the diplomatic seat in Tegucigalpa, and illegal impediment of ingress and egress to and from the embassy, where legitimate President Manuel Zelaya and at least 85 aides, supporters and some members of the news media are sheltered, the UN Security Council has concluded that said harassment i s real and it is ongoing.
If the coup regime believed that its use of chemical and sonic devices would render its attacks less visible, it has already lost that gamble.
Article 31 of The Vienna Convention on Consular Relations of 1963 (http://untreaty.un.org/ilc/texts/instruments/english/conventions/9_2_1963.pdf) is titled “Inviolability of the consular premises,” and states:

“Consular premises shall be inviolable to the extent provided in this article… The authorities of the receiving State shall not enter that part of the consular premises which is used exclusively for the purpose of the work of the consular post except with the consent of the head of the consular post or of his designee or of the head of the diplomatic mission of the sending State… the receiving State is under a special duty to take all appropriate steps to protect the consular premises against any intrusion or damage and to prevent any disturbance of the peace of the consular post or impairment of its dignity… The consular premises, their furnishings, the property of the consular post and its means of transport shall be immune from any form of requisition for purposes of national defence or public utility.”
Article 33 states: “The consular archives and documents shall be inviolable at all times and wherever they may be.”
Article 34, titled “Freedom of movement,” states: “the receiving State shall ensure freedom of movement and travel in its territory to all members of the consular post."
Article 35, titled “Freedom of communication,” states:

“The receiving State shall permit and protect freedom of communication on the part of the consular post for all official purposes. In communicating with the Government, the diplomatic missions and other consular posts, wherever situated, of the sending State, the consular post may employ all appropriate means, including diplomatic or consular couriers, diplomatic or consular bags and messages in code or cipher… The official correspondence of the consular post shall be inviolable. Official correspondence means all correspondence relating to the consular post and its functions… The consular bag shall be neither opened nor detained.”
In light of those international laws, the device you see in the photograph up top, deployed by Honduran coup regime security forces at the gates of the Brazilian Embassy, offers a smoking gun of proof that the regime is violating the Vienna Convention.
Narco News and its team of technical engineers and counter-surveillance consultants has identified the apparatus as the LRAD-X Remote Long Range Acoustic Device (http://www.atcsd.com/site/content/view/208/110/), manufactured by the American Technologies Corporation.
The instrument is an offensive weapon, used on US Navy warships and by other nations, which can emit sounds that, “Through the use of powerful voice commands and deterrent tones, large safety zones can be created while determining the intent and influencing the behavior of an intruder.”
The LRAD-X machine can shoot sounds of up to 151 decibels. According to the US National Institute on Deafness and Other Communications Disorders (http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/hearing/noise.asp) sounds less loud than those it produces can cause Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL): “Sources of noise that can cause NIHL include motorcycles, firecrackers, and small firearms, all emitting sounds from 120 to 150 decibels. Long or repeated exposure to sounds at or above 85 decibels can cause hearing loss. The louder the sound, the shorter the time period before NIHL can occur.”
The front of the device looks like this:
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/acoustic-pain-field.jpg
And this is the back of the device:
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/lrad-rx-rear.jpg.jpeg
In other words, the LRAD-X is the source of the high-pitched and pain-inducing sounds that have been fired both at those inside the Brazilian Embassy and turned around when anti-coup demonstrators have tried to come close to it. As such, it interferes with the Vienna protected inviolability of the Embassy and its free communications.
Under international law, this violation already serves as sufficient justification for intervention by UN Peacekeeping Forces of the multinational kind that the country of Brazil has led in Haiti.
But that’s not all: Narco News has received the following photos of a C-guard LP Cellular telephone jamming device (http://www.netline.co.il/page/cell_phone_jammer.aspx) designed for low power indoor use. The black out range can be set to cover an area of 5 to 80 meters. The device was found inside the premises of the Brazilian embassy yesterday. Here it is, front:
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/c-guard-500.jpg
And back:
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/c-guard-SN-500.jpg
(On Monday a large multitude of people, including journalists, including some from pro-coup news agencies, were able to enter the Brazilian Embassy to welcome or interview President Zelaya. It is possible that the cell phone jamming device was placed inside the premises then.)
Sold by Netline (http://www.netline.co.il/page/cell_phone_jammer.aspx) under the product category of "Counter Terror Electronic Warfare," the device, the company boasts, "C-Guard LP cellphone jammers block all required cellular network standards simultaneously: GSM, CDMA, TDMA, UMTS (3G), Nextel, 2.4 GHz and more."
The deployment of a cell phone jamming device is in direct violation of the Vienna Convention articles above protecting the inviolability of embassy and consular communications. What’s more, sources inside the embassy that are in constant direct contact with Narco News testify that prior to locating and removing the device, cell phones of the President, his aides and others in the building were impeded by much interference.
Additionally, around noon today, President Zelaya called a press conference inside the embassy, during which a medical doctor testified that two of the people staying inside the embassy displayed symptoms of bleeding from the nose or the stomach, and that a larger number of them displayed symptoms of nausea, throat and sinus irritation and related problems that can be caused by neuro-toxic gases used in chemical warfare that are also prohibited by international treaties.
Zelaya said, calmly and deliberatively, that upon awaking at 7:30 a.m., he had felt an unfamiliar irritation, “first in the mouth, next in the throat, and later a small pain in the stomach. I drank water and milk. And I came out to find others feeling sick. Since then we’ve been trying to figure out where it is coming from.”
Understanding the dramatic nature of this kind of warfare and its capacity to generate panic, fear and anger, Zelaya urged members of the anti-coup civil resistance, “Please, do not attack the police. Maintain yourselves at a respectable distance. Don’t come near enough to be beaten. Protest your grievances peacefully.”
Displaying the cell phone jamming device, President Zelaya said, “This apparatus is installed to interfere and practically act against all telephones inside the Embassy. We practically have a sonic intervention that could also be affecting the health and nerves of people inside."

“They have also aimed frequencies of high intensity against the Embassy. This is also to affect our psychological state. Other machines are installed in the neighboring houses, where the owners have been kicked out and the military has occupied them.”
Hortensia “Pichu” Zelaya, also inside the embassy, sent out this photograph, below, taken earlier today of a device, partly covered by a green plastic bag, that security forces erected from one of the neighboring properties in clear view and air stream of the Brazilian embassy. “As soon as we discovered it,” she wrote, “they immediately took it down.”
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/device_bag_field.jpg
Father Andrés Tamayo, also inside the embassy, told reporters at the press conference that he witnessed that device first hand. It is not yet known what exactly it is, or why it was accompanied by a plastic bag, or whether some kind of substance or chemical agent or gas was inside the bag and aimed at the Brazilian embassy.
These evidences and the eye-witness testimonies, including that of the doctor and the priest, demonstrate convincingly that while the Honduran coup regime issues emphatic denials of such attacks on the sovereign embassy of Brazil, it is clearly engaging in them nonetheless. The UN Security Council should not need any high tech apparatus of its own to be able to see and hear what is really going on at ground level, and respond accordingly to the coup regime's mockery of it.
Update 5:08 p.m. Tegucigalpa (7:08 p.m. ET): The coup regime held a "cadena nacional" (mandatory broadcast on all radio, TV and cable channels) this afternoon to deny having engaged in any chemical warfare and to say it would allow the international Red Cross and Dr. Andres Pavon, a human rights leader, into the embassy to check the health of those inside. A group of doctors, including Pavon, just emerged from the examinations and reported the following:
That the symptoms were definitely caused by some kind of "contaminant." Upon review of the photos of the unidentified device in the final photograph above, Pavon concludes that it is a humidifier and that the plastic bag contained some kind of liquid to put where water usually goes, and that it was the likely cause of the contamination of the embassy. It was not concluded whether the contaminant weapon was chemical or biological.
The doctors also confirmed, for Radio Globo, that UN officials had entered the Embassy with them to participate in the investigation.
The coup regime has just called a military curfew for most of the country's population from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m. tonight.
5:32 p.m.: We've just confirmed independently from a source inside the building that UN officials have entered the Brazilian embassy.

Jan Klimkowski
09-26-2009, 01:39 PM
More sonic boom boom.

And worse... :eviltongue:

Magda Hassan
09-27-2009, 12:06 AM
THE ISRAELI CONNECTION TO THE HONDURAN COUP (http://desertpeace.wordpress.com/2009/09/26/the-israeli-connection-to-the-honduran-coup/)

September 26, 2009 at 6:35 am (Conspiracy Theories (http://en.wordpress.com/tag/conspiracy-theories/), Corrupt Politics (http://en.wordpress.com/tag/corrupt-politics/), Honduras (http://en.wordpress.com/tag/honduras/), Israel (http://en.wordpress.com/tag/israel/), Latin America (http://en.wordpress.com/tag/latin-america/))

I guess you can call it ‘Payback Time’….. for 30 Billion Dollar$ a year, Israel is expected to do something. Apparently that ’something’ is to have Mossad Agents do the dirty work for the CIA…. and supply poison gas to the opponents of Democracy.


Is THIS the CHANGE we were hearing about?
http://desertpeace.files.wordpress.com/2009/09/unconstitutional-change.jpg?w=318&h=472
Manuel Zelaya: Israelis sent to kill me

Manuel Zelaya takes refuge in Brazilian Embassy in Honduras since coming back to the country. He claims Israeli mercenaries hired by the de facto government tormenting him, planning on murdering him
Ousted Honduran President Manuel Zelaya, who returned to his country this week after three months in exile, is accusing his government of hiring Israeli mercenaries to torture him with high-frequency radiation in his safe haven in the Brazilian Embassy.
In a conversation with the Miami Herald, Zelaya said that he has begun to suffer from throat pains resulting from poisonous gases being leaked into the embassy in Tegucigalpa. He also said that he fears mercenaries will enter the building and murder him. “They are threatening to kill us,” he said.
Witnesses said that soldiers were noticed installing some kind of satellite in front of the embassy on Friday that emitted loud noises.
Israeli sources in Miami whom the newspaper contacted said that they cannot confirm the presence of Israeli mercenaries in Honduras.
Zelaya, who was deposed in a military coup in June, also said, “I prefer to walk on my own two feet than to live on my knees under a dictatorship.” He turned to the American administration with a request to take action in his favor. “I said to President Obama, to Secretary of State Clinton, to the US ambassador, and to anyone willing to listen: they know what to do, but have been very cautious until now.”
The de facto Honduran government announced Wednesday that it will initiate talks with Zelaya if he recognizes the election results that were held in the country in November.
“I am ready to meet with anyone, anywhere, including former President Manuel Zelaya,” said the interim President Roberto Micheletti. This statement represents a significant change in the president’s position, as he previously declared he did not intend to be drawn into conflict with Brazil and that Zelaya “can stay in the embassy five to 10 years if he wants.”

Source (http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-3781844,00.html) Via Uruknet (http://www.uruknet.de/index.php?p=m58277&hd=&size=1&l=e)


If you can read Spanish….. the folowing is also an interesting connection….


Rodas: lanzaron gases tóxicos israelíes, e identifica empresas

Nueva York. EFE.
La canciller del Gobierno de Manuel Zelaya, Patricia Rodas, reiteró este viernes
la denuncia de que las autoridades de facto de Honduras lanzaron “gases tóxicos” contra la embajada de Brasil en Tegucigalpa, en donde se refugia del depuesto presidente, y dio los nombres de las empresas que los vendieron.
“Fuentes de la inteligencia militar leales” a Zelaya “nos han filtrado que los químicos y armas de asedio han sido proporcionadas por las empresas Alfacom e Intercom”, dijo este viernes Rodas durante una conferencia de prensa en Nueva York.
La ministra de Relaciones Exteriores hondureña asiste a los debates de la 64 Asamblea General de la ONU, ante la que su país aún no ha intervenido y está aún a la espera de hacerlo la próxima semana.
Esas dos empresas se ubican en Tegucigalpa, y serían propiedad del ciudadano israelí Yehuda Leitner, que “sirvió de intermediario con Israel. Ingresaron (en el país) en un vuelo privado en los últimos días”, explicó Rodas.
En Tegucigalpa, Zelaya denunció el lanzamiento de “gases tóxicos” contra la legación diplomática, donde se encuentra junto a familiares y un grupo de seguidores desde el lunes, mientras el Gobierno de facto aseguró que es “totalmente falso”.
La ministra del depuesto Gobierno hondureño indicó que el especialista en salud pública, Mauricio Castellanos “tomó resultados de ambiente desde las afueras de la embajada de Brasil en Honduras, aproximadamente a unos 300 metros del edificio debido a que los militares tiene bloqueado el acceso a la embajada”.
Según Rodas, el especialista utilizó un equipo aprobado por la Administración de Drogas y Alimentos (FDA, por su sigla en inglés) estadounidense y dijo que “los resultados muestran una concentración arriba de lo normal de amoniaco, que se usa como gas pimienta”.
Indicó que, de acuerdo con esos análisis, había una alta concentración de ácido cianhídrico, del que señaló produce “una reacción rápida al inhalarlo, y al contacto con el hierro de la sangre produce vértigo, náuseas, vómitos, cefaleas y dificultades respiratorias”.
También denunció que los ocupantes de la embajada “están siendo objeto de lanzamiento de armas químicas desde helicópteros y aviones o bien utilizadas por las tropas, aparatos sofisticados de radiaciones sónicas y electromagnéticas” que les han causado diversos trastornos.
Rodas urgió a que haya “una misión médica internacional de la ONU”, y expresó que su país se encuentra ante “una guerra irregular”.
Asimismo, denunció que las fuerzas armadas del Gobierno de facto no dejan entrar a la legación diplomática brasileña a médicos ni a personal de la Cruz Roja Internacional”.
La canciller señaló también que desde la embajada brasileña algunos de sus ocupantes le habían señalado que habían visto salir “de una casa camiones cargados de tierra. Parece que están excavando un túnel. Que sea eso y no que estén enterrando bombas como ya han hecho en el pasado”.
–
-Declaración Universal
de Los Derechos Humanos
10 de diciembre de 1948.
“Todo individuo
tiene derecho a la vida,
a la libertad
y a la seguridad
de su persona.”
Artículo 3.
“Todo individuo
tiene derecho
a la libertad de opinión
y de expresión;
este derecho incluye
el de no ser molestado
a causa de sus opiniones,
el de investigar
y recibir informaciones
y opiniones,
y el de difundirlas,
sin limitación de fronteras,
por cualquier
medio de expresión.”
Artículo 19.
http://desertpeace.wordpress.com/2009/09/26/the-israeli-connection-to-the-honduran-coup/
Thanks Ed!

Magda Hassan
10-09-2009, 01:00 AM
Surveillance Camera Footage of Honduras Coup Invasion of Channel 36

Posted by Al Giordano (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/al-giordano) - October 8, 2009 at 11:33 am By Al Giordano
The coup that can't shoot straight has done it again, as journalist Belén Fernández reports today on Narco News (http://narconews.com/Issue60/article3865.html): when military and police troops invaded the studios of Channel 36 on September 28, stealing its transmitters, antennas and other equipment, they forgot to remove the surveillance cameras.
Here, for the first time, you can see for yourself what really happened:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oq_9jtRxNeA&feature=player_embedded


In that first video, National Police enter through the television network's underground parking lot and then up the stairs at 5:20 a.m. when the station is empty. They bring in men wearing masks and bulletproof vests stamped "Policia Nacional" to disconnect the TV station's broadcasting equipment, who then start removing it, piece by piece, from the premises. The police also bring their own videographer, so the regime presumably has its own archive of what exact equipment it stole!
And there's more in the second surveillance camera video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SMFyNaHClqo&feature=player_embedded


Here, the masked men of the coup regime rifle through the equipment in another studio from the same Channel 36. At points you can see the National Police video cameraman in view of the surveillance camera. And then you can see them carrying it all down the stairs and out the door, an hour and 40 minutes later, at 6:58 a.m.
There's your Honduran "civilian coup" regime's version of "democracy" and "freedom" at work.
It should be added that this kind of jackbooted censorship is endorsed and defended by the US public relations firm of "Chlopak, Leonard, Schechter & Associates on behalf of the Office of the President of the Republic of Honduras," and Washington DC lobbyist Lanny Davis, enemies of press freedom, all. So next time any of those goons in suits and ties try to spin a story angle on you, kind journalists, remember to ask them about the invasion and censorship of Channel 36, in which they, too, are complicit.

Magda Hassan
10-10-2009, 02:32 PM
Came via email. I haven't been able to confirm this and radio Globo is off line and un-contactable via phone.

Radio Globo reports: Snipers fire on Zelaya
Mercenaries and paramilitaries arrive in Honduras
Urgent - Take Action Now!


Call Now - demand and end to the attacks on Zelaya and a
restoration of civil liberties.
Honduras Desk, U.S. State Department 202-647-3482
State Department Main Switchboard 202-647-4000
White House 202-456-1111
OAS Washington Office 202-458-3000
The situation is grave in Tegucigalpa. According to a message from
the organization, Pastors for Peace, Radio Globo from Honduras is
reporting that snipers are shooting into the Brazilian Embassy
where President Zelaya and hundreds of supporters have taken
refuge. There is no word yet on injuries.

Also, according to an Oct. 9 AP report, paramilitaries from
Colombia are arriving in Honduras now. Many of these
paramilitaries were trained in torture and repression at the
infamous School of the Americas in the U.S.

Support the people of Honduras in their heroic struggle against the
brutal coup regime! Thousands of courageous working people are
taking to the streets, in spite of the growing brutality of the
criminal right wing forces, who are armed and trained by the U.S.

The following is a report from the delegation of U.S. activists in
Honduras, who will be holding a news conference today, October 9,
at 5pm EST at the offices of the Bottlers? Union, a center in
Tegucigalpa of the National Front for Resistance Against the Coup:
In the last 24 hours, the situation in Honduras has reached a
profound level of urgency. The illegal, de facto Micheletti regime
is clearly reaching a point of desperation?and there is a serious
danger in this, as the rightwing can and will do anything when they
are desperate.

Last night, we received word that at the Brazilian embassy,
where President Manuel Zelaya has been seeking refuge, two
scaffolds had been erected and two snipers placed on them?one from
the Honduran police and one from the Honduran army. Heavy military
activity was also occurring on the ground around the embassy, with
military convoys placed at strategic places all around the windows
and doors of the embassy. The fear is that an assassination attempt
on Zelaya?s life may be carried out soon.

Another alarming report relayed to us today from Honduran human
rights leaders is of the presence of 120 paramilitaries?experts in
killing?from other Latin American countries in Honduras. Many of
these paramilitaries have been trained at the School of the
Americas based in Georgia.

Today while we were in a meeting, the human rights leader we
were meeting with received a phone call that police at the
pedagogical university had given protesters there 10 minutes to
disperse or face dire consequences. Military convoys had been
brought in to surround the protesters.

As this email is being written, members of the U.S. Delegation
in Solidarity with the Honduras Resistance are at the U.S. embassy,
attempting to meet with representatives there to alert them of the
situation and demand the discontinuation of U.S. aid to the de
facto regime, a freeze on the assets of the golpista government
members, and the abandonment of any electoral process that doesn?t
first involve the restitution of President Zelaya, as is the will
of the Honduran people.

The delegation also reports that despite the coup government's
announcement that it had lifted the ban on civil liberties, the
country still remains under martial law. The coup government is
telling the world that it has lifted martial law, but they haven't
told anyone in the police or military, from the top commanders to
the troops in the streets. There is still a massive armed
presence, and protesters and dissidents are still being brutally
attacked and arrested.

That's why it is so important for us to support the Delegation in
Solidarity with the Honduran Resistance. The corporate media is
echoing the coup government's press releases claiming that martial
law has been lifted and civil liberties restored, and ignoring the
fact that repression is intensifying. We need you to help get the
word out.

What you can do now:

Call - Honduras Desk, U.S. State Department 202-647-3482
State Department Main Switchboard 202-647-4000
White House 202-456-1111
OAS Washington Office 202-458-3000

Demand an end to the attacks on Zelaya and Honduran
activists. Demand a restoration of civil liberties in Honduras.


Sign the Petition - Demand safe passage for the U.S. delegation -
http://www.iacenter.org/honduras/honduras_delegation100609/


Make an emergency donation to help with the expenses of the
delegation and to help us spread the word - http://www.iacenter.org/
donate/

Magda Hassan
10-10-2009, 02:59 PM
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_AYeev3Ko2F8/StA8pUNj3AI/AAAAAAAAAZ8/VtqYON6zAIM/s400/2.jpg (http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_AYeev3Ko2F8/StA8pUNj3AI/AAAAAAAAAZ8/VtqYON6zAIM/s1600-h/2.jpg)

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_AYeev3Ko2F8/StA8b71EnVI/AAAAAAAAAZ0/hqpd6wy_aJU/s400/pasamontanas.jpg (http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_AYeev3Ko2F8/StA8b71EnVI/AAAAAAAAAZ0/hqpd6wy_aJU/s1600-h/pasamontanas.jpg)

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_AYeev3Ko2F8/StA8ApucUnI/AAAAAAAAAZs/-zp49I7b9lw/s400/andamio.jpg (http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_AYeev3Ko2F8/StA8ApucUnI/AAAAAAAAAZs/-zp49I7b9lw/s1600-h/andamio.jpg)
El régimen de facto, encabezado por Roberto Micheletti, prometió que no invadiría la Embajada de Brasil en Tegucigalpa, sin embargo, frente a la legación diplomática, la dictadura ha plantado un dispositivo de hombres especialistas en asaltos y operaciones nocturnas. The de facto regime, headed by Roberto Micheletti, promised not to invade the Brazilian Embassy in Tegucigalpa, however, against the embassy, the dictatorship has planted a device specialists men in assaults and night operations.

La cúpula castrense, el eje de la dictadura, mantiene perennemente un contingente integrado por francotiradores, soldados expertos en asalto, paracaidismo, inteligencia militar y Tropas Especiales de Selva y Operaciones Nocturnas, conocidas como “Teson”, el comando élite de las Fuerzas Armadas. The military leadership, the axis of the dictatorship remains a contingent composed perennially snipers, soldiers assault experts, parachuting, military intelligence and Special Forces Jungle and night operations, known as "Teson," the command of the military elite.

Esos militares (integran el primer anillo del dispositivo) reciben órdenes directas de la alta jerarquía castrense y dirigen las operaciones en la calle de la Embajada. These service members (comprising the first ring of the device) receive direct orders from senior military and direct operations in the street of the Embassy.

A diferencia de los soldados de rangos inferiores (están en los anillos secundarios) que utilizan M-16, estos portan fusiles de asalto Galil (de fabricación israelí), la versión moderna de los soviéticos AK-47, y pistolas automáticas (Petro Beretta o CZ), yatagán y pasamontañas. Unlike the lower-ranking soldiers (they are in the side rings) using M-16, these carry Galil assault rifles (made in Israel), the modern version of the Soviet AK-47s, and pistols (Petro Beretta or CZ), yataghan and balaclavas.

Un par de ellos solamente viste el uniforme verde digitalizado, sin los apellidos (en la parte superior de las solapas de las bolsas) y las insignias para no revelar su identidad. A couple of them only wearing the green uniform scanned without names (at the top of the flaps of the bags) and the badges for anonymity.
Estos esconden la cara detrás de un pasamontañas, pero la panza prominente delata su edad. They hide their face behind a balaclava, but the protruding paunch betrays his age.

En el contingente hay francotiradores, adiestrados en el Segundo Batallón Táctico, que utilizan fusiles con mirada infrarroja empleados misiones nocturnas. In the contingent there are snipers, trained in the Second Battalion Tactical, using rifles with infrared eyes night missions employees.

Ellos ya han apuntado en varias ocasiones hacia el interior de la Embajada, por ejemplo, en la noche del jueves pasado, según informes de periodistas que han estado adentro. They have pointed repeatedly to the interior of the Embassy, for example, last Thursday night, according to reports from journalists who have been inside.

Los hombres de uniforme verde camuflado (comprado en la administración de Zelaya Rosales) son apoyados por efectivos de la Policía Preventiva, agentes de la Dirección Nacional de Investigación Criminal (DNIC) y Dirección de Servicios Especiales de Investigación (DSEI). The men in green camouflage uniform (purchased in the administration of Zelaya Rosales) are supported by members of the Preventive Police, officers from the National Directorate of Criminal Investigation (DNIC) and Directorate of Special Investigation Services (DSEI).

Estos son los encargados de registrar exhaustivamente a los civiles que entran o salen de la legación y los automóviles que llegan a esa zona. These are fully responsible for registering civilians who enter or leave the embassy and cars arriving in the area.
Les toman fotografías y los filman. They are photographed and filmed.

Los registros que les practican a las personas son extremos. The records that people practice them are extreme.
A los periodistas hasta les leen las libretas. Journalists until they read the books.
Para el caso, este viernes, un agente de la DNIC le leyó las notas a la reportera de Telesur, María José Díaz, en el momento que dejaba la Embajada junto con otros colegas. For that matter, on Friday, an official of DNIC you read the notes to Telesur reporter, Maria Jose Diaz, when he left the embassy along with other colleagues.

Desde el pasado 21 de septiembre, cuando el presidente constitucional, Manuel Zelaya Rosales, anunció que se encontraba en la Embajada de Brasil, el régimen desplegó un dispositivo de asedio compuesto por unos 2.000 hombres dispersos en varios anillos. Since last Sept. 21, when the constitutional president, Manuel Zelaya Rosales, announced that he was in the Brazilian embassy, the regime deployed a siege device consisting of some 2,000 men scattered in several rings.

El pasado miércoles, cuando la Organización de Estados Americanos (OEA) montó la mesa del diálogo para encontrar una salida a la crisis, el secretario general, José Miguel Insulza, exhortó al gobierno de facto a suspender el asedio. Last Wednesday, when the Organization of American States (OAS) set up the table of dialogue to find a solution to the crisis, the Secretary General Jose Miguel Insulza, called the de facto government to stop the siege.

Contrario a lo que se esperaba, el régimen golpista instaló la noche del jueves un andamio hidráulico frente a la sede diplomática. Contrary to expectations, the coup regime installed Thursday night hydraulic scaffolding in front of the embassy.
Desde ahí, con binoculares, policías y soldados observan los movimientos de los acompañantes de Zelaya Rosales. From there, binoculars, police and soldiers observe the movements of the companions of Zelaya Rosales.

Esta semana, los golpistas incorporaron al equipo tecnológico el andamio hidráulico porque, según ellos, dentro de la Embajada de Brasil hay extranjeros armados. This week, the insurgents entered the technological equipment hydraulic scaffold because according to them, within the Brazilian Embassy is armed foreigners.

Días antes, el 22 de septiembre, los golpistas estrenaron el Dispositivo Acústico de Largo Alcance (Long Range Acoustic Device, LRAD), conocido como “cañón sónico”. Days earlier, on September 22, putschists premiered the Long Range Acoustic Device (Long Range Acoustic Device, LRAD), known as "sonic cannon".
Lo colocaron frente a la Embajada y lo emplearon para causarle daños al sistema auditivo de los ciudadanos que se encuentran en el interior. He was placed outside the Embassy and used it to cause damage to the auditory system of citizens who are inside.

El pasado 27 de septiembre, el canciller de facto, Carlos López Contreras, anunció que su gobierno había dispuesto cancelarle el estatus diplomático a la Embajada al término de diez días, es decir, el 7 de octubre. On 27 September, the de facto Foreign Minister Carlos Lopez Contreras, said his government was ready to cancel the Embassy diplomatic status after ten days, ie on 7 October.
http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fmiradadehalconhn.blogspot.com%2F


http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_AYeev3Ko2F8/Ss-bzisxUFI/AAAAAAAAAYM/-MgdGcZmbCk/s320/para.jpg (http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_AYeev3Ko2F8/Ss-bzisxUFI/AAAAAAAAAYM/-MgdGcZmbCk/s1600-h/para.jpg)


Informe del Servicio de Noticias de la ONU News Service report of the UN

El Grupo de Trabajo de las Naciones Unidas sobre la utilización de mercenarios, expresó hoy gran preocupación por la presencia de ex paramilitares de Colombia en Honduras, contratados para proteger propiedades e individuos de la violencia en el país. The Working Group of the United Nations on the use of mercenaries today expressed grave concern over the presence of ex-paramilitaries in Colombia to Honduras, hired to protect property and individuals from violence in the country.

En un comunicado los expertos señalaron que la prensa ha informado que unos 40 ex integrantes de las Autodefensas Unidas de Colombia (AUC) han sido reclutados por terratenientes hondureños.Ante esta situación, instaron a las autoridades hondureñas a tomar todas las medidas prácticas para prevenir la utilización de mercenarios en su territorio ya investigar a fondo las denuncias sobre su presencia y actividades.El Grupo de Trabajo recordó que Honduras es parte de la Convención Internacional contra el Reclutamiento, la Utilización, la Financiación y el Entrenamiento de Mercenarios, instrumento jurídico que prohíbe dichas actividades. In a statement, experts noted that the press has reported that about 40 former members of the United Self-Defense of Colombia (AUC) have been recruited by landowners hondureños.Ante this situation, they urged the Honduran authorities to take all practical steps to prevent use of mercenaries in their territory and to investigate thoroughly allegations of their presence and activities.The Working Group recalled that Honduras is part of the International Convention against the Recruitment, Use, Financing and Training of Mercenaries, legal instrument prohibiting such activities.

Foto publicada por Red Voltaire/cortesía de Warnews italia. Photo published by Red Voltaire / Warnews courtesy of italy.
DR DR
http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fmiradadehalconhn.blogspot.com%2F200 9%2F10%2Fonu-alerta-sobre-presencia-de.html

Magda Hassan
10-27-2009, 05:42 AM
Honduras leader's nephew killed




http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/46614000/jpg/_46614943_enzoafp.jpg Enzo Micheletti's body was found in woodland

The nephew of the interim President of Honduras Roberto Micheletti has been found dead in what the police are calling an execution style killing.
Enzo Micheletti's body was discovered on Sunday in woodland near Choloma, 250 km north of the capital, Tegucigalpa.
Police say his hands were tied behind his back and his body was riddled with bullets
There is no indication that his death is connected to the coup that brought his uncle to power at the end of June.
The 24-year-old's body was discovered on Sunday two days after he had been reported missing.
The body of another unidentified man was found nearby.
http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/46614000/jpg/_46614944_michelettiafp.jpg Roberto Micheletti came to power in June

Roberto Micheletti came to power after a coup at the end of June when armed soldiers forced President Manuel Zelaya out of the country at gunpoint.
It is not thought that the interim leader's nephew was involved in politics, but Honduras has the highest murder rate in Central America - much of it drug related.
Last year more than 7,000 people were killed.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/8327196.stm

Magda Hassan
10-31-2009, 08:45 AM
I'm not sure about this. It seems there is some sort of negotiated (by the State department) peace between the legitimate president Zelaya forces and the dictator Micheletti forces in Honduras. It requires the restoration of Zelaya. But it also requires the approval of the High Court. I don't know that it really does but I think that is Micheletti's get out of jail free card. Of course there will be no accounting for the gross human rights abuses that have occurred under the dictatorship. It seems likely to be a fig leaf for the already rigged upcoming elections in November otherwise the US could not possible recognise the elections if not all of the players are allowed to play. If Zelaya can still get the opinion poll to take place it will be good but this is unclear. All in all a not very satisfactory situation although it seems people there are trying to making the best of it. In the mean time repression continues unchanged.
Reports of a Deal in Honduras Are Premature

Posted by Al Giordano (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/al-giordano) - October 30, 2009 at 9:58 am By Al Giordano
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/thefield/3567/reports-deal-honduras-are-premature

http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/hondurascoup1.jpg.jpeg
US officials and commercial media organizations are popping champagne corks prematurely over a reported US-brokered “deal” to return Honduran President Manuel Zelaya to (limited) power, but the two sides that reportedly signed the agreement already disagree over what exactly it says.
Reuters reports (http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/a2a08190-c564-11de-8193-00144feab49a.html) that coup “president” Micheletti has agreed to step down:

”I have authorized my negotiating team to sign a deal that marks the beginning of the end of the country’s political situation,” Micheletti told reporters on Thursday night.
He said Zelaya could return to office after a vote in Congress that would be authorized by the country’s Supreme Court. The deal would also require both sides to recognize the result of a Nov. 29 presidential election and would transfer control of the army to the top electoral court.
If approved by Congress, Zelaya would be able to finish out his presidential term, which ends in January. It was not clear what would happen to other elements o f the agreement if Congress votes against Zelaya’s restoration.
(Bold type mine, for emphasis.)
But Micheletti’s claim that a Congressional vote to restore Zelaya would require Supreme Court authorization is a flat out lie, according to a source with Zelaya inside his Brazilian Embassy refuge in Tegucigalpa: “That is what the golpistas have put out, but that is NOT the accord… The Supreme Court gives its non-binding opinion to the Congress, but the key is that all of this takes time, time that the golpistas want to keep taking.”
While there is some healthy distrust already over whether Congress will gin up on its end and really vote to restore Zelaya, that probably will be easier to accomplish than many believe. Two words: Pepe Lobo. The National Party candidate for President, Lobo is leading in the polls. He obviously wants very much for the November 29 “elections” to become internationally recognized elections. His party holds 55 of 128 seats in Honduras’ unicameral legislature, just ten short of a majority. There are at least 22 Liberal Party members that have publicly indicated they want Zelaya back as president, plus 11 minor party legislators most of whom are likely to go along with such a deal. Faced with such a patchwork majority, look for most of the 62 Liberal Party members in Congress to fold and go with the flow. The Congressional vote is not likely to prove a stumbling block to implementing this agreement.
The real problem could be the authoritarian Supreme Court. Micheletti’s invention of a non-existent clause in the agreement, one that requires the court’s approval of it, points to where the stalling tactic will come from. This is the same Supreme Court that carried out the coup d’etat on June 28 and has micro-managed the regime’s affairs all summer and fall on a level that would not be appropriate or legal in most countries. Because Honduras’ 1982 Constitution is such a self-conflicted document with many articles that contradict each other, the court has been cherry-picking which laws to discard and which to interpret, often badly.
What the summer of 2009 in Honduras has demonstrated is that democracies need not only worry about excesses of executive branch power. In this case, it is the judicial branch that proved the primary and most dangerous usurper of democracy.
If Micheletti keeps insisting that this so-called “agreement” requires Supreme Court ratification, look for this game to go into extra innings before any resolution can happen.
On the other hand, if Secretary Clinton and her team of negotiation babysitters got their ducks and supreme court members in line ahead of time – reflecting a level of attention to detail that they haven’t displayed all summer long – then, yes, this deal would be likely to succeed.
The devil will be in the details, and their implementation. Until it’s clear that the Supreme Court or Congress won’t stand in the way, there is no deal.
And I’ll repeat: The problem won’t likely come from Congress, but, rather, a continuance of the real problem all along: the despotic, arbitrary and anti-democracy tendencies of the Honduras Supreme Court.
Update: Pepe Lobo weighs in (http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5jAkMGKIUDg_ngUiZboxQbYj5_DPwD9BLGVKO1), exactly as we predicted he would:

"We are willing to be cooperative in Congress with the agreement of the negotiators," Porfirio Lobo, a National Party lawmaker who is favored to win the Nov. 29 presidential elections, said Friday. "The best decision for Honduras will be taken."
(And it's worth noting, once again, how embarrassingly clumsy and wrongheaded the La La Land prognostications are from a certain golpista corner of the Ugly American diaspora of the expat community in Honduras. Last night (http://lagringasblogicito.blogspot.com/2009/10/guaymuras-accord-tonight.html), the anonymous blogger who calls herself La Gringa told her gullible readers: "presidential candidate Pepe Lobo is asking the Nacionalistas to abstain." The sheer stupidity and inability to deduce what is in Lobo's best interests is staggering, but also typical.)
Update II: Statement (http://contraelgolpedeestadohn.blogspot.com/2009/10/comunicado-no-32.html) from the National Resistance Front Against the Coup d'Etat:

1. We celebrate the coming restitution of President Manuel Zelaya Rosales as a popular victory over the cruel interests of the golpista oligarchy. This victory has been won through more than four months of struggle and sacrifice by the people, that in spite of the savage repression unleashed by the repressive corps of the state in the hands of the dominant class has known how to resist and grow in conscience and organization becoming an uncontainable social force.
2. The Dictatorship's signature on the document that establishes "the return of the executive branch to its status prior to June 28" represents explicit acceptance of what in Honduras had been a coup d'etat that must be removed to return to institutional order and guarantee a democratic environment in which the people can make use of its right to transform society.
3. We demand that the agreements that are signed at the negotiating table be ratified expeditiously by the National Congress. In that sense, we alert all our compañeros and compañeras nationwide to join in the pressure actions so that the document is complied with immediatley.
4. We reiterate that the National Constituent Assembly is an absolute aspiration of the Honduran people and a nonnegotiable right for which we will continue struggling in the streets, until achieving the refoundation of society to exist in justice, equality and true democracy.
"AFTER 125 DAYS OF STRUGGLE NOBODY GIVES UP"
Tegucigalpa, M.D.C. 30 de octubre de 2009
(Translated by Narco News.)

By email:
Honduran National Front of Resistance to the Coup celebrates
restoration of Zelaya!
Vows continued struggle for a just society!

Comuniqu? No. 32

The National Front of Resistance to the Coup d'Et?t, facing the
imminent signing of a negotiated agreement between the commission
representing the legitimate President Manuel Zelaya Rosales and the
representatives of the de facto regime, communicates the following to
the Honduran people and the international community:

1. We celebrate the upcoming restoration of President Manuel Zelaya
Rosales as a popular victory over the narrow interests of the coup
oligarchy. This victory has been obtained through four months of
struggle and sacrifice by the people who, in spite of the savage
repression unleashed by the repressive forces of the state in the
hands of the dominant class, have been able to resist and grow in
their levels of consciousness and organization and turn themselves
into an irrepressible social force.

2. The signing on the part of the dictatorship of the document which
mandates "returning the holder of executive power to its pre June 28
state," represents the explicit acceptance that in Honduras there was
a coup d'?tat that should be dismantled in order to return to
institutional order and guarantee a democratic framework in which the
people can exercise their right to transform society.

3. We demand that the accords signed at the negotiating table be
processed in an expedited fashion by the National Congress. We alert
all our comrades at the national level so that they can join the
actions to pressure for the immediate compliance with the contents of
the final document from the negotiating table.

4. We reiterate that a National Constituent Assembly is an
unrenounceable aspiration of the Honduran people and a non-negotiable
right for which we will continue struggling in the streets, until we
achieve the re-founding of our society to convert it into one that is
just, egalitarian and truly democratic.

"At 125 days of struggle, nobody here surrenders!"
Tegucigalpa, M.D.C. October 30, 2009

Translation by the Nicaragua Network

Magda Hassan
11-01-2009, 01:57 AM
Preamble
We, Honduran citizens, men and women, convinced of the need to strengthen the rule of law, protect our Constitution and the laws of our Republic, deepen democracy and ensure a climate of peace and tranquility for our people, have carried out an intense and frank process of political dialogue to seek a peaceful and negotiated solution to the crisis in which our country has been submerged in recent months.
As the result of this dialogue, in which the common sense, tolerance and patriotic spirit of all participants have prevailed, we have drawn up a political Accord that will allow civic coexistence to be reestablished and ensure a suitable climate for democratic governability in our country. This Accord, we are certain, will mark the road toward the peace, reconciliation and democracy Honduran society urgently requires.
The acceptance of this Accord demonstrates, yet again, that Hondurans are capable of successfully conducting a dialogue and, through it and by it, achieving the high goals set by our society and demanded by our country.
Pursuant to the preceding, we have agreed to the following accords.
1. Regarding the National Unity and Reconciliation Government To achieve reconciliation and strengthen democracy, we will form a National Unity and Reconciliation Government composed of representatives from various political parties and social organizations, recognized for their capacity, integrity, competence and willingness to dialogue, who will fill the different Secretariats, Sub-secretariats and other agencies of the State, in conformance with Article 246 and succeeding articles of the Constitution of the Republic of Honduras.
In view of the fact that, prior to June 28, the Executive Branch had not sent the National Congress a draft of the General Budget for Revenue and Disbursement, as established in Article 205, Subsection 32 of the Constitution of the Republic of Honduras, this National Unity and Reconciliation Government will respect the General Budget recently approved by the National Congress for fiscal year 2009 and will operate on its basis.
2. Regarding Renunciation of a Call for a National Constituent Assembly and Amending the Unamendable Articles of the Constitution To achieve reconciliation and strengthen democracy, we reiterate our respect for the Constitution and the laws of our country, abstaining from calls for a National Constituent Assembly, either directly or indirectly, and also renouncing the promotion or support of any public consultation for the purpose of reforming the Constitution to permit presidential reelection, modify the form of Government or contravene any of the unamendable articles in our Founding Charter [constitution].
In particular, we will not make public statements or exercise any sort of influence inconsistent with Articles 5, 239, 373 and 374 of the Constitution of the Republic of Honduras and we will energetically reject any expression contrary to the spirit of said articles and the Special Law to Regulate Referendums and Plebiscites.
3. Regarding General Elections and the Transfer of Government To achieve reconciliation and strengthen democracy, we reiterate that in conformance with Articles 44 and 51 of the Constitution of the Republic of Honduras, suffrage is universal, obligatory, egalitarian, direct, free and secret, and it is the responsibility of the fully autonomous and independent Supreme Electoral Tribunal to supervise and administer every facet of electoral activities and processes.
Likewise, we call on the Honduran people to peacefully participate in the coming general election and to avoid any type of demonstrations that oppose the elections or their results, or promote insurrection, unlawful conduct, civil disobedience or other acts that could result in violent confrontations or transgressions of the law.
For the purpose of demonstrating the transparency and legitimacy of the electoral process, we urge the Supreme Electoral Tribunal to authorize and accredit the presence of international missions from now until the announcement of the general election results, as well as during the transfer of power that will occur, in accordance with Article 237 of the Constitution of the Republic, on January 27, 2010.
4. Regarding the Armed Forces and the National Police To achieve reconciliation and strengthen democracy, we affirm our willingness to comply, in all its terms and conditions, with Article 272 of the Constitution of the Republic of Honduras, in accordance with which the Armed Forces are placed at the disposition of the Supreme Electoral Tribunal from one month before the general elections for the purpose of guaranteeing the free exercise of suffrage, the custody, transport and surveillance of electoral materials and other security aspects of the process. We reaffirm the professional, apolitical, obedient and non-deliberative character of the Honduran Armed Forces. Likewise, we agree that the National Police should strictly abide by the terms of its special legislation.
5. Regarding the Executive Power To achieve reconciliation and strengthen democracy, in the spirit of the subjects of the proposal for the San José Accord, both negotiating commissions have respectfully decided that the National Congress, as an institutional expression of popular sovereignty, in use of its authority, in consultation with the entities it believes pertinent such as the Supreme Court of Justice and in accordance with the law, resolve the issue regarding “restoring possession of the Executive Power to its status prior to June 28 until conclusion the current governmental period on January 27, 2010.”
The decision the National Congress adopts should establish a basis for achieving the social peace, political tranquility and democratic governability the society requires and the country needs.
6. Regarding the Verification Commission and the Truth Commission To achieve reconciliation and strengthen democracy, we stipulate the creation of a Verification Commission to verify commitments made under this Accord and those deriving from it, coordinated by the Organization of American States (OAS). Said Commission will be composed of two members of the international community and two members of the national community, the last two to be chosen, one each, by the parties [i.e., one by Micheletti and one by Zelaya].
The Verification Commission will be responsible for attesting to the strict compliance with all of the points of this Accord and will receive the full cooperation of Honduran public institutions for that effect.
The failure to comply with any of the commitments contained in this Accord, as verified and declared by the Verification Commission, will result in the activation of measures the Commission will establish for the transgressor or transgressors.
For the purpose of clarifying the events occurring before and after June 28, 2009, a Truth Commission will also be created to identify acts that led to the current situation and provide the people of Honduras with elements to avoid repetition of these events in the future.
This Dialogue Commission recommends that the next government, in the framework of a national consensus, constitute said Truth Commission in the first half of 2010.
7. Regarding the Normalization of Relations between the Republic of Honduras and the International Community On committing ourselves to faithfully comply with the commitments made in this Accord, we respectfully request the immediate revocation of those measures or sanctions adopted bilaterally or multilaterally that in any way affect the reinsertion and full participation of the Republic of Honduras in the international community, and its access to all forms of cooperation [aid].
We call on the international community to reactivate, as quickly as possible, the cooperation projects in effect with the Republic of Honduras and to continue the negotiation of future projects. We especially urge that, at the request of competent authorities, necessary and timely international cooperation be provided so that the Verification Commission and the future Truth Commission ensure faithful compliance and follow-through for the commitments made under this Accord.
8. Final Dispositions Any differences regarding interpretation or application of this Accord will be submitted to the Verification Commission, which will determine, in adherence to the Constitution of the Republic of Honduras and legislation in force, and through an authentic interpretation of the present Accord, the corresponding solution.
Taking into account that this Accord is the product of the understanding and fraternity of Hondurans, we vehemently request that the international community respect the sovereignty of the Republic of Honduras and fully observe the established principle in the United Nations charter of non-interference in the internal affairs of other States.
9. Calendar for Compliance with the Accords Given that this Accord takes immediate effect upon the date of its signing and for the purpose of clarifying the time for compliance and follow-through for the commitments made to achieve national reconciliation, we agree to the following calendar for compliance:

October 30, 2009

1. Signing and entrance of the Accord into effect.
2. Formal delivery of the Accord to Congress for the effects of Point 5, “Regarding the Executive Power.” November 2, 2009


1. Formation of the Verification Commission. After the signing of this Accord and no later than November 5


1. Formation and installation of the National Unity and Reconciliation Government January 27, 2010


1. Celebration of the transfer of government. First half of 2010


1. Formation of the Truth Commission. 10. Final Declaration On behalf of reconciliation and the patriotic spirit that has brought us to the dialogue table, we commit ourselves to complying in good faith with this Accord and what derives from it.
The world is witness to this demonstration of unity and peace, in which we commit our civic conscience and patriotic devotion. Together, we will know how to demonstrate our courage and decision to strengthen the rule of saw and build a tolerant, pluralistic and democratic society.
We sign this accord in the city of Tegucigalpa, Honduras, on October 30, 2009.
11. Acknowledgements We take this opportunity to thank the International Community for its accompaniment and good offices, especially the Organization of American States and its Secretary General, José Miguel Insulza; the [diplomatic] Missions of Foreign Ministers in the Hemisphere; the President of Costa Rica, Oscar Arias Sánchez; the Government of the United States, its President Barack Obama, and his Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton.
12. Regarding the Tegucigalpa/San José Accord’s Entrance in Effect For internal purposes, the Accord takes full effect upon signing.
For protocolary and ceremonial purposes, a public signing ceremony will be held on November 2.
Tegucigalpa, Municipio del Distrito Central, October 30, 2009 [Signed: Armando Aguilar Cruz, Vilma Cecilia Morales Montalván, Arturo Gerardo Corrales Alvarez, Victor Orlando Meza López, Mayra Janeth Mejía del Cid, Rodil Rivera Rodil]

Magda Hassan
11-14-2009, 07:12 AM
US Rep. Jan Schakowsky’s Three-Day Fact-Finding Mission in Honduras Confirms Widespread Human Rights Abuses

An Inventory of Reports from Major National and International Human Rights Organizations from Honduras Under Coup d’Etat


By Tamar Sharabi
Special to The Narco News Bulletin

November 13, 2009
TEGUCIGALPA, HONDURAS, NOVEMBER 13, 2009: Despite the US State Department’s stance for a ‘Honduran Solution,’ some Republican US Senators and House members have openly intervened and strongly supported the de facto government, not recognized by any nation in the world. US Rep. Jan. Schakowsky (D-Illinois), is the first congressperson to visit Honduras since the June 28 coup that did not come in prefabricated support of the de facto regime. She was invited by Bertha Oliva, Coordinator of COFADEH, a human rights organization that has been documenting abuses for the past 27 years. COFADEH has documented more than 3,000 illegal detentions since the coup and over 21 murders in a report published Oct. 22. During her recent mission in Washington, Oliva invited Schakowsky to witness firsthand the Honduran reality that is not making the headlines.
Schakowsky’s three day visit from November 10-12 included meetings with family members of victims that have died directly from violence from the coup, media outlets such as Channel 36 and Radio Globo that have been attacked censored for honestly reporting on the resistance movement, and also a visit to the Brazilian Embassy where ousted President Zelaya and approximately 40 others have taken refuge for the last 53 days. The Chicago Congresswoman commented on her opportunity to hear a recording of some of the sounds bombarded into the Embassy and see the blinding lights set up outside, in addition to the crane set up for the military to spy into the Embassy.
Citing a “serious deterioration of human rights since the coup,” Schakowsky reflected on the executive decree PCM-M-016-2009 published on Sep. 27 which was set in place to supposedly defend national security and public order but that “seems to be defined as anything that is said against the coup.” This is the same decree that, after even some of the coup plotters publicly criticized it, was promised to be lifted immediately but took until October 19t (when the UN Human Rights Commission began a visit) before it was officially printed in the official ‘Gazette’ to end the decree. Under that decree, any police commissioner present at a resistance demonstration could declare the gathering “illegal” and use violent means to disperse the peaceful crowds.
When asked about whether free and fair elections are possible under such conditions and expressing concern about other media outlets that have been under attack such as Radio Progresso and Radio Tocoa, Schakowsky did not explicitly express her opinion on whether the November 29 elections should take place or not. The question followed statements by Police Commissioner Danilo Orellana, who had appeared on Channel 6 and called for government actions against all media outlets that are calling on the public not to vote. Instead, Schakowsky evaded the question and stated:

“In a democratic country the principal of freedom of the press is really sacred, and as for the timing of the elections, congress should really move forward in an expedited fashion to restore the president and democratic order.” US State Department spokesman Ian Kelly, during the November 12 daily press briefing in Washington, confused matters even more during this exchange with a reporter:

QUESTION: Yeah, I knew that. But still, you know, we’re coming on three weeks now. Is it a legitimate election if the current government has been supplanted by an interim military-backed government? MR. KELLY: Yeah. Well, it’s in everybody’s interest that these elections are seen as free, fair, transparent, and enjoy international recognition.
QUESTION: So that just wipes the slate clean over the past five months?
MR. KELLY: Well, they need to be recognized as free, fair, transparent. There are also – we also need to address this question of national unity and reconciliation. There’s been a fracture in the Honduran body politic, and we need to repair that. And that’s what this accord does. And that’s – again, I’ll just say it again, that’s what we’re focused on is the – this accord.
Why did the ‘historic’ accord claimed by the State Department fail?
The San Jose-Tegucigalpa Accord (http://www.hondurasnews.com/2009/10/31/tegucigalpa-san-jose-accord/), signed on October 30, included a deadline of completing by Nov 5 the “Formation and installation of the National Unity and Reconciliation Government.” According to the de facto regime of Roberto Micheletti, its part of the deal had thus been fulfilled. Minutes after midnight on Nov 6 Micheletti held a press conference aired on National TV announcing the new de facto – de facto government without any representation from Honduran President Manuel Zelaya.
The accords fell short of guaranteeing Zelaya be reinstated for two main reasons. Firstly, there was no linkage between having Congress vote on the reinstatement of President Zelaya with the formation of the ‘unity’ government. This left the door open for Micheletti’s representatives to form the ‘unity’ government without considering who would manage the cabinet because it was obvious to them Micheletti would stay in power. Secondly, there was no deadline as to when Congress had to vote on the reinstatement of Zelaya. Thus Honduras is in the situation where the international community is once again demanding the return to democratic order and the original coup d’état plotters get to claim its actions are merely a “succession of power” for the second time.
The international community and the Honduras resistance movement, however, have not taken the bait. Now, US State Department spokesmen speak in support for the developments of the flawed accord to maintain its position for a “Honduran Solution.” Unsurprisingly, Senator Jim DeMint, (R-South Carolina) announced in a November 5 press release that he had secured a commitment from the Obama administration to recognize the elections of Nov 29 regardless of whether Zelaya is reinstated and regardless of whether the the Honduran Congress votes on the President’s return before or after the elections. In return, DeMint lifted his block on the nominations of Arturo Valenzuela to be Assistant Secretary of Western Hemisphere Affairs (Shannon’s previous job) and Thomas Shannon to be U.S. Ambassador to Brazil. According to DeMint’s press release (http://demint.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?FuseAction=PressReleases.Detail&PressRelease_id=c6542515-c3af-d65a-085d-537015ff8a97):

“I am happy to report the Obama Administration has finally reversed its misguided Honduran policy and will fully recognize the November 29th elections… I take our administration at their word that they will now side with the Honduran people and end their focus on the disgraced Zelaya.” As to the human rights abuses that Representative Schakowsky had the opportunity to witness along with dozens of delegations that have visited Honduras in the last four months, the State Department looks the other way. From that same November 12 State Department press briefing (http://www.state.gov/r/pa/prs/dpb/2009/nov/131877.htm):

QUESTION: A follow-up on Honduras. What does the U.S. think about the human rights situation there right now? There have been mass arrests, curfews, an emergency decree, and a ban on protests and media closures for three weeks during the presidential campaign. Does that undermine the electoral process, in the view of the U.S.? MR. KELLY: Regarding the – well, first of all, our real priority here is to see this accord implemented step by step. We’ve only gotten through step one, and we need step two and step three to be implemented.
Regarding the – these reports, I’m actually not aware of these reports of any actions to – you say ban rallies and – no, I’m not just aware of those reports. I think that we would need to have more details about it for us to really comment on it.
For Mr. Kelly’s convenience, here are links to ample documentation from respected Human Rights reports, both from local and international organizations:
COFADEH (Committee of Family Members of the Detained and Disappeared in Honduras) (http://www.cofadeh.org/html/documentos/segundo_informe_situacionl_resumen_violaciones_ddh h_golpe_estado.pdf)
Global Exchange (http://www.globalexchange.org/countries/americas/honduras/gxhondurasdelegation.pdf)
CPTRT (Center for Prevention,Treatment and Rehabilitation for Victims of Torture and their Families) (http://www.cptrt.org/pdf/Tortura_Represion_Sistematica_GolpeEstado.pdf)
Human Rights Watch (http://www.hrw.org/americas/honduras)
Amnesty International (http://www.amnesty.org/en/library/asset/AMR37/004/2009/en/0bef3d1b-ed50-46bc-8bb3-3f8ca416016c/amr370042009eng.pdf)
The United Nations and the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (part of the Organization of the American States) have not yet published their respective reports.
http://www.narconews.com/Issue62/article3935.html

Magda Hassan
11-30-2009, 09:01 PM
Honduras elects Porfirio Lobo as new president

Rival Elvin Santos concedes defeat as ousted president, Manuel Zelaya, declares vote illegitimate

(http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/gallery/2009/nov/30/honduras)




Rory Carroll (http://www.guardian.co.uk/profile/rorycarroll) in Tegucigalpa
guardian.co.uk (http://www.guardian.co.uk/), Monday 30 November 2009 07.51 GMT

http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2009/11/30/1259567292707/Porfirio-Lobo-001.jpg The president-elect of Honduras, Porfirio Lobo, addresses supporters in Tegucigalpa. Photograph: Claudia Barrientos/AFP/Getty Images

A wealthy rancher was due to be declared Honduras (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/honduras)'s new president today after a tumultuous election dogged by the overthrow of his predecessor.
Preliminary results gave Porfirio Lobo 56% of votes, prompting cavalcades of cheering, honking supporters in the streets of the capital, Tegucigalpa. His nearest rival, Elvin Santos of the ruling Liberal party, conceded defeat.
Lobo, from the centre-right National party, promised to unify a country polarised by the military-led coup against Manuel Zelaya in June, a political shock which rattled Latin America and left Honduras isolated and stripped of aid and investment.
"We are very happy. Now we can get things back to normal," said Luis Fernando Gomez, 37, a business graduate, at a boisterous campaign victory party.
The Supreme Electoral Tribunal said 61% of registered voters cast ballots, a big jump from the barely half who voted in the 2005 election won by Zelaya. Local media, which backed the coup, hailed a "historic" turnout.
Before results were announced, the United States, Panama and Peru signalled they would accept the election as a way out of the crisis. Canada and the European Union are expected to follow suit.
But critics said the election was neither free nor fair and had whitewashed the coup. Leftist governments including those of Argentina, Brazil, Ecuador and Venezuela said they would not recognise the vote, branding it a farce which could embolden coup-minded conservative forces across the region.
Zelaya, who was not on the ballot, had called for a boycott. After polls closed he said information from a quarter of polling stations indicated only around 35% voted. "As president of Honduras I declare this process illegitimate," he said.
In the absence of established international observer groups, who shunned the election, it was difficult to verify the turnout independently. Officials at polling centres visited by the Guardian gave estimates ranging from just 30% in poor areas to as high as 70% in wealthier ones.
"I voted because we need a way out of this crisis," said Yesenia Ramos, 31, showing a green-stained finger outside a polling station in Cementerio, a slum in Tegucigalpa. "My brother has lost his job, businesses are closing. We've all been affected."
Metres away, in a stark illustration of Honduras' extreme poverty, several men foraged for food on a mound of putrid, fly-blown rubbish. "Vote? Give me a break, it'll change nothing," said Luis Alvarado, 44.
Voting was mostly peaceful but security forces used teargas and batons to break up a demonstration in the city of San Pedro Sula. A day earlier they raided the offices of pro-Zelaya groups, saying they were looking for weapons and evidence linked to small homemade bombs which had damaged polling centres.
In recent weeks the de facto authorities curbed civil liberties and cracked down on critical media and Zelaya supporters, leaving hundreds injured and detained and at least 10 reportedly killed. Amnesty International demanded that the identities and whereabouts of people arrested yesterday be revealed.
Zelaya, a wealthy logger-turned leftist populist, was seized and exiled on 28 June after congress, the army, the supreme court and his own party objected to his deepening alliance with Venezuela's socialist president, Hugo Chávez. They accused Zelaya of plotting to extend his rule, a charge he denied.
The election date and candidates were chosen long before the coup. The de facto president, Roberto Micheletti, was not on the ballot. A pro-Zelaya candidate withdrew, leaving the field dominated by candidates from the traditional ruling elite.
Lobo, 61, a veteran congressman who is known by the nickname Pepe, hinted that criminal charges against Zelaya would be dropped and appealed to foreign governments to recognise his mandate once he was sworn in on 27 January.
"We are prepared to approach them and ask them to understand that there is a government which was elected, that it is the precise will of Hondurans at the ballot box, that it is a democracy and we should all respect the leadership of countries."
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/nov/30/honduras-lobo-president

Magda Hassan
11-30-2009, 09:03 PM
The Sham Elections in Honduras

Why Obama shouldn't turn a blind eye to the undemocratic shenanigans in Tegucigalpa.

BY GEORGE VICKERS | NOVEMBER 25, 2009


http://www.foreignpolicy.com/files/images/HondurasElectionBox625.jpg
On Sunday, when Hondurans go to the polls to elect a new president, Barack Obama's administration may be tempted to congratulate the winner, gradually resume normal diplomatic and economic relations with the successor government to the deposed president, Manuel Zelaya, and thus enable the de factogovernment that drove him from office to erase the remaining stains of its coup d'état.

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Yield not unto temptation. This election is taking place in a political environment contaminated by repression, violence, and fear. If the U.S. government recognizes the vote, it will grant the de facto regime led by former parliamentary head Roberto Micheletti a legitimacy it does not deserve; it will needlessly lengthen a crisis that is hurting Honduras, its people, and its prospects for real democracy; and it will harm the U.S. image in the region. Most importantly, there is an alternative to this "see no evil" strategy.
What has transpired in Honduras in recent weeks has eliminated the prospects for free and fair elections. Actions specifically aimed at suppressing political organizing for the election, including mass arrests, illegal detentions, and violence -- documented by respected international groups such as Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, and the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights -- have yet to be investigated or prosecuted by the Honduran attorney general's office.
More than 50 candidates for public office, including several running for congressional and mayoral seats and one presidential candidate, have removed their names from the ballot in protest against the coup regime.
Lists of anti-coup activists have been compiled by local mayors and given to the military. The government's telecommunications commission has continued to block pro-Zelaya media outlets, forcing them to play reruns of old cowboy movies rather than news critical of the coup regime.
All of this while the Micheletti government reinstated a state of siege last weekend and intimidated opponents by announcing that it has trained hundreds of Honduran lawyers to prosecute individuals participating in a boycott of Sunday's vote. No matter the turnout, no matter the result, these are not conditions within which legitimate elections can take place.
Moreover, the coup and the campaign have made utterly clear that the constitutional framework in one of Latin America's poorest countries may be insufficient for dealing with the vast array of social, political, and economic challenges facing Honduras -- with or without a new, democratically elected president.
In a country where 70 percent live in poverty -- in a system riven with corruption, as Transparency International (http://www.transparency.org/policy_research/surveys_indices/cpi/2009) recently made clear -- it is not hard to understand why Zelaya's calls for a constitutional assembly in June resonated deeply with Honduran society.
Although coup leaders and others question Zelaya's method and motives, this crisis has revealed that many Hondurans still want a significant reform of their country's Constitution. It was the United States' own handpicked negotiator, Costa Rican President Oscar Arias, who called the Honduran Constitution "the worst in the world (http://www.examiner.com/x-5325-Orlando-Republican-Examiner%7Ey2009m9d30-OAS-mediator-Oscar-Arias-denounces-Honduras-constitution)." With neither any clause for impeachment nor any recourse for amendment, Arias had the document dead to rights. And it is easy to imagine the events of June repeating themselves if serious debate over constitutional reform does not continue once the facade of democracy is restored. Indeed, it is just this sort of national conversation that the majority of Hondurans still seem to desire. Just one month ago, 54 percent (http://www.gqrr.com/repository/documents/1574.pdf) of Honduran respondents told a U.S. polling firm that a constitutional assembly would now be the best way for resolving the current crisis.
In the end, the Honduran people themselves will need to decide what, if any, changes they want to make to their Constitution, and whether any such changes can be made through a piecemeal reform process or whether a constitutional assembly to rewrite the document altogether will ultimately be necessary. For now, however, the United States should publicly support such a conversation, beyond Sunday's vote. And most importantly, it should do its part to ensure an open political environment exists for doing so.
In other words, don't bless these elections and walk away. Instead, Washington should maintain its suspension of government-to-government assistance and not recognize the newly elected regime until there is a full restoration of civil liberties and steps are taken to prosecute human rights abuses. Next, the Obama team should work with the Organization of American States and other democracies -- the vast majority of which is reluctant to endorse these elections -- to find a way to bring Honduras back into the international community. For starters, if the new government is to recover any semblance of legitimacy, it will need to ensure that adequate conditions exist for a broad and pluralistic debate and dialogue, including with respect to any constitutional issues. Moreover, such a dialogue should be seen as responding to the legitimate rights and concerns of Honduran citizens, rather than being branded as treason, as is customary for the coup government today.
Supporting this next process may be the only way for the United States to retain a trace of goodwill among many rightfully frustrated Hondurans -- not to mention the rest of Latin America, disappointed that five months of hemispheric unity might end because of a hasty and ill-considered decision to recognize Sunday's elections.
http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2009/11/25/the_sham_elections_in_honduras

Magda Hassan
11-30-2009, 09:09 PM
By Al Giordano (with reporting from Tamar Sharabi in Honduras)
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/memorandumsantos.jpg
While today's coup-sponsored "election" in Honduras won't settle the country's crisis created by the June 28 coup d'etat, it continues to provide a showcase for the profoundly anti-democratic nature of the regime.
This just in from Tamar Sharabi, reporting from Honduran territory:

Evidence has surfaced that state employees were forced to attend the closing campaign ceremony of Elvin Santos, the ex-Vice President under Zelaya. In the letter, addressed to all department heads of the office of Civil Service, general director Marco Tulio Flores wrote, “I instruct all employees that are fulfilling their duties, without any exception, to attend the closing campaign of the Liberal Party that will take place Sunday November 22 at 9:30am. In a booth at the entrance to the coliseum Xiomara Orellana will take attendance of all personnel of this institution.”
Sharabi also reports that jack-booted regime repression continued right up through yesterday, as a pretext for larceny, too:

On Saturday November 28 military soldiers raided the offices of small business collective RED-COMAL in Siguatepeque, Comayagua, a city approximately 2 hours north from the capital. The Police Commissioner issued a search warrant 15 minutes after the raid began with the purpose of looking for weapons, posters and any documents that call on the population not to vote. Ricardo Bueso, speaking to Radiodelosmenos.org, reported that the military and police stole four laptops along with money from some of the organization’s sales
The National Front Against the Coup d'Etat has called on its participants to remain indoors in a "voluntary curfew" in noncooperation with the fraudulent vote. Should any incidents of violence occur today it won't be from the Resistance, but, rather, the result of the regime's own provocateurs. National presidential candidate Carlos H. Reyes withdrew from the ballot last month, as did many Congressional candidates and one major-party vice presidential candidate: Santos' own running mate on the Liberal Party line is among those who reject this fraudulent process as illegitimate.
We'll keep you updated throughout the day and into tonight as the "mock election" reaches its culmination...
Update 12:16 p.m. Tegucigalpa (1:16 p.m. ET): US citizens and human rights observers in Honduras just made the following announcement:

U.S. Human rights observers from a dozen different organizations around the United States have been in Honduras for several days to observe the human rights environment in Honduras at this time of elections.
Some 20 U.S. Citizens have traveled throughout Honduras over the past 3 days to cities and communities such as Tegucigalpa, San Pedro Sula, Tocoa, Santa Rosa de Copán, Choluteca, Comayagua, Siguatepeque y Puerto Grande. In addition, they have visited police stations, hospitals and jails.
In each of these communities they have observed the sistematic abuse of human rights as evidenced by raids, detentions, threats, physical abuse, indimidation and persecution on the part of state security agents. These actions have been mostly directed against citizens identified with the Resistance movement.
These findings and concerns will be shared at a:
PRESS CONFERENCE
TODAY, SUNDAY NOVEMBER 29, 2009 3:00 P.M. (4 p.m. EST)
IN FRONT OF THE UNITED STATES EMBASSY, TEGUCIGALPA
3:33 p.m. Tegucigalpa (4:33 p.m. ET): Coup security forces, while attacking a peaceful demonstration in San Pedro Sula today, wounded the Reuters photographer (http://periodicopg.com.ve/?q=node/22644) Herbert Villarreal while he attempted to document the story. Villarreal received twelve stitches in the head as a result of the attack.
4:38 p.m. Tegucigalpa (5:38 p.m. ET): Strike up the Grand Wurlitzer of spin as the Honduras regime tries to take what is, today, looking like 70 percent abstention from the vote and call it "70 percent turnout." They're issuing statements to the press about running out of ink (the indelible sort that voters get on their thumbs so they can't vote twice), polls remaining open an hour later to handle the supposed heavy demand, floated false turnout numbers. But here is what it really looks like this afternoon at polling places throughout Honduras:
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/urnasvacias.jpg.jpeg
Yup. Mostly empty ballot boxes, no lines, polling places as ghost towns. The first media war to be fought tonight will be over which version of the story is accurate. The official sources, of course, will do everything to claim high turnout and a successful "election." Set your BS detectors to the red zone tonight.
4:46 p.m. Tegucigalpa (5:46 p.m. ET): Coup security forces surrounded and arrested Spaniard journalist Mario Gascón Aranda this afternoon as he was reporting the day's events, accused him of meddling in the internal affairs of Honduras and announced they would expel and deport him from the country, according to Radio Globo.
7:31 p.m. Tegucigalpa (8:31 p.m. ET): Exit polls have - and no surprise to readers of these pages - National Party candidate Pepe Lobo as the "winner" of today's mock elections in Honduras with over 50 percent of the vote to 38 percent for Liberal Party candidate Elvin Santos. Various Latin American nations have already said they do not recognize Lobo as a legitimate president, including Uruguay which today elected former guerrilla leader José Mujica in real elections today, not to mention a vast number of Honduran citizens. Claims of voter turnout, results, all of it, of course, can't and shouldn't be believed. And won't be. Nothing is resolved. Today's act of electoral theater was an exercise in futility...
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/thefield/3632/memo-honduras-state-employees-forced-attend-santos-campaign-rally

Magda Hassan
12-08-2009, 11:08 AM
Electoral Fraud Proved in Honduras: More than 50 Percent Did Not Vote

Posted by Al Giordano (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/al-giordano) - December 7, 2009 at 8:18 am By Al Giordano
Video Here:
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/thefield/3660/electoral-fraud-proved-honduras-more-50-percent-did-not-vote


While most international news organizations took obedient dictation of the Honduras coup regime's claims of more than 62 percent voter participation in the November 29 "elections," authentic journalist Jesse Freeston did what real reporters are supposed to do: He went directly to the source, asked questions, took notes, and videotaped the evidence.
Freeston today publishes this bombshell report, above, on The Real News that documents definitively that Honduras electoral officials knowingly lied about their claims of more than 60 percent voter turnout. The hard results in possession of the Supreme Electoral Tribunal (TSE, in its Spanish initials) demonstrate only 49.2 percent turnout: That means that a majority - more than 50 percent - of Honduran citizens abstained in the "elections" that the National Front Against the Coup d'Etat had called unfair, unfree and placed under boycott.
The hard numbers show that abstention - and by inference, the Resistance - was the winner in the November 29 vote.
Usually, electoral fraud is committed to change the outcome between candidates in an election. It is not yet known whether the stuffing of official results with claims of 62 percent voter turnout (about 25 percent higher than the actual 49 percent participation) was also used to change the results of presidential, congressional or municipal contests.
The real question all along was well known to be: How many Hondurans would vote? And how many Hondurans would not? In the coup regime's zeal to legitimize this electoral farce it invented a number - 62 - and claimed that to be the percent of participation in the November 29 vote. Journalist Freeston walks the viewer, step by step, through the post-electoral claims by presidential candidate Pepe Lobo (declared winner of the mock elections), members of the Honduran Congress, diplomats from the United States, Canada, Costa Rica and other countries, and international corporate newspaper editorials, all of which cited the "more than 60 percent turnout" to label the "elections" as free, fair and transparent.
He then goes inside the vote counting rooms at the Supreme Electoral Tribunal in Tegucigalpa, camera in hand, and videotapes the real numbers from computer screens and paper print-outs: 49.2 percent turnout. He also conducts an interview with Leonardo Ramírez Pareda, the official responsible for counting the votes, who in a moment of frankness (perhaps unaware of what his bosses were claiming outside the room to the press) says, matter of factly, that the participation was at 49 percent. All of this evidence is on camera, and it is now known to the world, thanks to the journalist gumshoe work of Freeston and The Real News.
The 49.2 percent turnout count, Freeston notes, is very close to the independent count of the US-financed "Hagamos Democracía" organization, which works under the auspices of the National Democratic Institute (NDI) of the US State Department's National Endowment for Democracy (NED). Freeston notes that the NDI withheld its own count information from its press release lauding the the "elections" as a success.
The work that Freeston did to bring you, and all Hondurans and citizens of the world, these facts was something that any reporter for AP, Reuters, CNN, NPR, the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal or any other media could have done, but did not do: report the real facts that were available on the ground even as the Supreme Electoral Tribunal still has not - eight days after the "elections" - released the official town by town "results" which make a lie of its chairman's election night claims of 62 percent turnout.
Logic would dictate that the same governments and media organizations that, in the days since, have cited the false turnout numbers as the reason to consider the Honduras "elections" free, fair and transparent, and therefore recognize their "results," now must withdraw that recognition. Some have been played as fools, once again, by an anti-democratic coup regime. Others are willing participants in the dishonest charade.
Freeston's report is a game changer inside Honduras and outside of it as well. It will shortly be translated to Spanish and other languages (as will this written summary of it). The real facts will be distributed far and wide by the Honduran resistance and by pro-democracy voices everywhere on earth. The conclusion is based on hard data and therefore undeniable: The Honduras coup regime cooked the "results" of the November 29 "elections" with knowing falsehood. The real results reveal that abstention and the Resistance-called boycott of the electoral theater won the majority two Sundays ago. The elections are therefore absolutely illegitimate, cannot be recognized, and neither can their "results." And authentically freedom-loving peoples of Honduras and the world will never adhere to them, abide by them, respect them or acknowledge them.
The coup d'etat unleashed last June 28 now has led to a situation where the incoming government that is slated to take power on January 27, 2010 enjoys no more legitimacy or legality than the present coup regime. The Honduras people are without a democratically elected government, and will continue to be without one for some time to come. And any other country's government, or media, that continues to claim to recognize them as legitimate reveals itself to be complicit in the theft of democracy.
Now, kind readers, do your part: break the information blockade, distribute Freeston's video report far and wide, translate it into your own languages, and wave it in the faces of any government official or media organization that attempts to repeat the big lie of majority participation in the Honduras vote last week. They are the usurpers of democracy. And you are its last, best hope.
Update: Jesse Freeston, the investigator and author of the report, adds an important point - that the 49 percent total was itself subject to opportunities for padding between the ballot box and that count. Thus, if anything, the number could well be too high, still:

"The TSE tabulation is still up-stream from numerous opportunities for fraud. So I don't think it's fair to assume that the 49 percent number is correct. There's the entire military apparatus between the vote cast and the vote count."


http://narcosphere.narconews.com/thefield/3660/electoral-fraud-proved-honduras-more-50-percent-did-not-vote

Magda Hassan
01-28-2010, 01:19 AM
Wednesday, January 27, 2010

Zelaya En Route to Dominican Republic (http://hondurascoup2009.blogspot.com/2010/01/zelaya-en-route-to-dominican-republic.html)

Manuel Zelaya Rosales went by car from the Brazilian embassy to Toncontin International Airport about 20 minutes ago and arrived at the airforce base there. He was accompanied by his wife, a daughter, Rasel Tomé and escorted by President Porfirio Lobo Sosa, fresh from his inauguration ceremony, President Colom of Guatemala, and President Fernandez of the Dominican Republic. At the same time, the other people within the Brazilian embassy who were Zelaya supporters left the embassy without incident, La Tribuna reported (http://www.latribuna.hn/web2.0/?p=90972). At the airport was a large crowd organized by the Frente de Resistencia to see him off. Crowd photos showed that there were many thousand people gathered peacefully there. At the air force base the Zelayas and Tomé boarded a twin engine Embraer jet, which has just taken off for the Dominican Republic.

Update 2:35 pm PST: The spokesperson for President Alvaro Colom of Guatemala is denying (http://www.latribuna.hn/web2.0/?p=90969) that Colom attended Lobo Sosa's inauguration and accompanied Zelaya to Toncontin Airport as various Honduran newspapers have reported today.

Update 4:21 pm PST: Zelaya has arrived in the Dominican Republic. La Tribuna reports (http://www.latribuna.hn/web2.0/?p=91064) that General Romeo Vasquez Velasquez was at the Airport to see Zelaya off. "Political phenomena are one thing, another is the friends you keep," Vasquez Velasquez told the press.
http://hondurascoup2009.blogspot.com/2010/01/zelaya-en-route-to-dominican-republic.html

Magda Hassan
11-29-2010, 04:13 AM
Memo Reveals US State Department Knew Honduras Coup Was Illegal, Did Not Follow Own Advice


Posted by Erin Rosa (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/erin-rosa) - November 28, 2010 at 11:55 pm Leaked Cable, Early During Coup, Defined Removal of President Manuel Zelaya as Illegitimate
Less than month after the coup d'état that removed Honduran President Manuel Zelaya from office at gun point, the US Embassy in the country's capital sent a memo to State Department headquarters in Washington DC ripping apart arguments used by the coup plotters.

“...The military and/or whoever ordered the coup fell back on what they knew – the way Honduran presidents were removed in the past: a bogus resignation letter and a one-way ticket to a neighboring country,” reads a confidential cable from Tegucigalpa (http://cablegate.wikileaks.org/cable/2009/07/09TEGUCIGALPA645.html), signed by US Ambassador Hugo Llorens (pictured right) and published today by the organization Wikileaks.http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/ambllorens2.jpg

The agency did not heed the warnings written by Llorens. The document, which was sent to the White House, the Central Intelligence Agency, and the military, is in contrast to the State Department's position to back a coup supporter to be the future president of the country months after the memo was sent. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was later found to be involved in giving millions (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/thefield/too-cute-half-honduras-mr-president) to the coup regime through a US government-financed corporation she helped manage.

In the July 9, 2009 document, titled “Open and Shut: The Case of the Honduran Coup,” Llorens writes that after consulting legal specialists and analyzing the country's constitution it's clear that “the actions of June 28 can only be considered a coup d'etat by the legislative branch, with the support of the judicial branch and the military, against the executive branch.”

On that date soldiers forced their way into the democratically-elected president's home in the capital and put Zelaya on a plane to San José, Costa Rica after the country's Supreme Court had issued a secret arrest warrant. “Accounts of Zelaya's abduction by the military indicate he was never legally 'served' with a warrant; the soldiers forced their way in by shooting out the locks and essentially kidnapped the President,” Llorens says in the memo.

Zelaya's alleged “crime” according to coup backers was proposing to have a vote to create an assembly to rewrite the country's constitution. Later that day the National Congress passed a resolution to remove Zelaya from office, while presenting a fake resignation letter. Roberto Micheletti, President of the National Congress, was declared the new president of a de facto government run by coup supporters.

The cable says “it is not clear” that promoting a vote to change the constitution is unconstitutional, and that regardless of the legal arguments, the armed forces are not allowed to execute judicial orders and Congress had no authority to remove Zelaya from office.

“Zelaya's arrest and forced removal from the country violated multiple constitutional guarantees, including the prohibition on expatriation, presumption of innocence and right to due process,” Llorens writes. “Furthermore, a source in the Congressional leadership told us that a quorum was not present when there [sic] solution was adopted, rendering it invalid. There was no recorded vote, nor a request for the 'yeas' and 'nays.'”

Despite calling the Micheletti government “illegitimate” and the coup a product of a “hasty, ad-hoc, extralegal, secret, 48-hour process,” it was Llorens and the State Department who later began to support the coup. The US-financed Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC), which had “hands on” management (http://www.narconews.com/Issue59/article3760.html) by Clinton on its board of directors, gave $6.5 million to the coup regime after Zelaya was ousted. The agency then backed coup supporter Porfirio “Pepe” Lobo as the winner of a presidential election held five months after Zelaya was removed. Lobo denied a coup had taken place, and as president he later gave amnesty to everyone involved in plotting it.

In other words, while it is now clear that the State Department knew the coup was illegitimate and unconstitutional, why did the agency get so involved with funding the coup regime and backing one of its key supporters in elections that were marked by well-document (http://www.narconews.com/Issue62/article3954.html) abuses and fraud?

That question could be answered soon. The cable in one of hundreds from Honduras that will be made available over the next few months according to Wikileaks, and they may explain the State Department's handling of the first Latin American crisis under the Obama administration.
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/erin-rosa/2010/11/memo-reveals-us-state-department-knew-honduras-coup-was-illegal-did-not-f

Peter Lemkin
11-29-2010, 07:19 AM
Memo Reveals US State Department Knew Honduras Coup Was Illegal, Did Not Follow Own Advice


Posted by Erin Rosa (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/erin-rosa) - November 28, 2010 at 11:55 pm Leaked Cable, Early During Coup, Defined Removal of President Manuel Zelaya as Illegitimate
Less than month after the coup d'état that removed Honduran President Manuel Zelaya from office at gun point, the US Embassy in the country's capital sent a memo to State Department headquarters in Washington DC ripping apart arguments used by the coup plotters.

“...The military and/or whoever ordered the coup fell back on what they knew – the way Honduran presidents were removed in the past: a bogus resignation letter and a one-way ticket to a neighboring country,” reads a confidential cable from Tegucigalpa (http://cablegate.wikileaks.org/cable/2009/07/09TEGUCIGALPA645.html), signed by US Ambassador Hugo Llorens (pictured right) and published today by the organization Wikileaks.http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/ambllorens2.jpg

The agency did not heed the warnings written by Llorens. The document, which was sent to the White House, the Central Intelligence Agency, and the military, is in contrast to the State Department's position to back a coup supporter to be the future president of the country months after the memo was sent. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was later found to be involved in giving millions (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/thefield/too-cute-half-honduras-mr-president) to the coup regime through a US government-financed corporation she helped manage.

In the July 9, 2009 document, titled “Open and Shut: The Case of the Honduran Coup,” Llorens writes that after consulting legal specialists and analyzing the country's constitution it's clear that “the actions of June 28 can only be considered a coup d'etat by the legislative branch, with the support of the judicial branch and the military, against the executive branch.”

On that date soldiers forced their way into the democratically-elected president's home in the capital and put Zelaya on a plane to San José, Costa Rica after the country's Supreme Court had issued a secret arrest warrant. “Accounts of Zelaya's abduction by the military indicate he was never legally 'served' with a warrant; the soldiers forced their way in by shooting out the locks and essentially kidnapped the President,” Llorens says in the memo.

Zelaya's alleged “crime” according to coup backers was proposing to have a vote to create an assembly to rewrite the country's constitution. Later that day the National Congress passed a resolution to remove Zelaya from office, while presenting a fake resignation letter. Roberto Micheletti, President of the National Congress, was declared the new president of a de facto government run by coup supporters.

The cable says “it is not clear” that promoting a vote to change the constitution is unconstitutional, and that regardless of the legal arguments, the armed forces are not allowed to execute judicial orders and Congress had no authority to remove Zelaya from office.

“Zelaya's arrest and forced removal from the country violated multiple constitutional guarantees, including the prohibition on expatriation, presumption of innocence and right to due process,” Llorens writes. “Furthermore, a source in the Congressional leadership told us that a quorum was not present when there [sic] solution was adopted, rendering it invalid. There was no recorded vote, nor a request for the 'yeas' and 'nays.'”

Despite calling the Micheletti government “illegitimate” and the coup a product of a “hasty, ad-hoc, extralegal, secret, 48-hour process,” it was Llorens and the State Department who later began to support the coup. The US-financed Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC), which had “hands on” management (http://www.narconews.com/Issue59/article3760.html) by Clinton on its board of directors, gave $6.5 million to the coup regime after Zelaya was ousted. The agency then backed coup supporter Porfirio “Pepe” Lobo as the winner of a presidential election held five months after Zelaya was removed. Lobo denied a coup had taken place, and as president he later gave amnesty to everyone involved in plotting it.

In other words, while it is now clear that the State Department knew the coup was illegitimate and unconstitutional, why did the agency get so involved with funding the coup regime and backing one of its key supporters in elections that were marked by well-document (http://www.narconews.com/Issue62/article3954.html) abuses and fraud?

That question could be answered soon. The cable in one of hundreds from Honduras that will be made available over the next few months according to Wikileaks, and they may explain the State Department's handling of the first Latin American crisis under the Obama administration.
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/erin-rosa/2010/11/memo-reveals-us-state-department-knew-honduras-coup-was-illegal-did-not-f

Just as we all knew...they know [at least in principle, if not in the 'heart'] right from wrong; good from evil; legal from illegal - but choose the wrong and the evil and the illegal time and time again - for their own power and profit and geopolitical aims. The political/corporate/intelligence/military/financial class in the Uber-countries are the criminal class, for sure!

I'd say that was one of the better Wikileaked cables, thus far!

Magda Hassan
11-29-2010, 08:23 AM
C O N F I D E N T I A L TEGUCIGALPA 000645

SIPDIS

WHA FOR A/S TOM SHANNON
L FOR HAROLD KOH AND JOAN DONOGHUE
NSC FOR DAN RESTREPO

E.O. 12958: DECL: 07/23/2019
TAGS: PGOV (http://cablegate.wikileaks.org/tag/PGOV_0.html) KDEM (http://cablegate.wikileaks.org/tag/KDEM_0.html) KJUS (http://cablegate.wikileaks.org/tag/KJUS_0.html) TFH01 (http://cablegate.wikileaks.org/tag/TFH01_0.html) HO (http://cablegate.wikileaks.org/tag/HO_0.html)
SUBJECT: TFHO1: OPEN AND SHUT: THE CASE OF THE HONDURAN COUP

REF: TEGUCIGALPA 578

Classified By: Ambassador Hugo Llorens, reasons 1.4 (b and d)

¶ (http://cablegate.wikileaks.org/cable/2009/07/09TEGUCIGALPA645.html#par1)1. (C) Summary: Post has attempted to clarify some of the
legal and constitutional issues surrounding the June 28
forced removal of President Manuel "Mel" Zelaya. The
Embassy perspective is that there is no doubt that the
military, Supreme Court and National Congress conspired
on June 28 in what constituted an illegal and
unconstitutional coup against the Executive Branch, while
accepting that there may be a prima facie case that Zelaya
may
have committed illegalities and may have even violated the
constitution. There is equally no doubt from our perspective
that Roberto Micheletti's assumption of power was
illegitimate. Nevertheless, it is also evident that the
constitution itself may be deficient in terms of providing
clear procedures for dealing with alleged illegal acts by
the President and resolving conflicts between the branches
of government. End summary.

¶ (http://cablegate.wikileaks.org/cable/2009/07/09TEGUCIGALPA645.html#par2)2. (U) Since the June 28 removal and expulsion of President
Zelaya by the Honduran armed forces, the Embassy has
consulted Honduran legal experts (one cannot find a fully
unbiased professional legal opinion in Honduras in the
current politically charged atmosphere) and reviewed the
text of the Honduran Constitution and its laws to develop a
better understanding of the arguments being parlayed by the
coup's supporters and opponents.

-------------------------------
Arguments of the Coup Defenders
-------------------------------

¶ (http://cablegate.wikileaks.org/cable/2009/07/09TEGUCIGALPA645.html#par3)3. (SBU) Defenders of the June 28 coup have offered some
combination of the following, often ambiguous, arguments to
assert it's legality:

-- Zelaya had broken the law (alleged but not proven);

-- Zelaya resigned (a clear fabrication);

-- Zelaya intended to extend his term in office
(supposition);

-- Had he been allowed to proceed with his June 28
constitutional reform opinion poll, Zelaya would have
dissolved Congress the following day and convened a
constituent assembly (supposition);

-- Zelaya had to be removed from the country to prevent a
bloodbath;

-- Congress "unanimously" (or in some versions by a 123-5
vote) deposed Zelaya; (after the fact and under the cloak
of secrecy); and

-- Zelaya "automatically" ceased to be president the moment
he suggested modifying the constitutional prohibition on
presidential reelection.

¶ (http://cablegate.wikileaks.org/cable/2009/07/09TEGUCIGALPA645.html#par4)4. (C) In our view, none of the above arguments has any
substantive validity under the Honduran constitution. Some
are outright false. Others are mere supposition or ex-post
rationalizations of a patently illegal act. Essentially:

-- the military had no authority to remove Zelaya from the
country;

-- Congress has no constitutional authority to remove a
Honduran president;

-- Congress and the judiciary removed Zelaya on the basis
of a hasty, ad-hoc, extralegal, secret, 48-hour process;

-- the purported "resignation" letter was a fabrication and
was not even the basis for Congress's action of June 28;
and

-- Zelaya's arrest and forced removal from the country
violated multiple constitutional guarantees, including the
prohibition on expatriation, presumption of innocence and
right to due process.

-------------------------------------------
Impeachment under the Honduran Constitution
-------------------------------------------

¶ (http://cablegate.wikileaks.org/cable/2009/07/09TEGUCIGALPA645.html#par5)5. (U) Under the Honduran Constitution as currently
written, the President may be removed only on the basis of
death, resignation or incapacitation. Only the Supreme
Court may determine that a President has been
"incapacitated" on the basis of committing a crime.

¶ (http://cablegate.wikileaks.org/cable/2009/07/09TEGUCIGALPA645.html#par6)6. (U) There is no explicit impeachment procedure in the
1982 Honduran Constitution. Originally, Article 205-15
stated that Congress had the competence to determine
whether "cause" existed against the President, but it did
not stipulate on what grounds or under what procedure.
Article 319-2 stated that the Supreme Court would "hear"
cases of official or common crimes committed by high-level
officials, upon a finding of cause by the Congress. This
implied a vague two-step executive impeachment process
involving the other two branches of government, although
without specific criteria or procedures. However, Article
205 was abrogated in 2003, and the corresponding provision
of Article 319 (renumbered 313) was revised to state only
that the Supreme Court would hear "processes initiated"
against high officials. Thus, it appears that under the
Constitution as currently written, removal of a president
or a government official is an entirely judicial matter.

¶ (http://cablegate.wikileaks.org/cable/2009/07/09TEGUCIGALPA645.html#par7)7. (U) Respected legal opinion confirms that the removal of
a president is a judicial matter. According to a 2006 book
by respected legal scholar Enrique Flores Valeriano -- late
father of Zelaya's Minister of the Presidency, Enrique
Flores Lanza -- Article 112 of the Law of Constitutional
Justice indicates that if any government official is found
to be in violation of the Constitution, that person should
be removed from office immediately with the ultimate
authority on matters of Constitutionality being the Supreme
Court.

¶ (http://cablegate.wikileaks.org/cable/2009/07/09TEGUCIGALPA645.html#par8)8. (U) Many legal experts have also confirmed to us that
the Honduran process for impeaching a President or other
senior-level officials is a judicial procedure. They
assert that under Honduran law the process consists of formal
criminal charges being filed by the Attorney General
against the accused with the Supreme Court. The Supreme
Court could accept or reject the charges. If the Court
moved to indict, it would assign a Supreme Court
magistrate, or a panel of magistrates to investigate the
matter,
and oversee the trial. The trial process is open and
transparent and the defendant would be given a full right
of self-defense. If convicted in the impeachment trial,
the magistrates have authority to remove the President or
senior official. Once the President is removed, then the
constitutional succession would follow. In this case, if a
President is legally charged, convicted, and removed, his
successor is the Vice President or what is termed the
Presidential Designate. In the current situation in
Honduras, since the Vice President, Elvin Santos, resigned
last December in order to be able to run as the Liberal
Party Presidential candidate, President Zelaya's successor
would be Congress President Roberto Micheletti.
Unfortunately, the President was never tried, or
convicted, or was legally removed from office to allow a
legal succession.

-----------------------------
The Legal Case Against Zelaya
-----------------------------

¶ (http://cablegate.wikileaks.org/cable/2009/07/09TEGUCIGALPA645.html#par9)9. (C) Zelaya's opponents allege that he violated the
Constitution on numerous grounds, some of which appear on
their face to be valid, others not:

-- Refusing to submit a budget to the Congress: The
Constitution is unambiguous that the Executive shall submit
a proposed budget to Congress by September 15 each year
(Art. 367), that Congress shall approve the budget (Art.
366) and that no obligations or payments may be effectuated
except on the basis of an approved budget (Art. 364);

-- Refusing to fund the Congress: Article 212 states that
the Treasury shall apportion quarterly the funds needed for
the operation of the Congress;

-- Proposing an illegal constitutional referendum: The
Constitution may be amended only through two-thirds vote of
the Congress in two consecutive sessions (Art. 373 and
375); a constituent assembly to rewrite the constitution,
as Zelaya promoted, is therefore unconstitutional; however,
it is not clear that proposing a constituent assembly in
itself violates the constitution, only that any changes
ensuing from that assembly would be invalid;

-- Defying the judgment of a competent court: Zelaya
insisted on pushing ahead with his constitutional reform
opinion poll after both a first-instance court and an
appeals court ordered him to suspend those efforts;
however, while he clearly intended to follow through with
the poll, he never actually did it;

-- Proposing to reform unreformable articles: Since
Zelaya's proposed constituent assembly would have unlimited
powers to rewrite the constitution, it violated Article
374, which makes certain articles unamendable; once again,
though, Zelaya never actually attempted to change the
so-called "carved in stone" articles; it was only assumed
he intended to;

-- Dismissing the armed forces chief: The Supreme Court's
Constitutional Hall ruled June 25 that Zelaya was in
violation of the Constitution for dismissing Defense Chief
Vasquez Velasquez; the Constitution (Art. 280) states that
the President may freely name or remove the chief of the
armed forces; but the court ruled that since Zelaya fired
him for refusing to carry out a poll the court had ruled
illegal, the firing was illegal.

¶ (http://cablegate.wikileaks.org/cable/2009/07/09TEGUCIGALPA645.html#par10)10. (C) Although a case could well have been made against
Zelaya for a number of the above alleged constitutional
violations, there was never any formal, public weighing of
the evidence nor any semblance of due process.

-----------------------
The Article 239 Cannard
-----------------------

¶ (http://cablegate.wikileaks.org/cable/2009/07/09TEGUCIGALPA645.html#par11)11. (U) Article 239, which coup supporters began citing
after the fact to justify Zelaya's removal (it is nowhere
mentioned in the voluminous judicial dossier against
Zelaya), states that any official proposing to reform the
constitutional prohibition against reelection of the
president shall immediately cease to carry out their
functions and be ineligible to hold public office for 10
years. Coup defenders have asserted that Zelaya therefore
automatically ceased to be President when he proposed a
constituent assembly to rewrite the Constitution.

¶ (http://cablegate.wikileaks.org/cable/2009/07/09TEGUCIGALPA645.html#par12)12. (C) Post's analysis indicates the Article 239 argument
is flawed on multiple grounds:

-- Although it was widely assumed that Zelaya's reason for
seeking to convoke a constituent assembly was to amend the
constitution to allow for reelection, we are not aware
that he ever actually stated so publicly;

-- Article 239 does not stipulate who determines whether it
has been violated or how, but it is reasonable to assume
that it does not abrogate other guarantees of due process
and the presumption of innocence;

-- Article 94 states that no penalty shall be imposed
without the accused having been heard and found guilty in a
competent court;

-- Many other Honduran officials, including presidents,
going back to the first elected government under the 1982
Constitution, have proposed allowing presidential
reelection, and they were never deemed to have been
automatically removed from their positions as a result.

¶ (http://cablegate.wikileaks.org/cable/2009/07/09TEGUCIGALPA645.html#par13)13. (C) It further warrants mention that Micheletti himself
should be forced to resign following the logic of the 239
argument, since as President of Congress he considered
legislation to have a fourth ballot box ("cuarta urna") at
the November elections to seek voter approval for a
constituent assembly to rewrite the constitution. Any
member of Congress who discussed the proposal should also
be required to resign, and National Party presidential
candidate Pepe Lobo, who endorsed the idea, should be
ineligible to hold public office for 10 years.

--------------------------------------------- -
Forced Removal by Military was Clearly Illegal
--------------------------------------------- -

¶ (http://cablegate.wikileaks.org/cable/2009/07/09TEGUCIGALPA645.html#par14)14. (C) Regardless of the merits of Zelaya's alleged
constitutional violations, it is clear from even a cursory
reading that his removal by military means was illegal, and
even the most zealous of coup defenders have been unable to
make convincing arguments to bridge the intellectual gulf
between "Zelaya broke the law" to "therefore, he was packed
off to Costa Rica by the military without a trial."

-- Although coup supporters allege the court issued an
arrest warrant for Zelaya for disobeying its order to
desist from the opinion poll, the warrant, made public days
later, was for him to be arrested and brought before the
competent authority, not removed from the county;

-- Even if the court had ordered Zelaya to be removed from
the country, that order would have been unconstitutional;
Article 81 states that all Hondurans have the right to
remain in the national territory, subject to certain narrow
exceptions spelled out in Article 187, which may be invoked
only by the President of the Republic with the agreement of
the Council of Ministers; Article 102 states that no
Honduran may be expatriated;

-- The armed forces have no/no competency to execute
judicial orders; originally, Article 272 said the armed
forces had the responsibility to "maintain peace, public
order and the 'dominion' of the constitution," but that
language was excised in 1998; under the current text, only
the police are authorized to uphold the law and execute
court orders (Art. 293);

-- Accounts of Zelaya's abduction by the military indicate
he was never legally "served" with a warrant; the soldiers
forced their way in by shooting out the locks and
essentially kidnapped the President.

¶ (http://cablegate.wikileaks.org/cable/2009/07/09TEGUCIGALPA645.html#par15)15. (U) The Armed Forces' ranking legal advisor, Col.
Herberth Bayardo Inestroza, acknowledged in an interview
published in the Honduran press July 5 that the Honduran
Armed Forces had broken the law in removing Zelaya from the
country. That same day it was reported that the Public
Ministry was investigating the actions of the Armed Forces
in arresting and deporting Zelaya June 28 and that the
Supreme Court had asked the Armed Forces to explain the
circumstances that motivated his forcible exile.

¶ (http://cablegate.wikileaks.org/cable/2009/07/09TEGUCIGALPA645.html#par16)16. (C) As reported reftel, the legal adviser to the
Supreme Court told Poloff that at least some justices on
the Court consider Zelaya's arrest and deportation by the
military to have been illegal.

------------------------------------------
Congress Had no Authority to Remove Zelaya
------------------------------------------

¶ (http://cablegate.wikileaks.org/cable/2009/07/09TEGUCIGALPA645.html#par17)17. (C) As explained above, the Constitution as amended in
2003 apparently gives sole authority for removing a
president to the judiciary. The Congressional action of
June 28 has been reported in some media as acceptance of
Zelaya's resignation, based on a bogus resignation letter
dated June 25 that surfaced after the coup. However, the
June 28 Congressional resolution makes no mention of the
letter, nor does it state that Congress was accepting
Zelaya's resignation. It says Congress "disapproves" of
Zelaya's conduct and therefore "separates" him from the
office of President -- a constitutional authority Congress
does not have. Furthermore, a source in the Congressional
leadership told us that a quorum was not present when the
resolution was adopted, rendering it invalid. There was no
recorded vote, nor a request for the "yeas" and "nays."

¶ (http://cablegate.wikileaks.org/cable/2009/07/09TEGUCIGALPA645.html#par18)18. (C) In sum, for a constitutional succession from Zelaya
to Micheletti to occur would require one of several
conditions:

Zelaya's resignation, his death, or permanent medical
incapacitation (as determined by judicial and medical
authorities), or as discussed previously, his formal criminal
conviction and removal from office. In the absence of any of
these conditions and since Congress lacked the legal
authority to remove Zelaya, the actions of June 28 can only
be considered a coup d'etat by the legislative branch, with
the support of the judicial branch and the military, against
the executive branch. It bears mentioning that, whereas the
resolution adopted June 28 refers only to Zelaya, its effect
was to remove the entire executive branch. Both of these
actions clearly exceeded Congress's authority.

-------
Comment
-------

¶ (http://cablegate.wikileaks.org/cable/2009/07/09TEGUCIGALPA645.html#par19)19. (C) The analysis of the Constitution sheds some
interesting light on the events of June 28. The Honduran
establishment confronted a dilemma: near unanimity among
the institutions of the state and the political class that
Zelaya had abused his powers in violation of the
Constitution, but with some ambiguity what to do about it.
Faced with that lack of clarity, the military and/or
whoever ordered the coup fell back on what they knew -- the
way Honduran presidents were removed in the past: a bogus
resignation letter and a one-way ticket to a neighboring
country. No matter what the merits of the case against
Zelaya, his forced removal by the military was clearly
illegal, and Micheletti's ascendance as "interim president"
was totally illegitimate.

¶ (http://cablegate.wikileaks.org/cable/2009/07/09TEGUCIGALPA645.html#par20)20. (C) Nonetheless, the very Constitutional uncertainty
that presented the political class with this dilemma may
provide the seeds for a solution. The coup's most ardent
legal defenders have been unable to make the intellectual
leap from their arguments regarding Zelaya's alleged crimes
to how those allegations justified dragging him out of his
bed in the night and flying him to Costa Rica. That the
Attorney General's office and the Supreme Court now
reportedly question the legality of that final step is
encouraging and may provide a face-saving "out" for the two
opposing sides in the current standoff. End Comment.
LLORENS

Peter Lemkin
03-17-2011, 08:24 AM
JUAN GONZALEZ: Former Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide has decided to return to Haiti this week ahead of Sunday’s presidential runoff election. Aristide has lived in exile in South Africa since 2004, when he was ousted in a U.S.-backed coup. Amy Goodman is in South Africa to cover Aristide’s return to Haiti. She joins us now from Johannesburg.

Welcome, Amy.

AMY GOODMAN: Hi, Juan. Hi, Juan. It’s great to be with you, and quite amazing what is going to be taking place here in this historic country, South Africa, to do with the history of another historic country, Haiti. We flew in from New York earlier today to Oliver Tambo Airport. And just, that is amazing in itself, right? He was the former president of the ANC, the late president of the African National Congress, one of the great anti-apartheid leaders. When we came in from the plane, the first image was that of Nelson Mandela, the former president of South Africa. And on all the wings of the planes are the flag of the new country of South Africa—you know, in 1994, not so new—but the symbol of a peaceful revolution that took place in this country.

Now, the reason we are here, though, is because President Aristide, as you said, is returning to South Africa before—is returning to Haiti before the Sunday elections that will be taking place for a new president in Haiti. This is truly historic.

Regular listeners and viewers to Democracy Now! may remember back to 2004, to the second coup against Aristide. The first was in 1991, unfortunately a U.S-backed coup that threw the democratically elected president out of office. The second was in 1994, when he was reelected, again a U.S.-backed coup. Democracy Now! was on the plane to the Central African Republic to Bangi, where he was flown into exile by U.S. military and U.S. security. We went in a small delegation that was led by Maxine Waters, the Los Angeles Congress member; Randall Robinson, the founder of TransAfrica; and others, to return the Aristides to the Western hemisphere, amidst, at the time, Condoleezza Rice and Donald Rumsfeld and Colin Powell, Secretary of State at the time, warning the Aristides they were not to return to the Western hemisphere, to which Randall Robinson responded, when we are on the flight, "Whose hemisphere are they talking about?" And now—they returned to Jamaica, ultimately in exile in South Africa, where they have been for the last seven years. Now the Aristides are attempting to return to their country, to Haiti.

I’m joined right now by K.K. Kean. We will both be on the plane, though last-minute negotiations are taking place between, well, the government of South Africa, the U.S., which is putting tremendous pressure on the government of South Africa not to return the Aristides to Haiti and putting pressure on the Haitian government. As I was on that plane—and K.K. Kean was, as well, the renowned filmmaker who’s made many films on Haiti, most recently called Rezistans, covered the coup in 1991 and has done many films since. We are going to hopefully return on this plane again, with the Aristides, to chronicle this historic journey of the Aristides and their two daughters to their country, to Haiti.

K.K. Kean, as you join us now, talk about the significance of this return of the Aristides, though last-minute negotiations are taking place, even as we speak, with the tremendous pressure that’s being brought to bear on the Aristides and the South African and Haitian governments by the U.S.

K.K. Kean: OK, thank you, Amy, and it’s a pleasure to be here. It’s certainly a pleasure to be part of this long-awaited return, which we hope will actually take place this time.

The Aristides have been in exile here in South Africa for seven years, always wanting to go home, always looking for an opportunity. At this point, they’ve been given passports by the Haitian government. So, according to the Haitian government, it’s fine for them to return. However, there’s an election next Sunday, and, no matter what happens, the Haitian government will change. And we’re far less secure of the new Haitian government, whether they will allow Aristide to return or not. So, this is the reason that it’s a small window of opportunity, which Aristide and his friends are trying to take opportunity of.

JUAN GONZALEZ: Well, Amy and K.K., on Monday, the U.S. State Department urged former President Aristide to postpone his trip.

MARK TONER: However, former President Aristide has chosen to remain outside of Haiti for seven years. To return this week could only be seen as a conscious choice to impact Haiti’s elections. We would urge former President Aristide to delay his return until after the electoral process has concluded, to permit the Haitian people to cast their ballots in a peaceful atmosphere. Return prior to the election may potentially be destabilizing to the political process.

JUAN GONZALEZ: That was State Department spokesperson Mark Toner. On Monday, we asked Aristide’s attorney, Ira Kurzban, to respond.

IRA KURZBAN: President Aristide’s desire to return home is unrelated to the election, but to a desire to be in Haiti to carry on his educational work. However, he is genuinely concerned that a change in the Haitian government may result in his remaining in South Africa. The Department of State has previously said that this is a decision for the Haitian government. They should leave the decision to the democratically elected government, instead of seeking to dictate the terms under which a Haitian citizen may return to his country.

The State Department statement today is full of misinformation. The claim that President Aristide voluntarily left Haiti and could have returned the past seven years is belied by the U.S. government’s active involvement in his removal as the democratically elected president of Haiti and their active role in ensuring that he remained, and apparently remains, in South Africa.

JUAN GONZALEZ: That was Ira Kurzban, President Aristide’s longtime lawyer. Amy, your sense of why it’s so important at this critical time, just before the election, for President Aristide to return?

AMY GOODMAN: Well, you know, it’s very interesting to hear the wording of Mark Toner’s statement. Before that, well, now the resigned P.J. Crowley, the State Department spokesperson, who had actually tweeted out at an earlier time that the Aristides should not be returning.

Aristide is a Haitian citizen. He was the president of Haiti, but he will return as a resident of Haiti. And, you know, right now, I have just seen a letter that’s being circulated to lawyers and law professors around the United States, where they are calling on Cheryl Mills, the chief of staff of the Department of State, to—criticizing the State Department’s statement, saying that he has every right to return. Also, the significance of who is in the State Department, people who understand that well, like Harold Koh, used to head the human rights clinic at Yale University, like Michael Posner, the Assistant Secretary Michael Posner, who used to be head of the Lawyers Committee for Human Rights, which is now called Human Rights First—the issue of the human rights and the right of freedom of expression and of a Haitian citizen to return home, of a Haitian family to return home. This is a critical moment right now. The negotiations are taking place behind the scenes. The safety of this trip is extremely important. And the pressure that the U.S. has continually brought to bear on President Aristide is one that is very important to highlight.

The U.S. can change its role in the troubled relationship it has had in Haiti, since the very beginning. I mean, in 1804, Haiti was the first black republic, born of a slave uprising, the only country in the world, and the U.S. government would not recognize the republic of Haiti for decades, because congressmen at that time were afraid that the slave uprising would inspire slaves in the United States. So you go back to that time, and you see the history. Again, in 1991 and 2004, the U.S. role in the coups against the democratically elected leader, President Aristide. So, to change that troubled history, especially in a country that is undergoing so much right now—we’re looking at the earthquake in Japan, so horrific. Let’s remember also the earthquake in Haiti that killed so many hundreds of thousands of people, then the cholera outbreak. Haiti needs a break. Haiti needs to be able to assert itself, not with the intervention of other countries, but aiding the rebuilding of Haiti. And President Aristide has always been a part of that.

One last thing, Juan, I just wanted to bring K.K. in. You know, she has been here seven years in South Africa documenting the Aristides’ stay here, in fact documenting when President Aristide got his doctorate, another doctorate, here in South Africa.

K.K. Kean: That is, I’ve made seven trips to South Africa. I haven’t been here for seven years. But yes, President Aristide was honored by UNISA, one of the largest universities in the world. He was given a doctorate in philosophy and African languages. And I documented that and also filmed him talking about his thesis, which was called "Umoya Wamagama," which means "The Spirit of the Words" and talks about similarities in Creole and African languages.

AMY GOODMAN: And his meeting with Nelson Mandela? He had a meeting with Nelson Mandela.

K.K. Kean: Yeah. Oh, yeah. But Mbeki was the president at that time and was present at the ceremony, yeah.

AMY GOODMAN: And it was—

K.K. Kean: This film was shown on Haitian television, which was very important at the time.

Magda Hassan
03-18-2011, 07:19 AM
Who the hell is Obama to tell either South Africa or Aristides what to do? He has no business in either country to do a damn thing. :hitler:

Glad Zuma and Aristides gave him the bird :finger:

the U.S. government has put so much pressure on the South African government not to return the Aristides to Haiti. Actually, news came out earlier this week that President Obama personally called President Zuma of South Africa to implore him not to provide this jet for the Aristides to return home. But, the South African government responded in a public way and said that they would not be pressured by anyone.


Democracy Now! Exclusive: Aboard Aristide’s Airplane: Ex-Haitian Leader Returns From 7 Years In Exile


by Amy Goodman
In defiance of the Obama administration, former Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide is headed back to Haiti today for the first time since being ousted in a 2004 U.S.-backed coup. Hours ago, Aristide boarded a plane in South Africa bound for Port-Au-Prince. Joining him on the flight is his wife, Mildred Aristide, attorney Ira Kurzban and actor Danny Glover. Democracy Now! host Amy Goodman is also on aboard. Minutes before takeoff she filed this report (listen to MP3 (http://traffic.libsyn.com/democracynow/AmyAirplane.mp3)) and sent exclusive photos (http://demnow.tumblr.com/post/3927088526/exclusive-photos-of-former-president-jean-bertrand).http://www.commondreams.org/sites/commondreams.org/files/imce-images/aristideboardsplane_0.jpgFormer Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide aboard the plane that will return him home to Haiti. PHOTO: AMY GOODMAN/DEMOCRACY NOW!
AMY GOODMAN: I’m Amy Goodman, the host of Democracy Now! at the Lanseria International Airport, a private airport in Johannesburg, where the South African government flight is about to take the Aristides home from South Africa—where they’ve been in exile for the last seven years—to Haiti. It is a momentous time.
We just went upstairs to the news conference, which was held by South African government officials and President Aristide. He spoke in Zulu, Xhosa, and he handed out an English translation for the rest of the press to the consternation of some of them. President Aristide said in Zulu:

“Dear brothers and sisters, a great day has arrived, a day to say goodbye before returning home, the day to whole-heartedly thank President Zuma and the government, former President Mbeki and his wife, our beloved Madiba and his family”—referring of course to Nelson Mandela. “Dear friends at the University of South Africa and Wits University—all of you brothers and sisters of South Africa. My family and I will never forget this long and beautiful time spent with you in the heart of Mama Africa. We saw the spirit of Ubuntu the first day we met with Minister Dlamini-Zuma in 2003 until today. Indeed, the cleverness of our ancestors is outstanding. Ubuntu is an honor to Africa and to this country. The world truly needs this philosophy. May the starts of Ubuntu shine in the sky over the entire world.”
He ended again by saying, “Warm greetings dear brothers and sisters. We wish you a prosperous life and all the best. Thank you. Bye, bye.”
He spoke in Swahili, in Zulu, in Afrikaans and in Tswana. He is extremely excited about returning home.http://www.commondreams.org/sites/commondreams.org/files/imce-images/aristidefamilyonplane_0.jpgFormer Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide and his wife, Mildred Aristide, get settled in the plane before departing South Africa, the country that has been their home while in exile from Haiti. PHOTO: AMY GOODMAN/DEMOCRACY NOW!
We had a private meeting with the president and his family this afternoon and the delegation that’s accompanying him: Danny Glover, the actor and activist; James Early, of the Smithsonian Institution, formerly chair of the Institute for Policy Studies; and K.K. Kean, the filmmaker who has made a number of films about Haiti. It is—and the family, of course, of the Aristides. He did not want to make any political statements there. He wanted the South African government to speak before he would speak. And, he simply said that he is thrilled to be going home. He looks forward to being –- these are his words, not mine–– “a resident of Haiti, not the president” at this point, to really pursuing issues of health and education in Haiti.
Now we’re in a holding area, about to get on to the plane that will take us–– we don’t know exactly the itinerary at this moment—but will take us to Port-au-Prince, Haiti, where we expect to arrive sometime around noon on Friday. This is the culmination of years of effort. I mean, ever since that fateful day on February 29, 2004–– the second of two U.S.-backed coups against President Aristide. The first was in 1991, when he was ousted for three years. The second when the number two man in the U.S. embassy came to the home of the Aristides in Tabar in Haiti and they were bundled onto a jet with security and military and they were sent off to the Central American Republic. The U.S. government insisted that the Aristides went of their own free will. And, it’s something they’ve insisted to this day because, in the last days, the U.S. government has issued warnings to the State Department that the Aristides should not come back to Haiti. That, he left of his own free will in 2004.
We don’t know the itinerary at this point, we just know that we expect to land in Port-au-Prince, Haiti about noon on Friday. It’s about 11 o’clock on Thursday here in South Africa. It promises to be a long nights journey into a new day. It’s very interesting to watch President Aristide right now; I’m watching him speak to a South African government official right now who is wishing him well, saying that he is a part of the South African family, not just a friend. And, it’s interesting because the U.S. government has put so much pressure on the South African government not to return the Aristides to Haiti. Actually, news came out earlier this week that President Obama personally called President Zuma of South Africa to implore him not to provide this jet for the Aristides to return home. But, the South African government responded in a public way and said that they would not be pressured by anyone. So, tonight, the Aristides return home to Haiti. I’m Amy Goodman for Democracy Now! in Johannesburg, South Africa. We’re about to board the plane and hope to arrive in Haiti in Friday about noon.
http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2011/03/17-7

Peter Lemkin
03-18-2011, 07:47 AM
I welcome his return. He never should have been overthrown [twice!!!] by the USA [and France]....and, sadly, I fear for his safety due to the USA....they have many 'assets' in Haiti and Aristide will need very good bodyguards and the people behind him to not be kidnapped again! Yea, the 'ol USA thinks it is the Empire and all [internal and external] must bow to our power and will - cross us and there is an iron fist waiting! :hitler: Each time he was overthrown by secret US coup and/or kidnapping, he was the duly elected President! We really stand for democracy - NOT! We just love puppet dictators on the right....and hate nationalists who only want to help their own People [rather than our Oligarchy's 'bottom line']. Sick and not changing - even under Obama.

Peter Lemkin
03-18-2011, 04:12 PM
He's back and the chants of the spontaneous protests are to the effect that Sunday's elections are a fraud - and they are - as his party is outlawed and was and is the one most Haitians back...but also the one the USA dislikes the most....... I predict some very chaotic scenes and riots, perhaps. They will be blamed on Aristide, when the opposite is true..... S.N.A.F.U.

Magda Hassan
05-27-2011, 01:49 PM
Almost 2 years since the coup President Zelaya is returning to Honduras. Father Bourgeois and others from the School of the Americas Watch will also accompany him on his return tomorrow.
Brazilian envoy to witness ex-Honduran president's return



10:40, May 27, 2011


Brazil said Thursday it would send an envoy to witness former Honduran president Manuel Zelaya's scheduled return to his country on Saturday, a pre-condition set by the Organization of the Americas (OAS) to readmit the Central American nation.

Special Advisor on International Affairs of Brazilian Presidency Marco Aurelio Garcia will travel to the Honduran capital of Tegucigalpa on that occasion, Foreign Minister Antonio Patriota told a joint news conference.

"That should seal the return of Honduras to the American and international coexistence," Patriota said.

Under a deal reached among OAS members on Sunday, Hondruas, whose membership was suspended after Zelaya was ousted in a coup in June 2009, would be readmitted into the organization under the conditions that the former president would be allowed to safely return to his country with full political rights guaranteed.

The readmission would be formalized at an extraordinary general meeting to be held on June 1 in Washington.

The current Honduran government led by Porfirio Lobo which emerged from elections after the coup, would also gain recognition of OAS members after Zelaya's return.

Source: Xinhua

Magda Hassan
11-11-2014, 10:50 PM
Hard choices: Hillary Clinton admits role in Honduran coup aftermath

Clinton’s embrace of far-right narrative on Latin America is part of electoral strategy
September 29, 2014 6:00AM ET
by Mark Weisbrot (http://america.aljazeera.com/profiles/w/mark-weisbrot0.html) @MarkWeisbrot (http://www.twitter.com/MarkWeisbrot)


In a recent op-ed in The Washington Post, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton used a review of Henry Kissinger’s latest book, “World Order,” (http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/hillary-clinton-reviews-henry-kissingers-world-order/2014/09/04/b280c654-31ea-11e4-8f02-03c644b2d7d0_story.html) to lay out her vision for “sustaining America’s leadership in the world.” In the midst of numerous global crises, she called for return to a foreign policy with purpose, strategy and pragmatism. She also highlighted some of these policy choices in her memoir “Hard Choices” and how they contributed to the challenges that Barack Obama’s administration now faces.
The chapter on Latin America, particularly the section on Honduras, a major source of the child migrants currently pouring into the United States, has gone largely unnoticed. In letters to Clinton and her successor, John Kerry, more than 100 (http://www.cepr.net/index.php/blogs/the-americas-blog/108-members-of-congress-urge-action-on-political-repression-and-human-rights-abuses-in-honduras) members of Congress have repeatedly (http://www.justforeignpolicy.org/node/1170) warned about the deteriorating security situation in Honduras, especially since the 2009 military coup that ousted the country’s democratically elected President Manuel Zelaya. As Honduran scholar Dana Frank points out in Foreign Affairs (http://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/140283/dana-frank/hopeless-in-honduras), the U.S.-backed post-coup government “rewarded coup loyalists with top ministries,” opening the door for further “violence and anarchy.”
The homicide rate in Honduras, already the highest in the world, increased by 50 percent from 2008 to 2011; political repression, the murder of opposition political candidates, peasant organizers and LGBT activists increased and continue to this day. Femicides skyrocketed. The violence and insecurity were exacerbated by a generalized institutional collapse. Drug-related violence has worsened amid allegations of rampant corruption (http://bigstory.ap.org/article/honduras-police-cleanup-efforts-stall) in Honduras’ police and government. While the gangs are responsible for much of the violence, Honduran security forces have engaged in a wave of killings (http://bigstory.ap.org/article/honduras-police-accused-death-squad-killings) and other human rights crimes with impunity.
Despite this, however, both under Clinton and Kerry, the State Department’s response to the violence and military and police impunity has largely been silence, along with continued U.S. aid to Honduran security forces. In “Hard Choices,” Clinton describes her role in the aftermath of the coup that brought about this dire situation. Her firsthand account is significant both for the confession of an important truth and for a crucial false testimony.
First, the confession: Clinton admits that she used the power of her office to make sure that Zelaya would not return to office. “In the subsequent days [after the coup] I spoke with my counterparts around the hemisphere, including Secretary [Patricia] Espinosa in Mexico,” Clinton writes. “We strategized on a plan to restore order in Honduras and ensure that free and fair elections could be held quickly and legitimately, which would render the question of Zelaya moot.”
This may not come as a surprise to those who followed the post-coup drama closely. (See my commentary from 2009 on Washington’s role in helping the coup succeed here (http://www.cepr.net/index.php/op-eds-&-columns/op-eds-&-columns/top-ten-ways), here (http://articles.latimes.com/2009/jul/23/opinion/oe-weisbrot23) and here (http://www.cepr.net/index.php/op-eds-&-columns/op-eds-&-columns/seven-weeks-after-honduran-coup-washington-still-lagging-the-region-on-restoring-democracy).) But the official storyline, which was dutifully accepted by most in the media, was that the Obama administration actually opposed the coup and wanted Zelaya to return to office.

Clinton’s position on Latin America in her bid for the presidency is another example of how the far right exerts disproportionate influence on US foreign policy in the hemisphere.


The question of Zelaya was anything but moot. Latin American leaders (http://www.oas.org/en/media_center/press_release.asp?sCodigo=E-214/09), the United Nations General Assembly (http://www.un.org/News/Press/docs/2009/ga10840.doc.htm) and other international bodies vehemently demanded his immediate return to office. Clinton’s defiant and anti-democratic stance spurred a downward slide in U.S. relations with several Latin American countries, which has continued. It eroded the warm welcome and benefit of the doubt that even the leftist governments in region offered to the newly installed Obama administration a few months earlier.
Clinton’s false testimony is even more revealing. She reports that Zelaya was arrested amid “fears that he was preparing to circumvent the constitution and extend his term in office.” This is simply not true. As Clinton must know, when Zelaya was kidnapped by the military and flown out of the country in his pajamas on June 28, 2009, he was trying to put a consultative, nonbinding poll on the ballot to ask voters whether they wanted to have a real referendum on reforming the constitution during the scheduled election in November. It is important to note that Zelaya was not eligible to run in that election. Even if he had gotten everything he wanted, it was impossible for Zelaya to extend his term in office. But this did not stop the extreme right in Honduras and the United States from using false charges of tampering with the constitution to justify the coup.
In addition to her bold confession and Clinton’s embrace of the far-right narrative in the Honduran episode, the Latin America chapter is considerably to the right of even her own record on the region as secretary of state. This appears to be a political calculation. There is little risk of losing votes for admitting her role in making most of the hemisphere’s governments disgusted with the United States. On the other side of the equation, there are influential interest groups and significant campaign money to be raised from the right-wing Latin American lobby, including Floridian Cuban-Americans and their political fundraisers.
Like the 54-year-old failed embargo against Cuba, Clinton’s position on Latin America in her bid for the presidency is another example of how the far right exerts disproportionate influence on U.S. foreign policy in the hemisphere.