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Jan Klimkowski
08-06-2009, 05:34 PM
Rupert Murdoch plans charge for all news websites by next summer

Times and Sun readers to pay as loss-making Murdoch declares end to free-for-all

Andrew Clark in New York The Guardian, Thursday 6 August 2009 Article

Rupert Murdoch said quality journalism is not cheap and so he intends to charge for all his websites.

The billionaire media mogul Rupert Murdoch suffered the indignity of seeing his global empire make a huge financial loss yesterday and promptly pledged to shake up the newspaper industry by introducing charges for access to all his news websites, including the Times, the Sun and the News of the World, by next summer.

Stung by a collapse in advertising revenue as the recession shredded Fleet Street's traditional business model, Murdoch declared that the era of a free-for-all in online news was over.

"Quality journalism is not cheap," said Murdoch. "The digital revolution has opened many new and inexpensive distribution channels but it has not made content free. We intend to charge for all our news websites."

The Australian-born press and television baron was speaking as his News Corporation holding company slumped to a $3.4bn (£2bn) net loss for the financial year to June, hit by huge writedowns in the value of its assets, restructuring charges and a dive in commercial revenue.

Murdoch's newspaper holdings span the globe, from the Australian to the Wall Street Journal and to his News International stable in London.

At present, only the Wall Street Journal charges a fee for online access and until recently, received wisdom in the publishing industry was that readers would not pay to read newspapers on the internet.

Murdoch said he had completed a review of the possibility of charging and that he was willing to take the risk of leading the industry towards a pay-per-view model: "I believe that if we're successful, we'll be followed fast by other media."

He said he was thinking in terms of "this fiscal year" to introduce charges. He said News Corp would avoid a migration of readers to free sites by "making our content better and differentiated from other people".

The charging model will be extended to red-top tabloids such as the Sun and the News of the World. Murdoch said he was keen to capitalise on the popularity of celebrity stories: "When we have a celebrity scoop, the number of hits we get now are astronomical."

He accepted that there could be a need for furious litigation to prevent stories and photographs being copied elsewhere: "We'll be asserting our copyright at every point."Among quality newspapers, Murdoch singled out the Daily Telegraph's run of stories about MPs' expenses as an example of news for which consumers would be willing to pay, describing it as a "great scoop": "I'm sure people would be very happy to pay for that."

Murdoch said change was inevitable: "We're certainly satisfied that we can produce significant revenues from the sale of digital delivery of newspaper content."

Murdoch's British newspaperssuffered a 14% drop in year-end advertising revenue as the recession took its toll. Profits across News Corp's global newspaper division fell from $786m to $466m.

Elsewhere, Murdoch's empire was hit by huge reorganisation costs and write-downs at its interactive media division, which includes the social networking website MySpace.

News Corp's Twentieth Century Fox film studio recorded annual profits of $848m, a drop from last year's $1.24bn, as films such as X-Men Origins: Wolverine and the second instalment of the Night at the Museum series failed to match releases such as The Simpsons Movie and Live Free or Die Hard a year ago.

Earnings from cable networks rose by 31% to $1.67bn but the group's television division, including its Fox stations in the US and Star networks in Asia, saw profits fall from $1.12bn to $174m.

"The past year has been the most difficult in recent history, and our 2009 financial performance clearly reflects the weak economic environment that we confronted throughout the year," said Murdoch.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2009/aug/06/rupert-murdoch-website-charges

Jan Klimkowski
08-06-2009, 05:38 PM
Rupert Murdoch said quality journalism is not cheap

Oh the irony.


He accepted that there could be a need for furious litigation to prevent stories and photographs being copied elsewhere: "We'll be asserting our copyright at every point."

It's possible to copyright pornography and disinformation?

Wow. I learn something new from the Dirty Digger every day.

I wondered where to put this thread, and decided "Propaganda" was the appropriate folder for the godfather of Faux News.

Magda Hassan
08-06-2009, 10:23 PM
Well, the company is not called News LIMITED for nothing.

Mark Stapleton
08-06-2009, 11:55 PM
Calling Murdoch the dirty digger is a bit misleading. While he loves war (well there's so much money in it), he would never become a participant himself. He leaves that to others.

Pay money to read journalists reflect Murdoch's extremely sick view of the world? Don't think so.

I can get the sport and weather elsewhere.

Peter Lemkin
08-07-2009, 08:47 AM
Maybe one of the more stock-market saavy here can invent futures in Propaganda and we can all get rich, as there will be a boom market, I'm sure!

Jan Klimkowski
08-07-2009, 05:25 PM
Calling Murdoch the dirty digger is a bit misleading. While he loves war (well there's so much money in it), he would never become a participant himself. He leaves that to others.



I agree. It's also arguably a slur on Australians.

However, the phrase originated with the English satirical magazine, Private Eye, because, after buying The Sun, central to Murdoch's strategy to sell newspapers to working class Brits was putting photographs of topless women on Page 3.


Murdoch told the staff that he wanted the Sun to focus on ‘sex, sports and contests’, a mission translated in the satirical paper Private Eye as ‘a tear away appear with a lot of tit’. Private Eye labeled Murdoch ‘the Dirty Digger’, well before the paper’s launch in 1970 of a regular feature, which continues to this day: a photograph of a naked woman on page three. As recently as October 2002, the Sun was congratulating itself on the emergence of a Sun-look alike in Moscow (dubbed inevitably, the Sun-ski) complete with page three ‘lovelies’. The Sun’s page three girl has also made a successful move to the paper’s website.

http://runningbetweenthewickets.blogspot.com/2008/07/when-celebrities-try-to-make-it-in-nick.html

Mark Stapleton
08-07-2009, 11:37 PM
Calling Murdoch the dirty digger is a bit misleading. While he loves war (well there's so much money in it), he would never become a participant himself. He leaves that to others.



I agree. It's also arguably a slur on Australians.

However, the phrase originated with the English satirical magazine, Private Eye, because, after buying The Sun, central to Murdoch's strategy to sell newspapers to working class Brits was putting photographs of topless women on Page 3.


Murdoch told the staff that he wanted the Sun to focus on ‘sex, sports and contests’, a mission translated in the satirical paper Private Eye as ‘a tear away appear with a lot of tit’. Private Eye labeled Murdoch ‘the Dirty Digger’, well before the paper’s launch in 1970 of a regular feature, which continues to this day: a photograph of a naked woman on page three. As recently as October 2002, the Sun was congratulating itself on the emergence of a Sun-look alike in Moscow (dubbed inevitably, the Sun-ski) complete with page three ‘lovelies’. The Sun’s page three girl has also made a successful move to the paper’s website.

http://runningbetweenthewickets.blogspot.com/2008/07/when-celebrities-try-to-make-it-in-nick.html

Interesting. Murdoch had a similar strategy here. I remember when the Murdoch's Daily Mirror, a Sydney newspaper, had the page 3 girl as a regular feature. It lasted through to the mid 1980's I think.

He'll leave a legacy of editorial interference, dubious political alliances, advocacy of war, tax avoidance and tits.

Jack White
08-08-2009, 12:18 AM
Remember that Murdoch (who hides that he is half Jewish) came to
power as a CIA asset during the Nugan Hand Bank scandal.

Jack

Charles Drago
08-08-2009, 03:38 PM
"Murdoch told the staff that he wanted the Sun to focus on ‘sex, sports and contests.'" [emphasis added]

America's commercial television networks -- broadcast and cable -- are now all but inundated by "American Idol"-like competitions.

Or, as Murdoch would have it, "contests."

I include in this category the "Real Housewives" series that dominates cable's Bravo channel -- originally offered as a PBS-like home for independent and classic films and other fine and performing arts programming, now reduced to catfights and caterwauling.

[Memo to my agent: "The Real Housewives of the Warsaw Ghetto" -- Watch as five jaunty Jewess jigglers fight tooth and nail over who makes the best rat-tatouie, who's been sleeping with Fritz the sentry, and who gets to keep their children alive." Appointment TV -- in the bunker that is the American heartland.]

"Contests" are all about picking sides and obliterating the competition, amassing toys and other trophies, and abandoning all scruples in the mad race to acquire.

"Contests" are all about differentiating between "them" and "us," and demonizing "them."

Consumerism does what its name tells us it does.

It consumes.

Everything and everyone.

Mark Stapleton
08-13-2009, 01:37 PM
Consumerism does what its name tells us it does.

It consumes.

Everything and everyone.


I agree fully, CD. It's consumed the minds of the current generation. I'm sad for them.

Myra Bronstein
08-13-2009, 04:16 PM
Rupert Murdoch said quality journalism is not cheap Oh the irony.
...


:rolleyes: How could he possibly know?

Jan Klimkowski
10-07-2009, 06:46 PM
Remember that Murdoch (who hides that he is half Jewish) came to
power as a CIA asset during the Nugan Hand Bank scandal.

Jack

Some original and important Australian research:


Importantly, the murder of Mackay also served to cover up the potential exposure of Frank Nugan's CIA connections, which was particularly critical given that in "April, May and June 1977, the Australian media and Parliament were awash with allegations of CIA activities in Australia, caused by the allegations of Christopher Boyce and Gough Whitlam." (15) Other evidence to support Jiggens's theory comes from Tony Reeve's book Mr Sin: The Abe Saffron Dossier (Allen & Unwin, 2007). Reeves provided evidence of how Frank Nugan had distributed marijuana from his Griffith packing shed, and how Sir Peter Abele's trucking company, Thomas Nationwide Transport (TNT), was used "to move -- along with huge volumes of legitimate cargoes -- large quantities of illegal drugs around Australia and the world." Reeves also drew attention to the close relations that existed between Abeles and the Nugan Hand Bank: information which is particularly significant because "Bela Csidei, Murray Riley's partner in the trans-Pacific drug trade, was well known as a front man for Abeles." (16)

As one might expect, the mainstream media fulfilled a critical function in shielding the police force and the Nugans from critical public scrutiny, and so it is fitting that Frank Nugan's henchman, "Fred Krahe, was employed at the time of the murder with The Sun newspaper in Sydney." Moreover the tight relationship between the mainstream media and the criminal underworld was no anomaly, as prior to leaving the police force, Krahe had "carefully cultivated" the support of leading NSW crime reporters like Bill Jenkins, whose "frequent scoops were breathlessly splashed across the... front pages" of Rupert Murdoch's now defunct Sydney paper The Daily Mirror. Thus while under normal circumstances one might expect that structural factors alone are enough to ensure that the mainstream media manufactures consent for elite interests, in the case of Krahe, it is apparent that individual journalists, like Jenkins, facilitated this process by covering up for the key movers in Australia's organized crime scene. (17)

..............

15. Jiggens, The Killer Cop and the Murder of Donald Mackay, p.194.

Head of the Eastern Division of the CIA, Ted Shackley, played a key role in the November 1975 Pine Gap security crisis, which helped lead to the constitutional coup that led to the removal of Labor Prime Minister Gough Whitlam. (p.95) Thus it is noteworthy that Shackley "was very closely associated with Michael Hand... and nearly all the other Nugan Hand players." (p.91)

Here it is important to point out that while it is widely alleged that Whitlam's policies provided a serious threat to sanctity of intelligence agencies, in actual fact they did not pose such threat (although this was most likely misinterpreted by the CIA). Jim Jose writes: "Whitlam accepted the necessity and desirability of agencies like the [Australian Security Intelligence Organisation] ASIO; he also accepted the assumption which legitimized these groups." Jim Jose, "The Whitlam Years: Illusion and Reality," in Pat Flanagan (ed.), Big Brother or Democracy: The Case for the Abolition of ASIO (University of Adelaide, 1979), p.40. (back)

16. Tony Reeves, Mr Sin: The Abe Saffron Dossier (Allen & Unwin, 2007), p.84; Jiggens, The Killer Cop and the Murder of Donald Mackay, p.134.

Sir Peter Abeles "belonged to a powerful, right-wing émigré group which included Alexander Barton, Sir Paul Strasser and Sir Ivan Charody who were referred to as 'the Hungarian Mafia' or as 'Askin's Knights' because NSW premier, Sir Robert Askin knighted all of them." (p.135) David Hickie writes that he was told that knighthoods could be brought "earlier in Askin's reign at a... modest $20,000 a pop." He then continues noting that "while such claims are hard to document... a $20,000 cheque from the chief executive of Boral Ltd, Sir Elton Griffin, turned up in the private bank account of Sir Robert Ask in at the time Griffin was knighted." Boral is now "Australia's largest building and construction materials supplier." It is also interesting to note that Bernie Houghton -- who played a key role in setting up the Nugan Hand Bank -- arranged for Michael Hand to work with Sir Paul Strasser's Parkes Corporation. Moreover, although little known, in 1969, the Australian Secret Intelligence Service (ASIS) "uncovered the involvement of Lennie [McPherson], Houghton and some NSW police in a massive people-smuggling operation. ASIS had mounted a 'national security' exercise to check on illegal immigrants as part of Australia's Cold War paranoia about communists arriving by stealth and taking over the country. What they found was a massive trade in sex slaves, run by Sydney criminals and backed by a local undercover agent of the CIA." (For a critical analysis of the links between capitalism and modern-day slavery, see "Combating [Some] Slavery.")

David Hickie, The Premier and the Prince, p.84; Tony Reeves, Mr Big: The True Story of Lennie McPherson and His Life of Crime (Allen & Unwin, 2005), p.152. (back)

17. Jiggens, The Killer Cop and the Murder of Donald Mackay, p.140, p.141, p.146. (back)


http://swans.com/library/art15/barker32.html

http://www.deeppoliticsforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2376

Magda Hassan
10-07-2009, 11:46 PM
The Peter Abeles referred to here owned a trucking company, TNT, that he used as a profitable favor in helping Murdoch break the Wapping picket lines in distributing his newspapers.

Jan Klimkowski
10-08-2009, 05:10 PM
The Peter Abeles referred to here owned a trucking company, TNT, that he used as a profitable favor in helping Murdoch break the Wapping picket lines in distributing his newspapers.

The TNT link is most intriguing.

Plausibly deniable delivery services making massive profits.

Hell, why bother with diplomatic pouches...

Magda Hassan
10-08-2009, 10:49 PM
Most interesting Jan.

Tony Reeves interviewed a TNT truck driver who told him that in the 1970s he regularly drove shipments down from the Nugan packing shed to the Flemington markets in Sydney. When he turned up at the Nugan packing shed, he would be given money and told to have a meal, and that his truck would be packed for him. He would come back to find the truck packed and the contents locked away behind a new padlock. The same scenario would play itself out at the Sydney markets; he would be given money, told to have a meal, and would come back to find the truck unloaded. Intrigued by this, he checked out the truck and found minute traces of marijuana. The truck driver estimated that his truck fully loaded would hold ten tones of cannabis.
Very interesting.

Jan Klimkowski
10-09-2009, 04:41 PM
Most interesting indeed, Magda.

Maybe those TNT trucks had a special docking system for Air America planes..... :listen:

David Butler
03-26-2010, 02:00 PM
It's starting...Anyone signed up yet ? :top:


The Times and Sunday Times newspapers will start charging to access their websites in June, owner News International (NI) has announced.

Users will pay £1 for a day's access and £2 for a week's subscription.

The move opens a new front in the battle for readership and will be watched closely by the industry.

NI chief executive Rebekah Brooks said it was "a crucial step towards making the business of news an economically exciting proposition".

Both titles will launch new websites in early May, separating their digital presence for the first time and replacing the existing, combined site, Times Online.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/8588432.stm

David Guyatt
03-26-2010, 04:12 PM
Nope, and I don't plan to pay for the Times or any other online rag either. Perhaps, in the distant future if objective news reporting returns and is published without fear or favour then maybe. But since I doubt this will ever happen I'll have to rely on other means of gathering news - go offshore and leave the Treasure Island bandits to their own devices.

Paul Rigby
03-28-2010, 08:14 AM
Nope, and I don't plan to pay for the Times or any other online rag either. Perhaps, in the distant future if objective news reporting returns and is published without fear or favour then maybe. But since I doubt this will ever happen I'll have to rely on other means of gathering news - go offshore and leave the Treasure Island bandits to their own devices.

What, and miss all that fearless and oh-so-distinctive reportage and commentary?

Where else, one wonders, can you find Charles Bore on politics ("SamCam's bump - will it make the difference?"); Virginia Scrote on living in the country ("who are these beastly people spreading muck in my fields?"); Lionel Pimms on life in America ("Many of these people drive on the wrong side of the road, but I forgive them"); Milton J. Fastbuck on economics ("Keynes was really far-out, if you know what I mean"); or Radek Fiasco on war ("the wedding party was really a gathering of transvestite Al-Qaeda").

Er, everywhere.

On reflection, you're right, sod Murdoch and his pointless rags.