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Tosh Plumlee
03-03-2009, 04:19 PM
Narco News

"... DEA's Operation Xcellerator is Another Justice Department Dog and Pony Show (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/kristin-bricker/2009/02/deas-operation-xcellerator-another-justice-department-dog-and-pony-)

February 28, 2009 at 12:11 pm Despite the "Largest and Hardest Hitting Operation to Ever Target" the Sinaloa Cartel, the DEA is Merely Treading Water in the War on Drugs

On February 25, the US Department of Justice (DoJ) held a press conference celebrating the culmination of Operation Xcellerator (http://www.usdoj.gov/opa/pr/2009/February/09-ag-162.html), which it says resulted in the arrests of 755 Sinaloa cartel members in the United States and Mexico. Law enforcement agencies arrested the last 52 suspects the day of the press conference, which the DoJ held on the same day the House of Representatives voted on 2009 funding for Plan Mexico. Plan Mexico, also known as the Merida Initiative, is the US government's estimated $1.6 billion military and law enforcement aid package to support the Mexican government's increasingly violent war on drugs...".

on another note:

"... Iran/Contra whistleblower Celerino “Cele” Castillo III was scheduled to report to prison on March 5, but the power of justice has intervened on his behalf.
A federal judge in San Antonio, at a hearing held late last week, ruled that Castillo's report date to prison should be extended until July 20. The judge, W. Royal Furgeson Jr. (http://www.txwd.uscourts.gov/general/judges/biographyview.asp?bID=6), issued his ruling over the objections of a federal prosecutor, who argued that Castillo should be sent to prison because he was a “danger to the community.”

The hearing was called by the judge to consider a motion to allow Castillo to remain free on bail through his appeal. The motion was filed by Castillo's current attorney, public defender Judy Fulmer Madewell. ...".

They are coming after us one by one... The sins of past addministrations have to be covered at all cost. The American people are not allowed to know "the rest of the story"....

New information:

This week, Mike and Mark are joined by Celerino Castillo (http://www.powderburns.org/) - Vietnam Vet and Ex-DEA agent - to talk about torture, the sorry state of the justice system and the "war on drugs". Listeners will want to check out the article (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/11/02/AR2007110201170_pf.html) on waterboarding referenced in the show, by Federal Judge Evan Wallach.
About the Guest:
http://www.expertwitnessradio.org/images/celememorial.gifCELERINO "CELE" CASTILLO III, is a 20-year veteran of both state and federal law enforcement with 12-year service in the U. S. Department of Justice, Drug Enforcement Administration. Mr. Castillo is a highly decorated DEA agent for his undercover operations in Central and South America. For several years, he was also placed in major cities like San Francisco and New York City for deep cover operations. He is an author of "Powderburns" Cocaine, Contras And The Drug War (http://www.powderburns.org/store.html), and is an acclaimed public speaker and educator.
COURT QUALIFIED EXPERT WITNESS: For 20 years Mr. Castillo has qualified as an "expert witness" in criminal and civil trials, both for and against various state and federal law enforcement agencies, in the following subjects: Undercover tactics, entrapment, informant handling practices and procedures, all subjects related to drugs trafficking, money laundering, and international narcotics investigations, police profiling, research on federal documentation for the defense. (Bates)
http://www.expertwitnessradio.org/images/powderburns2.gif (http://www.powderburns.org/store.html)MR. CASTILLO has written several internationally known articles against federal law enforcement corruption: "Written Statement of Celerino Castillo III, for The House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence" 1998. He was mentioned in several articles on Informant Handling for The National Law Journal. ABC's Primetime Live, Dateline NBC, Discovery Channel and other numerous news magazines have done exclusive interviews on Mr. Castillo pertaining to "Outrageous Conduct" by the U.S. Government.
Links:
Cele Castillo's Website - powderburns.org (http://www.powderburns.org/)
Judge Evan Wallach article (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/11/02/AR2007110201170_pf.html) - "Waterboarding Used to Be a Crime"
NPR Nance interview on Waterboarding (http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=15844677&sc=emaf)
Mike's essay - "I volunteer to kidnap Ollie North" (http://www.expertwitnessradio.org/essays/e1.htm)

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Peter Lemkin
03-03-2009, 05:56 PM
Narco News

"... DEA's Operation Xcellerator is Another Justice Department Dog and Pony Show (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/kristin-bricker/2009/02/deas-operation-xcellerator-another-justice-department-dog-and-pony-)

February 28, 2009 at 12:11 pm Despite the "Largest and Hardest Hitting Operation to Ever Target" the Sinaloa Cartel, the DEA is Merely Treading Water in the War on Drugs

On February 25, the US Department of Justice (DoJ) held a press conference celebrating the culmination of Operation Xcellerator (http://www.usdoj.gov/opa/pr/2009/February/09-ag-162.html), which it says resulted in the arrests of 755 Sinaloa cartel members in the United States and Mexico. Law enforcement agencies arrested the last 52 suspects the day of the press conference, which the DoJ held on the same day the House of Representatives voted on 2009 funding for Plan Mexico. Plan Mexico, also known as the Merida Initiative, is the US government's estimated $1.6 billion military and law enforcement aid package to support the Mexican government's increasingly violent war on drugs...".

on another note:

"... Iran/Contra whistleblower Celerino “Cele” Castillo III was scheduled to report to prison on March 5, but the power of justice has intervened on his behalf.
A federal judge in San Antonio, at a hearing held late last week, ruled that Castillo's report date to prison should be extended until July 20. The judge, W. Royal Furgeson Jr. (http://www.txwd.uscourts.gov/general/judges/biographyview.asp?bID=6), issued his ruling over the objections of a federal prosecutor, who argued that Castillo should be sent to prison because he was a “danger to the community.”

The hearing was called by the judge to consider a motion to allow Castillo to remain free on bail through his appeal. The motion was filed by Castillo's current attorney, public defender Judy Fulmer Madewell. ...".

They are coming after us one by one... The sins of past addministrations have to be covered at all cost. The American people are not allowed to know "the rest of the story"....

http://www.deeppoliticsforum.com/forums/images/misc/progress.gif

I know T. They are. You're correct, they don't want the People to know what has been going on...and goes on still. My personal suggestion is you contact our mutual friend in New York - the one I introduced you to in San Diego and now has a radio show. He knows what you know and he has his weekly radio show soapbox with which to 'speak' for those who have no or little voice - and to the Public - focused on this VERY subject. I know you work hard at this matter on your own, as well. :heeeelllllooooo:

Tosh Plumlee
03-03-2009, 06:26 PM
Thanks Pete. I have been in touch with him and he is there... a right on person... we are talking.

I just sent Dawn a reply and thought I would sent you a copy. I feel you will fully understand what I am really saying without saying it direct. I need more than just me releasing facts and documents... that is perhaps viewed as "self serving". There is an old pilots OPS saying.... "When behind the power curve, call all your allies together and seek wise counciel...".

Well I'm calling. You and others come forward with what you know.... scatter it to the winds... take the chance with me, because that is the only way I (or all of us) can be protected. Pete you have paid a price in your intanglements with me and my background, so did Jay Harrison.

Now on another matter: Walt is a good man and does mean well... he has kept his promise to Jay..., however, I have told him not to release anything concerning me. Jay asked me long before he died to hold his information until the time was right... I feel that time is getting close and Walt will come forth soon and clear the air on this matter. (end)

Tosh Plumlee
03-03-2009, 06:39 PM
HI Dawn.

A good friend of ours, Charles, gave me good advise when I first came on this Forum.

"...publish or perish...". I do not respond, but he hit it right on. I did not want to tell him that I was told by other sources, " publish and you will perish..". However, as you know that was not the first time I was warned.

Anyway...I'm shaking the bushes once again, and some in the 'beltway" are getting nervous. I'll keep you posted as I once again kick this thing in the butt.

"DEEP COVER SHALLOW GRAVES" Now open for bids. Any takers? I think not.... but we will see.

Tosh Plumlee
03-03-2009, 08:02 PM
An interesting quote from six years ago. I feel it is appro today, in view of the Mexican drug wars across from our border towns:

"..... Despite the risk of crossing the line with respect to violating his now-classified truth telling, Plumlee appeared on former DEA agent Mike Levine’s New York radio show (http://www.expertwitnessradio.org/) in 2003 and offered listeners the following warning concerning what he claims is the continuing covert activity on the part of U.S. intelligence agencies in trafficking drugs:

2003

"... It’s still going on. The reason I said that is that … I hope your listeners remember that someone who has been very active in the drug war said that this stuff is still going on, very secret, very hush hush, very coded. There’s too much money involved.
U.S. intelligence agencies, the CIA as well as its frequent partner in operations, the Pentagon (the Defense Intelligence Agency, the National Security Agency, etc.), carry out covert operations through an elaborate chain of proprietary companies, legitimate businesses (some of whom might not even realize they are being used at times); front companies and cut-out networks and assets. Its all designed to provide the operations with cover and plausible deniability. The goal is to achieve a desired outcome that is very visible, such as the overthrow of a foreign government deemed unacceptable to hegemonic U.S. interests...".

Time has proven the above statements. The drug war has now crossed our borders and infested our border towns and our major cities.
Our elected officials today, like days of old, sit on their hands and still wonder.... WHY? And "How did this happen?" Well we as Americans have not seen anything as yet.... like the economy, its going to get worse...., another prediction and billions of more U.S. dollars are going to be just thrown away.
note:
http://nealmatthews.com/Documents/Tosh.pdf Article. I Ran Drugs for Uncle Sam; 1990 San Diego Reader. Background information on AMSOG and other classified operations.

Tosh Plumlee
03-04-2009, 01:39 AM
http://nealmatthews.com/Documents/Tosh.pdf Article. I Ran Drugs for Uncle Sam; 1990 San Diego Reader. Background information on AMSOG and other classified operations, including a CIA Operational map of the time.

Tosh Plumlee
03-04-2009, 01:42 AM
The real U.S. Drug War from a 1990 viewpoint
http://nealmatthews.com/Documents/Tosh.pdf Article. I Ran Drugs for Uncle Sam; by Neal Matthews, 1990 San Diego Reader. Background information on AMSOG and other classified operations, including a CIA Operational map of the time.

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Tosh Plumlee
03-05-2009, 12:25 AM
copy summation transcribe tape #10 by xxxxxxxx 1991; sensitive


Ref; XXXXX1705A (Sworn in by Committee August 2, 1990; (classified committee sensitive; November 25, 1991)

(continued xxx tape ten)

SECRET


CIA Asset William Robert, Tosh, Plumlee OMC-XXXBCXXX

William “Tosh” Plumlee.
(cont. from tape two)

After joining the army in Dallas Texas, he soon worked under several case officers with old OSS and CIA ties, including Captain Edward G. Seiwell. of the U.S. Army's Fourth Army, HDQ. Military INTELL.

In 1955, Plumlee received pilot training under the GI Bill at White Rock Airport in Dallas, Texas, while he was assigned to the Fourth Army Reserve at Dallas Love Field. Also at this time, he worked at Red Bird Airport south of Dallas, as an aircraft mechanic, becoming involved with several CIA-front companies. "XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXxx ( Plumlee was 17 years of age at this time.

Sensitive documentation provided by law enforcement to this committee states:

"Plumlee was a former deep-cover military and CIA asset from 1956 to 1987 with a long history of CIA activities in Central America, Cuba, and Mexico.". (ref; 105-XXXX-XXX (note: and various other FBI 62 files)

Background Overview

Plumlee was sent to the Miami area where he became involved in covert operations in Cuba, the Caribbean and Central America. The record shows most of his time, while he was in the Miami Florida area, he flew guns and ammunition for various covert factions in half a dozen countries. Plumlee said he was driven by the adventure and the paychecks. He explained that in his covert operations he had to keep other federal agencies from knowing about the clandestine and usually illegal operations he was associated with.


He was one of a handful of North Americans fighting to overthrow Batista and install Fidel Castro. He described how covert activities have the ring of unreality to the public because of their lack of knowledge about the activities. "Those who work the 8 to 5 shift cannot comprehend what goes on in covert operations", he stated.

The record shows Plumlee was involved in the Cuban conflict of 1957 through 1964, while connected to military and CIA intelligence operations. In the early fifties, he supplied Fidel Castro’s rebel forces in Cuba with arms and ammunition; There were similar
sensitive reports indicating that the CIA had armed Castro to overthrow the Batista government. However, the Committee has not been able to confirm those reports.
In the mid 1960s, Plumlee flew missions evacuating defecting Russian missile technicians out of Cuba, and earlier had trained Cuban pilots in Nicaragua and Happy Valley for the pending April 1961 Bay of pigs invasion,



Shortly thereafter, he flew covert missions, as a civilian pilot, in aircraft used in Southeast Asia by Air America. (1967)
At a later date, early 1980, he flew weapons to Central America and drugs on the return XXX XXXX "...as ordered by his government handlers...".
.
CIA and Military Personnel Involved in Drug Operations

Plumlee has told this Committee, he tried to leave covert operations after a short tour in Vietnam, but his handlers kept calling him for other deep-cover or “black” projects.

He wrote, in a manuscript in 1982, "Deep Cover; Shallow Graves "

"...It was in Mexico where I saw the widespread government corruption on both sides of the border. Someone in Washington was turning a blind eye toward drug shipments from Colombia being smuggled through Mexico and into the United States. It was obvious, our intelligence information was being tampered with at the highest level. Millions of dollars, dirty drug money, was being routed through Panama by the cartel, some of it to be used to influence the upcoming presidential election. Some of the illegal cargoes were flown and transported by other CIA operatives and military
personnel holding civilian status, thus covering their CIA-Military affiliations from public view. ...".

Plumlee had flown and had contacts with key people in the Contra and drug operations, including Bill Cooper (captain of the C-123 plane shot down over Nicaragua ). He worked for various CIA proprietary or front companies, including Riddle Airlines, the Dodge Corporation, Inter-Mountain Aviation, Evergreen Helicopters, Act Technology, AirAmerica, CGG American Services, In- Air, and other companies that he,"couldn't’t remember".

As a standard CIA procedure, Plumlee stated to this Committee, the agency gave him different aliases when working in different undercover operations, including Buck Pearson, James Plumlee, James H. Rawlings, William H. Pearson, Juan Carbello, and some that he couldn't’t remember anymore. In the early 1970s Plumlee was attached to an operation in Miami called, "OVERHAUL" at JM/WAVE, (WAVE STATION, MIAMI) which involved assassination attempts upon Fidel Castro.

Other documentation received indicates Plumlee was involved in "black operations" within the Pentagon while also working with the CIA. He became a CIA contract pilot, taking orders from the Pentagon and XXXXXXXXXXX had associations with and through the National Security Council and its staff. Plumlee stated he worked with John Martino and John Roselli in another CIA J/M WAVE operations of the 1960's, which, he stated, was another CIA operation to assassinate Castro.

U.S. Military Working with Mafia People?

Documentation and other testimony from other pilots and operatives indicate, Plumlee flew many black operations, including flying arms to Central America in the early eighties and drugs back into the United States, being advised that these activities were sanctioned operations and were in the national interest.XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX the Pentagon, and the staff of the National Security Council, in these drug activities.

He described in detail how the military and intelligence groups worked with Mafia people and casino-associated crime groups.
He described early assassination attempts on Dominican dictator Rafael Trujillo, and again Fidel Castro, and kidnapping people in foreign countries. He described how these illegal operations were given the pious-sounding name of national security, the same label used to support secrecy on subversive and criminal activities
against the United States.

Attempt to Assassinate Eden Pastora; Captain, "ZERO"

Plumlee described to this Committee how one of the Contra commanders on the Southern Front, Eden Pastora, also known as Commander Zero, refused to engage in drug trafficking as the other XXXXXXX The CIA then tried to assassinate Pastora
during a media conference held at La Penca, Costa Rica, during which Pastora was expected to expose the CIA-DEA drug trafficking. The record shows the conference started in chaos as a bomb exploded and killed several people.

Mr.Plumlee confirmed to this Committee the existence of Operation Whale Watch and Operation Watchtower, drug smuggling operations involving the CIA, U.S. military, with knowledge of the National Security Council, He mentioned drug flights from Central America to the United States for the CIA, with stops at places he marked on maps that he provided to Senator Gary Hart and Staff.

Plumlee testified under oath that there was close cooperation between Mexican and U.S. government personnel in drug smuggling (there is other evidence in later testimony from XXXXXX. which confirms sections of Plumlee's testimony. This defies comprehension, Plumlee described his undercover activities to this Committee, including the practice of the Mexican police and its military protecting drug traffickers, something that will be described in considerably more detail in later testimony.

Mr.Plumlee described one of the drug corridors used by the CIA that ran the length of Baja California with a refueling stop at an airstrip north of Cabo San Lucas. He described another common drug route that he flew, starting in Panama, with stops at Santa Elena, known as "Point West" in Costa Rica, His flights took him north of Puerto Escondido in Southern Mexico, and then up through Baja California to Mexicali.

He stated to this Committee, he had delivered drugs to airfields throughout the Southwest, including Borrego Springs, a xxxxx airstrip, and another one near Humboldt Mountain in Arizona where drugs would be pushed out of the aircraft. He provided this Committee with a detailed map of an airstrip near Buckskin Mountain close to the Colorado River, and at abandoned mine sites between Parker and Havasu City, Arizona.

Mr.Plumlee described to this Committee some of the code words used in radio and other communications:

“Apples” was the code word for small arms and ammunition.
“Oranges” referred to C-4 explosives and primer cords.
“Pears” referred to electronics.
“Bananas” referred to personnel. For instance, if he was to deliver a
government agent, he would say on the radio, “Bananas are delivered.”

“Code 6” referred to the flyway through Central Mexico and crossing the U.S. border at Piedres Negras, and then into the Big Bend region of Texas.

“Code 7” referred to the air route along the Baja Peninsula, through San Felipe and Mexicali, to drop points in the Anza-Borrego Desert, Twenty Nine Palms, or the former Patton bombing range east of the Salton Sea.
Mr.Plumlee mention in passing the Delgado Ranch near San Felipe: Carlos Quintero and a major drug deal in 1984 involving Quintero that involved the Contras. Plumlee's information corroborated what several other sources who stated they also flew drugs into these locations.
Mr.Plumlee provided the Committee with various documents relating to the drug trafficking by U.S. forces, one of which was marked DEA, Secret, dated February 13, 1990, which stated in part:

(SECRET)

"....Apparently one month ago (January 1990),? and AVINA-Batiz were engaged
in conversation when AVINA-Batiz told ? that the flow of drugs into the
United States is the best solution to Latin America’s problems. The poisoning
of American youth is the best answer to the down-trodden Latin American
masses in retaliation against the imperialistic actions of the United
States.... has learned that the reporter from Vera Cruz (FNU) Valasco, before
his death (1985) was allegedly developing information that, using the
DFS as cover, the CIA established and maintained clandestine airfields to
refuel aircraft loaded with weapons which were destined for Honduras and
Nicaragua.
Pilots of these aircraft would load up with cocaine in Barranquilla,
Colombia and enroute to Miami, Florida, refuel in Mexico at narcotictrafficker-
operated and CIA-maintained airstrips.... XXXXXX were working
a similar type of refuel operations, picking up cocaine in Medellin, Colombia and flying it thru Cuba into Miami. ....".

Smuggling Arms Into Mexico ATF Report

An August 10, 1976 FBI report from the special agent in charge of the
Phoenix office (62-2116) to the FBI director confirmed that, "Plumlee had flown a large shipment of arms to Albuquerque for later flight to San Diego, XXXXXX stated there was also a 1963 government report on a matter found in Phoenix file 26-20103, however, that “file has been destroyed.” The FBI report further stated, “This would fit
into the time frame PLUMLEE alleged on 8-10-76 wherein he was instructed to leave a plane loaded with arms in New Mexico.” The 1976 date suggests that the United States was clandestinely shipping arms to Mexico. The Committee asked Mr. Plumlee if, in his view, was this an attempt of the CIA to destabilize or overthrow another government? (the record shows Mr. Plumlee did not have an opinion)
Plumlee provided the Committee a picture of him seated in the pilot’s seat of a Cxxxxx ID-669-P, which was taken by pilot William Cooper who was shortly thereafter shot down over Nicaragua in a C-123, exposing the U.S.’s role in undermining the Nicaraguan government. XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

XX. Plumlee explained that he personally delivered that C- 130 to Crittenden of Crittenden Air Transport, which provided support for Crittenden’s CIA connections.


Operation Grasshopper: A COVERT Government Drug Operation :

Mr.Plumlee described an operation known as Operation Grasshopper which usedgovernment contract pilots to fly drugs, including an undercover pilot, Barry Seal. Plumlee described the protection given to the CIA drug trafficking by other government agencies.

Mr.Plumlee described the brutal murder of a former Air America pilot, Scott Wheeler aka Maurice Louis Gonzales, in Quedo Loco Lobo, near Oaxaca in Southwestern Mexico, by Pepe Suequez. Plumlee described how an informant sought to report the killing to American authorities, who then allowed an American State Department representative and a Mexican police officer to be present while he was ask questions by XXXXXXXXXXX.
Later, Mexican police retaliated against the informant for reporting the
killing to American authorities by horribly mutilating him and leaving him to slowly die in a Mexican prison yard.

Mr. William Holden of Senator Gary Hart's staff received additional information and has confirmed that Mr. Plumlee gave precise details, documents, and other CIA sensitive information to the Senator.
XXXXXXXX maps, field maps, coded flyways, names, military codes, that left no doubt that these activities did exist. This information was passed on to various congressional committees, none of who allowed the American public to know about it. Senator Hart conveyed the information to Senator John Kerry (D-MA),
chairman of the Subcommittee on Terrorism, Narcotics and International Communications.

In a February 14, 1991, letter to Senator John Kerry, Senator Hart stated:
".... Mr. Plumlee raised several issues including that covert U.S. intelligence agencies were directly involved in the smuggling and distribution of drugs. He provided my staff with detailed maps and names of alleged covert landing strips in Mexico, Costa Rica, Louisiana, Arizona, Florida, and California where the alleged aircraft cargoes of drugs were off-loaded and replaced
with Contra military supplies. He also stated that these operations
were not CIA operations but rather under the direction of the White House, Pentagon and NSC personnel. My staff brought these allegations to the attention of the Senate Armed Services Committee and the Senate Intelligence Committee at the time, but no action was initiated by either committee. ...".

note: The Committee had received another letter from a reporter:

Journalist Art Goodtimes of the Telluride Times-Journal wrote a letter,at the request of Mr. Plumlee:

(January 13, 1991) to Senator John Kerry offering to provide maps, data, and
testimony of former CIA agent Tosh Plumlee. The letter advised that Plumlee
was involved in flying in Central America and had evidence of the U.S. government’s
involvement in illegal drug trafficking through Mexico, El Salvador
and Panama. The letter stated in part:
Government’s involvement with illegal drug operations, infiltrated by military
undercover operatives...Plumlee intent to get a federal investigation
into the illegal covert activities instigated by various agencies of our government
in Central America. ...".

DEA report in part, recap:

A DEA report dated February 13, 1990, marked SECRET, stated in part:

"....BUENDIA had allegedly gathered information on...the relationship the CIA
had with known narcotic traffickers in Vera Cruz area....the CIA narcotic
trafficker situation was very delicate (not to be spoken about)....information
on CIA arms smuggling and the connection the CIA had to narcotic
traffickers....Shortly thereafter, Eden Pastora, aka Commander ZERO, who had given BUENDIA information on CIA arms smuggling allegedly suffered a CIA sponsored bomb attack while traveling in Costa Rica....It was later learned that BUENIDA had allegedly obtained information that would expose high ranking members of the PRI political party who were assisting the CIA with arms smuggling and knew of the CIA link to narcotics
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX XXXXXXX XXXXXXXXX
and high officials of Mexico’s PRI party, was killed by elements of the Mexican DFS security detail...".
Picture of Plumlee in a C-130 provided by DEA xxxxxxx xxxxxx

Tosh Plumlee
03-05-2009, 12:32 AM
recap: copied from tape and notes August 2006



copy summation transcribe tape #10 by xxxxxxxx 1991; sensitive


Ref; XXXXX1705A (Sworn in to Committee August 2, 1990; classified committee sensitive; November 25, 1990)

(continued from tape two)

SECRET


CIA Asset William Robert, Tosh, Plumlee OMC-XXXBCXXX

William “Tosh” Plumlee.
(cont. from tape two)

After joining the army in Dallas Texas, he soon worked under several case officers with old OSS and CIA ties, including Captain Edward G. Seiwell. of the U.S. Army's Fourth Army, HDQ. Military INTELL.

In 1955, Plumlee received pilot training under the GI Bill at White Rock Airport in Dallas, Texas, while he was assigned to the Fourth Army Reserve at Dallas Love Field. Also at this time, he worked at Red Bird Airport south of Dallas, as an aircraft mechanic, becoming involved with several CIA-front companies. "XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXxx ( Plumlee was 17 years of age at this time.

Sensitive documentation provided by law enforcement to this committee states:

"Plumlee was a former deep-cover military and CIA asset from 1956 to 1987 with a long history of CIA activities in Central America, Cuba, and Mexico.". (ref; 105-XXXX-XXX (note: and various other FBI 62 files)

Background Overview

Plumlee was sent to the Miami area where he became involved in covert operations in Cuba, the Caribbean and Central America. The record shows most of his time, while he was in the Miami Florida area, he flew guns and ammunition for various covert factions in half a dozen countries. Plumlee said he was driven by the adventure and the paychecks. He explained that in his covert operations he had to keep other federal agencies from knowing about the clandestine and usually illegal operations he was associated with.


He was one of a handful of North Americans fighting to overthrow Batista and install Fidel Castro. He described how covert activities have the ring of unreality to the public because of their lack of knowledge about the activities. "Those who work the 8 to 5 shift cannot comprehend what goes on in covert operations", he stated.

The record shows Plumlee was involved in the Cuban conflict of 1957 through 1964, while connected to military and CIA intelligence operations. In the early fifties, he supplied Fidel Castro’s rebel forces in Cuba with arms and ammunition; There were similar
sensitive reports indicating that the CIA had armed Castro to overthrow the Batista government. However, the Committee has not been able to confirm those reports.
In the mid 1960s, Plumlee flew missions evacuating defecting Russian missile technicians out of Cuba, and earlier had trained Cuban pilots in Nicaragua and Happy Valley for the pending April 1961 Bay of pigs invasion,



Shortly thereafter, he flew covert missions, as a civilian pilot, in aircraft used in Southeast Asia by Air America. (1967)
At a later date, early 1980, he flew weapons to Central America and drugs on the return XXX XXXX "...as ordered by his government handlers...".
.
CIA and Military Personnel Involved in Drug Operations

Plumlee has told this Committee, he tried to leave covert operations after a short tour in Vietnam, but his handlers kept calling him for other deep-cover or “black” projects.

He wrote, in a manuscript in 1982, "Deep Cover; Shallow Graves "

"...It was in Mexico where I saw the widespread government corruption on both sides of the border. Someone in Washington was turning a blind eye toward drug shipments from Colombia being smuggled through Mexico and into the United States. It was obvious, our intelligence information was being tampered with at the highest level. Millions of dollars, dirty drug money, was being routed through Panama by the cartel, some of it to be used to influence the upcoming presidential election. Some of the illegal cargoes were flown and transported by other CIA operatives and military
personnel holding civilian status, thus covering their CIA-Military affiliations from public view. ...".

Plumlee had flown and had contacts with key people in the Contra and drug operations, including Bill Cooper (captain of the C-123 plane shot down over Nicaragua ). He worked for various CIA proprietary or front companies, including Riddle Airlines, the Dodge Corporation, Inter-Mountain Aviation, Evergreen Helicopters, Act Technology, AirAmerica, CGG American Services, In- Air, and other companies that he,"couldn't’t remember".

As a standard CIA procedure, Plumlee stated to this Committee, the agency gave him different aliases when working in different undercover operations, including Buck Pearson, James Plumlee, James H. Rawlings, William H. Pearson, Juan Carbello, and some that he couldn't’t remember anymore. In the early 1970s Plumlee was attached to an operation in Miami called, "OVERHAUL" at JM/WAVE, (WAVE STATION, MIAMI) which involved assassination attempts upon Fidel Castro.

Other documentation received indicates Plumlee was involved in "black operations" within the Pentagon while also working with the CIA. He became a CIA contract pilot, taking orders from the Pentagon and XXXXXXXXXXX had associations with and through the National Security Council and its staff. Plumlee stated he worked with John Martino and John Roselli in another CIA J/M WAVE operations of the 1960's, which, he stated, was another CIA operation to assassinate Castro.

U.S. Military Working with Mafia People?

Documentation and other testimony from other pilots and operatives indicate, Plumlee flew many black operations, including flying arms to Central America in the early eighties and drugs back into the United States, being advised that these activities were sanctioned operations and were in the national interest.XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX the Pentagon, and the staff of the National Security Council, in these drug activities.

He described in detail how the military and intelligence groups worked with Mafia people and casino-associated crime groups.
He described early assassination attempts on Dominican dictator Rafael Trujillo, and again Fidel Castro, and kidnapping people in foreign countries. He described how these illegal operations were given the pious-sounding name of national security, the same label used to support secrecy on subversive and criminal activities
against the United States.

Attempt to Assassinate Eden Pastora; Captain, "ZERO"

Plumlee described to this Committee how one of the Contra commanders on the Southern Front, Eden Pastora, also known as Commander Zero, refused to engage in drug trafficking as the other XXXXXXX The CIA then tried to assassinate Pastora
during a media conference held at La Penca, Costa Rica, during which Pastora was expected to expose the CIA-DEA drug trafficking. The record shows the conference started in chaos as a bomb exploded and killed several people.

Mr.Plumlee confirmed to this Committee the existence of Operation Whale Watch and Operation Watchtower, drug smuggling operations involving the CIA, U.S. military, with knowledge of the National Security Council, He mentioned drug flights from Central America to the United States for the CIA, with stops at places he marked on maps that he provided to Senator Gary Hart and Staff.

Plumlee testified under oath that there was close cooperation between Mexican and U.S. government personnel in drug smuggling (there is other evidence in later testimony from XXXXXX. which confirms sections of Plumlee's testimony. This defies comprehension, Plumlee described his undercover activities to this Committee, including the practice of the Mexican police and its military protecting drug traffickers, something that will be described in considerably more detail in later testimony.

Mr.Plumlee described one of the drug corridors used by the CIA that ran the length of Baja California with a refueling stop at an airstrip north of Cabo San Lucas. He described another common drug route that he flew, starting in Panama, with stops at Santa Elena, known as "Point West" in Costa Rica, His flights took him north of Puerto Escondido in Southern Mexico, and then up through Baja California to Mexicali.

He stated to this Committee, he had delivered drugs to airfields throughout the Southwest, including Borrego Springs, a xxxxx airstrip, and another one near Humboldt Mountain in Arizona where drugs would be pushed out of the aircraft. He provided this Committee with a detailed map of an airstrip near Buckskin Mountain close to the Colorado River, and at abandoned mine sites between Parker and Havasu City, Arizona.

Mr.Plumlee described to this Committee some of the code words used in radio and other communications:

“Apples” was the code word for small arms and ammunition.
“Oranges” referred to C-4 explosives and primer cords.
“Pears” referred to electronics.
“Bananas” referred to personnel. For instance, if he was to deliver a
government agent, he would say on the radio, “Bananas are delivered.”

“Code 6” referred to the flyway through Central Mexico and crossing the U.S. border at Piedres Negras, and then into the Big Bend region of Texas.

“Code 7” referred to the air route along the Baja Peninsula, through San Felipe and Mexicali, to drop points in the Anza-Borrego Desert, Twenty Nine Palms, or the former Patton bombing range east of the Salton Sea.
Mr.Plumlee mention in passing the Delgado Ranch near San Felipe: Carlos Quintero and a major drug deal in 1984 involving Quintero that involved the Contras. Plumlee's information corroborated what several other sources who stated they also flew drugs into these locations.
Mr.Plumlee provided the Committee with various documents relating to the drug trafficking by U.S. forces, one of which was marked DEA, Secret, dated February 13, 1990, which stated in part:

(SECRET)

"....Apparently one month ago (January 1990),? and AVINA-Batiz were engaged
in conversation when AVINA-Batiz told ? that the flow of drugs into the
United States is the best solution to Latin America’s problems. The poisoning
of American youth is the best answer to the down-trodden Latin American
masses in retaliation against the imperialistic actions of the United
States.... has learned that the reporter from Vera Cruz (FNU) Valasco, before
his death (1985) was allegedly developing information that, using the
DFS as cover, the CIA established and maintained clandestine airfields to
refuel aircraft loaded with weapons which were destined for Honduras and
Nicaragua.
Pilots of these aircraft would load up with cocaine in Barranquilla,
Colombia and enroute to Miami, Florida, refuel in Mexico at narcotictrafficker-
operated and CIA-maintained airstrips.... XXXXXX were working
a similar type of refuel operations, picking up cocaine in Medellin, Colombia and flying it thru Cuba into Miami. ....".

Smuggling Arms Into Mexico ATF Report

An August 10, 1976 FBI report from the special agent in charge of the
Phoenix office (62-2116) to the FBI director confirmed that, "Plumlee had flown a large shipment of arms to Albuquerque for later flight to San Diego, XXXXXX stated there was also a 1963 government report on a matter found in Phoenix file 26-20103, however, that “file has been destroyed.” The FBI report further stated, “This would fit
into the time frame PLUMLEE alleged on 8-10-76 wherein he was instructed to leave a plane loaded with arms in New Mexico.” The 1976 date suggests that the United States was clandestinely shipping arms to Mexico. The Committee asked Mr. Plumlee if, in his view, was this an attempt of the CIA to destabilize or overthrow another government? (the record shows Mr. Plumlee did not have an opinion)
Plumlee provided the Committee a picture of him seated in the pilot’s seat of a Cxxxxx ID-669-P, which was taken by pilot William Cooper who was shortly thereafter shot down over Nicaragua in a C-123, exposing the U.S.’s role in undermining the Nicaraguan government. XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

XX. Plumlee explained that he personally delivered that C- 130 to Crittenden of Crittenden Air Transport, which provided support for Crittenden’s CIA connections.


Operation Grasshopper: A COVERT Government Drug Operation :

Mr.Plumlee described an operation known as Operation Grasshopper which usedgovernment contract pilots to fly drugs, including an undercover pilot, Barry Seal. Plumlee described the protection given to the CIA drug trafficking by other government agencies.

Mr.Plumlee described the brutal murder of a former Air America pilot, Scott Wheeler aka Maurice Louis Gonzales, in Quedo Loco Lobo, near Oaxaca in Southwestern Mexico, by Pepe Suequez. Plumlee described how an informant sought to report the killing to American authorities, who then allowed an American State Department representative and a Mexican police officer to be present while he was ask questions by XXXXXXXXXXX.
Later, Mexican police retaliated against the informant for reporting the
killing to American authorities by horribly mutilating him and leaving him to slowly die in a Mexican prison yard.

Mr. William Holden of Senator Gary Hart's staff received additional information and has confirmed that Mr. Plumlee gave precise details, documents, and other CIA sensitive information to the Senator.
XXXXXXXX maps, field maps, coded flyways, names, military codes, that left no doubt that these activities did exist. This information was passed on to various congressional committees, none of who allowed the American public to know about it. Senator Hart conveyed the information to Senator John Kerry (D-MA),
chairman of the Subcommittee on Terrorism, Narcotics and International Communications.

In a February 14, 1991, letter to Senator John Kerry, Senator Hart stated:
".... Mr. Plumlee raised several issues including that covert U.S. intelligence agencies were directly involved in the smuggling and distribution of drugs. He provided my staff with detailed maps and names of alleged covert landing strips in Mexico, Costa Rica, Louisiana, Arizona, Florida, and California where the alleged aircraft cargoes of drugs were off-loaded and replaced
with Contra military supplies. He also stated that these operations
were not CIA operations but rather under the direction of the White House, Pentagon and NSC personnel. My staff brought these allegations to the attention of the Senate Armed Services Committee and the Senate Intelligence Committee at the time, but no action was initiated by either committee. ...".

note: The Committee had received another letter from a reporter:

Journalist Art Goodtimes of the Telluride Times-Journal wrote a letter,at the request of Mr. Plumlee:

(January 13, 1991) to Senator John Kerry offering to provide maps, data, and
testimony of former CIA agent Tosh Plumlee. The letter advised that Plumlee
was involved in flying in Central America and had evidence of the U.S. government’s
involvement in illegal drug trafficking through Mexico, El Salvador
and Panama. The letter stated in part:
Government’s involvement with illegal drug operations, infiltrated by military
undercover operatives...Plumlee intent to get a federal investigation
into the illegal covert activities instigated by various agencies of our government
in Central America. ...".

DEA report in part, recap:

A DEA report dated February 13, 1990, marked SECRET, stated in part:

"....BUENDIA had allegedly gathered information on...the relationship the CIA
had with known narcotic traffickers in Vera Cruz area....the CIA narcotic
trafficker situation was very delicate (not to be spoken about)....information
on CIA arms smuggling and the connection the CIA had to narcotic
traffickers....Shortly thereafter, Eden Pastora, aka Commander ZERO, who had given BUENDIA information on CIA arms smuggling allegedly suffered a CIA sponsored bomb attack while traveling in Costa Rica....It was later learned that BUENIDA had allegedly obtained information that would expose high ranking members of the PRI political party who were assisting the CIA with arms smuggling and knew of the CIA link to narcotics
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX XXXXXXX XXXXXXXXX
and high officials of Mexico’s PRI party, was killed by elements of the Mexican DFS security detail...".
Picture of Plumlee in a C-130 provided by DEA xxxxxxx xxxxxx

Magda Hassan
03-05-2009, 01:30 AM
Most interesting Tosh. What is your take on the current border war going on Texico way? Are these some of the same people or a new crop?

Tosh Plumlee
03-05-2009, 02:03 AM
Kind of like 'same ole; same ole...but different hats. The MO is the same and we as a government have done nothing but throw money at it.... the weapons they (cartels) have are mostly from our own military stock piles..... but the American people are not suppose to know that....... this Mexico thing here on the Border with El Paso has been ongoing for over three years now.... the media is just now getting into it... only because they have been pushed into it because of all the murders.... for me its like I told you so... ha... Its gonna get worse before it gets better... just like the economy.... take care.

David Guyatt
03-05-2009, 08:54 AM
I found the below quotes particularly interesting:


The record shows Plumlee was involved in the Cuban conflict of 1957 through 1964, while connected to military and CIA intelligence operations. In the early fifties, he supplied Fidel Castro’s rebel forces in Cuba with arms and ammunition; There were similar sensitive reports indicating that the CIA had armed Castro to overthrow the Batista government. However, the Committee has not been able to confirm those reports.

(my underlining)

And


Millions of dollars, dirty drug money, was being routed through Panama by the cartel, some of it to be used to influence the upcoming presidential election.

(my underlining)

And


Plumlee testified under oath that there was close cooperation between Mexican and U.S. government personnel in drug smuggling (there is other evidence in later testimony from XXXXXX. which confirms sections of Plumlee's testimony. This defies comprehension, Plumlee described his undercover activities to this Committee, including the practice of the Mexican police and its military protecting drug traffickers, something that will be described in considerably more detail in later testimony.

(my underlining).

And (but also refer to item 2 above)


He also stated that these operations
were not CIA operations but rather under the direction of the White House, Pentagon and NSC personnel.

Peter Lemkin
03-05-2009, 11:47 AM
Kind of like 'same ole; same ole...but different hats. The MO is the same and we as a government have done nothing but throw money at it.... the weapons they (cartels) have are mostly from our own military stock piles..... but the American people are not suppose to know that....... this Mexico thing here on the Border with El Paso has been ongoing for over three years now.... the media is just now getting into it... only because they have been pushed into it because of all the murders.... for me its like I told you so... ha... Its gonna get worse before it gets better... just like the economy.... take care.

I don't doubt a word you say, Tosh. Between the murders like clockwork in one place, and over in TJ the guy recently admitting he was paid to make corpses disappear by dissolving in acid and bases [paid piecework, apparently]...it is very ugly. But these are the thugs. The BIG fish are BIG businessmen, or even high in the governments [Mexico, US, Other] and wear expensive suits and gucci shoes and don't get their hands dirty...their 'troops' do that for them. They just count the money......

Some War on Drugs....maybe better worded as a War on drug users, and War for the Drug Cartels and their bankers/backers.

Tosh Plumlee
03-06-2009, 06:35 AM
Thirty plus years fighting the "Drug War', the longest war in the history of the United States....and its not over yet.

History does repeat itself..... Many testified about illegal drug activites in the early 80's. BUT the information was withheld by many in Congress and the main stream media for political reasons:

Some of the testimony, as to drug running and U.S. weapons going to the Cartel, can be found locked within the beltway of Washington DC, as far back as 1980:
(note some of the military grade weapons of the Contra area have now been found (2009) in the Mexico cartel's hands south of El Paso... ATF report of Nov 2009.

Example Congressional Record Reference as to 'Mockingbird" (alive and well in 2009)

also:
Iran-Contra and Mockingbird examples with introduction by H. Michael Sweeney (mhtml:file://C:\Users\William\Pictures\MOCKINGBIRD ARTICLE posted on - DEEP POLITICS FORUM11-31-08.mht!x-usc:http://www.whale.to/b/sweeney_h.html), proparanoid.com
Document by Julian Holmes
No copyright - Public Domain
Permissions not required

"...The very lengthy (25 pages typwritten) document below is actually a letter to the Washington Post by Julian C. Holmes, in which he takes the Post to task for decades of disinformation - typically in the form of combating what the Post likes to describe as 'conspiracy theory' which, in the end, turns out to be conspiracy fact. ...

....
..... investigation by a task force of 13 congressmen headed by Lee Hamilton (D-IN). who had chaired the House of Representatives Iran-Contra Committee. Hamilton has named as chief team counsel Larry Barcella, a lawyer who represented BCCI when the Bank was indicted in 1988 (*11). (which led to failure of the Savings and Loan banks of the late 80's; Neal Bush and friends were found guilty of Fraud)

"... Like the Washington Post, Hamilton had not shown interest in pursuing the U.S. arms-for-drugs operation (*12). He had accepted Oliver North's lies,and as Chairman of the House Intelligence Committee he derailed House Resolution 485 which had asked President Reagan to answer questions about Contra support activities of government officials and others (*13).

After CIA operative John Hull (from Hamilton's home state). was charged in Costa Rica with "international drug trafficking and hostile acts against the nation's security", Hamilton and 18 fellow members of Congress tried to intimidate Costa Rican President Oscar Arias Sanchez into handling Hull's case "in a manner that will not complicate U.S.-Costa Rican relations" (*14). The Post did not report the Hamilton letter or the Costa Rican response that declared Hull's case to be "in as good hands as our 100 year old uninterrupted democracy can provide to all citizens" (*15).
Though the Post does its best to guide our thinking away from conspiracy theories, it is difficult to avoid the fact that so much wrongdoing involves government or corporate conspiracies:
In its COINTELPRO operation, the FBI used disinformation, forgery, surveillance, false arrests, and violence to illegally harass U.S.citizens in the 60's (*16).
The CIA's Operation MONGOOSE illegally sabotaged Cuba by "destroying crops, brutalizing citizens, destabilizing the society, and conspiring with the Mafia to assassinate Fidel Castro and other leaders" (*17).

xxx

notes: 13b. Report of the Congressional Committees Investigating the Iran-Contra Affair, Senate Report No. 100-216, House Report No. 100-433, November 1987, p.139-141.
14a. Letter to His Excellency Oscar Arias Sanchez, President of the Republic of Costa Rica; from Members of the U.S. Congress David Dreier, Lee Hamilton, Dave McCurdy, Dan Burton, Mary Rose Oakar, Jim Bunning, Frank McCloskey, Cass Ballenger, Peter Kostmayer, Jim Bates, Douglas Bosco, James Inhofe, Thomas Foglietta, Rod Chandler, Ike Skelton, Howard Wolpe, Gary Ackerman, Robert Lagomarsino, and Bob McEwen; January 26, 1989.
14b. Peter Brennan, "Costa Rica Considers Seeking Contra Backer in U.S. Indiana Native Wanted on Murder Charge in 1984 Bomb Attack in Nicaragua", WashingtonPost, February 1, 1990.
14c. "Costa Rica Seeks Extradition of Indiana Farmer", Scripps-Howard News Service,April 25, 1991.
15. Press Release from the Costa Rican Embassy, Washington DC, On the Case of the Imprisonment of Costa Rican Citizen John Hull", February 6, 1989.
16. Brian Glick, War at Home, Boston: South End Press, 1989.
17. John Stockwell, The Praetorian Guard The U.S. Role in the New World Order, Boston: South End Press, 1991, p.121.

"...In a FOIA suit-- and after twelve years of stalling --the CIA released documentation, in 2002, although very quitely, that John Hull was a contract operative for the CIA and had received $10,000 a month for the use of his ranch and landing strip in violation of the "Boland Amendment", from 1980 through 1986; and too, to ride herd on the citizens of Cost Rica and report to the CIA, CR station ... Mark G Tanner (0c21) his findings... Sealed Congressional Testimony declassified Feb 2002 Congressional Record

Charles Drago
03-06-2009, 02:10 PM
Massive infections cannot be treated successfully with minimal doses of antibiotics.

Even if the patient survives, vital organs may be damaged beyond repair.

Failure to remove those organs will prove fatal to the patient.

The lifeblood of America is poisoned, and Barack Obama is a baby aspirin.

The vital organs of the American body politic have been damaged so terribly that repair may not be possible.

It may be time to move the capitol westward and start over.

Tosh Plumlee
03-06-2009, 04:49 PM
Guns for Drugs


March 6,2009

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – A dozen Mexican soldiers were arrested on suspicion of working with the violent Gulf Cartel, the Mexican army said on Thursday, a blow to President Felipe Calderon's military-backed campaign against drug gangs.
The troops are accused of collaborating with four municipal policemen in the central state of Aguascalientes who provided protection for Gulf cartel capos, the army said in a statement.
The arrests come as Calderon sent thousands more troops to the violent border city of Ciudad Juarez in an attempt to curb spiraling drug violence that killed more than 6,000 people last year.
Calderon deployed the army to fight organized crime since taking office in 2006 partly because soldiers have traditionally been seen as less corrupt than police.
But several recent high-profile arrests -- including a presidential guardsmen who allegedly received $100,000 a month to track Calderon for drug traffickers -- reveal infiltration in the highest levels of Mexico's security forces.
The Gulf cartel is fighting a turf war for control of smuggling routes with its main rival the Sinaloa federation, led by Mexico's most wanted man Joaquin "Shorty" Guzman.
The Gulf cartel's feared hitmen known as the Zetas, infamous for torturing and beheading their enemies, were founded by a group of military deserters.
(Reporting by Mica Rosenberg; Editing by Bill Trott)

Tosh Plumlee
03-06-2009, 07:58 PM
.... enclosed is additional information that may be of future use, in view of the Mexican border war down here in NM and Mexico. In order to protect myself I need to get as much documented information out there ASP.

DEA Field Reports, Baldwin-Berliz 1990 additional background information 1990;to above post:

http://toshplumlee.info/pdf/DEAfiles.pdf (http://toshplumlee.info/pdf/DEAfiles.pdf)

note; I was one of three undercover contract pilots who flew C-130's into the Caro ranch (El Digado). "Alverz", a friend and fellow pilot, was the UC pilot who had taken DEA agent Ki Ki Camaranda into this place before they were both captured, tortured and killed.

This was known-- in some circles at the time---, as 'The Mexico CIA Thing"/ I changed clothes and rested at this ranch many times in a three year time span and droped of CIA de-coding devices as well as guns and US Military hardware to the factions within the Mexican army and the DFS (Mexican Federal) and reported this information back to DEA HQ (Phonix AZ. aka "AMSOG " American Military Special Operations Group of theTri-State Drug Task Force; ref; Sargent Ed Salem and Harry Hawkins, my assigned UC contacts of the time. (reference: Phoenix Org. Crime Unit, (used as a 'cut-out' by ATF and DEA)

This highly secret unit, was the State of Arizona's Tri-State Drug Task Force chaired by then Gov Bruce Babbit. (this was an Undercover operation launched by the DEA and ATF as far back as 1978) This was also known as "The War on Drugs, or The Drug War". Some of these units and pilots were also associated with MI out of the special operations group (before Ollie North) of the Pentagon. This was a few years before the Iran-Contra. and the Boland Act.

Tosh Plumlee
03-08-2009, 04:25 PM
For those who might be interested, Celle Castillo and Tosh Plumlee will be featured as guest speakers on the Mike Levine radio program, Expert Whitness, on Monday, March 09, 09... check website for additional information, time, and background information.

http://www.expertwitnessradio.org/ (on website)

or in NY radio:

WBAI (http://www.wbai.org/)
99.5 FM
New York City
Monday 5-6 p.m.

Peter Lemkin
03-08-2009, 06:04 PM
For those who might be interested, Celle Castillo and Tosh Plumlee will be featured as guest speakers on the Mike Levine radio program, Expert Whitness, on Monday, March 09, 09... check website for additional information, time, and background information.

http://www.expertwitnessradio.org/

....that would be Eastern Standard Time, and as an archived show afterwards.....at WBAI, New York radio extaordinaire.

Good deal Tosh....looking forward to it!.....

Dawn Meredith
03-08-2009, 09:59 PM
Thanks Tosh, will be sure to check it out.

Great timing, I was just telling an old friend about you yesterday. He's not a CT and can't handle the idea that our government was ever in the drug trade. So I sent this link to him too, as well as a few select pages from a google search of you.
Dawn

Peter Lemkin
03-09-2009, 04:53 AM
I believe the first part of the interview with Castillo is archived here (http://www.expertwitnessradio.org/archives/interrogationcastillo.html), The second part with Tosh on too I'll find the url to and post, it should be on that page somewhere - sometimes it takes about 24 hours after it was live. It can also be found here (http://wbai.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=396&Itemid=135) just after broadcast. Best would be to listen live via the WBAI (http://stream.wbai.org/) website at Monday 5PM EST - and record it - but it will be available as streaming or for download afterwards, as well.

Expert Witness Show - WBAI New York
Mondays, 5:00-6:00 p.m. EST
Michael Levine: host
Kristina Borgesson: producer
Website: www.expertwitnessradio.org
For copies of the show: 212-209-2970
Email Address: expert53@aol.com
The Expert Witness - Interviews and commentary on the news.
Michael Levine is a 25-year veteran of DEA, Customs, IRS, and BATF. Author of NY Times Bestseller Deep Cover, The Big White Lie, Triangle of Death. 35-year court-qualified expert in "use of force," "covert operations," "narcotics trafficking," "human intelligence," "criminal informants" and more.

Past [I think 5 part] interview with Tosh Plumlee on Mike Levine's show here. (http://www.expertwitnessradio.org/archives/index.sql)

Tosh Plumlee Interview - Part V - Broadcast September 14, 2003
MP3 (For Internet Explorer, Windows Media Player)


Tosh Plumlee Interview - Part IV - Broadcast September 13, 2003
MP3 (For Internet Explorer, Windows Media Player)


Tosh Plumlee Interview - Part III - Broadcast September 12, 2003
MP3 (For Internet Explorer, Windows Media Player)


Tosh Plumlee Interview - Part II - Broadcast September 11, 2003
MP3 (For Internet Explorer, Windows Media Player)


Tosh Plumlee Interview - Part I - Broadcast September 10, 2003
MP3 (For Internet Explorer, Windows Media Player)

[you have to scroll down about 80% of the way for these]

Peter Lemkin
03-09-2009, 06:52 AM
This leaves out some of the most important info Levine has made public - but read his books and listen to his archived shows if you want the 'real deal'. Plumlee and Levine [and a few others] are on the same 'page' singing their 'hymns' about a phoney and misleading and misled 'War On Drugs'!

Michael Levine (DEA)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Levine_(DEA)
Michael Levine is a former senior United States law enforcement agent and has been called "America's top undercover cop for 25 years" by 60 Minutes. A 25 year veteran of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) he has gained much attention for his criticisms of the CIA and the influence it has played on DEA operations. He has even gone as far as claiming the CIA was instrumental in the creation La Corporacion, the "General Motors of cocaine".

Levine has testified as an expert witness in 500 civil and criminal trials internationally and domestically and has lectured on Undercover Operations and Human Intelligence for a wide range of professional audiences ranging from the Defense Intelligence Agency and the FBI advanced undercover seminar to the New York State Department of Justice Services and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

Levine's career as an undercover agent first became public with the publication of his DEA authorized biography in March, 1988 "Undercover" ISBN 0-8129-1220-9.

In March of 1988 Levine caused a controversy when he wrote a letter to the New York Daily News about how he wanted to arrest Howard Stern after Stern had been joking on the radio about drugs being used backstage before his PPV show Howard Stern's Negligeé and Underpants Party. Special Agent in Charge for the New York City office of the Drug Enforcement Administration Robert Stutman denied any investigation into Stern and said "Levine's letter was written without the agency's knowledge."[1] However, in Levine's followup book, the New York Times best seller "Deep Cover"[2], it was revealed that the letter to "Daily News" as well as the Stern investigation had not only been authorized by DEA and the Department of Justice, but that Stern's media clout had in fact caused DEA to back down from the investigation.

In "Deep Cover" now in the top fifty "Project Censored" archives of Bill Moyers,[3], Levine revealed that Edwin Meese, the then Attorney General of the United States, had blown the cover of a DEA undercover team, posing as a Mafia family, that had penetrated the office of the President of Mexico and was "buying" Mexican military protection for the transportation of 15 tons of cocaine through Mexico into the United States.

Since 1995, he has hosted "The Expert Witness Radio Show" on the flagship station of the Pacifica Radio Network, WBAI-FM in New York. http://www.expertwitnessradio.org [4]

On August 11, 2008, Levine was featured on The Colbert Report in a segment entitled "Nailed 'Em," which pokes fun at the American justice system for law enforcement activity that some would consider trivial or frivolous. This episode focused on a medical marijuana patient who was denied a job for failing a drug test.[5]

Levine has also been featured as an expert commentator on more than 100 nationally and internationally broadcast TV news and current events shows, including but not limited to NBC Dateline, the Macneil Lehrer News hour, Inside Edition, 60 Minutes, Crier Report, Geraldo Rivera Show, Crossfire, Good Morning America, NBC and CBS Morning shows, Cold Blood, The Donnie Deutch Show, Charlie Rose, Bill Moyers' "Project Censored," and "Contrapunto" (Cross Fire;s Spanish language version).Contents [hide]
1 Bibliography
1.1 Fiction Based Works
2 References
3 External links


[edit]
Bibliography
The Big White Lie: The Deep Cover Operation That Exposed the CIA Sabotage of the Drug War. ISBN-10: 1560250844; ISBN-13: 978-1560250845
Deep Cover: The Inside Story of How DEA Infighting, Incompetence and Subterfuge Lost Us the Biggest Battle of the Drug War. ISBN-10: 0595092640; ISBN-13: 978-0595092642
Fight Back; How to Take Back Your Neighborhood, Schools And Families From the Drug Dealer. ISBN-13: 978-0-595-41834-3; ISBN-10: 0-595-41834-1

[edit]
Fiction Based Works
Triangle of Death. ISBN: 0-440-22367-9
Technical consultant to the NBC miniseries Kingpin.[6]
Actor and Technical Consutant to the Showtime series (Cable TV Series) Street Time

[edit]
References
^ New York Daily News March 10th, 1988
^ Levine, Michael (1990). Deep Cover: The Inside Story of How DEA Infighting, Incompetence and Subterfuge Lost Us the Biggest Battle of the Drug War, Delacorte Press, New York. ISBN-10: 0595092640; ISBN-13: 978-0595092642.
^ http://www.projectcensored.org/static/1990/1990-story5.htm
^ Biography of Michael Levine, Expert Witness Radio, http://www.expertwitnessradio.org/bio/
^ http://www.comedycentral.com/colbertreport/videos.jhtml?videoId=179077
^ IMDB, Kingpin, http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1362783/

[edit]
External links
Michael Levine at Lawsonline
Michael Levine's professional site
Michael Levine's Radio Show

Peter Lemkin
03-09-2009, 07:01 AM
5. CONTINUED MEDIA BLACKOUT OF DRUG WAR FRAUD

While the fire and brimstone of drug war rhetoric continues to saturate the mainstream press, high-ranking drug war insiders continue to come forward in attempts to expose the "war" for what it really is: a battle for the hearts, minds, and tax dollars of the American public. And the media continue to be the government's apparently willing ally in this war.

The latest to "go public" is Michael Levine, who recently retired from the DEA after 25 years as a leading undercover agent for various law enforcement agencies. Over the course of his career, Levine has personally accounted for at least 3,000 people serving a total of 15,000 years in jail, as well as several tons of various illegal substances seized. Upon his retirement Levine published a critical expose of the DEA in which he thoroughly documents his journey from true believer to drug war heretic.

Levine documents numerous instances of CIA involvement in the drug trade, State Department intervention, and DEA cooperation with both parties. Levine's story closely parallels that of Richard Gregorie whose defection from the Attorney General's office was the fourth ranked "censored" story of 1989.

According to Levine, "the only thing we know with certainty is that the drug war is not for real. The drug economy in the United States is as much as $200 billion a year, and it is being used to finance political operations, pay international debts -- all sorts of things." While not being completely frozen out by the media, not one DEA or other government official would appear to respond to his charges.

Levine's appearance on The MacNeil/Lehrer show was significant because Terrence Burke (the acting DEA chief), when asked by Lehrer, agreed with Levine that "we (the U.S.), have consistently chosen drugs over communism," but Burke only agreed to appear on the show after the Levine interview (which was taped) and with the proviso that he would not discuss any of the charges made in the book.

Another strange media non-event was the proposed "60 Minutes" segment on "the drug war fraud". On January 24, "60 Minutes" producer Gail Eisen called Levine and explained that executive producer Don Hewitt had ordered a "crash production" for a segment on his experience with the DEA. Levine gave "60 Minutes" extensive documentation and he was instructed to get his passport in order to do on location shooting in Panama. He then received a phone call informing him that "60 Minutes" had suddenly and inexplicably dropped the piece.

"The whole drug war is a media war," says Levine, "It's a psychological war, aimed at convincing America through the press that our government is seriously trying to deal with the drug problem when they're not."

SSU CENSORED RESEARCHER: DENISE MUSSETTER

SOURCE: EXTRA!, 130 West 25th St., New York, NY 10001
DATE: July/August 1990
TITLE: "Ex-DEA Agent Calls Drug War a Fraud"
AUTHOR: Martin A. Lee

SOURCE: THE HUMANIST, 7 Harwood Drive, PO Box 146, Amherst, NY 14226-0146
DATE: September/October 1990
TITLE: "A Funny, Dirty Little Drug War"
AUTHOR: Rick Szykowny

COMMENTS: Investigative journalist Martin A. Lee, co-author of "Unreliable Sources: A Guide to Detecting Bias in News Media," felt the "drug war" issue received minimal exposure. "Charges by Michael Levine, a 25-year veteran of the Drug Enforcement Administration, that the drug war is a fraud, got very little coverage in mainstream U.S. news media -- this at a time when the so-called drug war was perhaps the biggest ongoing news story in the U.S. press." Lee said that his interview with Levine was reprinted in a handful of alternative weeklies, but no mainstream news outlet picked up his charges and explored the serious issues he raised. Rick Szykowny, author of the article in The Humanist, said that the media coverage of the drug war amounted to a propaganda exercise, as the media focused on the Bush Administration's self-serving pronouncement and rigorously avoided any analysis of either the systemic social and cultural causes of drug use (and abuse) in this country or the political aspects of the "war on drugs". Szykowny also suggested that "The Bush Administration is the most obvious beneficiary of the mass-media's uncritical coverage of the drug war -- as were the Reagan and Nixon administrations before it. The Drug War is the kind of issue that lends itself quite handily to cynical political manipulation. By declaring "war" on drug abuse -- essentially a thorny social (non-military) problem -- the Bush administration was able to achieve a number of things. It could foment a kind of crisis mentality in the general public, to the point where the average American supported the suspension of constitu-tionally protected civil liberties in order to wage that war. It could divert the attention of the American public (and mass media) from far more substantial political issues -- and from the fact that the United States government has cynically colluded with international drug traffickers when it has served the interests of 'national security.' The Bush Administration was also able to intervene in the internal affairs of South American nations under the pretext of 'going to the source,' and even invaded Panama to (allegedly) bring Manuel Noriega to trial on drug trafficking charges."

From Project Censored (http://www.projectcensored.org/static/1990/1990-story5.htm)

David Guyatt
03-09-2009, 10:55 AM
According to Levine, "the only thing we know with certainty is that the drug war is not for real. The drug economy in the United States is as much as $200 billion a year, and it is being used to finance political operations, pay international debts -- all sorts of things." While not being completely frozen out by the media, not one DEA or other government official would appear to respond to his charges.

The global figure is in excess of $1 trillion. That was the case over a decade ago now. Combine that with the illicit weapons trade - the ugly sister of narcotics, gambling and other profitable but illegal activites and we're talking serious money. So serious that banks and Wall Street and governments are now a major part of what was once called The Octopus.

Magda Hassan
03-09-2009, 11:56 AM
I think the octopus deserves its own thread.

Tosh Plumlee
03-09-2009, 03:58 PM
In case you missed this. For those who may be interested in the current events unfolding in our border towns and spilling over into the major cities of the United States. I see this as a National Security matter and I'm happy to see our president addressing this problem:

"...
Obama, Mullen discuss violence in Mexico

<LI class=cnnHiliteHeader _extended="true">Story Highlights <LI _extended="true">NEW: Obama expresses interest in intelligence, surveillance technology, official says
<LI _extended="true">NEW: Talks highlight growing concern as drug-related violence continues in Mexico
<LI _extended="true">Body of Jorge Natividad Norman Harrison one of three found in Tijuana on Tuesday
<LI _extended="true">Mexican officials said they found firearms, Valium pills in search of his business
Next Article in World » (http://www.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/africa/03/09/zimbabwe.tsvangirai.accident.return/index.html?iref=nextin)

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(CNN) -- President Obama and Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman Adm. Michael Mullen on Saturday discussed how the U.S. military can assist Mexico in addressing growing violence from drug cartels, according to a military official.
http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2009/WORLD/americas/03/07/mexico.headless.bodies/art.tijuana.afp.gi.jpg Mexican authorities discovered three headless bodies in Tijuana on Tuesday.


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The conversation, which Obama initiated within hours of Mullen's return to the United States from a visit to Mexico City, underscores the growing concern with which the United States views the situation.
"The president was eager to get the chairman's observations on what he found out," the official told CNN.
The president expressed interest in military capabilities that the U.S. has that could help Mexican forces, including intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance technology, the official said.
Mexico's military and police have been embroiled in increasingly violent clashes with cartels, which are battling among themselves for control over an ever-growing market in the United States.
This week, a U.S. citizen was among the three decapitated bodies found in Tijuana (http://topics.cnn.com/topics/Tijuana), Mexican authorities said Saturday. Growing drug violence has made beheadings in Tijuana, Juarez and other Mexican towns more commonplace over the past year.
Don't Miss


Mexico pours troops into border city (http://www.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/americas/03/06/mexico.troops/index.html)

The Tijuana attorney general's office identified the man as Jorge Natividad Norman Harrison, 45, who ran a pizzeria in El Mirador, in Tijuana. The bodies were found Tuesday.
In a written statement, Mexican officials said they found firearms and more than 100 Valium pills in a search of Harrison's business.
The statement also noted that he had a criminal history in the United States for drugs and conspiracy.

David Guyatt
03-09-2009, 05:15 PM
I wonder what Obama's motives are -- any thoughts Tosh?

I noticed the bit about the body of an headless American, Jorge Natividad Norman Harrison, which was one of those found. This seems to be the same Jorge Natividad Norman Harrison who's real name is Jaime Ramos Herrera. I also noticed that the three were killed and beheaded apparently for squealing:


The bodies were accompanied by a threatening handwritten message that referred to "blabbermouths." Authorities are attributing the deaths to organized crime.

http://weblog.signonsandiego.com/news/breaking/2009/03/tijuana_victim_is_us_citizen_w.html

Tosh Plumlee
03-09-2009, 05:48 PM
I wonder what Obama's motives are -- any thoughts Tosh?

I noticed the bit about the body of an headless American, Jorge Natividad Norman Harrison, which was one of those found. This seems to be the same Jorge Natividad Norman Harrison who's real name is Jaime Ramos Herrera. I also noticed that the three were killed and beheaded apparently for squealing:


The bodies were accompanied by a threatening handwritten message that referred to "blabbermouths." Authorities are attributing the deaths to organized crime.

http://weblog.signonsandiego.com/news/breaking/2009/03/tijuana_victim_is_us_citizen_w.html




I understand that U.S. troop will be moved into some of the border towns to show the Mexican government that the United States supports the Mexican War on Drugs... (I wonder where the State Department and H. Clinton is on this as well as our Mexico Ambs. )

Also some of my "contact", sources have told me that the American was a UC operative working contract for the ATF and DEA.... (it seems someone, or some, inside the Mexican Army Intell are working for the Cartel's gangs and releasing classified US Intell to them and also giving or selling them US military hardware.

David Guyatt
03-09-2009, 07:04 PM
Thanks for that. I thought the American death whiffed a bit.

Tosh Plumlee
03-09-2009, 07:47 PM
Thanks for that. I thought the American death whiffed a bit.



The Mexican Drug War
Tanks rolling up Broadway?
listen (coming tonight)
Tonight - two legendary intel pros join us in a freewheeling conversation about the Mexican Drug war - its' history - where it is now - and what ISN'T being done about it.
About the Guests:
http://www.expertwitnessradio.org/images/tosh.jpgRobert Tosh Plumlee was born in 1937. He joined the United States Army in April 1954 and was assigned to the Texas 49th Armored Division. Later he was transferred to Dallas and assigned to the 4th Army Reserve Military Intelligence Unit, commanding officer Captain Edward G Seiwell.
While he was in the Army he also workedt as an aircraft mechanic before obtaining his pilot's license in 1956. Soon afterwards (1957-64) he began work as a pilot for a Military INTEL, Special Operations Group out of the Pentagon assigned to covert and clandestine CIA flights. Some of his case officers (or handlers) included; William Harvey, Tracy Barnes, Rip Robertson, Tony Bender, and others. In those capacities, Plumlee transported arms to Cuba before Castro took power. Plumlee was also associated with Operation 40, the infamous special attack task force of the CIA's Covert Operational Group.(COG)
In 1962 Plumlee was assigned to Task Force W which operated at the time from the JM/WAVE,OMC also known as the CIA's secret WAVE Station in Miami.
Plumlee also worked many classified operations most as an undercover operative and contract pilot for the federal government during the "Drug War" during the presidency of Ronald Reagan, Bush one, Clinton, and Bush two.
In 1977 Plumlee testified before Frank Church and his Select Committee on Intelligence Activities. He also testified before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee in 1990 and 1991. and Senator John Kerry's Sub Committee on Narcotics, Terrorism.
http://www.expertwitnessradio.org/images/celememorial.gifCelerino "Cele" Castillo, III, is a 20-year veteran of both state and federal law enforcement with 12-year service in the U. S. Department of Justice, Drug Enforcement Administration. Mr. Castillo is a highly decorated DEA agent for his undercover operations in Central and South America. For several years, he was also placed in major cities like San Francisco and New York City for deep cover operations. He is an author of "Powderburns" Cocaine, Contras And The Drug War (http://www.powderburns.org/store.html), and is an acclaimed public speaker and educator.
COURT QUALIFIED EXPERT WITNESS: For 20 years Mr. Castillo has qualified as an "expert witness" in criminal and civil trials, both for and against various state and federal law enforcement agencies, in the following subjects: Undercover tactics, entrapment, informant handling practices and procedures, all subjects related to drugs trafficking, money laundering, and international narcotics investigations, police profiling, research on federal documentation for the defense. (Bates)
http://www.expertwitnessradio.org/images/powderburns2.gif (http://www.powderburns.org/store.html)MR. CASTILLO has written several internationally known articles against federal law enforcement corruption: "Written Statement of Celerino Castillo III, for The House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence" 1998. He was mentioned in several articles on Informant Handling for The National Law Journal. ABC's Primetime Live, Dateline NBC, Discovery Channel and other numerous news magazines have done exclusive interviews on Mr. Castillo pertaining to "Outrageous Conduct" by the U.S. Government.
Links:

Tosh Plumlee
03-10-2009, 04:46 AM
Cocaine Jet That Crashed in Mexico Part of Cowboy Government Operation, DEA Sources Claim

Mexican Officials Fear the Case, if Exposed, Could Jeopardize US Funding for “Plan Mexico”



By Bill Conroy
Special to The Narco News Bulletin

December 19, 2007
(note the Bush's secret money deal to Mexico, without Congress or House approval


The fact that the Gulfstream was forced to ditch over the Yucatan after being refused landing clearance at two Mexican airports is strong evidence that this operation, if ICE operated as alleged, does not have the proper controls in place, law enforcement sources told Narco News. If the operation was being adequately monitored and controlled by U.S. law enforcement, in coordination with Mexican authorities, the jet would have been directed to a safe landing zone, they add.
Mexican law enforcers subsequently apprehended the two pilots of the downed jet. Neither one of them appears to be a U.S. citizen, according to Mexican press accounts.
Narco News has previously reported that the bill of sale for the Gulfstream jet — which was sold only weeks before its crash landing — lists an individual named Greg Smith, whose name also shows up in public documents that indicate he worked as a pilot in the past for an operation involving the FBI, DEA and CIA that targeted narco-traffickers in Colombia. [See link here. (http://www.narconews.com/Issue48/article2919.html)]

(note; Pilot Tosh Plumlee had known and flown with Greg Smith in Forest Service C130's in the mid 90's these were CIA contract operations conducted through Mexico)

Mexican authorities interrogated the pilots of the ill-fated cocaine jet prior to turning them over to DEA agents for questioning. DEA confirmed that it is now handling the investigation into the jet crash and subsequent seizure of the cocaine.

It appears that the pilots spilled the beans on the ICE operation during their interrogation by Mexican authorities, DEA sources tell Narco News. The meeting held at DEA headquarters was focused, in part, on assessing the implications of that information. The Mexican government has chosen not to raised a stink over the matter, the DEA sources claim, for fear of jeopardizing the pending $1.4 billion U.S. aid package promised as part of the proposed “Mérida Iinitiative” — commonly known as “Plan Mexico,” which will provide a Christmas list of training and equipment to the Mexican government to battle with the “drug cartels. ...”.


See rest of article on the "Narco News Website, if interested.

Tosh Plumlee
03-10-2009, 05:10 AM
Cocaine Jet That Crashed in Mexico Part of Cowboy Government Operation, DEA Sources Claim

Mexican Officials Fear the Case, if Exposed, Could Jeopardize US Funding for “Plan Mexico”



By Bill Conroy
Special to The Narco News Bulletin

December 19, 2007
(note the Bush's secret money deal to Mexico, without Congress or House approval


The fact that the Gulfstream was forced to ditch over the Yucatan after being refused landing clearance at two Mexican airports is strong evidence that this operation, if ICE operated as alleged, does not have the proper controls in place, law enforcement sources told Narco News. If the operation was being adequately monitored and controlled by U.S. law enforcement, in coordination with Mexican authorities, the jet would have been directed to a safe landing zone, they add.
Mexican law enforcers subsequently apprehended the two pilots of the downed jet. Neither one of them appears to be a U.S. citizen, according to Mexican press accounts.
Narco News has previously reported that the bill of sale for the Gulfstream jet — which was sold only weeks before its crash landing — lists an individual named Greg Smith, whose name also shows up in public documents that indicate he worked as a pilot in the past for an operation involving the FBI, DEA and CIA that targeted narco-traffickers in Colombia. [See link here. (http://www.narconews.com/Issue48/article2919.html)]

(note; Pilot Tosh Plumlee had known and flown with Greg Smith in Forest Service C130's in the mid 90's these were CIA contract operations conducted through Mexico)

Mexican authorities interrogated the pilots of the ill-fated cocaine jet prior to turning them over to DEA agents for questioning. DEA confirmed that it is now handling the investigation into the jet crash and subsequent seizure of the cocaine.

It appears that the pilots spilled the beans on the ICE operation during their interrogation by Mexican authorities, DEA sources tell Narco News. The meeting held at DEA headquarters was focused, in part, on assessing the implications of that information. The Mexican government has chosen not to raised a stink over the matter, the DEA sources claim, for fear of jeopardizing the pending $1.4 billion U.S. aid package promised as part of the proposed “Mérida Iinitiative” — commonly known as “Plan Mexico,” which will provide a Christmas list of training and equipment to the Mexican government to battle with the “drug cartels. ...”.


See rest of article on the "Narco News Website, if interested.

Peter Lemkin
03-10-2009, 05:40 AM
Same MO. Seems they are even using some of the same planes. Tosh, without asking you to name names, what percentage of the pilots and crew do you think are the same or contain some of the same players? Also, I know there are others who silently back your speaking out - having been involved themselves, but too afraid to join you openly. I'm sure there are yet others who would rather your head be on a platter for breaking the code of silence. Do they send you 'love letters and calls, etc.' or maintain their silence and just 'let it be known' they are not happy with your speaking out? Anyway, I and I'm sure others here applaud what you are doing and have done for many decades now.

Peter Lemkin
03-10-2009, 08:39 AM
About the Guests:

Robert Tosh Plumlee was born in 1937. He joined the United States Army in April 1954 and was assigned to the Texas 49th Armored Division. Later he was transferred to Dallas and assigned to the 4th Army Reserve Military Intelligence Unit, commanding officer Captain Edward G Seiwell.

While he was in the Army he also workedt as an aircraft mechanic before obtaining his pilot's license in 1956. Soon afterwards (1957-64) he began work as a pilot for a Military INTEL, Special Operations Group out of the Pentagon assigned to covert and clandestine CIA flights. Some of his case officers (or handlers) included; William Harvey, Tracy Barnes, Rip Robertson, Tony Bender, and others. In those capacities, Plumlee transported arms to Cuba before Castro took power. Plumlee was also associated with Operation 40, the infamous special attack task force of the CIA's Covert Operational Group.(COG)

In 1962 Plumlee was assigned to Task Force W which operated at the time from the JM/WAVE,OMC also known as the CIA's secret WAVE Station in Miami.

Plumlee also worked many classified operations most as an undercover operative and contract pilot for the federal government during the "Drug War" during the presidency of Ronald Reagan, Bush one, Clinton, and Bush two.

In 1977 Plumlee testified before Frank Church and his Select Committee on Intelligence Activities. He also testified before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee in 1990 and 1991. and Senator John Kerry's Sub Committee on Narcotics, Terrorism.

Celerino "Cele" Castillo, III, is a 20-year veteran of both state and federal law enforcement with 12-year service in the U. S. Department of Justice, Drug Enforcement Administration. Mr. Castillo is a highly decorated DEA agent for his undercover operations in Central and South America. For several years, he was also placed in major cities like San Francisco and New York City for deep cover operations. He is an author of "Powderburns" Cocaine, Contras And The Drug War, and is an acclaimed public speaker and educator.

COURT QUALIFIED EXPERT WITNESS: For 20 years Mr. Castillo has qualified as an "expert witness" in criminal and civil trials, both for and against various state and federal law enforcement agencies, in the following subjects: Undercover tactics, entrapment, informant handling practices and procedures, all subjects related to drugs trafficking, money laundering, and international narcotics investigations, police profiling, research on federal documentation for the defense. (Bates)

MR. CASTILLO has written several internationally known articles against federal law enforcement corruption: "Written Statement of Celerino Castillo III, for The House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence" 1998. He was mentioned in several articles on Informant Handling for The National Law Journal. ABC's Primetime Live, Dateline NBC, Discovery Channel and other numerous news magazines have done exclusive interviews on Mr. Castillo pertaining to "Outrageous Conduct" by the U.S. Government

David Guyatt
03-10-2009, 09:48 AM
Further extract from the Narco News story:


The FBI charged Vega in 2000 with obstruction of justice, alleging that he used an illegal scheme of promising Colombian narco-traffickers lenient sentences in exchange for money and their cooperation with the U.S. government. Those charges were dropped, however, because prosecutors were later forced to concede that Vega’s so-called “corruption scheme” was actually a government-sanctioned cover story. In fact, Vega claims the FBI authorized the cover story.

But the government still found a way to stick it to Vega by hitting him with a misdemeanor tax charge. Vega says he served 52 days in jail after being convicted in 2004 of that taxing transgression. Ironically, one of the allegedly corrupt Colombian law enforcers who Vega claims was part of the Bogotá Connection, Col. Danilo Gonzalez of the Colombian National Police, was assassinated in Bogotá on the very day Vega was sentenced in the tax case.

Vega, in a recent lawsuit filed in federal court, claims the FBI and DEA both used him between 1997 and 2000 to help broker plea deals with Colombian narco-traffickers and that, in the end, the U.S. government stiffed him out of $28.5 million in promised payments for his work.

It was during that work for the FBI and DEA that Vega ran across Greg Smith, whom Vega claims was brought in by the FBI to pilot some 25 to 30 flights that involved couriering federal agents, Colombian narco-traffickers and lawyers back and forth between the United States and Latin America as part of the naroc-trafficker “recruiting” efforts.

Vega also says that the CIA was very involved in this effort, assisting with assuring the safe transport of the narco-traffickers to the airports in Latin America.

“We did have the full cooperation of the CIA…,” he told Narco News.

And


In addition, one of the files leaked out of the U.S. Embassy in Bogotá to a narco-trafficker was a CIA file, according to Vega. The file provided to that narco-trafficker, Vega alleges, was a record of all the intelligence gathered by the CIA in Colombia on some 200 narco-traffickers.

So it appears the CIA’s fingerprints are all over the Bogotá Connection.

And now, given Mr. Smith’s possible link to the Gulfstream II jet — an aircraft reportedly linked to past CIA operations — Vega says he cannot rule out that Smith might be an asset of not only the FBI, but the CIA as well. He stresses, though, that it is only a “suspicion.”

David Guyatt
03-10-2009, 10:09 AM
Yes indeed.

Dawn Meredith
03-10-2009, 09:57 PM
Damn, I had an er come up last night and missed the show. I will check for re-airing. My life is a bit crazy right now, too much going on.
Dawn

Tosh Plumlee
03-10-2009, 10:50 PM
Calderon Links US to Mexico Drug Trade

March 05, 2009

Agence France-Presse



Mexican President Felipe Calderon hit back in an interview at charges his government is failing in its war against drug cartels, saying corruption in the United States is also to blame.
With murders among feuding Mexican drug cartels on the rise and demand for cocaine and other drugs north of the border, Calderon said the United States should take a hard look at itself before pointing the finger at anyone else.
"The main cause of the problems associated with organized crime is having the world's biggest consumer next to us," Calderon told AFP in an interview Wednesday.
"Drug trafficking in the United States is fueled by the phenomenon of corruption on the part of the American authorities," he said, calling on U.S. President Barack Obama to step up the fight against drugs in his own country.
Calderon admitted some Mexican officials had helped cartels, but urged the United States to consider how many of its officials have been implicated.
"I want to know how many American officials have been prosecuted for this," he said, listing a string of prosecutions made against Mexican police officers and government officials during his administration.
"It is not an exclusively Mexican problem, it is a common problem between Mexico and the United States," he said.
Cocaine is produced in South America, but the Mexican cartels control most of the multi-billion-dollar trade.
Calderon launched a wide-ranging crackdown on drug cartels soon after taking office in late 2006. The cartels in turn hit back with ever-higher levels of violence and intimidation.
Mexican border cities have suffered the brunt of the violence, prompting concerns in Washington that the killings and attacks could spill over into the United States.
Some 5,300 people were murdered in drug violence across Mexico in 2008. Ciudad Juarez, across from El Paso, Texas, was worst hit, with more than 1,600 drug-related deaths reported.
Admiral Mike Mullen, the head of the U.S. military, is due in Mexico this week as Washington prepares to step up military and other assistance to battle the cartels.
A top agenda item is "the growing violence and growing threat with regard to narco-trafficking and the drug cartels," Mullen's spokesman, Captain John Kirby, told AFP.
Mexico's police and security forces are often out-gunned by the well-financed gangs.

The administration of George W. Bush pledged 1.6 billion dollars over three years in security assistance to Mexico and Central America, primarily aimed at better equipping Mexico's security forces.

Calderon called on U.S. officials to staunch the flow of weapons from the United States to Mexico.
"The biggest empowerment of organized crime are the weapons that arrive from the United States," Calderon said.
"Since 2006 we have decommissioned 27,000 weapons, everything from missile launchers to 2,500 grenades. We have also found uniforms and weapons belonging to the U.S. Army."
But he said recent talks with Obama offered hope.

"We now have a clearer, more decisive response (from the current administration), one which matches the magnitude of the problem which we face," he said.
In late February, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder said U.S. and Mexican authorities had arrested 750 people over 21 months in an anti-drug sweep, including 52 members of Mexico's Sinaloa drug cartel.

The Calderon government has deployed 36,000 soldiers and tens of thousands of police officers in Mexico's most violent cities in a bid to end drug related violence.
In the latest sweep, police in Cancun said late Wednesday they arrested Antelmo Lazaro "El Chamoy" Rodriguez, accused of being a leader of the "Zetas," a paramilitary gang of hitmen working for the Gulf of Mexico drug cartel.
The original Zetas were elite special forces soldiers trained to find and detain drug lords, but a group of deserters formed the gang in the late 1990s.





© Copyright 2009 Agence France-Presse. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


This was covered in program by tosh... sorta confirms segments of program.

Where has the U.S. mainstream media been on this?

Mockingbird alive and well

Magda Hassan
03-11-2009, 03:23 AM
Sounds like Calderon wants more money for his Swiss bank account. Or else.

Peter Lemkin
03-11-2009, 04:46 AM
http://www.expertwitnessradio.org/archives/expertWitness-2009-03-09-mexicandrugwar.mp3

Robert Tosh Plumlee was born in 1937. He joined the United States Army in April 1954 and was assigned to the Texas 49th Armored Division. Later he was transferred to Dallas and assigned to the 4th Army Reserve Military Intelligence Unit, commanding officer Captain Edward G Seiwell.

While he was in the Army he also workedt as an aircraft mechanic before obtaining his pilot's license in 1956. Soon afterwards (1957-64) he began work as a pilot for a Military INTEL, Special Operations Group out of the Pentagon assigned to covert and clandestine CIA flights. Some of his case officers (or handlers) included; William Harvey, Tracy Barnes, Rip Robertson, Tony Bender, and others. In those capacities, Plumlee transported arms to Cuba before Castro took power. Plumlee was also associated with Operation 40, the infamous special attack task force of the CIA's Covert Operational Group.(COG)

In 1962 Plumlee was assigned to Task Force W which operated at the time from the JM/WAVE,OMC also known as the CIA's secret WAVE Station in Miami.

Plumlee also worked many classified operations most as an undercover operative and contract pilot for the federal government during the "Drug War" during the presidency of Ronald Reagan, Bush one, Clinton, and Bush two.

In 1977 Plumlee testified before Frank Church and his Select Committee on Intelligence Activities. He also testified before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee in 1990 and 1991. and Senator John Kerry's Sub Committee on Narcotics, Terrorism.

http://www.expertwitnessradio.org/images/tosh.jpg

Celerino "Cele" Castillo, III, is a 20-year veteran of both state and federal law enforcement with 12-year service in the U. S. Department of Justice, Drug Enforcement Administration. Mr. Castillo is a highly decorated DEA agent for his undercover operations in Central and South America. For several years, he was also placed in major cities like San Francisco and New York City for deep cover operations. He is an author of "Powderburns" Cocaine, Contras And The Drug War, and is an acclaimed public speaker and educator.

COURT QUALIFIED EXPERT WITNESS: For 20 years Mr. Castillo has qualified as an "expert witness" in criminal and civil trials, both for and against various state and federal law enforcement agencies, in the following subjects: Undercover tactics, entrapment, informant handling practices and procedures, all subjects related to drugs trafficking, money laundering, and international narcotics investigations, police profiling, research on federal documentation for the defense. (Bates)

MR. CASTILLO has written several internationally known articles against federal law enforcement corruption: "Written Statement of Celerino Castillo III, for The House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence" 1998. He was mentioned in several articles on Informant Handling for The National Law Journal. ABC's Primetime Live, Dateline NBC, Discovery Channel and other numerous news magazines have done exclusive interviews on Mr. Castillo pertaining to "Outrageous Conduct" by the U.S. Government.

Links:

Cele Castillo's Website - http://www.powderburns.org

David Guyatt
03-11-2009, 11:39 AM
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/7936115.stm


Mexico police find severed heads

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/45554000/gif/_45554642_mexico_jalisco_0309.gif

Five severed heads have been found inside ice coolers by the side of a road in Mexico, police say.

A police patrol made the grim find in the central state of Jalisco, on a road leading to the city of Guadalajara.

The heads were found with messages addressed to rivals of the killers, who were assumed to be involved in Mexico's bitter and violent drug war.

Jalisco is close to Sinaloa state, scene of many high-profile killings and home to the powerful Sinaloa cartel.

The state is home to a number of key figures in the drug trade, including Mexico's most-wanted man, Joaquin "Shorty" Guzman.

Grim tactic

Mexico is currently in the midst of a battle between feuding drugs cartels.

The gangs are fighting a vicious turf war in the north of the country over lucrative smuggling routes into the US.

Police in Jalisco said the heads found on Tuesday were severed before being packed in ice and dumped by the roadside.

"They were recently severed heads, cut off about four hours before they were found," a spokesman said.

They were accompanied by a note thought to be from the killers threatening rival gangs.

Drug wars in Mexico have claimed thousands of lives in recent years, with more than 1,000 people killed already in 2009.

Some 186 people were decapitated during 2008 out of a total of 5,600 killed in total, Mexico's Human Rights Commission says.

In an effort to dampen the rising tide of murders, Mexico's president last week deployed thousands of troops to Ciudad Juarez, near the US border, to try to wrest control of the city from the gangs.

Dawn Meredith
03-11-2009, 12:26 PM
I too see this as a Nationsl Security issue. That combined with the utter mess the economy is in spells major disaster. I was thinking the other day that some of us should pool our efforts and write to every memeber of Congress, Senate etc. strongly suggesting that all drugs be legalized. Kill two birds with one stone. Get rid of the criminal element, tax the now legal drugs and thereby bring in a ton of revenue to aid our economy. Of course if we convinced every member- (fat chance :) )- there would be the major issue of the CIA etc and their proprietary interest.
It would also drastically affect our law practice but that is a hit I'd gladly take.
Dawn

Tosh Plumlee
03-12-2009, 05:04 PM
Fugitive drug lord makes Forbes' billionaire list

By MARK STEVENSON, Associated Press Writer Mark Stevenson, Associated Press Writer – Wed Mar 11, 10:37 pm ET

MEXICO CITY – Who says crime doesn't pay? A suspected drug lord who is Mexico's most-wanted fugitive made the Forbes list of billionaires on Wednesday with a fortune described as "self made."
The magazine estimates Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman's worth at $1 billion — No. 701 on the list, right between a Swiss oil-trading tycoon and a U.S. chemical heir. Dozens of other people were also tied for the spot.
It is unclear what Guzman thinks of the distinction. Forbes senior editor Luisa Kroll notes that "unfortunately ... Guzman could not be reached for comment."
Often described as Mexico's most powerful cartel kingpin, Guzman has been on the run with a $5 million reward on his head since 2001, when he escaped from prison apparently hidden in a laundry truck.
At the time, he was serving more than 20 years for criminal association and bribery. Mexican officials say he leads the Sinaloa drug gang, though Guzman has never been convicted on drug trafficking charges.
The government had no immediate comment on the listing, which includes an old photo of Guzman taken under police custody while wearing rumpled prison clothes unbefitting the world's alleged 701st-richest person.
Guzman, 54, is not the first drug trafficker to make the list; Forbes says Colombian cocaine kingpin Pablo Escobar was once included, before dying in a shootout with the South American nation's security forces in 1993.
"El Chapo," whose nickname refers to his short, stocky build, has been enjoying a bit of notoriety lately. Telemundo, the No. 2 Spanish-language television network in the United States, announced last year that it is working on a new docudrama based on Guzman's life.
Forbes cited estimates that Guzman and his operation likely grossed 20 percent of the $18 billion to $39 billion in drug revenues that Mexican and Colombian traffickers laundered last year — "enough for him to have pocketed $1 billion over his career and earn a spot on the billionaires list for the first time."
That figure, Kroll said, "is a conservative estimate based on the information we have." (end)


Guzman has 'CUT Deals' with US officials in three administrations.... (just like Escobar and Ochoa of the 80's) Cartel's investments and contributions to some or our elected officials money war chest and into their campagin funding must stop... We need to expose them ..,and in getting them we will get Guzman.

Now we have a 'Mexican border drug war; and soon our troops will be along the border and drawn into a bloody conflict on both sides of the border... Who finances all this and buys the weapons for the drug gangs and cartels?... Its time to get real and get our heads out of the sand (or other places) and demand our elected officials do somethin besides talk and hide from their sins.

Talk about "PORK?"

David Guyatt
03-12-2009, 05:58 PM
I just can't believe Forbes would include a (fugitive or otherwise) drug baron on their list, as it suggests mainstream acceptability.

Perhaps that is where we are these days --- crims are okay, after all they are the ultimate capitalists.

What a fooked up world we live in.

Tosh Plumlee
03-12-2009, 06:30 PM
I just can't believe Forbes would include a (fugitive or otherwise) drug baron on their list, as it suggests mainstream acceptability.

Perhaps that is where we are these days --- crims are okay, after all they are the ultimate capitalists.

What a fooked up world we live in.

We David.... We can do somethinng... The President has an information phone number and website... This Forum should post what has been posted these past few weeks and forward some of the comments to them in DC He says he wants to know... Well lets tell him instead of pussy footing around Lets get all the information we can to that website ... articles, statements and the likes to the President as well as CBS, CNN, and any other Major Media; and not just say things and post, and gripe ..."well they won't do anything about it, because they are in with them"... well I feel we should expose them for what they are... I am on Point... ANYONE else out there willing to go on POINT with me? ...are we just going to bitch on forums and hide in the shadows because we are afraid?... (not directed at you David) Some know what and who I am talking to and about.... Thanks for the post David... later Tosh

David Guyatt
03-12-2009, 07:00 PM
My personal position is pretty clear on this issue: it'll make no difference writing to Obama or others in the body politic. The political system is well beyond salvage and Obama is a captured man.

But even though I'm a Brit and cynical beyond saving, I'm ready to write to Obama via the White House website and suggest he read some of the material on this site - and then sit back and see what happens.

Hopefully it won't result in a late night knock on the door with a nondescript private jet waiting at my local airport to whisk me off to Syria or Egypt for electroshock, water-boarding and testicular remodeling.

Views and thoughts of others?

Peter Lemkin
03-12-2009, 07:45 PM
Listened to the show, Tosh. Interesting, even if you told me [and others] that long ago!....and Castillo confirmed much, as did Mike Levine. the URL to listen to the show is on the post just above this one, folks. No admission charge.

Tosh Plumlee
03-12-2009, 09:14 PM
My personal position is pretty clear on this issue: it'll make no difference writing to Obama or others in the body politic. The political system is well beyond salvage and Obama is a captured man.

But even though I'm a Brit and cynical beyond saving, I'm ready to write to Obama via the White House website and suggest he read some of the material on this site - and then sit back and see what happens.

Hopefully it won't result in a late night knock on the door with a nondescript private jet waiting at my local airport to whisk me off to Syria or Egypt for electroshock, water-boarding and testicular remodeling.

Views and thoughts of others?


Well David that is a positive start. Now let us see others come forward and write those letters and sent the postings to Obama. He may be a "captured man" but only we the people can free him from those political chains. Cut and paste the info... focus on one subject for now, "The Mexica American Drug War" ask the questions... demand the answers... I have one: Where the hell is the State Department on this issue... What is the 'Homeland Security' doing? Where the hell is the American Ambassador to Mexico?

I think I can answer one of those questions... The Secretary of State has to keep a very low profile on this matter in order to protect someone very close to her? The cat will not be allowed to 'jump out of that bag' , on that secret deal.... follow the money into political contributions of old. We can't have that surfacing at this time; can we?.....OH! no, if so then one of those "Specialized Attack Teams" who play with the Dogs of War will be let loose for damage control...

Soon we will see just how strong our new President really is... who is shaking what trees in DC now days? "...testicular remodeling...". is the least of my worries today... been there and had that done to me years ago, in reference to this FRAUD in the Drug War.

Thanks David for taking a public stand... write the damn letters and post the information. Help us Americans Right a very serious WRONG. Later Tosh.
________________________________________

White House: President Obama http://www.whitehouse.gov/contact/

Phone Numbers

Comments: 202-456-1111
Switchboard: 202-456-1414
FAX: 202-456-2461
TTY/TDD

Comments: 202-456-6213
______________________________________________

David Guyatt
03-13-2009, 10:53 AM
?I think I can answer one of those questions... The Secretary of State has to keep a very low profile on this matter in order to protect someone very close to her? The cat will not be allowed to 'jump out of that bag' , on that secret deal.... follow the money into political contributions of old. We can't have that surfacing at this time; can we?.....OH! no, if so then one of those "Specialized Attack Teams" who play with the Dogs of War will be let loose for damage control...


http://www.ncoic.com/clinton.htm

ARKANSAS GOVERNOR BILL CLINTON
PRESIDENT GEORGE BUSH
CIA DRUGS FOR GUNS CONNECTION

By
Paul DeRienzo

An independent group of researchers in Arkansas are charging that Governor Bill Clinton is covering up an airport used by the CIA and major cocaine smugglers in a remote corner of the Ozark mountains. According to Deborah Robinson of In These Times, the Inter mountain Regional Airport in Mena,Arkansas continues to be the hub of operations for people like assassinated cocaine kingpin Barry Seal as well as government intelligence operations linked to arms and drug smuggling.

In the 1980's, the Mena airport became one of the world's largest aircraft refurbishing centers, providing services to planes from many countries.Researchers claim that the largest consumers of aircraft refurbishing services are drug smugglers and intelligence agencies involved in covert activities.In fact, residents of Mena, Arkansas, have told reporters that former marine Lt. Colonel Oliver North was a frequent visitor during the 1980's. Eugene Hasenfus, a pilot who was shot down in a Contra supply plane over Nicaragua in 1986, was also seen in town renting cargo vehicles.

A federal Grand Jury looking into activities at the Mena airport refused to hand down any indictments after drug running charges were made public.Deborah Robinson says that Clinton had "ignored the situation" until he began his presidential campaign." Clinton then said he would provide money for a state run investigation of the Mena airport. But according to Robinson, the promise of an investigation was never followed up by Clinton's staff. In fact, a local Arkansas state prosecutor blasted Clinton's promise of an investigation, comparing it to "spitting on a forest fire."

Clinton's involvement in the drug and arms running goes even further than a mere cover-up of the deplorable activities that went on, and are still going on, at the airport in Mena. A federal mail fraud case against an Arkansas pilot-trainer who participated in illegal arms exports to Central Americarelied on a key Clinton staffer as a chief witness. The case was dismissedfor lack of evidence when the CIA refused to allow the discussion of top secret information about the arms transfers.

Terry Reed, a former employee of the CIA's Air America operation in Laos during the Indochina war, claims to have been recruited as a pilot trainer into the Iran operation by Oliver North. In an article written by David Gallis and published last year by Covert Action Information Bulletin, Reed said that in 1983 he had agreed to supply North's operatives with "certain items."

In pursuit of the Reagan administration's Contra war against the Sandinistas, the CIA had planted mines in Nicaragua's harbors. In 1984, Congress passed the Boland Amendment, which cut off US aid to the Contras. According to Reed, it was during this period that North aided him to become involved in a covert operation called "Project Donation". Reed was told he would be reimbursed for supplying the Contras by insurance companies that were linked to North's operation.,

Shortly afterwards, Reed reported the "theft" of Piper turbo-prop aircraft and he filed a $33,000 claim on which he eventually collected almost $7,000.

In late 1985, Reed received a phone call from an Air America buddy, William Cooper, a pilot working with Southern Air Transport, another CIA front company. Cooper also was working with soon to be murdered drug kingpin Barry Seal at the same time he was flying re-supply missions for the Contras. In 1986, he was shot down and killed over Nicaragua along with co-pilot Wallace Sawyer. The plane's cargo-kicker, Eugene Hasenfus, parachuted into the arms of waiting Sandinista soldiers. Video images of his capture spanned the world and forced an airing of a tiny part of US covert operations.

Sandinistas who recovered the downed cargo plane searched Cooper's pockets and found phone numbers linking the re-supply operation with Felix Rodriguez, an associate of George Bush, best known for murdering Che Guevara after his capture in Bolivia. To this day, Rodriguez, who works for the CIA, wears Che's watch as a trophy.

Reed says that Cooper told him that the stolen Piper would soon be returned and that he should store it in a hanger at Mena until the Hasenfus mess blew over. "There was a lot of Contra stuff going on in Arkansas." said Reed, "it was the hub."

Meanwhile, Reed went into business in Mexico with the blessing of Rodriguez, who was overseeing the Contra air re-supply operation in El Salvador. Reed's company used Mexico to export arms to the Contras, in violation of the Boland Amendment. Reed went down to Mexico and his operation continued for a year after the Iran-Contra story broke.

According to Arkansas Committee researcher Mark Swaney, in the summer of 1987, even as the ContraGate hearings were going on in Congress, Terry Reed began to suspect they were using his front company for something other than smuggling weapons. One day, he was looking for a lathe in one of his warehouses near the airport in Guadalajara and he opened up one of the very large air freight shipping containers (they are about 28' long, about 7' high and about 8' wide), and he found it packed full of cocaine.

Swaney reports that Reed realized he was in a very precarious situation because he was the only person on paper who had anything to do with the company set up to run guns to the Contras in Nicaragua out of Mexico and there was nobody to say that he did not know anything about what was going on. Reed decided he wasn't going to play the part of a patsy.

Swaney says that Reed's contact man for the CIA in Mexico was Felix Rodriguez, whom Reed confronted. Reed said that he hadn't bargained for getting into narcotics smuggling and that he was dropping out all together. Soon afterward, his legal problems began.

In a series of mysterious events, Reed was charged with mail fraud for claiming insurance for an aircraft that was used by North's network under Operation Donation. Reed, who was eventually acquitted of the charges, was picked up by the FBI after the missing plane was discovered in the Mena hanger where Reed had put the plane at Cooper's suggestion. The discovery was made by Clinton's security chief Buddy Young. Young testified that his discovery of the stolen plane was coincidental, an assertion federal Judge Frank Thiel said was unsupported by the facts.

Reed was charged with mail fraud for collecting insurance on the plane, but the CIA prevented prosecutors from releasing information they called "top, top secret," about the Rodriguez-North, Southern Air Transport connection. In November 1990, the prosecution admitted they couldn't prosecute Reed without the secret documents and Judge Thiel ordered Reed acquitted on all of the charges.

Allegations of Governor Bill Clinton's extra-marital sexual exploits originated with a 1990 lawsuit by Larry Nichols, a former Arkansas state employee. Nichols was fired by Clinton in 1988 after reporters discovered Nichols had been lobbying on behalf of the Contras from his office as head of the Arkansas Development Finance Authority.

The suit claimed that Clinton had lied when he said Nichols was fired because he was phoning the Contras directly from his state office. Nichols claimed he only called Washington to lobby on behalf of the Contras. In the suit, Nichols also revealed the affair between Clinton and office secretary Gennifer Flowers.

The suit was dropped by Nichols on January 25, 1992, after Gennifer Flowers went public with her story of the affair. Nichols told reporters that he decided to drop the suit after meeting with Clinton security chief Buddy Young- the same man who found Terry Reed's missing Piper aircraft at the Mena airport.

According to Arkansas Committee researcher Mark Swaney, Nichols said that Young had told him he was a "dead man." prompting Nichols to drop the suit. In public, Nichols says he dropped the suit because "the media have made a circus out of this thing and it's gone way too far."

In court documents recently released by Manhattan District Attorney Robert Morgenthau, it has been revealed that Jackson Stephens, a billionaire banker in Little Rock, Arkansas, and one of presidential candidate Bill Clinton's main supporters, may have played a key role in setting up the illegal purchase by the Bank of Credit and Commerce International (BCCI) of two American banks.

Both First American National Bank, the largest bank in Washington DC, and Georgia National Bank, were purchased by BCCI front man and Stephens business associate Gaith Pharon. Stephens' family bank, the Worthern National Bank,recently extended a two million dollar loan to the Clinton campaign.

Stephens, who is an avid golfer and chairman of the prestigious Masters Tournament Committee, is named in the court records as having brought Pharon together with Stephens' close friend Bert Lance. Lance was a former cabinet official under President Jimmy Carter who was forced to resign due to a banking scandal.

According to newspaper reports, BCCI founder Agha Hasan Abedi was introduced to Lance by Stephens. Stephens, Lance, and First American Bank director and longtime Democratic party power broker Clark Clifford all maintain that they did not know the group of Pakinstani and Saudi investors headed by Pharon, which they were dealing with, were actually fronting for BCCI. Clinton's staff has refused to comment.

Bill Clinton's environmental record has been as dismal as his record in the Iran-Contra scandal. He has supported the incineration of extremely toxic chemicals at a site in the city of Jacksonville, 20 miles from Little Rock, that is reputed to be the most polluted spot in the United States. Jacksonville was the site of Hercules Inc., a company that produced the two components of Agent Orange, 2,4 D, which is still used in agriculture and 2,4,5,T, which was banned by the federal government in 1983 as a carcinogen. Agent Orange was used to defoliate Vietnamese forests during the Indochina war and its production yields the by- product dioxin, the most toxic chemical known on earth.

Hercules sold the operation in 1976 to Vertac Inc., which closed the plant in 1987, leaving behind 20,000 barrels of the chemicals. Gov. Bill Clinton supports a plan to incinerate the waste, a plan that is being vigorously opposed by the residents of Jacksonville.

In These Times reporter Deborah Robinson says that Clinton has allowed Arkansas to become a dumping ground. "Arkansas" she says, "is still kind of a backwoods state and there's a lot of room for someone to set up whatever they want to set up and Arkansas has been exploited by people who have things they want to do that they might no get away with somewhere else." Robinson adds, "there are a lot of questions about what Somebody like Clinton would do for a country when he couldn't do anything for his own state."

Tosh Plumlee
03-13-2009, 02:02 PM
[quote=Tosh Plumlee;4783]?I think I can answer one of those questions... The Secretary of State has to keep a very low profile on this matter in order to protect someone very close to her? The cat will not be allowed to 'jump out of that bag' , on that secret deal.... follow the money into political contributions of old. We can't have that surfacing at this time; can we?.....OH! no, if so then one of those "Specialized Attack Teams" who play with the Dogs of War will be let loose for damage control...


Thanks David for posting the article:

(perhaps we could have the date of that article)


Yes, I know. I have flown into Mena many times, although not with drugs. There was a company there who had a defense contract to repair and service C-130's. In fact 60 min did a small srory there and they film a C-130 taxing to "Richmont Aviation" with a 'Pirates' flag sticking out the window. I was the pilot who flew that aircraft into Mena. (documented)

As the Senator Hart letter of 1990 shows and the letter from Art Goodtimes of the Telluride Times, points out I introduced Art to Bill Cooper (the pilot killed in the shoot down of the C-123) at the Floradora Sloon in Telluride Colorado in 1984, before the Iran Contra affair was known about. ( better known as,Guns for Drugs) Thanks again for your postings)

David Guyatt
03-13-2009, 04:38 PM
Tosh, there is no date on the article but it is based in part on Terry Read's book which was published in 1994, so the article is, I presume, post that date.

Btw, thanks for posting your attachment - very significant correspondence and a disgrace that in the intervening two decades nothing has been done to bring these damnable crooks to heel.

Peter Lemkin
03-13-2009, 06:56 PM
Seems they missed the main message Tosh and others have been trying to say....but none the less....

JUAN GONZALEZ: President Obama is considering deploying National Guard troops along the border with Mexico in response to the escalating drug war. In his most direct comments so far on Mexico’s fight against drug cartels, Obama told reporters from regional newspapers, quote, “We’re going to examine whether and if National Guard deployments would make sense and under what circumstances they would make sense.” But Obama ruled out any immediate military move.

More than a thousand people have been killed in Mexico in drug-related violence this year. 6,000 people died last year. Vice President Joe Biden highlighted the threat posed by drug traffickers this week when he announced Gil Kerlikowske as the new drug czar.

VICE PRESIDENT JOE BIDEN: Since the beginning of last year, there have been nearly 7,000 drug-related murders in Mexico. If we had said that years ago, we would have looked at each other like we were crazy. But 7,000 drug-related murders in Mexico. Violent drug trafficking organizations are threatening both the United States and Mexican communities.


JUAN GONZALEZ: Last week, Admiral Mike Mullen, the chair of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff, said the US military is ready to help Mexico in its fight against drug cartels with some of the same counterinsurgency tactics used against militant networks in Iraq and Afghanistan. Mullen made the comment after meeting with high-ranking Mexican officials in Mexico City. Mullen said he emphasized the Pentagon’s readiness to provide new intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance help, such as unmanned drones to spy on drug gangs, especially along the US border.

His comments came in the wake of a report issued by US Joint Forces Command late last year that grouped Mexico with Pakistan as a state that could undergo a “rapid and sudden collapse.” Last Sunday, during an interview on Meet the Press, Defense Secretary Robert Gates said the US military will increase its support of Mexico.

ROBERT GATES: I think we are beginning to be in a position to help the Mexicans more than we have in the past. Some of the old biases against cooperation with our—between our militaries and so on, I think, are being set aside.

DAVID GREGORY: You mean providing military support?

ROBERT GATES: No, providing them with—with training, with resources, with reconnaissance and surveillance kinds of capabilities, but just cooperation, including in intelligence.


JUAN GONZALEZ: Meanwhile, on Tuesday, a House subcommittee considered the Department of Homeland Security’s request for additional border security funding in light of the increasing violence. This is Jayson Ahern, Acting Commissioner of US Customs and Border Protection.

JAYSON AHERN: So far, that kind of violence has been contained in Mexico, but we certainly do not want to see it spill over in the United States. And to that end, we have developed very detailed contingency plans to maintain control of the border as we move forward. While in recent years we’ve certainly focused on threats coming into the United States, Secretary Napolitano has made it clear that southbound enforcement, keeping guns and money out of the hands of criminals in Mexico, will be a priority for us. To this end, we’ll dedicate additional personnel and technology to combat this threat, and we’re finalizing our enhanced operational plans at this time.


JUAN GONZALEZ: For its part, Mexico recently announced it will send a total of 7,000 soldiers and federal police officers into the border city of Ciudad Juarez, where 1,600 people died last year in drug-related violence. Ciudad Juarez is located across the US border from El Paso, Texas. In a recent visit to El Paso, Texas Governor Rick Perry called for 1,000 US troops to be deployed to protect the border. But the mayor of El Paso, John Cook, has expressed concern about militarizing the border.

MAYOR JOHN COOK: Soldiers are trained to kill. That’s what their job is. The job of the Border Patrol is different; it’s to protect the border. So, just the training that goes into it and understanding what the law is, understanding who has a right to be in certain places, is not something that soldiers usually pay much attention to. They set up a perimeter, and they defend it, and they kill anybody who comes into their territory. I don’t really want that to happen in the city of El Paso. I don’t want our border militarized.


AMY GOODMAN: Much of the drug-related violence in Mexico has been fueled by the ability of drug cartels to purchase AK-47 assault rifles and other arms in the US. According to law enforcement officials, 90 percent of the guns picked up in Mexico from criminal activity are purchased in the United States. Last month, fifty-four Congress members wrote to President Obama backing Mexican calls to enforce a ban on the imports of assault weapons, which are often shipped to Mexico.

For more, we’re joined by three guests. But we’re going to begin in Las Cruces in Mexico—New Mexico with Laura Carlsen. She’s the director of the Mexico City-based Americas Policy Program for the Center for International Policy. Her latest article is called “Drug War Doublespeak.” She’s joining us by video stream.

Welcome to Democracy Now!, Laura.

LAURA CARLSEN: Thank you, Amy. Thank you for the invitation.

AMY GOODMAN: It’s good to have you with us. Your piece is called “Drug War Doublespeak,” and you start by talking about the “blitzkrieg of declarations from US government and military officials and pundits […] claming Mexico was alternately at risk of being a failed state [and] on the verge of a civil war.” What do you think is actually happening there?

LAURA CARLSEN: Well, we’ve been very surprised at this barrage of statements recently. And there are two reasons, basically. A lot of the talk has been focused on Mexico’s national security threat. Mexico has a very serious problem with violence, and that’s a predictable result of the drug war model that’s being applied, but it is not a threat to US national security.

When we started to look at some of these articles talking about spillover of Mexican violence into the United States, what we found is that there’s no evidence of that whatsoever at this point. The articles begin talking about the violence in Mexico, some of the worst cases. Then they jump to declarations by public officials, and there’s no evidence of what’s actually happening in the United States, because we simply don’t have that. In the case of using statistics, like there’s a lot of talk about the number of kidnappings in Phoenix, it turns out that many times those statistics are spurious, and they have no backup. They’ve been invented, or they’ve been twisted in many cases.

This is a real warning sign for us, because when we see an exaggerated threat assessment, as we’re seeing right now in terms of spillover of Mexican violence to the United States, it’s generally a prelude to militarization. And in fact, with Governor Perry requesting soldiers on the border and the National Guard, we’re already seeing a buildup for that kind of militarization.

JUAN GONZALEZ: Now, you also talk about, in your article, the Mérida Initiative that President Bush originally announced. What was that, and how has it faired?

LAURA CARLSEN: The Mérida Initiative was designed by President Bush in October of 2007, and essentially this is a drug war model. It’s a copy of Plan Colombia, that we have six years and $6 billion of experience with and that the GAO itself has called a failure in stopping drug flows. It provides military equipment and US goods and services—no cash—to Mexico in order to supposedly reduce the power of the cartels. The first appropriations were 2008, and just last week the second appropriations, $300 million for Mexico in 2009, were passed.

The Mérida Initiative supports the offensive of President Felipe Calderon in Mexico, which, as I said, is this model of interdiction and enforcement that almost completely ignores the public health aspects of the drug problem. Since it’s gone into effect, the US narcotics report itself reports that there’s been a decrease in seizures, an increase in production, and most importantly, what we’ve already seen is this incredible increase in the violence. If last year’s numbers were—the 2007 numbers were approximately 2,500 narco-related deaths. The figures for 2008 were 6,290. And they’re going up. This violence is predictable: when you fight violence with violence, what you get is more violence.

AMY GOODMAN: We’re going to go to break, then come back. Laura Carlsen, director of the Mexico City-based Americas Policy Program at the Center for International Policy, she’s near the border. She’s in Las Cruces, New Mexico. Her latest piece is called “Drug War Doublespeak.” And then we’re going to speak with the president of the Brady Center, talk about the guns that are coming over the border. And we’ll be speaking with Professor Greg Grandin, who—his latest book coming out—he’ll be talking about issues in Latin America. Stay with us.

[break]

AMY GOODMAN: We are joined by not only Laura Carlsen, who is here with us from Las Cruces, New Mexico. She is with the organization that looks at Mexico and Latin America. We’re also—she’s with the group called the Center for International Policy. We’re also with Greg Grandin, professor of Latin America history at NYU. His new forthcoming book is called Fordlandia. Paul Helmke is with us, as well, president of the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence. He’s joining us from Washington. Juan?

JUAN GONZALEZ: Yes, I’d just like to ask Laura Carlsen another question, on the question of whether there is success occurring in this drug war in Mexico. On the one hand, you see the administration praising President Felipe Calderon and his initiatives. On the other hand, you see a continued rise in the supposed production of various types of drugs in Mexico. And also, the role of the Mexicans who have been deported from the United States from prisons here in the United States after they serve terms, is there any indication that this is having an impact on the level of violence and of the upsurge in the drug trafficking in Mexico?

LAURA CARLSEN: Well, first of all, it’s very frustrating to see the way that these multiple failures of the drug war model, that’s been roundly criticized now by the United Nations in the drug war policy meetings in Vienna, as well as by a high-level commission called the Latin American Commission on Drugs and Democracy, are continuously spun as successes. It’s completely unacceptable to ask a society to accept higher levels of violence as a sign that we’re winning the drug war. There’s an increasing level of civilians that are being caught in the crossfire between the 45,000 army troops that are in the streets in Mexico and the drug cartels who are fighting for plazas. So, this is very frustrating. We know that this model doesn’t work, because it’s been applied before. And we know that it’s not working in Mexico now.

I don’t think the deportees have as much to do with the rising violence as do deserters from the army. That’s where there’s a very serious problem. One of the items included in the Mérida Initiative, a number of them have to do with increased training for the army and police forces. What we know is that with the high desertion rates that we have in the Mexican army and the high levels of corruption in both the police and the army, much of that training is going to go straight to the drug cartels.

AMY GOODMAN: I wanted to go right now to Washington, D.C. Our guest there is Paul Helmke, president of the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence. These latest figures that we have just gone through, the number of weapons that are being used, something like 90 percent of them from the United States—your piece—your organization’s piece, “America’s Weak Gun Laws Are Fueling the Violence in Mexico”—how?

PAUL HELMKE: The folks in Mexico have figured out what criminals in the US figured out a long time ago: our weak and nearly nonexistent laws in the US are making it very easy for these guns to get to Mexico. Most Americans don’t realize that we basically have very few laws on the book, almost none, restricting access to guns. And so, it’s very easy to go to unlicensed dealers, who basically can sell any kind of gun without any kind of background check, particularly gun shows, particularly in Texas, Arizona, New Mexico. They go to licensed dealers who are corrupt, and because Congress in effect shields them by keeping the information about where the records are, what the inventory is, who’s in trouble, and making sure that ATF doesn’t have the funding, that’s where guns come from.

And the fact that we allow an unlimited number of guns, almost any kind of gun, very serious military—nearly military-style hardware, it’s obvious that’s why 90 to 95 percent of the guns are coming from the US. We are the world’s gun bazaar, and the gangs in Mexico have figured it out. If anything, Mexico ought to be putting up their army at our border to check the cars coming from the US in to see who’s bringing the guns in, because we make it so easy for dangerous people to get those guns.

JUAN GONZALEZ: Now, your article mentions that about one percent of all the licensed gun dealers represent 60 percent of the illegal gun sales.

PAUL HELMKE: Right.

JUAN GONZALEZ: Why doesn’t the government crack down on those particular licensed dealers that are involved in this trafficking?

PAUL HELMKE: Seems pretty obvious to me. Actually, that information is a little old. Congress no longer allows that kind of information to be made public. That’s from 2000, when it was said that 60 percent of the guns traced to crime come from one percent of the dealers.

But we only have enough ATF agents—it would take them twenty-one years to investigate every gun dealer to do—to stop by every gun dealer in the US. And in fact, we have laws on the books that say once you’ve investigated a gun dealer, a licensed gun dealer in the US, you cannot come back again for another twelve months unless you have a warrant. We make it harder to sell cigarettes to minors or liquor to minors than we do to sell guns in this country. And since you can go in again with a credit card and buy a thousand AK-47s, .50-caliber sniper rifles that can shoot down helicopters, it’s obvious why they come to the US to get their guns.

AMY GOODMAN: Paul Helmke—

PAUL HELMKE: We do nothing to stop—almost nothing to stop dangerous people from getting them.

AMY GOODMAN: I remember when President Bush first took office and the statement of the NRA, “We’re now going to be operating out of the Oval Office.”

PAUL HELMKE: Right.

AMY GOODMAN: Do you still see their power at that level today? And what do you feel needs to be done?

PAUL HELMKE: Clearly, we have a lot stronger supporters with President Obama, Vice President Biden, Attorney General Holder, Rahm Emanuel, others in the administration. Elected officials in Congress, however, are still scared to death of the NRA for some reason. They think that the NRA is powerful, even though the NRA basically hasn’t won a single contested election in either the ’06 cycle or the ’08 cycle. We don’t know of any person who’s lost because of standing for commonsense gun control over the last two elections. But a lot of politicians are afraid of them, even though when we poll people at exit polls, 75 to 85 percent of gun owners, McCain voters, Republicans, as well as the general American public, support things like doing background checks in all sales, strengthening ATFs so we can stop this illegal trade in gun, restricting some of the weapons that are easily available to the general public.

JUAN GONZALEZ: And even we covered—I think it was last week that the passage of—giving D.C. the right to have a voting member of Congress, it was stuck into that bill the elimination or the reduction of D.C.’s strong gun control laws.

PAUL HELMKE: Clearly sad. D.C.’s law was challenged. The Supreme Court spoke up last summer, said D.C. went too far. But the Supreme Court, Justice Scalia speaking, said you can still have restrictions on who gets guns, what types of guns, where you take guns, how they’re sold, how they’re marketed, how they’re carried. But Congress thinks they know the Constitution better than the Supreme Court. And the Senate, sadly, the other week, said that D.C. City Council didn’t get it right, and so they want to play super city council in the sky and basically say, “You can’t have a vote in Congress unless we can gut your gun laws totally.” That’s ridiculous, and it does show the power of the gun lobby.

AMY GOODMAN: Paul Helmke, the case that just went on trial this week in Phoenix, Arizona, of a gun store owner who went on trial on charges he sold more than 700 weapons to straw buyers, knowing the firearms were bought on behalf of Mexican drug syndicates?

PAUL HELMKE: Right, happens all the time. A straw buyer is someone who knows they can’t pass a background check, so they get someone else. And basically, the straw buyer says, “Let me look at that gun. How much does it cost? How does it feel?” And then they have someone else with them fill out the paperwork, obvious straw buyers.

We don’t do enough in this country to crack down on that, and it’s because, basically, we are not serious. We want everybody to have a gun for any purpose.

That gun dealer actually was originally in California, which has the best gun laws in this country, and he moved to Arizona, because it was too hard for him to sell those guns in California and he knew that in Arizona it would be a lot easier for him to market these to the gangs and the drug cartels in Mexico.

AMY GOODMAN: Greg Grandin is also with this, a professor of Latin American history at New York University, NYU, here in New York, just down the road. Can you put the policy of the US with Mexico in context, overall, in Latin America right now?

GREG GRANDIN: Well, the logic context is two things. One is the rise of the left throughout most of South America, in which the US has lost influence in what used to be called its backyard. But it also—and the reason for the rise of the left is the second part of the context, and that’s the absolute failure of economic policies, starting with NAFTA and even before, what’s generally known as neoliberalism or the Washington Consensus.

All the drug war is is a crystallization, in a lot of ways, of all of the pressures brought to bear on the Mexican state by privatization, by deregulation, through the opening of the economy. In some ways, you see a direct relationship between the recession of the state, particularly in northern Mexico, and the vacuum created, which is filled by the cartels. Society, no less than nature, abhors a vacuum. And in many ways, the cartels have functioned as the state, and they tax businesses, they create infrastructure, they provide jobs. The money raised—the money, the profits by narcotics industry in Mexico, billions of dollars—some estimates are $30 billion a year—are injected into Mexican banks. They keep Mexican banks afloat.

So, in many ways, what you’re seeing here with the drug wars in Mexico is a death match between different sectors of elites trying to assume state powers. And when Felipe Calderon took power and came to office in 2006, he declared a war on drugs, and he sent troops into Juarez and other cities in the north, and that’s what kicked off this cycle of violence.

It’s nowhere close to being a failed state. That is hysteria. I think that’s right. But there is a serious crisis in Mexico. And the larger conflict—context, of course, is that a hundred years ago—we’re coming up on the hundredth anniversary of the Mexican Revolution, and so I guess what’s called a failed state now, back then, was called a revolution. So I think Mexicans are acutely aware that.

JUAN GONZALEZ: And Greg, you mentioned when Felipe Calderon came to office. Obviously, we tend to forget that he was elected in perhaps the most controversial election in Mexican history, a very, very close margin against a leftist candidate, Lopez Obrador. Is there some concern that this increase in militarization, both within Mexico and now possibly from the United States side of the border, will have some impact on the continuing political dynamic within Mexico?

GREG GRANDIN: Oh, I think there’s a clear concern that the Mexican state, the promise of democratization that happened with the election of PAN and Vicente Fox two cycles back has not been delivered, that there’s—that both main political—that all three main political parties, the PAN, the PRI and the PRD, are losing its ability to channel dissent and protest and popular aspirations through the political process.

And you see the growth of social movements and protest, not just in Chiapas, of course, with the Zapatistas, but we saw Oaxaca, saw the crisis in Oaxaca. And we saw a lot of the rhetoric of the war on drugs and the war on terror being used to repress dissent in Oaxaca. And in Chihuahua, people protesting the privatization of water and other natural resources have been locked up and have been physically repressed under the aegis of the war on terror and the war on drugs. So you’re seeing a kind of synergy of all of these different crises coming together in Mexico.

AMY GOODMAN: President Obama is weighing the possibility of sending more troops to the border. Do you think some of that—you were mentioning having to do with the economy, of many more Mexicans having to come up, of—not about drugs, but about people who are being squeezed all over the world?

GREG GRANDIN: They’re being squeezed. But what’s interesting about this particular crisis, I read some statistics that actually in every other economic crisis that Mexico has had throughout the last thirty or forty years, there’s been a—it’s been correlated with an increase of migration to the United States. This is the first time where there’s actually a reverse in migration, because of the economy tanking in the US. And along with that, remittances have fallen. So, in some ways, migration has served as a safety valve from Mexican politics since 1968. And what you’re seeing is a shutting down of that safety valve, which increases the pressures that Juan was talking about within Mexican society.

JUAN GONZALEZ: I’d like to ask Laura Carlsen, if we could get you back in the conversation here, for those of us who have had the opportunity from time to time to cross the border between Mexico and the US, there’s an amazing difference between how you are treated when you’re coming from the US into Mexico versus from Mexico into the US, in terms of the type of inspection and processes that you have to go through. As Paul Helmke was suggesting, maybe if the Mexican army would start searching cars coming from or trucks coming from the United States into Mexico, they might be able to interdict many of these weapons that are coming in illegally.

AMY GOODMAN: Laura, are you there?

LAURA CARLSEN: Yes.

AMY GOODMAN: Could you respond to that?

LAURA CARLSEN: Well, I think there’s a complete double standard in terms of what is really a transnational problem-–everyone recognizes it’s a transnational problem—and the way that it’s viewed in Mexico and the United States. By talking about spillover and many of the measures, the Mérida Initiative included, that focus only on the Mexican responsibility for this problem, what the United States is doing is washing its hands of these kinds of problems, including the drug—the gunrunning, as well as being the largest market and the reason for existence for these drug cartels.

When there’s drug activity in the United States, it doesn’t mean it’s spilling over from Mexico. This is a normal part of the transnational drug trade. The United States is responsible for its share of corruption, by letting these kinds of illegal substances into the country, by the illegal trade in guns and money laundering that supports the drug industry on the ground in Mexico and other places. And so, by pushing the entire onus of this onto Mexico, it’s releasing itself from responsibilities in many ways that’s completely unacceptable and creating an image that there’s a contagion coming from the south, which is Mexico, into a fundamentally healthy organism, which is US society, and we all know that isn’t true.

AMY GOODMAN: Laura Carlsen, President Calderon said, to say Mexico doesn’t have authority over all its national territories is absolutely false and absurd. He said the media is mounting a campaign of lies against Mexico. What do you think has to happen?

LAURA CARLSEN: Yeah, I think that’s basically true. Any definition of a failed state, when you look at it technically and including the rankings that they do of failed states, Mexico does not qualify. There are places where the drug cartels have significant power. It’s not that there’s a total absence of the state. The drug cartels don’t want to be the state. They don’t want to take over the state. What they want to do is they want to carry out their business, a very lucrative business.

What I think has to happen is that we have to get rid of this failed drug war model and we have to start looking at other options. The Latin American Commission on Drugs and Democracy that was run by former Mexican President Ernesto Zedillo, former Brazilian President Fernando Henrique Cardoso, and former Colombian President Cesar Gaviria, came out with a recommendation saying it’s time to completely change course on this. What we have to do is start looking at illegal drug use as a public health problem; cease to criminalize it; stop having these confrontations, bloody confrontations, in the street with the drug cartels; and focus repressive measures just on organized crime. And at the same time, they came out and suggested that we take a serious look at legalization, in some cases, of drugs, because the only way this is really going to stop is when that market doesn’t exist anymore. And the prohibitionist policies that have been put in place until now have completely failed.

AMY GOODMAN: Greg Grandin, on a different note, Salvador elections on Sunday?

GREG GRANDIN: Well, the polls show that the election is close. The FMLN candidate, which would have—which, if he does win, it will end nearly twenty years of ARENA right-wing rule, the ARENA party being linked to the death squad in the civil war of El Salvador in the 1980s. Mauricio Funes was well ahead in the polls, but there’s been a major scare campaign.

JUAN GONZALEZ: That’s the candidate of the FMLN.

GREG GRANDIN: That’s the candidate of the FMLN. There’s been a major scare campaign over the last two or three months, along the lines of what happened in Mexico, bringing it back to Mexico, with Manuel Lopez Obrador in 2006, which linked him to Chavez. And Lopez Obrador was well ahead in the polls, scheduled to win, and at the last minute it came in very close. Peru, we saw the same thing. So there’s been an orchestrated attempt to link Funes with Chavez and also with the FARC in Colombia and scare Salvadoran voters into voting once again for ARENA. We saw the same thing in 2004.

Key to this, as you mentioned in the opening, is a threatening the Temporary Protection Status. There’s about 2.5 million Salvadorans in the United States. Hundreds of thousands of them are here under what’s known as a TPS, Temporary Protection Status, that was implemented in, I think, 1989, 1990, and it was a recognition of the migration, out-migration, exile, resulting from the violence of the civil war in the 1990s. And it’s almost been a ritual of US politics every time there’s a presidential election in El Salvador to threaten to revoke that TPS status. What you saw in El Salvador was headlines blared along all the right-wing newspapers, which is completely controlled by ARENA or affiliated with ARENA, announcing that Congress threatens to cut off TPS and remittances will fall and all of this, and all of this alarmism.

The Obama administration, the State Department, issued a neutrality statement yesterday. It was about a paragraph long, but it’s not getting any attention within the Salvadoran press, and certainly not the headlines that the statements by Dan Burton and other Republican congressmen have received.

AMY GOODMAN: Well, we’ll certainly follow that story on Monday, what happens with the Salvador elections on Sunday. I want to thank you all for being with us. Greg Grandin, professor of Latin American history at NYU, his forthcoming book called Fordlandia: The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford’s Forgotten Jungle City. Laura Carlsen, with us from Las Cruces, New Mexico, she is with the Center for International Policy. And finally, Paul Helmke, president of the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence, speaking to us from Washington, D.C.

http://www.democracynow.org/2009/3/13/obama_signals_readiness_to_further_militarize

Tosh Plumlee
03-13-2009, 07:15 PM
http://www.deeppoliticsforum.com/forums/images/icons/icon1.gif "...Hey T, you may see troops not far from home soon. ...".

Pete: JSOC....There already there and have been there these past three weeks. A secret (military civilian team) crossed over a few weeks ago and others joined them last week. They are working with a Mexican secret Task Force of the Mexican Army.. (joint venture)....You will be hearing more about this team and others in the weeks to come. Its all 'Hush-Hush" for now and is a TS coded OPS... same ole same ole.... assassination teams one a one on one special forces ops... stay tuned

(information before the fact) YES WE HAVE TROOPS OPERATING IN MEXICO TODAY.

Tosh Plumlee
03-15-2009, 02:51 AM
From the NARCO NEWS, March 13, 2009 by Bill Conroy:

___________________________________________

The House of Death Is Now in the Obama Administration’s Court



Posted by Bill Conroy (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/bill-conroy) - March 13, 2009 at 11:51 pm U.S. Appeals Court Hearing Raises Unsettling Questions "Under Color of Law”
The informant at the center of the House of Death carnage was the subject of a high-stakes court hearing this past Tuesday, March 10.
The informant’s attorney, Jodilyn Goodwin, appeared before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit, arguing her client’s case, fighting to prevent his deportation to Mexico, where the informant claims he will become another victim of the House of Death.
The recent hearing before the U.S. Court of Appeals in St. Paul, Minn., is particularly noteworthy because it provides us with a first insight into how the Obama Justice Department views the informant’s case, and by extension, the House of Death murders and the subsequent cover-up of the U.S. government’s complicity in those murders.
The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) initiated deportation proceedings against the informant, Guillermo E. Ramirez Peyro, in 2005 and his case has been tied up in the courts ever since — with an immigration judge twice ruling in favor of granting him deferral from deportation under the United Nations Convention Against Torture and the Justice Department-controlled Board of Immigration Appeals twice ruling against Ramirez Peyro.
Ramirez Peyro, a former Mexican law enforcer, argues that if returned to Mexico, he will be tortured and murdered with the assistance of Mexican officials, specifically law enforcers, as a payback for his snitching on drug-cartel activities.http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/Ramirez.Peyro.gif
According to the government's attorney, Tiffanny Walters Kleinert, the facts of the case, as established by the immigration judge who heard the case originally, are not in dispute and the government does not contest that Ramirez Peyro will, in all likelihood, be murdered, if deported to Mexico, probably with the assistance of Mexican law enforcers.
However, in a twist that seems out of sync with the human rights rhetoric coming out of the Obama White House, Kleinert also argues before the Appeals Court that even though Ramirez Peyro faces an almost-certain gruesome death if returned to Mexico, he is not entitled to relief from the court under the Convention Against Torture — which prohibits the U.S. from deporting an individual to a country where he faces imminent risk of being tortured by individuals acting on behalf of the government.
Kleinert argues that even if Mexican law enforcers participate in Ramirez Peyro’s murder, as expected, and as they did with the victims of the House of Death, they would not be acting officially "under color of law."
Kleinert contends that because the Mexican government, and its president, Felipe Calderon, do not officially condone such corruption and are allegedly working to eliminate it, then any participation by Mexican government officials, including law enforcers, in Ramirez Peyro's expected murder would not constitute a homicide “under color of law."
In other words, because any Mexican law enforcer (or soldier) involved in torturing and killing Ramirez Peyro would be acting without the “official” permission of the Mexican government, Ramirez Peyro is precluded, according to Kleinert's argument, from seeking protection under the Convention Against Torture.
If the U.S. Court of Appeals agrees with Kleinert, then the U.S. government will provide Ramirez Peyro with a one-way ticket to Mexico — where even the attorney representing the U.S. government in this case agrees he will most likely face the same fate as the House of Death murder victims — whose corpses were found buried in the backyard of a middle-class home in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, in various states of decay, covered in lime ("milk" in narco-trafficker parlance) to speed decomposition.http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/sandalio_gonzalez.jpg
“When you see them doing this, then the fact there's a cover up of the other murders should come as no surprise,” says former DEA Special Agent in Charge Sandalio Gonzalez, who blew the whistle on the U.S. government’s complicity in the House of Death murders. “There is no Department of Justice. There is a government law firm that defends government officials, and in this case, they're going the extra step. They're trying to get rid of the witness [Ramirez Peyro]. Wow!”
Narco News sent an e-mail to the Department of Justice, seeking comment on Ramirez Peyro’s case, just to assure that the new Attorney General, Eric Holder, is on board with the “under color of law” reasoning.
From the e-mail:

[I]I am interested in confirming that a case now before the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit is, in fact, on the Attorney General's radar and that the position of the government's attorney (Tiffany Walters Kleinert) arguing that case is supported by the Attorney General.
As of press time, the Department of Justice had not responded to Narco News’ query.


Bloodshed and Cover-up
The House of Death murders, which occurred between August 2003 and mid-January 2004, took place in Juarez under the watch of the Bush administration, as did the cover-up of the U.S. government’s complicity in those murders — orchestrated at the highest levels of the Department of Justice, the Drug Enforcement Administration and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). [See link (http://www.narconews.com/houseofdeath/)]
The informant, Ramirez Peyro, a former Mexican police officer, while working as an informant for ICE, assisted a cell of the Vicente Carrillo Fuentes drug organization in carrying out those murders. That cell was headed by an individual named Heriberto Santillan-Tabares, who was eventually arrested in the U.S. on murder and drug-trafficking charges, but later negotiated a plea deal with the U.S. Attorney overseeing the case, Johnny Sutton. The plea bargain resulted in the murder charges against Santillan being dropped, and he was handed a 25-year prison sentence.
After participating in the first murder and informing his ICE handlers of that fact, the informant Ramirez Peyro was authorized by ICE and the Department of Justice, including Sutton’s office, to continue on his mission — resulting in at least 11 more murders and the near assassination of a DEA agent and his family.
This all played out despite the fact that U.S. Attorney Sutton (a “dear friend (http://blogs.chron.com/beltwayconfidential/2007/07/border_guard_case_trails_bush_1.html)” of former President Bush who remains in office as of now under the Obama administration) had enough evidence to close out the investigation against Santillan several months prior to the first House of Death murder. Instead, Sutton chose to allow the informant to continue his bloody work — for which the U.S. government paid Ramirez Peyro some $220,000.http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/Johnny%20Sutton.JPG
And when Gonzalez, at the time the chief of DEA’s office in El Paso, Texas, sought to expose the U.S. government’s complicity in the needless carnage, via a memo drafted and delivered to Sutton in February 2004, rather than investigate the charges, U.S. Attorney Sutton chose instead to use his connections within the Department of Justice to retaliate against the whistleblower and assure his message was silenced. And to this day, the cover-up continues — with the silencing of the informant Ramirez Peyro one of the few remaining loose strings.
The hearing before the U.S. Court of Appeals this past Tuesday, March 10, is the most recent development in the case, which has been pending in the U.S. immigration court system since 2005 (while Ramirez Peyro sits in prison “locked up in solitary protective custody,” according to his attorney, Goodwin).
An immigration judge has twice ruled that Ramirez Peyro should be allowed to stay in the U.S. under the Convention Against Torture. And twice, the DOJ-controlled Board of Immigration Appeals has reversed the immigration judge’s rulings.
The panel of three U.S. Court of Appeals judges who heard arguments in Ramirez Peyro’s case earlier this week will issue a decision in the coming weeks or months. A number of legal outcomes are possible for Ramirez Peyro in the short-term, but ultimately, and likely sooner rather than later, the courts will decided if he can be set free to live in a neighborhood near you.
In the alternative, the court also could set the wheels in motion for Ramirez Peyro to become a dead man walking — waiting on his ticket to be punched permanently across the border with the assistance of Mexican officials and law enforcers who, somehow, will be able to snuff out his life without acting “under color of law.”
If there is any indication as to how the U.S. Court of Appeals’ judges view the U.S. government’s argument in this case, the following question raised during the March 10 hearing by Judge Michael J. Melloy — directed at Kleinert — could be that oracle:

Let me ask you a question. … Do you know going back to our own unfortunate history in civil rights, were police officers not prosecuted under actions taken under color of law when they would stop civil rights workers in the deep South and turn them over to the Ku Klux Klan or participate in murders? I’m thinking of the famous three murders in Mississippi where the police stopped the people under pretense of a speeding violation and then turned them over to the Klan. Do you know, were they prosecuted on the theory that they were performing their duties under color of law?
But you can judge for yourself, kind readers. The March 10 Appeals Court hearing can be heard at this link (http://www.ca8.uscourts.gov/cgi-bin/new/getDocs.pl?case_num=08-2657&from=inter), or you can read it below, as transcribed by Narco News.

Tosh Plumlee
03-15-2009, 03:01 AM
Cant Edit last post... sorry: Here is the article-- Link to court proceedings below:

The House of Death Is Now in the Obama Administration’s Court


Posted by Bill Conroy (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/bill-conroy) - March 13, 2009 at 11:51 pm U.S. Appeals Court Hearing Raises Unsettling Questions "Under Color of Law”
The informant at the center of the House of Death carnage was the subject of a high-stakes court hearing this past Tuesday, March 10.
The informant’s attorney, Jodilyn Goodwin, appeared before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit, arguing her client’s case, fighting to prevent his deportation to Mexico, where the informant claims he will become another victim of the House of Death.

The recent hearing before the U.S. Court of Appeals in St. Paul, Minn., is particularly noteworthy because it provides us with a first insight into how the Obama Justice Department views the informant’s case, and by extension, the House of Death murders and the subsequent cover-up of the U.S. government’s complicity in those murders.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) initiated deportation proceedings against the informant, Guillermo E. Ramirez Peyro, in 2005 and his case has been tied up in the courts ever since — with an immigration judge twice ruling in favor of granting him deferral from deportation under the United Nations Convention Against Torture and the Justice Department-controlled Board of Immigration Appeals twice ruling against Ramirez Peyro.

Ramirez Peyro, a former Mexican law enforcer, argues that if returned to Mexico, he will be tortured and murdered with the assistance of Mexican officials, specifically law enforcers, as a payback for his snitching on drug-cartel activities.

According to the government's attorney, Tiffanny Walters Kleinert, the facts of the case, as established by the immigration judge who heard the case originally, are not in dispute and the government does not contest that Ramirez Peyro will, in all likelihood, be murdered, if deported to Mexico, probably with the assistance of Mexican law enforcers.

However, in a twist that seems out of sync with the human rights rhetoric coming out of the Obama White House, Kleinert also argues before the Appeals Court that even though Ramirez Peyro faces an almost-certain gruesome death if returned to Mexico, he is not entitled to relief from the court under the Convention Against Torture — which prohibits the U.S. from deporting an individual to a country where he faces imminent risk of being tortured by individuals acting on behalf of the government.

Kleinert argues that even if Mexican law enforcers participate in Ramirez Peyro’s murder, as expected, and as they did with the victims of the House of Death, they would not be acting officially "under color of law."
Kleinert contends that because the Mexican government, and its president, Felipe Calderon, do not officially condone such corruption and are allegedly working to eliminate it, then any participation by Mexican government officials, including law enforcers, in Ramirez Peyro's expected murder would not constitute a homicide “under color of law.". In other words, because any Mexican law enforcer (or soldier) involved in torturing and killing Ramirez Peyro would be acting without the “official” permission of the Mexican government, Ramirez Peyro is precluded, according to Kleinert's argument, from seeking protection under the Convention Against Torture.

If the U.S. Court of Appeals agrees with Kleinert, then the U.S. government will provide Ramirez Peyro with a one-way ticket to Mexico — where even the attorney representing the U.S. government in this case agrees he will most likely face the same fate as the House of Death murder victims — whose corpses were found buried in the backyard of a middle-class home in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, in various states of decay, covered in lime ("milk" in narco-trafficker parlance) to speed decomposition.

“When you see them doing this, then the fact there's a cover up of the other murders should come as no surprise,” says former DEA Special Agent in Charge Sandalio Gonzalez, who blew the whistle on the U.S. government’s complicity in the House of Death murders. “There is no Department of Justice. There is a government law firm that defends government officials, and in this case, they're going the extra step. They're trying to get rid of the witness [Ramirez Peyro]. Wow!”

Narco News sent an e-mail to the Department of Justice, seeking comment on Ramirez Peyro’s case, just to assure that the new Attorney General, Eric Holder, is on board with the “under color of law” reasoning.
From the e-mail:

[I]I am interested in confirming that a case now before the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit is, in fact, on the Attorney General's radar and that the position of the government's attorney (Tiffany Walters Kleinert) arguing that case is supported by the Attorney General.
As of press time, the Department of Justice had not responded to Narco News’ query.


Bloodshed and Cover-up


The House of Death murders, which occurred between August 2003 and mid-January 2004, took place in Juarez under the watch of the Bush administration, as did the cover-up of the U.S. government’s complicity in those murders — orchestrated at the highest levels of the Department of Justice, the Drug Enforcement Administration and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). [See link (http://www.narconews.com/houseofdeath/)]

The informant, Ramirez Peyro, a former Mexican police officer, while working as an informant for ICE, assisted a cell of the Vicente Carrillo Fuentes drug organization in carrying out those murders. That cell was headed by an individual named Heriberto Santillan-Tabares, who was eventually arrested in the U.S. on murder and drug-trafficking charges, but later negotiated a plea deal with the U.S. Attorney overseeing the case, Johnny Sutton. The plea bargain resulted in the murder charges against Santillan being dropped, and he was handed a 25-year prison sentence.

After participating in the first murder and informing his ICE handlers of that fact, the informant Ramirez Peyro was authorized by ICE and the Department of Justice, including Sutton’s office, to continue on his mission — resulting in at least 11 more murders and the near assassination of a DEA agent and his family.

This all played out despite the fact that U.S. Attorney Sutton (a “dear friend (http://blogs.chron.com/beltwayconfidential/2007/07/border_guard_case_trails_bush_1.html)” of former President Bush who remains in office as of now under the Obama administration) had enough evidence to close out the investigation against Santillan several months prior to the first House of Death murder. Instead, Sutton chose to allow the informant to continue his bloody work — for which the U.S. government paid Ramirez Peyro some $220,000.

And when Gonzalez, at the time the chief of DEA’s office in El Paso, Texas, sought to expose the U.S. government’s complicity in the needless carnage, via a memo drafted and delivered to Sutton in February 2004, rather than investigate the charges, U.S. Attorney Sutton chose instead to use his connections within the Department of Justice to retaliate against the whistleblower and assure his message was silenced. And to this day, the cover-up continues — with the silencing of the informant Ramirez Peyro one of the few remaining loose strings.

The hearing before the U.S. Court of Appeals this past Tuesday, March 10, is the most recent development in the case, which has been pending in the U.S. immigration court system since 2005 (while Ramirez Peyro sits in prison “locked up in solitary protective custody,” according to his attorney, Goodwin). An immigration judge has twice ruled that Ramirez Peyro should be allowed to stay in the U.S. under the Convention Against Torture. And twice, the DOJ-controlled Board of Immigration Appeals has reversed the immigration judge’s rulings.

The panel of three U.S. Court of Appeals judges who heard arguments in Ramirez Peyro’s case earlier this week will issue a decision in the coming weeks or months. A number of legal outcomes are possible for Ramirez Peyro in the short-term, but ultimately, and likely sooner rather than later, the courts will decided if he can be set free to live in a neighborhood near you.

In the alternative, the court also could set the wheels in motion for Ramirez Peyro to become a dead man walking — waiting on his ticket to be punched permanently across the border with the assistance of Mexican officials and law enforcers who, somehow, will be able to snuff out his life without acting “under color of law.”

If there is any indication as to how the U.S. Court of Appeals’ judges view the U.S. government’s argument in this case, the following question raised during the March 10 hearing by Judge Michael J. Melloy — directed at Kleinert — could be that oracle:

Let me ask you a question. … Do you know going back to our own unfortunate history in civil rights, were police officers not prosecuted under actions taken under color of law when they would stop civil rights workers in the deep South and turn them over to the Ku Klux Klan or participate in murders? I’m thinking of the famous three murders in Mississippi where the police stopped the people under pretense of a speeding violation and then turned them over to the Klan. Do you know, were they prosecuted on the theory that they were performing their duties under color of law?
But you can judge for yourself, kind readers. The March 10 Appeals Court hearing can be heard at this link (http://www.ca8.uscourts.gov/cgi-bin/new/getDocs.pl?case_num=08-2657&from=inter), or you can read it below, as transcribed by Narco News.



The Players


Guillermo E. Ramirez-Peyro vs. Eric H. Holder, Jr.
[appeals court case No. 08-2657]
Hearing before the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit, St. Paul, Minn., Tuesday, March 10, 2009, beginning at 9 a.m.
Judges
Diana E. Murphy
Michael J. Melloy
Bobby E. Shepherd
Attorneys
For Ramirez Peyro: Jodilyn Marie Goodwin
For the U.S. government: Tiffany Walters Kleinert,



Court in Session (transcript copy of court)


http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/bill-conroy/2009/03/house-death-now-obama-administration%E2%80%99s-court (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/bill-conroy/2009/03/house-death-now-obama-administration%E2%80%99s-court)

Tosh Plumlee
03-15-2009, 04:07 AM
AP – Police and forensic officers work at the site where bodies were found in the outskirts of Ciudad Juarez, …

March 09, 2009 (repub; AP March 14,2009 El Paso news outlet)

CIUDAD JUAREZ, Mexico – Police acting on a tip found nine bodies partially buried in the desert on the outskirts of the Mexican border city of Ciudad Juarez, an official said Saturday.
Investigators are searching the desert site south of the city to see whether there are any more bodies.
An official with the state prosecutor's office who declined to be named in line with department policy says a police officer's badge was found at the site. Authorities were working to identify the bodies.
State security official Enrique Torres Valadez said a total of nine bodies, seven male and two female, have been found so far.
"One was handcuffed, all were tortured," he said. "They had been there for days or maybe weeks."
Ciudad Juarez, a city of 1.3 million people across the border from El Paso, Texas, has been hit by a wave of drug-fueled violence, prompting federal authorities to dispatch thousands of soldiers.
Torres said 1,500 more troops were arriving Saturday, on top of 2,150 who arrived Friday.
Farther east, in the border city of Reynosa, federal police announced Saturday that they had arrested a man who allegedly led operations there for the feared Zetas, a group of hit men for the Gulf drug cartel.
Sergio Pena Mendoza, 39, is also suspected of participating in an unsuccessful plot to free an imprisoned Zetas leader from jail in neighboring Guatemala, authorities told a news conference in Mexico City.
Pena Mendoza was arrested after he tried to flee a police patrol in a stolen pickup truck with Texas plates. Police found an assault rifle in the truck and said Pena Mendoza is suspected of killing a police official and a businessman in southern Mexico.
Interim Federal Police Commissioner Rodrigo Esparza said Pena Mendoza achieved the same rank in the Zetas — and was a possible replacement for — Jaime Gonzalez Duran, also known as "The Hummer," a founding member of the gang who was arrested in Reynosa in November.
Questioned by reporters as he was led through police installations in Mexico City, Pena Mendoza denied the accusations.
Also Saturday, a male suspect threw a hand grenade at police officers in the western city of Guadalajara, according to a statement from the Jalisco state prosecutor's office. The statement said the officers were not seriously injured, but gave no further details, including how many were hurt.
Police detained the suspect and later found 14 more grenades and 10 assault rifles in his home. (end)

Tosh Plumlee
03-15-2009, 04:28 AM
March 14,2009 given to AFP and AP..... direct download, (pictures and interview)

CIUDAD JUAREZ, Mexico (AFP) – At least five bodies were found in an unmarked grave in the northern border city of Ciudad Juarez in Mexico's Chihuahua state, where four more people were found executed, police said Saturday.
"A hidden grave was found with at least five lifeless male bodies that had been shot by armed men who had taken them hostage earlier," the office of public security in Ciudad Juarez said.
Police did not rule out the possibility of uncovering more bodies near the grave, located in the outskirts of this city of 1.3 million, which has emerged as the country's most violent with upwards of 1,600 killings in 2008.
More than 1,000 people have been killed so far this year in suspected drug attacks amid the government's crackdown on warring cartels, particularly in and around Ciudad Juarez, a major distribution center for drugs bound for the United States.
Last year saw more than 5,300 drug-related killings in Mexico.
The grisly violence flared after President Felipe Calderon declared war on drug cartels nearly two years ago, prompting armed resistance from drug barons and setting off a turf warfare between rival gangs.
Meanwhile in Mexico's easternmost Yucatan peninsula, soldiers captured a senior leader of the notorious Gulf drug cartel in the popular seaside resort Cancun, authorities said Saturday.
Napoleon de Jesus Mendoza, accused of involvement in the killing of two soldiers in February, was captured Thursday in possession of about 700,000 dollars.
Since December 2006 Mexico has deployed more than 36,000 soldiers throughout the country to battle the cartels. (end)


Does anybody really see what is hapening here?... or does anyone really care? ... This has become a United States Security matter regardless where we admit it or not.
Our elected oficials, in Washington D.C., seem to have their fingers up their nose and picking their butts and wondering what to do. (or just plain covering their past sins)

(more to come... I am in Juarez MX, as I type this... Sat night live......... later) Tosh

Peter Lemkin
03-15-2009, 09:16 AM
Same thing goes on at Tijuana. But I and the border police know of other places along that looooong border where things come in - 'no problemo' - if you know the right sort of 'password'. Usually it comes by 'airmail' - even by 'pouch' - but some ground-deliveries, as well. Seems those on both sides of the border who know too much or are in the 'wrong' 'gang' sometimes meet an early and violent end.

David Guyatt
03-15-2009, 09:29 AM
The Narco News report is damning and I, for one, won't be holding my breath that O's Attorney General will do the right thing. I fear that Peyro's days are numbered. I hope I am wrong btw, but I have seen nothing so far to indicate that Obama is a wind of change, but rather a tide of the same old, same old business as usual brigade.

Take care down there Tosh.

Dawn Meredith
03-15-2009, 12:17 PM
This is just terrible. And I fear David will be right. That's what they do in the US: use 'em then screw 'em. Tosh what the hell are you doing on the Mexican border? It's very dangerous there, like you don't know that.
Stay safe buddy.

Tosh Plumlee
03-15-2009, 03:00 PM
I have to agree. I have seen nothing from three administrations for over twenty years in reference to the so called "Drug War". I expect nothing from this one. But I have to plug ahead and give the benefit of doubt to Obama in view of what he has said.

I do not expect anyone in Washington's "Beltway", to work with him (even the ones he has picked) D.C will cover their sins and assassinate whoever gets in their way. That said, for some strange reason.., deep inside, I have to keep trying and not let apathy take over like most Americans..

David Guyatt
03-15-2009, 03:09 PM
I agree Tosh. Apathy is a killer and brings everything to a halt. Keep fighting I say.

Tosh Plumlee
03-15-2009, 03:15 PM
Yes Dawn, it is. There are a thousand stories like this one in the Naked City.

I am not in my rocking chair as yet, althought close. I am down here, "working" on documenting various aspects of the Zetas operations (Gulf Cartel) here in Juarez. Thats about all I can say at this point in time... perhaps you have seen some of our work on TV these past two weeks.
I'm Hanging out with the Mexican Army. Most of these guys and girls are really good people and they know the ones in their ranks whon have turned "bad". They have their own "Hit Teams" and most of that is not covered by American mainstream media. Its a real war down here between them and the gangs. Secretly they have to work undercover and infiltrate these border gangs and take them out., and they do not work through the Mexican court system. They have their own system to deal with the turncoats and it is not something you want to see on prime time American TV. Its a cat and mouse game within their own ranks and very dangerous for them.

Its kind of like our own situation as to our political system... you have to weed out the crooks before they weed you out... Take care little lady... tell the "Fisty One' hello for me... Tosh

Tosh Plumlee
03-15-2009, 11:20 PM
MEXICO UNDER SIEGE
Drug cartels' new weaponry means war



Email Picture (http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/lat-fg-mexico-arm-race15-p,0,1844604,email.photo)

Felipe Salinas / Associated Press
Police officers drive past a burning police vehicle in Zihuatanejo, Mexico. In a three-week period, five grenade attacks were launched on police patrols and stations.


Narcotics traffickers are acquiring firepower more appropriate to an army -- including grenade launchers and antitank rockets -- and the police are feeling outgunned.
By Ken Ellingwood and Tracy Wilkinson
March 15, 2009
Reporting from Zihuatanejo, Mexico, and Mexico City -- It was a brazen assault, not just because it targeted the city's police station, but for the choice of weapon: grenades.

The Feb. 21 attack on police headquarters in coastal Zihuatanejo, which injured four people, fit a disturbing trend of Mexico's drug wars. Traffickers have escalated their arms race, acquiring military-grade weapons, including hand grenades, grenade launchers, armor-piercing munitions and antitank rockets with firepower far beyond the assault rifles and pistols that have dominated their arsenals.




"There is an arms race between the cartels," said Alberto Islas, a security consultant who advises the Mexican government.

"One group gets rocket-propelled grenades, the other has to have them."

There are even more ominous developments: Authorities reported three thefts of several hundred pounds of blasting material from industrial explosives plants in Durango during a four-day period last month. Authorities believe the material may have been destined for car bombs or remotely detonated roadside devices, which have been used with devastating effect in Iraq, killing more than 1,822 members of U.S.-led forces since the war there began nearly six years ago.

The Mexican army has recovered most of the material, and there has been no reported use of such devices.

Grenades or military-grade weapons have been reported in at least 10 Mexican states during the last six months, used against police headquarters, city halls, a U.S. consulate, TV stations and senior Mexican officials. In a three-week period ended March 6, five grenade attacks were launched on police patrols and stations and the home of a commander in the south-central state of Michoacan. Other such attacks occurred in five other states during the same period.

At least one grenade attack north of the border, at a Texas nightclub frequented by U.S. police officers, has been tied to Mexican traffickers.

How many weapons have been smuggled into Mexico from Central America is not known, and the military-grade munitions are still a small fraction of the larger arsenal in the hands of narcotics traffickers. Mexican officials continue to push Washington to stem the well-documented flow of conventional weapons from the United States, as Congress holds hearings on the role those smuggled guns play in arming Mexican drug cartels.

There is no comprehensive data on how many people have been killed by heavier weapons.

But four days after the assault on the Zihuatanejo police station, four of the city's officers were slain in a highway ambush six miles from town on the road to Acapulco. In addition to the standard AK-47 and AR-15 assault rifles, the attackers fired at least six .50-caliber shells into the officers' pickup. The vehicle blew up when hit by what experts believe was a grenade or explosive projectile. The bodies of the officers were charred.

"These are really weapons of war," said Alberto Fernandez, spokesman for the Zihuatanejo city government. "We only know these devices from war movies."

U.S. law enforcement officials say they detected the smuggling of grenades and other military-grade equipment into Mexico about a year and a half ago, and observed a sharp uptick in the use of the weapons about six months ago.

The Mexican government said it has seized 2,239 grenades in the last two years, in contrast to 59 seized over the previous two years.

The enhanced weaponry represents a wide sampling from the international arms bazaar, with grenades and launchers produced by U.S., South Korean, Israeli, Spanish or former Soviet bloc manufacturers. Many had been sold legally to governments, including Mexico's, and then were diverted onto the black market. Some may be sold directly to the traffickers by corrupt elements of national armies, authorities and experts say.

The single deadliest attack on civilians by drug traffickers in Mexico took place Sept. 15 at an Independence Day celebration in the central plaza of Morelia, hometown of President Felipe Calderon and capital of Michoacan. Attackers hurled fragmentation grenades at the celebrating crowd, killing eight people and wounding dozens more.

Amid the recent spate of attacks in Michoacan, federal police on Feb. 20 announced the discovery of 66 fragmentation grenades in the fake bottom of a truck intercepted in southern Mexico, just over the border from Guatemala. The two men arrested with the cargo told police they were transporting the grenades to Morelia.


http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/d08a936e-0ff9-11de-a8ae-0000779fd2ac.html

http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-mexico-arms-race15-2009mar15,0,229992.story?page=1

NOTE: We were told by a Mexican Army informat that a major push is in the works for next week... roadside bombings and an attempt to blow up the 'Bridge of the Americas", between Juarez and El Paso. Also, "... the border town south of Columbus New Mexico will come under fire because there is a rival gang from the Baja holding up there and stockpiling weapons in and around the Mexican town...".

This area is under control at present by the Gulf faction of the Gulf Cartel and has control of that cross over point. The informat says its going to be a real "Blood Bath". ref; Mexican Army and Mexican Police Intell report. The American Border Patrol is on 'High Alert".

Stay tune. If it happens.... you heard it first on this FORUM.

note:

Keep your eyes on a little very little known Mexican town called "Palomas", south of Columbus New Mexico..., as well as another small crosover point on the Arizona border called, 'Aqua Prieta', south of Douglas Arizona. In the next few weeks things may prove very interesting if our information proves true.

(motive? Information before the fact) Our Federal government and the Homeland Security Agency, have been notified of this Intell from Mexico, as well as other United States Federal agencies.


Going back over the border tonight... somethings in the works..... Border Patrol is on HIGH ALERT!

Tosh Plumlee
03-17-2009, 01:33 AM
Fr Brookings.edu

The Violent Drug Market in Mexico and Lessons from Colombia
Vanda Felbab-Brown
March 2009
Drug-related violence and the breakdown in security in Mexico have escalated to extraordinary levels over the past two years. Vanda Felbab-Brown examines this growing threat to civil society in Mexico, the spillover of crime into the U.S., how the situation compares to similar struggles in Colombia, and offers recommendations for a new strategy in the region.

To view the full page, go to:
http://www.brookings.edu/papers/2009/03_mexico_drug_market_felbabbrown.aspx?emc=lm&m=223288&l=4&v=192882 (http://www.brookings.edu/papers/2009/03_mexico_drug_market_felbabbrown.aspx?emc=lm&m=223288&l=4&v=192882)

From article:

"... Some of the violence is also spilling across the border to the United States. Border patrol officers are increasingly confronted by drug traffickers with firepower. Perhaps as much as 90% of the firearms used by Mexican drug trafficking organizations5 have been purchased in the United States. Murders and kidnapping of U.S. residents who (or whose relatives) are caught up in the drug trade have increased dramatically. So has the kidnapping of illegal immigrants who, sometimes snatched en masse from coyotes (people smugglers), are held for ransom to be extorted from their relatives in the United States. More and more, coyotes force illegal immigrants to carry drugs (mainly marijuana) as a payment.

Because of their involvement in illegality, both groups are likely to significantly underreport abductions and kidnappings. Increasingly, such crime is leaking from border communities deeper into the U.S. border states. The number of kidnappings in Phoenix, Arizona, for example, tripled from 48 in 2004 to 241 in 2008.6 Drug turf wars among the drug trafficking organizations are beginning to occur in major cities in the U.S., such as Dallas, Texas. Still, the violence and criminality on the U.S. side of the border remain relatively low, and nowhere close to their levels in Mexico. ..".

(as yet)

from my notes on Sunday March 15,2009

Our Homeland Security Agency is doing nothing except just watching the problem get worse, and does nothing toward protecting American citizens along the borders.

Our State Department also is in 'limbo" not knowing what to do. Our Secretary of State is in god knows where and also has no clue on how to handle this can of worms.

This war down here has now crossed over the border in six places and these gangs are now heavily armed and embedded deep within our major cities, waiting for the call to attack Americans and anyone else who gets in their way.

Our Law Enforcement agencies are out gunned and spread to thin to handle this problem. Its about to get worse. So far the media has been put under wraps so "as not to spread panic". Our elected officials only hope this problem will just go away.

But, as of today American citizen as well as Mexican citizens are getting kidnapped and murdered at an alarming rate.

I just got back from Juarez Mexico and it was a real education. I went out to a site where two American bodies were found. One was a sixteen year old girl.., shot in the head after she was raped. Her boyfriend 20years old was bound and gagged and brutally tortured and castrated. In the girls clutched hand was the badge of a Mexican policeman. I was told she had ripped it from one of her abductors in a struggle. It was in the grave with her. They would not let me take pictures. As they removed the bodies, they gave me a mask to put over my nose and a swatter to swat the flies away. The masked Mexican Sargent told me it was a "common thing nowadays". These two are the twenty sixth and twenty seventh bodies he had recovered in the last two weeks. The couple were from El Paso across the border from Juarez Mexico. They had been reported missing three days ago.

Tomorrow we go to another grave site. This secret Mexican team is a select bunch of fine dedicated law enforcement personal and take exception as to how some of them are viewed in the American media. They cannot understand how our government stands by and lets this sort of thing happen to its citizen. I had no answer for them. And too, it was a debate I did not want to get involved with them. Their nerves are worn a little thin and their very jumpy.

They have invited me back in hopes I can help them get the right story out there for them in their fight in their Drug War. I consider it an honor and I will do my best, but its an up hill battle. The media and our government does not want to know these things. "It may cause bad relations with Mexico and the United States, if we cover this sort of thing", I am told. "It would be best if I let the experts handle these matters...., if for no other reason than my safety". Good Lord willing I'll be back tomorrow.


I wonder who is on survivor tonight? Looks like I am going to miss it. DAMN.

(hopefully to be continued)

P.S from a friend concerned about safty:

http://l.yimg.com/a/i/us/nws/p/ap_logo_106.png (http://us.rd.yahoo.com/dailynews/ap/brand/SIG=br2v03/*http://www.ap.org)Watchdog: Press freedom deteriorated in America

Mon Mar 16, 4:37 pm ET



ASUNCION, Paraguay – Freedom of the press has deteriorated in the Americas, with Mexico among the most dangerous countries in the region to be a journalist, the Inter American Press Association said Monday.
"Press freedom has worsened in the hemisphere in the last six months," the IAPA said as the association's four-day midyear meeting drew to a close in the Paraguayan capital.

Mexico "continues to be one of the most dangerous places for journalists," the group reported, pointing to four recent murders and eight attacks by criminal organizations.
"Unfortunately, their actions are bearing fruit. Self-censorship is a reality in the Mexican press," the organization said.

IAPA also expressed concern that the international financial crisis is forcing United States news media to shed thousands of jobs, eroding the sector's crucial role as whistle-blowers for corruption cases in the private and public sector.
The Miami, Florida-based organization accused Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez of "humiliating the press," and said his "incendiary rhetoric" has been adopted by other heads of state in Bolivia, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Honduras, Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Brazil and Argentina.
Twenty-six journalists remain imprisoned in Cuba, said the IAPA, which called on President Raul Castro to "relax repression against liberty of expression."
IAPA applauded a drop in violence against journalists in Colombia.

(end)




.

Tosh Plumlee
03-17-2009, 03:46 AM
There is something I do not understand: I remember when the Contra and the Sandinista matter was escalating in the mid eighties. We were concern that the little war down there was going to spread through out Latin America and into the United States. So we sent the 82nd and the 101st Airborne Divisions down there on maneuvers to show a form of strength to anyone who wanted to escalate the war or spread the war into other neighboring countries. It was a show of strength. We have done that many times with the Navy and our aircraft carriers in the middle east..

BUT, we now have gangs of drug cartel terrorist crossing over from Mexico and filtering into our major cities. These gangs are heavily armed and in place. Mexico has a real war going on down there. Juarez across from El Paso, Texas is a real war zone; yet the United States has not made a move to show these Cartels and their gangs the strength of the American Military, or its people. We have not sent any kind of a message to these thugs. We have not made a move like we did in Central America.

Our border is wide open and these misfits of a contaminated society are not coming across our borders looking for our jobs. Their coming here to kill us and our children..., their worst than the Taliban and I see it as a National Security matter. Maybe we need to send an aircraft carrier across the desert, perhaps the whole seventh fleet and a Division of Marines; and let them and others know not to F with us or the good people of Mexico anymore.

America its time to get our heads out of our butts; shutt the TV off and take a stand for your country. OR apathy is going to kill whats left of our freedoms.

P.S A Mexican Army officer just ask me to post the following... somewhere... so here it is;

CIUDAD JUAREZ, Mexico – A retired Mexican army general took over as head of public safety in the violence-plagued border city of Ciudad Juarez on Monday and a retired colonel was sworn in as police chief, as part of a militarization that includes 7,000 soldiers dispatched to keep the peace in the city of 1.3 million.
Gen. Julian Rivera Breton was sworn in as city public safety secretary to replace a man who resigned after criminals threatened to kill a policeman every other day until he left. Two such signs appeared on the bodies of a dead officer and a jail guard.
"All I ask is that the public continue to cooperate with us, that the public share their confidence and information with us," he said.
Col. Alfonso Cristobal Melgar was sworn in as head of the city police force after the previous chief, Sacramento Perez Serrano, was shot to death along with three other police officers in February.
Hundreds of army troops arrived over the weekend, bringing the total number of soldiers patrolling the city to around 7,000,
More than 2,300 federal police also are on patrol here, said joint security operation spokesman Enrique Torres Valadez.
An active-duty military officer, Mario Hernandez Escobedo, was also named security adviser to Mayor Jose Reyes Ferriz, who said the troops would remain under army command, but would coordinate with the city police force.
Following hundreds of drug-related killings, the city appears finally to be experiencing relative calm.
The city's streets were thick with checkpoints and convoys manned by federal police, which irritated some city residents.
"The police are very pleasant and courteous, but I'm losing time in getting to work, said Rodolfo Terrones, 24. "I'm always in a rush, and then I hit this," he said of a checkpoint where motorists are questioned and some vehicles searched.
Motorist Sarai Martinez Rosales took a calmer view. "Those who haven't done anything wrong, don't have anything to fear," Martinez Rosales said.
Elsewhere Monday, the bound, tortured bodies of two prison guards were found near the Michoacan state capital of Morelia. One of the men had been reported missing three days earlier.




(END

David Guyatt
03-18-2009, 09:11 AM
US poised to join Mexico drug war

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/7949665.stm


US poised to join Mexico drug war

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/45577000/jpg/_45577141_007038008-1.jpg
The general praised Mexican efforts, but said the US needed to do more

The US is drawing up comprehensive plans to help Mexico in its fight against drug-trafficking, a senior military official has told Congress.

Gen Gene Renuart, head of the US Northern Command, told a Senate hearing that troops or anti-narcotics agents would be sent to the Mexican border.

The plan could be finalised as early as this week, he added.

Correspondents say Mexico's mounting drug violence has emerged as a real national security threat to the US.

"Certainly, there may be a need for additional manpower," said Gen Renuart, who oversees US military interests in the border region.

"Whether that is best suited or best provided by National Guard or additional law enforcement agencies, I think, this planning team will really lead us to," he told the Senate Armed Services Committee.

Broad initiative

Governors of states that border Mexico have expressed concern both about the cartels, whose main source of income is exporting drugs such as cocaine into the US, and at the prospect of effectively militarising the US-Mexico frontier.

The military is already employing border security techniques mastered in the war zones of Iraq and Afghanistan, including unmanned aerial vehicles and technology capable of locating underground tunnels, reports say.

But an inter-agency government team, meeting this week at the Department of Homeland Security, is now expected to produce a broad new initiative to confront a drug war that has killed thousands in Mexico and spilled over into US cities.

"I think we'll have good plans come out of this work this week," Gen Renuart told the hearing.

A separate Senate committee in Washington heard that the presence of the Mexican drug cartels in the US had more than quadrupled since 2006.

The news came as Mexico and the US remained locked in a trade dispute centred on their busy border.

The US government stopped a pilot scheme earlier this month which allowed Mexican trucks to use roads in the US.

Mexico said the decision violated a free-trade deal between the countries and says it will impose tariffs on a range of American exports.

Peter Lemkin
03-18-2009, 10:06 AM
Great idea! A war against Mexico! Much more convenient than Iraq - close enough to take R&R home...and the food is great! Chicken fajitas for all troops daily! Hey, and the Tequilla!! We already took about half of Mexican territory, so why not the other half. They'd make a great and close bombing range, nuclear and toxic waste dump and what the hell, most of them are brown and short. Since some aspects of the military are already involved in the drugs coming through or from Mexico, how better to 'watch the store' than be there....and a chance to build more permanent bases and then move south and take 'back' the Central and South American governments now in open 'rebellion' to N. Americano imperialism. Chips and salsa for all!

Magda Hassan
03-18-2009, 10:58 AM
Don't forget that the US Sth American naval fleet has been re-commissioned and taken out of mothballs where it has been dormant since WW2 too. It has a nice base in Florida somewhere close to the Gulf of Mexico. And Cuba. And Venezuela and now El Salvador. A bit of gun boat diplomacy.

Tosh Plumlee
03-18-2009, 12:45 PM
US poised to join Mexico drug war

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/7949665.stm


US poised to join Mexico drug war

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/45577000/jpg/_45577141_007038008-1.jpg
The general praised Mexican efforts, but said the US needed to do more

The US is drawing up comprehensive plans to help Mexico in its fight against drug-trafficking, a senior military official has told Congress.

Gen Gene Renuart, head of the US Northern Command, told a Senate hearing that troops or anti-narcotics agents would be sent to the Mexican border.

The plan could be finalised as early as this week, he added.

Correspondents say Mexico's mounting drug violence has emerged as a real national security threat to the US.

"Certainly, there may be a need for additional manpower," said Gen Renuart, who oversees US military interests in the border region.

"Whether that is best suited or best provided by National Guard or additional law enforcement agencies, I think, this planning team will really lead us to," he told the Senate Armed Services Committee.

Broad initiative

Governors of states that border Mexico have expressed concern both about the cartels, whose main source of income is exporting drugs such as cocaine into the US, and at the prospect of effectively militarising the US-Mexico frontier.

The military is already employing border security techniques mastered in the war zones of Iraq and Afghanistan, including unmanned aerial vehicles and technology capable of locating underground tunnels, reports say.

But an inter-agency government team, meeting this week at the Department of Homeland Security, is now expected to produce a broad new initiative to confront a drug war that has killed thousands in Mexico and spilled over into US cities.

"I think we'll have good plans come out of this work this week," Gen Renuart told the hearing.

A separate Senate committee in Washington heard that the presence of the Mexican drug cartels in the US had more than quadrupled since 2006.

The news came as Mexico and the US remained locked in a trade dispute centred on their busy border.

The US government stopped a pilot scheme earlier this month which allowed Mexican trucks to use roads in the US.

Mexico said the decision violated a free-trade deal between the countries and says it will impose tariffs on a range of American exports.


David; I think this is what I was saying last week... Forum members heard it first on this Forum before it was announced by Washington..

In my strange way... I see this as some form of protection for myself... going back over and work with the Mexican Army, tonight... Tosh

P.S Don't forget.. the announcement about a "Secret' military (civ) team already working in Mexico was first mentioned on this Forum last week... see Ya.

David Guyatt
03-18-2009, 12:54 PM
Indeed Tosh, and the story has now reached the ears of the BBC eh.

Tosh Plumlee
03-18-2009, 01:54 PM
Indeed Tosh, and the story has now reached the ears of the BBC eh.

Yes, I know. Also the French has picked up on it also. However, the mainstream American media has not, and will not... they have been told to "backoff" The AIG and the economy is the only important news today.

I see it as a deversion to keep our eye on one matter so as not to expose the sins of another. If you go to far into this drug war then a whole can of past worms will be opened up. You don't hear to much talk about the old Savings and Loan and BCCI scandel of years past... wonder where Neal Bush is these days? I will be gone for a few days and not available, but hope to return with more "before the fact" information...

Peter Lemkin
03-18-2009, 03:59 PM
Good work Tosh. I'm sure the MSM will not cover this much and only for a day, if at all....they'll find or invent some other story that is pure circus or a diversion. You are absolutely correct on the other bank scandals - vanished into thin air, along with all the money. One could add Nugan-Hand, the gold from WW2 both in Germany and Japan and others. It is like a grand magic act.

David Guyatt
03-18-2009, 04:51 PM
Ah, Neil Bush, plunderer of Silverado Savings & Loan. Nice chap. Great wavy hair. Serious demeanour. Toothy grin. Crooked eyes.

Drug dealer eh?

Tosh Plumlee
03-18-2009, 09:07 PM
New Border fence between Mexico and New Mexico at mile mark 124 half way between Columbus New Mexico and El Paso Texas. Your $$$ at work.

Shell casings found at murder site in Mexico south of Juarez MX

Notice the old barb war fence behind monument. That was the old fence before the new three foot high iron fence was installed last year. This is a drug runners crossover point, between Columbus New Mexico and El Paso Texas.... mile marker 124 about one mile south of NM Highway 09.

Its still in use today. 'same ole-- same ole'. It is a very dangerous place at night. More than one person has met their end-- three hundred feet from the monument. The old car was shot up a few years ago. Three people were gunned down next to the car. The old car is now used to hide drugs, until they are picked up and transported north. The saddle in the mountain five miles north of the border was used as a stagging area for the drug runners for a number of years. It is said by BP that it is still in use.

(3rd picture from the left, you can still see part of the old fence in the center right of the picture. Its a two strand barb wire.

notes used to be left on the fence by the drug runners and the coyoties that controled this area. The Border Patrol would not go near this place, to dangerous and they were under staffed... still are.

As the pictures show, it is a desolate place and still very dangerous. You can be walking along and then suddenly the sand kicks up in front of you and in the back from automatic weaponds... a warning to clear out.... I always did.

(more to come)

David Guyatt
03-19-2009, 09:09 AM
Just the place to covertly insert SpecForces I would've thought? That is if there is a genuine will to do something positive about the drug running in this area.

Tosh Plumlee
03-20-2009, 11:22 PM
Crossover point for drug smugglers between MX and New Mexico. This new iron fence will keep them and others out of the USA. The old fence (on the right) did not do this. In the center picture is the old fence before Dec. 08. I feel a lot more safe now.

Magda Hassan
03-21-2009, 02:50 AM
Yep. That will do it.

Well, Tosh, it's all fixed now. You can come home and relax safe in the knowledge that the barbarians will not be able to breech the defenses.

Tosh Plumlee
03-23-2009, 03:58 AM
A FAILED DRUG WAR'S RISING BODY COUNT
by Debra J. Saunders, San Francisco Chronicle

"The war on drugs is a failure," the former presidents of Brazil, Colombia and Mexico wrote in the Wall Street Journal last month. "Prohibitionist policies based on eradication, interdiction and criminalization simply haven't worked," Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Cesar Gaviria and Ernesto Zedillo wrote.

In Mexico, an estimated 6,290 drug-related murders occurred last year. On Feb. 20, Roberto Orduna Cruz had to resign as chief of police of Cuidad Juarez after drug traffickers announced they would kill a police officer for every 48 hours Orduna remained on the job - and made good on the threat. As Cardoso, Gaviria and Zedillo warned, "The alarming power of the drug cartels is leading to a criminalization of politics and a politicization of crime." Their countries have received billions in U.S. aid for drug interdiction, yet the former presidents suggested "the possibility of decriminalizing the possession of cannabis for personal use."

Now that baby step is big. They should have used the l-word, legalize, as decriminalizing drugs would leave trafficking and big profits under the control of violent cartels. But as Eric Sterling, president of the Criminal Justice Policy Foundation, figures, "decriminalization is often used as a euphemism for legalization," in part because voters perceive legalization as complete lawlessness, when it should entail regulation "by a state by state basis and a drug-by-drug basis."

Which is why Norm Stamper, the former Seattle police chief, now speaks for Law Enforcement Against Prohibition. He grew up in San Diego and has spent a lot of time in Mexico. "I love the country and it's heartbreaking to see what's happening, when we know there's a solution for it," Stamper told me. "There's a simple but profound stroke that can drive the cartels and the street traffickers out of business - end the prohibition model and replace it with a regulatory model."

On March 7, the Economist resumed its call for an end to the war on drugs: "Prohibition has failed; legalization is the best solution." Noting that more then 800 Mexican police officers and soldiers were killed since December 2006, the editorial noted, "Indeed, far from reducing crime, prohibition has fostered gangsterism on a scale that the world has never seen before."

Thursday, CNN anchor Rob Marciano read parts of the Economist piece to Rep. Loretta Sanchez, D-Garden Grove ( Orange County ), then asked her about legalizing drugs. Sanchez responded ( please bear with this quote, it's a bit garbled ), "Certainly there is one drug - it's called alcohol - that we prohibited in the United States and had such a problem with, as far as underground economy and cartels of that sort, that we ended up actually regulating it and taxing it. And so, there has always been this thought that maybe if we do that with drugs, it would lower the profits in it and make some of this go away."

San Francisco Assemblyman Tom Ammiano has introduced a bill to legalize and tax and regulate, "the state's largest cash crop" - which would help with Sacramento's chronic budget shortfalls. I think it's fair to assume that if the bill passed, California would see an increase in marijuana use - which is not good - but a decrease in drug profits and violence - which is good.

At a House panel hearing last week, Rep. John Tierney, D-Mass., figured $15 billion to $25 billion in annual profits from U.S. drug sales bankroll Mexican cartels purchases of guns from America. "The profits and guns - and drug precursors in some cases - then find their way back across the border to Mexico and fuel the increasing violence."

Sterling said of the violence in Mexico, it "is not senseless. It's very deliberate. The reason the violence becomes more gruesome is because it's murder as message. It's an attempt to intimidate the government to make the government the way it used to be."

Sidney Weintraub of the Center for Strategic and International Studies told The Chronicle that 40 percent of Mexico's drug sales are marijuana. "What we have to do is change our policy and decriminalize marijuana."

Think the l-word, instead, to put more kingpins out of business. Except that to question the drug war is to risk losing tax money. When the El Paso, Texas, City Council passed a resolution calling for "open, honest, national dialogue on ending the prohibition of narcotics," state and national politicians threatened to withhold government funds. The Associated Press reported on a letter by five Democratic state representatives warned that the resolution "does not bring the right attention to El Paso. It says, 'We give up and we don't care.' " The El Paso mayor vetoed the measure and it died.

I'd say that to not ask if prohibition actually works is give up and not care.

Now here's a moral question: How many Mexican police officers have to die because American parents believe that U.S. drug laws will keep their teenagers from doing something their kids may or may not do whether it is or isn't legal?

Follow-up question: Will parents feel safer if the drug cartel violence moves north? (end)

US OR: Column: The Drug War Body Count (http://www.mapinc.org/newsleap/v09/n311/a10.html)

Bend Weekly, 16 Mar 2009 -
The war on drugs is a failure Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Cesar Gaviria and Ernesto Zedillo - the former presidents of Brazil, Colombia and Mexico - wrote in the Wall Street Journal last month. "Prohibitionist policies based on eradication, interdiction and criminalization . simply haven't worked", they wrote. In Mexico, an estimated 6,290 drug-related murders occurred last year. On Feb. 20, Roberto Orduna Cruz had to resign as chief of police of Cuidad Juarez after drug traffickers announced they would kill a police officer for every 48 hours Orduna remained on the job - and made good on the threat.

As Cardoso, Gaviria and Zedillo warned, "The alarming power of the drug cartels is leading to a criminalization of politics and a politicization of crime... Their countries have received billions in U.S. aid for drug interdiction, yet the former presidents suggested the possibility of decriminalizing the possession of cannabis for personal use...".

(end)

Another successful battle in the War on Drugs?

September 17, 2008

This morning the US Department of Justice trumpeted a press release about its September 16, 2008 arrests.

"175 Alleged Gulf Cartel Members and Associates Arrested in Massive International Law Enforcement Operation"

“'Project Reckoning", leads to the Seizure of $60 Million American dollars and More Than 40 Tons of Illegal Drugs From One of Mexico’s largest Drug Trafficking Cartels"

DEA Acting Administrator Michele M. Leonhart said, "We successfully completed a hard-hitting, coordinated and massive assault on the powerful and extremely violent Gulf Cartel. We have arrested U.S. cell heads, stripped the cartel of $60 million in cash, imprisoned their brutal assassins and significantly disrupted their U.S. infrastructure.”

But as reported in today’s New York Times article, "Blasts Kill 7 at Independence Day Celebration in Mexican President's Hometown," by Marc Lacey, the drug lords were not long in retaliating. By 11 p.m. last night there were seven dead and over a hundred injured in hand grenade attacks. The war on the drug cartels in Mexico and their supported mexican gangs, is spreading north toward the borders of Mexico and the United States. (end)

Peter Lemkin
03-23-2009, 07:21 AM
Uncle Sam and his rich buddies are all addicted to the profits of the Drug Trade and only make stage gestures about trying to control it....what they really try to 'control' is who gets the profits and who does not. The 'War' also serves to control certain aspects of the Public and give a 'wartime' atmosphere in which they can control and take 'wartime' measures. Its a fake War - in fact one on which 'we' are really fighting on the 'other side'.

Tosh Plumlee
03-24-2009, 04:19 PM
The Homeland Security's anouncement this morning, in reference to the drug war inside Mexico and along its border with the United States, was first mention on this forum last week by a Forum member.... You had it first before the mainstream media. H Clinton is now in Mexico talking about this matter with Mexico's President. The State Department is now on high alert concerning this matter, as well as the JCOS at the Pentagon. Law Enforcement has been trippled and checkpoints have been beefed up.

Operation, "BEST" and "OPS Firewall" have now been made public... U.S Troops are being moved into the border region as I type. New Mexico now has added border protection at the known and unknown crossover points for the drug runners are now being blocked... New Mexico now has a "Best" Team in focus.., as well as other secret teams in operations.

In short. Action is now being taken... The mainstream media did not want this story last month... but now they want credit for it now... (what a bunch of low lifes)

I am going back to Juarze today and ride along with the Mexican Army, again... These are really good guys and they know the ones that have turned and believe me they are taking care of them one by one... They too, to some degree, are getting a bumb wrap in the American Press.

American politics are playing into all this because of NAFT, just like they did many years ago. Good people have their lives on the line, and the Washington Beltway had rather play the Greed Game than solve this WAR.

The Media is in bed with them... and they sure as hell do not want me doing what I am doing... using a little ole Forum to put out what good Undercover law enforcement, Border Patrol, and the American military are doing to stop the spread of drugs coming into this country through Mexico. They are working hard with Mexico to solve these long delayed actions put on hold by previous addministrations. Got to run... but wanted this out "BEFORE THE FACT". My protection.

Example of past post:

"... The US is drawing up comprehensive plans to help Mexico in its fight against drug-trafficking, a senior military official has told Congress.

Gen Gene Renuart, head of the US Northern Command, told a Senate hearing that troops or anti-narcotics agents would be sent to the Mexican border.

The plan could be finalised as early as this week, he added.

Correspondents say Mexico's mounting drug violence has emerged as a real national security threat to the US. ..."


from a previous post :

"... This post is in answer to a few emails I have received asking me 'How did you know about these stories before they broke on CNN today and a few days ago?"...

Well the stories and the details thereof and the first news about Mexico's drug war problems first broke on this forum a few weeks ago. It was a test to see if anyone really reads this stuff. (documented before the fact, or appeared on any major American media news reports)

We, and that means friends of mine in law enforcement in Mexico and the United States, put together a 'private Undercover team and went into Mexico for three weeks. Some of us are still there. What we found was turned over to U.S. government officials, DEA, ATF and The Department of Justice as well as the Mexican Army, and the major media outlets..., it was sat on for a number of days by all, and appeared to be going nowhere.

I then went on Mike Levin's radio program with Celle Castillo, previous border Patrol and DEA, last week and in that program was a recap of previous CIA and military operations, dating back twenty years concerning America's so called Drug War, of the time was discussed.

That is when I started posting on this forum about the Mexico Drug War in and around Juarez and other border towns. Soon the mainstream media starting to cover parts of our findings, because we were pushing at them to take a look at what we had uncovered. ...".

3-15-09 posted in reference to Dawn's reply.:

"...
Yes Dawn, it is. There are a thousand stories like this one in the Naked City.

I am not in my rocking chair as yet, althought close. I am down here, "working" on documenting various aspects of the Zetas operations (Gulf Cartel) here in Juarez. Thats about all I can say at this point in time... perhaps you have seen some of our work on TV these past two weeks.
I'm Hanging out with the Mexican Army. Most of these guys and girls are really good people and they know the ones in their ranks whon have turned "bad". They have their own "Hit Teams" and most of that is not covered by American mainstream media. Its a real war down here between them and the gangs. Secretly they have to work undercover and infiltrate these border gangs and take them out., and they do not work through the Mexican court system. They have their own system to deal with the turncoats and it is not something you want to see on prime time American TV. Its a cat and mouse game within their own ranks and very dangerous for them.

Its kind of like our own situation as to our political system... you have to weed out the crooks before they weed you out... Take care little lady... tell the "Fisty One' hello for me... Tosh ...".

http://www.deeppoliticsforum.com/forums/images/misc/progress.gif

Peter Lemkin
03-24-2009, 07:27 PM
Tosh is worth a thousand CNN high-profile reporters and gets the stories they miss [on purpose] anyway.....good going T. Guess your getting lots 'o practice en Espanol!

Tosh Plumlee
03-24-2009, 10:54 PM
U.S. law enforcement has been 'crying their eyes out' to four administrations, pleading to whomever would listen about the pending doom of the drug war plague. They have pleaded with four Presidents and their administrations, and to members of both houses of Congres for help to stop this 'oncreeping'--soon to be onrushing criminal tide before it reached our borders. Some gave their lives in a phony drug war based on politics; a secret war where only lip service from those past Presidents and politicians was given them. However, in reality their pleas fell on deaf ears.

The 'Drug War' is a total, abject failure and has been a waste of taxpayers' money. More than one operative in law enforcement and the U.S. military has recently warned that the day of 'Drug Lord' rule in the Western Hemisphere has already arrived. They have told our politicians and begged them to pay attention to these issues. These drug cartels and gangs are not coming to our cities, they are already here--killing, raping, and maiming our citizens.

Today, law enforcement is outgunned (on both sides of the border)--armed with our own U.S high-grade military weapons, which have been sold for profit and transferred into the hands of these drug cartels and gangs, who use them to try to destroy the legitimate government of Mexico and soon our own. And our answer to this problem is, “ well let's shut the barn door, now that the horse is long gone."

I call it FRAUD in the Drug War and FRAUD upon the American people. Twenty-five years of FRAUD and FAILED POLICIES at the expense of the American people and too at the expense those who gave their lives in this unknown war.

I say, "SHAME ON OUR ELECTED OFFICIALS PAST AND PRESENT! THEY HAVE VIOLATED THEIR PUBLIC TRUST!" And have put AMERICA in Harms Way.
Tosh Plumlee

Peter Lemkin
03-25-2009, 06:58 PM
AMY GOODMAN: We move now to the border. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton heads to Mexico today, a day after the Obama administration announced it would send more money, technology and manpower to secure the United States-Mexico border and bolster the Mexican government’s anti-drug operation.

President Obama laid out the new plan at his press conference on Tuesday night.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: We are sending millions of dollars in additional equipment to provide more effective surveillance. We are providing hundreds of additional personnel that can help control the border, deal with customs issues. We are coordinating very effectively with the Mexican government and President Calderon, who has taken on a extraordinarily difficult task of dealing with these drug cartels that have gotten completely out of hand.

And so, the steps that we’ve taken are designed to make sure that the border communities in the United States are protected, and you’re not seeing a spillover of violence, and that we are helping the Mexican government deal with a very challenging situation.

We’ve got to also take some steps. Even as he is doing more to deal with the drug cartels sending drugs into the United States, we need to do more to make sure that illegal guns and cash aren’t flowing back to these cartels. That’s part of what’s financing their operations. That’s part of what’s arming them. That’s what makes them so dangerous.


AMY GOODMAN: Earlier Tuesday, Homeland Security Chief Janet Napolitano said the administration was, quote, “still considering and looking at” deploying the National Guard at the border. She added she would meet with Texas Governor Rick Perry to discuss sending a thousand National Guard troops to the border.

Secretary of State Clinton’s visit to Mexico marks the start of several high-level meetings between Mexico and the United States. Homeland Security Secretary Napolitano and Attorney General Eric Holder are scheduled to meet with Mexican officials in early April before President Obama’s visit just ahead of the Summit of the Americas.

Mexican authorities say over 6,000 people were killed in drug-related violence last year, and some American analysts have warned Mexico could become a, quote, “failed state.”

For some analysis from the US-Mexico border, I’m joined now on the telephone from El Paso, Texas, by independent journalist and author John Gibler. His book Mexico Unconquered: Chronicles of Power and Revolt came out earlier this year.

John, welcome to Democracy Now! The reaction on the border to the announcement yesterday, and what you see happening there?

JOHN GIBLER: Good morning, Amy. Thank you very much.

The reaction on the El Paso side is one of mild relief. There is a good deal of people kind of scared about this idea of spillover violence. And the reaction on the Juarez side of the border that I’ve been able to judge so far is one of skeptical “Well, we’ll see.” There’s a lot of energy, kind of skeptical of the Obama administration. They’ve not seen a lot of real promise and initiative from the US government on the drug war.

And one of the reasons there is, first of all, I think the United States government has always liked to export the perception of chaos and violence to other countries, like Colombia and now Mexico. So while the drug violence in Mexico is very real, at least the Mexican people are sufficiently outraged to demand change. Over the last few years, as the violence has exploded, every 2nd or 3rd of January the main headline of Mexico’s national dailies is the number of people that have been executed the year before. In 2007, that number was about 3,000. As you mentioned, in 2008, it was about 6,000 people. But where is the corresponding count in the United States?

Here, drug executions and violence between dealers who are disputing and battling over turf are a daily occurrence across the country, but the violence seems to have been ghettoized. There is no national political consciousness in the mainstream media or in the government about how that violence stems itself from the drug war. So now you have the mainstream media, the President coming along and warning us of spillover violence from Mexico.

I think that expresses the kind of racist logic of the drug war, where first drug violence is seen as spilling over from another country, instead of as something that is always transnational and related to the drug trade, and second, you know, the absence of the corresponding outrage for the drug violence that plagues most US cities—and the response there from the government seems to always be build more prisons and incarcerate more people of color.

AMY GOODMAN: And this issue of Mexico as a failed state?

JOHN GIBLER: I think, there again, it’s not so much that the state is failing, rather than rather uncomfortable facts about its true nature are exposed. And that has to do with the fact that the drug cartels, and for decades now, have so deeply infiltrated pretty much every institution in the state of [inaudible], so when the drug cartels enter into this extreme, bloody, very real war over territory, over trafficking routes, that war takes place within the structure of the state itself. That is, the different people in the judicial branch of government, the executive branch of government, the highest levels of the federal anti-drug forces, like those offices in the federal attorney general’s office, where Noe Ramirez Mandujano, the ex-anti-drug czar, was recently found taking $450,000 in bribes from the Sinaloa Cartel. Well, people start to fall internally to the state, as well, is one of the kind of levels [inaudible] casualties of that violence between rival cartels.

But here, as well, this should be a moment to pause and reflect and look back at the United States, as well, because, again, I think the US always tries to export this perception of chaos, export the perception of corruption, and it’s as if once the drugs cross the border they somehow teleport to their end users and are just [inaudible] across this vast nation without the aid of an incredible distribution network, highly organized, that will always need to rely on local fixtures, and local fixtures involved in every level of government. Again, here I think the Mexican people might have something to teach us in the fact that their outrage at the level of corruption and violence pushes society to act more, whereas here there’s just this tendency to export all of this chaos and violence to other countries and not look at how—you know, or [inaudible] to find the places where the drug cartels have also infiltrated the state here in the US.

AMY GOODMAN: John Gibler, I want to thank you for being with us, independent journalist and author—his book is Mexico Unconquered—speaking to us from near the border in El Paso, Texas.
http://www.democracynow.org/2009/3/25/obama_sending_more_federal_agents_money

Tosh Plumlee
03-26-2009, 04:00 PM
Some of us OPS boys and Law enforcement have been saying this for a very long time... now they are pushed into admitting it.

Clinton: US shares blame for Mexican drug wars


AP – Wed Mar 25, 7:10 pm ET



MEXICO CITY – U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton on Wednesday pledged to stand "shoulder to shoulder" with Mexico in its violent struggle against drug cartels, and acknowledged the U.S. shares blame because of its demand for drugs and supply of weapons.
She said the United States shares responsibility with Mexico for dealing with violence now spilling across the border and promised cooperation to improve security on both sides.
"The criminals and kingpins spreading violence are trying to corrode the foundations of law, order, friendship and trust between us that support our continent. They will fail," she told Mexican Foreign Relations Secretary Patricia Espinosa. "We will stand shoulder to shoulder with you."
On Tuesday, the Obama administration pledged to send more money, technology and manpower to secure the border in the U.S. Southwest and help Mexico battle the cartels. Clinton also said Wednesday that the White House will seek an additional $80 million to help Mexico buy Blackhawk helicopters.
All that is in addition to a three-year, $1.4 billion Bush administration-era program to support Mexico's efforts. Congress already has approved $700 million. President Barack Obama has said he wants to revamp the initiative.
Obama said Tuesday he wanted the U.S. to do more to prevent guns and cash from illicit drug sales from flowing into Mexico. But Clinton's remarks appeared more forceful in recognizing the U.S. share of the blame. In the past, particularly under the Bush administration, Mexican officials have complained that Washington failed to acknowledge the extent that the U.S. drug demand and weapons smuggling fuels the violence.
"I feel very strongly we have a co-responsibility," Clinton told reporters, adding: "Our insatiable demand for illegal drugs fuels the drug trade. Our inability to prevent weapons from being illegally smuggled across the border to arm these criminals causes the deaths of police officers, soldiers and civilians."
Criminals are outgunning law enforcement officials, she said, referring to guns and military-style equipment such as night-vision goggles and body armor that the cartels are smuggling from the U.S.
"Clearly, what we have been doing has not worked and it is unfair for our incapacity ... to be creating a situation where people are holding the Mexican government and people responsible," she said. "That's not right."

Clinton said she would repeat her acknowledgment as loudly and as often as needed during her two-day visit to Mexico City and the northern city of Monterrey. Officials said her priorities included encouraging the administration of Mexican President Felipe Calderon to increase its battle against rampant corruption by promoting police and judicial reform.
Just hours before she arrived, the Mexican army announced it had captured one of the country's most-wanted smugglers, a man accused of controlling the flow of drugs through Monterrey for the powerful Beltran-Leyva cartel.
The measures outlined Tuesday include increasing the number of immigrations and customs agents, drug agents and antigun-trafficking agents operating along the border, as well as sending more U.S. officials to work inside Mexico.
Those measures fall short of calls from some U.S. states that troops be deployed to prevent further spillover of the violence, which has surged since Calderon stepped up his government's battle against the cartels...".

A few months ago the following article was picked up and published in a foreign news outlet.


"... A violation of public trust

U.S. law enforcement has been 'crying their eyes out' to four administrations, pleading to whomever would listen about the pending doom of the drug war plague. They have pleaded with four Presidents and their administrations, and to members of both houses of Congres for help to stop this 'oncreeping'--soon to be onrushing criminal tide before it reached our borders. Some gave their lives in a phony drug war based on politics; a secret war where only lip service from those past Presidents and politicians was given them. However, in reality their pleas fell on deaf ears.

The 'Drug War' is a total, abject failure and has been a waste of taxpayers' money. More than one operative in law enforcement and the U.S. military has recently warned that the day of 'Drug Lord' rule in the Western Hemisphere has already arrived. They have told our politicians and begged them to pay attention to these issues. These drug cartels and gangs are not coming to our cities, they are already here--killing, raping, and maiming our citizens.

Today, law enforcement is outgunned (on both sides of the border)--armed with our own U.S high-grade military weapons, which have been sold for profit and transferred into the hands of these drug cartels and gangs, who use them to try to destroy the legitimate government of Mexico and soon our own. And our answer to this problem is, “ well let's shut the barn door, now that the horse is long gone."

I call it FRAUD in the Drug War and FRAUD upon the American people. Twenty-five years of FRAUD and FAILED POLICIES at the expense of the American people and too at the expense those who gave their lives in this unknown war.

I say, "SHAME ON OUR ELECTED OFFICIALS PAST AND PRESENT! THEY HAVE VIOLATED THEIR PUBLIC TRUST!" And have put AMERICA in Harms Way. ..".

Wm (Tosh )Plumlee ...American Mexico Special Operations Group (AMSOG)

Sept 25, 2008

P.S. It has taken some time for those in Washington DC to get it... and during this time frame thousands have been murdered and we have these gangs in our major U.S. cities today. The drug war has bneen played for political gain at the expense of those who have served in the so called, "war on drugs".

Peter Lemkin
03-26-2009, 04:51 PM
While they've 'noticed' the 'problem' now....militarizing the border IMO will only cause more deaths and hardships on both sides - mainly in Mexico. They don't want to do - or even think of what really needs to be done...such as decriminalizing the user, and making it part of the real economy, not the shadow economy - controlled by cartels and fat-cat hypocrites. What's your take Tosh on how this will play out now?! The admission was OK, but I don't see there is going to be any logical follow-up. They still make it seem like the 'nasty' 'drug pushers' south of the border bring it and induce people in the US to use it, rather than just supplying the demand [in some cases officially induced demand] - but all this pipeline in the hands of banditos armed to the teeth, and going up very high. :vollkommenauf:

Tosh Plumlee
03-29-2009, 10:43 PM
http://www.narconews.com/

Legal U.S. Arms Exports May Be Source of Narco Syndicates’ Rising Firepower



Posted by Bill Conroy (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/bill-conroy) - March 29, 2009 at 3:18 pm
More Than $1 billion In Private-Sector Weapons Exports Approved For Mexico Since 2004
Mainstream media and Beltway pundits and politicians in recent months have unleashed a wave of panic in the nation linking the escalading violence in Mexico, and its projected spread into the U.S., to illegal weapons smuggling.
The smokescreen being spread by these official mouthpieces of manufactured consensus is that a host of criminal operators are engaging in straw (or fraudulent) gun purchases, making clandestine purchases at U.S. gun shows or otherwise assembling small caches of weapons here in the states in order to smuggle them south of the border to the “drug cartels.”
The Obama administration is now sending hundreds of additional federal agents to the border in an effort to interdict this illegal arms smuggling to reassure an agitated middle-America that Uncle Sam will get these bad guys. The cascade of headlines from mainstream media outlets printing drug-war pornography assures us in paragraphs inserted between the titillation that the ATF’s Operation Gunrunner and other similar get-tough on gun-seller programs will save America from the banditos of Mexico.
To be sure, some criminal actors in the U.S. are smuggling small arms across the border. But the drug war in Mexico is not being fought with Saturday night specials, hobby rifles and hunting shotguns. The drug trafficking organizations are now in possession of high-powered munitions in vast quantities that can’t be explained by the gun-show loophole.
At least one report in a mainstream media outlet deserves credit for recognizing that trend.
“[Mexican] traffickers have escalated their arms race, acquiring military-grade weapons, including hand grenades, grenade launchers, armor-piercing munitions and antitank rockets with firepower far beyond the assault rifles and pistols that have dominated their arsenals,” states a recent story in the Los Angeles Times (http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-mexico-arms-race15-2009mar15,0,229992.story). (http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-mexico-arms-race15-2009mar15,0,229992.story) “The proliferation of heavier armaments points to a menacing new stage in the Mexican government's 2-year-old war against drug organizations. …”
Narco News, in a report last December [“Juarez murders shine a light on an emerging Military Cartel” (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/bill-conroy/2008/12/juarez-murders-shine-light-emerging-military-cartel)] also examined the increasing militarization of narco-trafficking groups in Mexico and pointed out that U.S. military-issued ammunition popped up in an arms cache seized in Reynosa, Mexico, in November 2008 that was linked to the Zetas, a mercenary group that provides enforcement services to Mexican narco-trafficking organizations.http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/20081130guns415.jpg
So where are these military-grade weapons really coming from?
Rather than address that valid question head on, the mainstream media, and now even the Obama administration, have been attempting to paint lipstick on the pig,trumpeting (http://www.america.gov/st/peacesec-english/2009/March/20090326115353dmslahrellek0.7660486.html&distid=ucs), in the words of U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, the “courageous efforts undertaken by [Mexican] President Calderon.”
And the “courageous” Mexican President Felipe Calderon, for his part, redirects the blame for the Mexican narco-organization’s increasing firepower back to the U.S.
In a story published by the Associated Press (http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2009/02/28/world/main4835694.shtml) in late February of this year, Mexican President Calderon is quoted alleging the following:
We need to stop the flow of guns and weapons towards Mexico. Let me express to you that we've seized in this two years more than 25,000 weapons and guns, and more than 90 percent of them came from United States, and I'm talking from missiles launchers to machine guns and grenades.
But no matter how hard Calderon and U.S. officials try to disguise the pig, it still oinks.
A Narco News investigation into the flow of arms across the U.S. border appears to lead right back to the systemic corruption that afflicts a vast swath of the Mexican government under President Felipe Calderon and this nation’s own embrace of market-driven free-trade policies.
The deadliest of the weapons now in the hands of criminal groups in Mexico, particularly along the U.S. border, by any reasonable standard of an analysis of the facts, appear to be getting into that nation through perfectly legal private-sector arms exports, measured in the billions of dollars, and sanctioned by our own State Department. These deadly trade commodities — grenade launchers, explosives and “assault” weapons —are then, in quantities that can fill warehouses, being corruptly transferred to drug trafficking organizations via their reach into the Mexican military and law enforcement agencies, the evidence indicates.
“As in other criminal enterprises in Mexico, such as drug smuggling or kidnapping, it is not unusual to find police officers and military personnel involved in the illegal arms trade,” states an October 2007 report (http://www.stratfor.com/weekly/mexico_dynamics_gun_trade) by the for-profit global intelligence group Stratfor, which Barron’s magazine (http://online.barrons.com/article/SB1002927557434087960.html) once dubbed the Shadow CIA. “… Over the past few years, several Mexican government officials have been arrested on both sides of the border for participating in the arms trade.”

Counting Commerce
The U.S. State Department oversees a program that requires private companies in the United States to obtain an export license in order to sell defense hardware or services to foreign purchasers — which include both government units and private buyers in other countries. These arms deals are known as Direct Commercial Sales [DCS]. Each year, the State Department issues a report tallying the volume and dollar amount of DCS items approved for export.
The reports do not provide details on who the weapons or defense services were exported to specifically, but do provide an accounting of the destination countries. Although it is possible that some of the deals authorized under the DCS program were altered or even canceled after the export licenses were issued, the data compiled by State does provide a broad snapshot of the extensive volume of U.S. private-sector arms shipments to both Mexico and Latin America in general.
According to an analysis of the DCS reports, some $1 billion in defense hardware was approved for export to Mexico via private U.S. companies between fiscal year 2004 and fiscal year 2007 — the most recent year for which data was available. Overall, during the same period, a total of some $3.7 billion in weapons and other military hardware was approved for export under the DCS program to all of Latin America and the Caribbean.
In addition to the military hardware exports approved for Mexico, some $3.8 billion in defense-related “services” [technical assistance and training via private U.S. contractors] also were approved for “export” to Mexico over the same four-year period, according to the DCS reports.
That means the total value of defense-related hardware and service exports by private U.S. companies to Mexico tallied nearly $5 billion over the four-year window. And that figure doesn’t even count the $700 million in assistance already authorized under the Merida Initiative [Plan Mexico] or any new DCS exports approved for fiscal years 2008 and 2009 [which ends Sept. 30].
Following is a sample of the types of arms shipments approved for export to Mexico through the DCS program during fiscal years 2006 and 2007 alone:
• $3.3 million worth of ammunition and explosives, including ammunition-manufacturing equipment;
• 13,000 nonautomatic and semiautomatic firearms, pistols and revolvers at a total value of $11.6 million;
• 42 grenade launchers valued at $518,531;
• 3,578 explosive projectiles, including grenades, valued at $78,251;
• Various night-vision equipment valued at $963,201.
A troubling revelation about the DCS program, which has direct relevance to the drug war in Mexico, is contained in a fiscal 2007 report issued by the State Department. That report summarizes the results of the State Department’s Blue Lantern (http://www.globaltradeexpertise.com/news_files/5ea3f261bf6b2660d61a1ad203d48a1e-221.php) end-use monitoring program for DCS exports.
That Blue Lantern report found that "the Western Hemisphere (especially Latin America and the Caribbean) continues to be a region with a high incidence of unfavorable cases involving firearms and ammunition." The unfavorable finding indicates that fraud may have occurred and those cases "may be subject to civil enforcement actions or referred to law enforcement for criminal investigation."
For the entire DCS program, and this is a disturbing figure, of the 634 Blue Lantern cases closed in fiscal year 2007, a total of 143, or 23 percent, were deemed “unfavorable."
The Blue Lantern report does not mention specific transactions in detail, but does provide case-study examples. One included in the report indicated that a Latin American firearms dealer acted as a “front company for another Latin American company.”
“[The] owner admits that [the] company exists only on paper…,” the fiscal year 2007 Blue Lantern report states. “[The] host country authorities had temporarily suspended the firearms import licenses to [the] parent company because of its link with small arms smuggling to gangs in [a] third country.”
Given Mexico’s strict gun (http://www.davekopel.org/Espanol/mexican-firearms-statutes.htm)laws (http://www.davekopel.org/Espanol/mexican-firearms-statutes.htm) with respect to private individuals, it is likely most of the DCS program defense hardware approved for export to that nation was directed toward the military or law enforcement agencies. But it is precisely that fact which should be raising some alarm in Washington.
Mexico, by Calderon’s own admission, is dealing with a serious corruption problem within the ranks of Mexican law enforcement.
From a December 2008 report in the Los Angeles Times (http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-mexico10-2008dec10,0,2574405.story):
Mexican President Felipe Calderon on Tuesday said his government was making strides against corruption but warned that graft remained a threat to the nation's efforts against crime.
Calderon’s rival in the 2006 Mexican presidential race, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrés_Manuel_López_Obrador), in recent open letter (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/kristin-bricker/2009/03/no-intervention) published in the Mexican newspaper Por Esto! (http://www.poresto.net/) and addressed to U.S. Secretary of State Clinton, is even more blunt in his assessment of the extent of corruption within the Calderon regime.
You surely know that all of this began when a group of about 30 traffickers of influence and corrupt politicians, using the cover of so-called neoliberal economic policies, took control of the Mexican State, as well as a good part of national and so-called public goods. And these policies of pillaging that has enriched a minority in an exaggerated and obscene manner, in a way that has not occurred in any other part of the world, has condemned the Mexican people to exile and survival.
And that corruption is not limited to Mexican law enforcement. Sources provided Narco News with a PowerPoint presentation (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/bill-conroy/2008/12/juarez-murders-shine-light-emerging-military-cartel)prepared for the DEA that indicates the following:
Between Jan 2000-Dec 2006: More than 163,000 military members were criminally processed during former president Vicente Fox’s 6 years term of office. The majority of the crimes were: [the list includes abuse of power, homicide, embezzlement, kidnapping, bank robbery, illegal possession of firearms and health crimes [essentially organized crime].
Another slide in that same DEA PowerPoint presentation states that the Mexican military reported an average of 1,200 desertions per month in 2006.
And it should not be ignored that the Zetas, one of the most violent drug-organization groups in Mexico right now, was founded by former elite Mexican special-operations troops — many of whom received some training in the United States.
[The two most recent DCS reports can be found at these links: FY2006 (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/**State.Dept.FY2006.DCS.document.pdf) and FY2007 (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/**State_Dept_rpt655_FY07.pdf).]

The Elephant in the Room
A former senior U.S. Customs Inspector, who asked that his name not be used, provided the following reaction when presented with the DCS data:
I would agree entirely [that] DCS (and DoD gifted, as opposed to DCS sold) weapons are obviously the simplest explanation for the massive rise in the number of fully automatic weapons, grenades, rockets, etc., obtained by the narcotics gangs. … That is to say, they are obtaining their weapons from their own, Mexican, government, by various illegal means.
… The Mexican government has a long and well-documented history of corruption at all levels, from city to federal. Most of the weapons being "displayed" [in the media] are simply not available for sale to American civilians, particularly including the grenades — both 40mm and hand types. …
… The source of these weapons can be easily traced by ATF. … All foreign sales must be reported to ATF prior to shipment, just in case the government wishes to hold up a shipment to a particular country, etc. Tracing the serial numbers would be easy, with US government assistance, of course.
But that assumes the Mexican government, and our own government, really want to trace those weapons. A November 2008 report in the San Antonio Express News (http://www.mysanantonio.com/Gun_Running_Series_Part_1.html), which includes details of the major weapons seizure in Reynosa, Mexico, that same month involving the Zetas, reveals the following:
Another example of coordination problems occurred this month. Mexican authorities in Reynosa across the border from McAllen, seized the country’s single largest stash of cartel weapons — nearly 300 assault rifles, shoulder-fired grenade launchers and a half million rounds of ammunition.
But weeks later, Mexican authorities still have not allowed the ATF access to serial numbers that would help them track down the buyers and traffickers on the U.S. side.
To be sure, cartel corruption and intimidation of Mexican law enforcement at every level and in every agency has caused some dysfunction.

A former DEA agent, who also asked not to be named, says the shipment of military-grade weapons to the Mexican government under the DCS program, given the extent of corruption within that government, is essentially like “shipping weapons to a crime syndicate.”
At least one individual with long connections to U.S. intelligence agencies is convinced that the corrupt transfer of arms between the Mexican military and narco-criminals in Mexico is more than theory.
Tosh Plumlee is a former CIA contract pilot who flew numerous missions delivering arms to Latin America and returning drugs to the United States as part of the covert Iran/Contra operations in the 1980s, according to public records (http://toshplumlee.info/pdf/sengaryhart.PDF). After becoming troubled by those government-sanctioned missions, Plumlee decided to take his concerns to Congress.

Plumlee was eventually called to testify before Congress on a number of occasions, only to find that the Congressional committees hearing his testimony ordered it classified — which meant if Plumlee later spoke about it publicly, he would be violating the law.

Plumlee, however, still has deep contacts in the spook world, some of whom, it seems, want him to bring some information forward concerning the nature of the drug war in Juarez, Mexico. As a result, Plumlee says he recently made a journey with individuals he described as “sensitive sources” to a small warehouse in Juarez — located just across border from El Paso, Texas. Plumlee says he agreed to accompany the sources because he is currently doing research for a book he is writing about the drug war.

Plumlee says it was clear to him that the warehouse was not part of a Mexican military operation, yet it was packed with U.S. military weapons — including grenades, grenade launchers, LAW anti-tank weapons [essentially high-tech bazookas], M16 rifles and night-vision equipment.
Plumlee says his sources indicated that the U.S. weapons in that warehouse — as well as another warehouse located elsewhere in Juarez that he did not visit — were now under the control of a narco-trafficking organization, which had obtained the munitions from corrupt elements of the Mexican military.

Plumlee concedes he does not know why he was allowed to step inside that warehouse and later walk out alive. All he can say for sure is that he was being used to get the information out and suspects that those weapons have since been relocated.
As incredible as Plumlee’s story sounds, it cannot really be surprising that there would be stores of weapons in clandestine warehouses in a city like Juarez, which, since the beginning of 2008, has produced about 2,000 of the estimated 7,000 murders in Mexico’s bloody drug war. And whether anyone chooses to believe Plumlee’s information or not, it is clear he has a long history of being a player in the netherworld of black operations, and might well be trusted by some players who still engaged in that dark art.

Mike Levine, a former DEA agent who has years of experience participating in dangerous undercover operations overseas, says Plumlee is who he claims to be. Levine now hosts a radio show in New York City on a Pacifica Radio station [the Expert Witness Radio Show (http://www.expertwitnessradio.org/)] and Plumlee has appeared on that show several times over the years.
Here’s what Levine has to say about Plumlee’s credibility:
Before I invited Tosh to come on the air, because his story was so incredible, I vetted him through government agents, all of whom said he is the real thing. I have a copy of the air map he turned over to a San Diego Weekly (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/IRanDrugsforUncleSam.pdf) newspaper, bearing notations of all his drug flights, which first sold me on the guy.
After he had made many revelations on-air in New York, and mainstream media continued to ignore him, Congress was apparently listening. I had been told by my own sources that agencies like CIA were regularly recording our show. (I used to remind them, on air, to make sure they pressed the red button to record.)
So Tosh calls me one day in around 1997 and says that Congress had asked him to testify about his experiences, in closed-door session. I told him, "If you do that, they are going to do nothing but classify your testimony making it illegal for you to tell your own story."
And that, indeed, is what did happen, according to Tosh.

Could it be that Plumlee was used as a type of message in a bottle because, like has happened so many times in the past history of this nation, the normal chain of command and our politicians in Washington, D.C., simply don’t want to hear the truth, don’t want to risk rocking the boat of international relations with Mexico or interrupting the free-trade flow of a multi-billion dollar “legal” arms business?
After all, if our government had to concede that the Mexican military is so wracked with corruption and beyond the control of Mexican President Calderon that it cannot be trusted to control its own weapons, then how can U.S. cooperation with Calderon’s government have any hope for success in what many would argue is an already ill-conceived drug war?
In fact, if that is what we are now confronting in Mexico, it is likely that U.S. cooperation with Calderon’s government, when it takes the form of U.S. weapon shipments, is likely only going to fuel further bloodshed and put U.S. agents and operatives now in the field assisting in those efforts at grave risk.
Narco News did seek to get comment from officials at both the Department of Justice and the Department of State about the issues raised in this story. To date, those queries — both by phone and e-mail — have been met with dead silence.
Stay tuned ….



Bill Conroy's Reporter's Notebook (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/bill-conroy)

Tosh Plumlee
03-30-2009, 12:49 AM
DRUGS and GUNS... GUNS and DRUGS... whats new?

The information below was given to mainstream media as well as to a congressional oversight committe. The report was put on hold until further notice.. as yet it has not reappeared. anywhere.

Report Finds U.S. Arms Sales are Undermining Human Rights (http://www.globaltradeexpertise.com/news_files/2d08d35a6097d5fcfe9d38e3e14e744b-203.php)

12/11/08 11:58 AM Posted by Jennifer Kessinger
On December 10, 2008, the New America Foundation, a nonpartisan policy institute, issued a report (http://www.newamerica.net/publications/policy/u_s_weapons_war_2008_0) stating that of the top 25 U.S. arms purchasers in the developing countries during 2006 - 2007, more than half were either undemocratic governments or regimes that engaged in major human right abuses. An executive summary of the report can be found here (http://www.newamerica.net/publications/policy/u_s_weapons_war_2008).

The thirteen countries listed in the report were Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Iraq, United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Egypt, Colombia, Jordan, Bahrain, Oman, Morocco, Yemen and Tunisia. Over 2006 - 2007, arms sales to these countries totaled more than $16.2 billion. The report also states that of the 27 nations engaged in major arms conflicts, 20 were receiving weapons and training in the U.S.

A spokesperson for the Bureau of Political-Military Affairs at the State Department commented that U.S. policy on sale of arms is well established, and considers a country’s need for an item, its human rights record, and whether the arms transfer supports U.S. foreign policy and national security goals. U.S. arms sales grew to $32 billion in 2007, or more than three times the level since President Bush took office in 2001.
Tags: Human Rights (http://www.globaltradeexpertise.com/news_files/tag-human-rights.php)

note:

U.S. Weapons at War 2008 (Executive Summary)

[/URL]
[URL="http://www.newamerica.net/taxonomy/term/14"]American Strategy Program (http://www.newamerica.net/publications/policy/u_s_weapons_war_2008_0), Arms and Security Initiative (http://www.newamerica.net/taxonomy/term/1038)




The United States is the world's leading arms exporting nation, accounting for over 45 percent of all weapons transferred globally in 2007.
The United States is also by far the world's largest provider of security assistance, a substantial portion of which involves cash support, subsidized weapons transfers, and military training. During the Bush administration alone, Washington provided over $108 billion in security assistance to scores of countries under over a dozen separate programs. Much of this aid has been provided to countries viewed as actual or potential partners in waging the "global war on terrorism," with little attention paid to human rights, nonproliferation, or arms control concerns.
As the Bush administration enters its final weeks in office, it is a good time to reassess current U.S. arms transfer policies and practices to determine whether such important issues as human rights and conflict prevention are being given adequate consideration in determining who gets what weaponry from the United States.
Curbing weapons transfers to undemocratic regimes and human rights abusers is sound policy not only on moral grounds but also on national security grounds. While these sales are often justified on the basis of their purported benefits, from securing access to overseas military facilities to rewarding coalition allies in conflicts such as the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the alleged benefits often come at a high price. By propping up repressive regimes and fueling regional arms races, arms transfers often promote the very instability that they are meant to reduce. And in too many cases, arms and military technology sent to allies of the moment end up in the hands of U.S. adversaries down the road, as happened in the cases of Saddam Hussein in Iraq and Islamic fundamentalist fighters in Afghanistan. Last, but not least, these ill-considered transfers undermine the global reputation of the United States and are, in turn, impediments to winning the "war of ideas" in the Muslim world and beyond.
A new policy should not seek to reduce arms transfers as a goal in and of itself, but rather to strike a balance between short-term political and military considerations and long-term U.S. interests in peace and stability. In many cases, seeking to enhance the role of human rights and conflict prevention in U.S. arms transfer policy will involve complex trade-offs, as in Iraq and Afghanistan, where massive "train and equip" programs are central to the goal of reducing the direct U.S. military presence in those nations, although the new military and police forces in those nations have far to go in meeting basic human rights standards.
While the sheer volume of U.S. arms transfers is a matter of concern, the real question is how these weapons end up being used. Are U.S.-supplied arms and training helping fledgling democracies in Iraq and Afghanistan to provide for their own security in ways that can reduce the need for American "boots on the ground?" Do U.S. weapons exports to potential adversaries like India and Pakistan or Turkey and Iraq increase the likelihood of local and regional conflict? Are adequate measures being taken to ensure that the accelerating flow of U.S. weaponry onto the global market is not being diverted into the hands of anti-U.S. forces? These are the kinds of questions that should be addressed by any new arms transfer policy.
Finally, as part of a "fresh start" for U.S. foreign policy, the new administration and the new Congress should take a serious look at participating in multilateral efforts to curb destructive and destabilizing weapons exports. The most important current initiatives in this regard are the new international ban on cluster munitions (which has been endorsed by over 100 countries) and the pursuit of a global arms trade treaty would establish more rigorous human rights conditions for weapons exports.

Summary of Findings

We're #1



The United States is the world's top arms-supplying nation, having entered into over $32 billion in Foreign Military Sales (FMS) agreements in 2007-a nearly three-fold increase over 2005.
During 2006 and 2007, the United States provided weapons and military training to over 174 states and territories, up from 123 states and territories in 2001, the first year of the Bush administration. While many of these transfers were relatively small deals completed under the commercial licenses granted by the State Department, a number of key countries of strategic significance were added and/or restored to the U.S. client list during the Bush years, including Afghanistan, India, Pakistan, Indonesia, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Liberia.
Fueling Conflict


Of the 27 major conflicts under way during 2006/07, 20 involved one or more parties that had received arms and training from the United States.
Total U.S. transfers to areas of active conflict exceeded $11 billion in 2006/07. The five biggest recipients were Pakistan ($3.7 billion), Turkey ($3.0 billion), Israel ($2.1billion), Iraq ($1.4 billion), and Colombia ($575 million).
Arming Human Rights Abusers



More than half (13) of the top 25 U.S. arms recipients in the developing world during 2006/07 were either undemocratic governments or regimes that engaged in major human rights abuses. This represents a one-third reduction from 2005, when 18 of the top 25 U.S. recipients fit these categories. But even given this positive change, the current pattern of U.S. sales remains in stark contrast to the Bush administration's pro-democracy rhetoric.
Total U.S. arms transfers to undemocratic governments and/or major human rights abusers totaled more than $16.2 billion in 2006/07, and the top recipients were Pakistan ($3.7 billion), Saudi Arabia ($2.5 billion), Iraq ($1.4billion), United Arab Emirates ($983 million), (Kuwait ($879 million), Egypt ($845 million), Jordan ($474 million), and Bahrain ($308 million).
The majority of the undemocratic and/or human rights abusing governments armed by the United States are in the two regions viewed as "central" to the war on terrorism: the Middle East (Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Oman, United Arab Emirates, Jordan, and Bahrain) and South Asia (Afghanistan and Pakistan).
Subsidizing Weapons Sales



U.S. security assistance funding has nearly doubled over the past eight years, from an average of $6-$8 billion a year prior to the first Bush term to an average of $14-$15 billion a year during the Bush administration.
Of the over $108 billion in security assistance funding authorized from FY 2002 to FY 2008, over a third-$39.7 billion-was disbursed through new programs like the Afghan and Iraq Train and Equip programs, the Commander's Emergency Response Program (CERP), the Pentagon's Section 1206 program, and the Coalition Support Fund program of assistance to countries fighting alongside U.S. forces in Iraq or Afghanistan. All of these programs are authorized and implemented by the Pentagon, and all of them are markedly less transparent and accountable than traditional security assistance programs supervised by the State Department.
Of the top ten U.S. arms recipients in the developing world, five-Pakistan, Iraq, Israel, Egypt and Colombia-rely heavily on U.S. government subsidies to purchase U.S. weapons. These countries track closely with the top recipients of U.S. security assistance during the Bush administration (FY 2002 to FY 2009), which are as follows: Afghanistan ($29.7billion), Iraq ($27.9 billion), Israel ($21.6 billion), Egypt ($14.9 billion), and Pakistan ($9.7 billion). These five countries alone account for over 83 percent of all security assistance disbursed by the Bush administration in the FY 2002 through FY 2008 budgets.
Recommendations

The next president and the new Congress should:

Develop a new arms transfer policy directive within its first six months in office establishing clearer criteria for arms transfer decision making that strike a balance among military, political, economic, human rights, and nonproliferation objectives.
Establish common standards of transparency and accountability for all arms transfer and security assistance programs, including required reporting on amounts disbursed, countries served, and weapons systems and training provided.
Reverse the trend toward situating security assistance programs within the Pentagon budget, on the grounds that the State Department is best equipped to mesh the competing interests that U.S. foreign and military policies are meant to address.
Endorse and/or ratify key international initiatives like the treaty banning anti-personnel land mines, the Convention on Cluster Munitions (CCM), and the proposed global Arms Trade Treaty (ATT).

Tosh Plumlee
03-31-2009, 02:55 AM
Your tax dollars are working for the drug cartels and our elected officials know it. However, we can not upset relations with Mexico it might hurt the NFTA trade agreements and too the pocketbooks of some elected officials and their "off the books' election funding.

Crooks on both sides of the border are coning us and we are to stupid to see this.



Tracing the Bad Gun Math (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/bill-conroy/2009/03/legal-us-arms-exports-may-be-source-narco-syndicates-rising-firepower#comment-28818)

Submitted March 30, 2009 - 9:04 pm by Bill Conroy (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/bill-conroy)
A big part of the argument being made by the U.S. and Mexican governments with respect to the source of guns in the possession of Mexican narco-trafficking groups is based on statistics related to so-called gun traces conducted by the ATF.
But if you follow the media narrative on this, as well as the U.S. government’s own proclamations, you soon discover that the math being practiced is right out of Alice in Wonderland, via the Mock Turtle: Reeling and Writhing, of course, to begin with, and then the different branches of arithmetic -- Ambition, Distraction, Uglification, and Derision.
I didn’t want to weigh a story down with this funny math — and I expect that is what the practitioners of this arithmetic alchemy are counting on — but for those who are interested, here is a run down of the madness being packaged and sold to us as fact.
From a Feb. 27, 2009, report from the U.S. Department of State (http://www.state.gov/p/inl/rls/nrcrpt/2009/vol1/116522.htm):
As of November 12, 2008, GOM [Government of Mexico] security forces had seized 39,437 illegal firearms, including the record-breaking seizure of weapons believed to belong to the Zetas of the Gulf cartel.
[Presumably that is for the year 2008, since the figure comes from a State Department report that offers a review of statistics from 2008.]
A Feb. 28, 2009, CBS/Associated Press story (http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2009/02/28/world/main4835694.shtml), however, presents a different set of facts, based, in part, on Mexican President Felipe Calderon’s statements:
"We need to stop the flow of guns and weapons towards Mexico," President Calderon told AP. "Let me express to you that we've seized in this two years more than 25,000 weapons and guns, and more than 90 percent of them came from United States, and I'm talking from missiles launchers to machine guns and grenades."
[Calderon’s two-year, 25,000 gun-seizure figure is remarkable in that it is considerably less than the State Department’s figure for less than one year.]
That same CBS/AP report offers up the following so-called facts:
The ATF says more than 7,700 guns sold in America were traced to Mexico last year, up from 3,300 the year before and about 2,100 in 2006.
The report fails to make clear whether the years in question are calendar or fiscal years, [and for the U.S. government, the fiscal year ends on Sept. 30, three months prior to the end of the calendar year]. Presumably the CBS/AP report was just imprecise and meant to refer to fiscal years, since that is generally the basis on which the ATF and other government agencies report their statistics.
The New York Times (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/25/world/americas/25mexico.html?_r=1&ref=americas), in a March 25, 2009, story then offers up this gem of a statistic, divorced of any context:
On top of that, 90 percent of the guns used by Mexican drug cartels originated in the United States, according to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.
We have to ask here, 90 percent of what? Does the Times mean 90 percent of guns traced by ATF, since Mexicodoes not have a gun tracing system (http://www.portfolio.com/news-markets/international-news/portfolio/2008/06/16/Examining-the-US-Mexico-Gun-Trade), or do they really mean to say 90 percent of all guns used by drug cartels? If so, the ATF must then have an inventory of all the guns still in the “cartels’” possession, right? Wonder how they got that?
The Wall Street Journa (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB123595012797004865.html)l does a bit better than AP in it’s precision over the nature of the year being described in a March 2, 2009, story that includes this bit of data:
The number of U.S. guns in Mexico is growing. The Justice Department's Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, or ATF, says more than 7,700 guns sold in America were traced to Mexico in the fiscal year ending last September. That's twice the 3,300 recorded the previous year [fiscal 2007]and more than triple the 2,100 traced the year before that.
So it looks, indeed, as though the AP report was, in fact, referring to a fiscal year in presenting its ATF gun-trace figures.
However, the New York Times (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/26/us/26borders.html), again, seems to be working from a different set of books, as it reports in a Feb. 26, 2009, story, the following:
In 2007, the firearms agency [ATF] traced 2,400 weapons seized in Mexico back to dealers in the United States, and 1,800 of those came from dealers operating in the four states along the border, with Texas first, followed by California, Arizona and New Mexico.
Again, that 2,400 figure is some 900 guns shy of the 3,300 gun traces the Wall Street Journal reported for that same year — assuming the Times is working with fiscal-year numbers, though the ambiguity helps to cover the imprecise reporting.
But both the New York Times and Wall Street Journal gun-tracing figures from fiscal 2007 don’t match the numbers reported by the ATF in a Feb. 7, 2008, congressional testimony (http://foreignaffairs.house.gov/110/hoo020708.htm), and included in the recent White House press release (http://www.whitehouse.gov/the_press_office/Administration-Officials-Announce-US-Mexico-Border-Security-Policy-A-Comprehensive-Response-and-Commitment/) trumpeting it’s expanded border protection plan:
In FY 2007 alone, approximately 1,112 guns which originated in Texas, Arizona and California were submitted for tracing from Mexico. For all other U.S. States in FY 2007, approximately 435 guns were submitted for tracing from Mexico.
By my math, according to the congressional testimony, the tally of guns submitted to ATF for tracing in fiscal 2007 is 1,547 — far short of the marks reported by both the Times and Journal.
Based on all that, on what basis do we get to the regular claim in the mainstream media that 90 percent of the guns used by the “cartels” originate in the U.S.? It just doesn’t add up.
But don’t expect the bad math to stop, because there is an agenda to push and press deadlines to meet.
Investigators say nine out of 10 guns retrieved from crime scenes south of the border are traced back to U.S. gun dealers.— Reuters, March 23, 2009 (http://www.reuters.com/article/politicsNews/idUSTRE52M7S720090323)

Tosh Plumlee
03-31-2009, 04:06 PM
What about the

By Todd Bensman (http://www.mysanantonio.com/email_us?contentID=42170887)- Express-News

Most of the weapons found in the largest gun seizure in Mexican history have been traced by federal ATF agents to Texas retailers.
The Mexican army's raid on a Reynosa stash house in November found a trove of drug cartel weapons that included 540 rifles, 165 hand grenades, 500,000 rounds of ammunition, TNT and other munitions.
Officials with the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives said they were able to trace 383 serial numbers from rifles seized in the raid and that 80 percent of those weapons came from licensed firearms dealers in Texas, primarily along the border.
ATF officials declined to provide the names of specific retailers on grounds that public disclosure could compromise investigations that could lead them to smuggling rings.
The remainder of the firearms came from licensed dealers in seven other U.S. states, among them Michigan, Illinois, Louisiana and Virginia. It was unclear why trace information for other weapons counted in the stash house was unaccounted for, said the ATF's Texas spokeswoman, Francesca Perot.
Mexican officials have repeatedly cited the Reynosa seizure as emblematic of the southern flow of powerful firearms from U.S. retailers, about which they have long complained to their American counterparts.
Responding to Mexican pressure to do more to stem weapons smuggling to drug cartels, President Barack Obama last week ordered 170 more agents to the border to crack down on gun smuggling.
The agents, who more than double the ranks of investigators who have pursued smugglers and their “straw buyers” who purchase weapons for the cartels at licensed retailers, will be deployed mostly in Texas, the center of illegal gunrunning from the U.S.
The traces of the Reynosa guns “created a substantial number of leads,” said Robert Elder, assistant special agent in charge of the ATF Houston field division, which has jurisdiction over hundreds of miles of border. “That is going to be a top priority for the folks that are going to be joining us.”
To deal with the problem, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano and Attorney General Eric Holder this week plan to attend an arms-trafficking conference in Mexico.
The bust in Reynosa, across the Rio Grande from McAllen, came after a Nov. 7 gunbattle with the Gulf Cartel's paramilitary enforcers.
The army raid uncovered a depot under the control of a notorious cartel lieutenant named Jaime “Hummer” Gonzalez Duran, who ran all aspects of the drug trafficking business — including enforcement to collect debts or eliminate rivals — between Reynosa and McAllen, according to interviews with FBI and Drug Enforcement Administration officials.
For at least two years before the weapons seizure, the DEA's Houston office had been after Gonzalez and his cell, in an investigation known as “Dos Equis.”
Gonzalez and 11 associates were indicted on federal trafficking charges in September. In October, a confidential FBI memo obtained by the San Antonio Express-News warned border police that Gonzalez and his group of Zetas hit men were amassing weapons for attacks against U.S. law enforcement.
The memo said one of Gonzalez's safe houses was discovered in Mission. It was stockpiled with assault weapons and tactical vests.
“Each cell leader has been personally instructed by Hummer to engage law enforcement with a full tactical response should law enforcement attempt to intervene in their operations,” the memo said.
Shortly after the FBI sent out its alert, DEA agents told their Mexican counterparts where they believed Gonzalez was hiding out, said Houston-based DEA Special Agent Violet Szeleczky.
Within 24 hours, Mexican authorities captured Gonzalez in the Reynosa gunbattle.

Tosh Plumlee
04-05-2009, 06:57 PM
Taken from article below:

"......

The Evidence
It’s worth noting that the Mexican military, like law enforcement agencies in Mexico, has a long history of being tarred with charges of official corruption. Following is a sample of that troubling track record.
• Sensitive documentation provided by law enforcement to this committee states:
"[William Robert “Tosh”] Plumlee was a former deep-cover military and CIA asset from 1956 to 1987 with a long history of CIA activities in Central America, Cuba, and Mexico."
… Mr. Plumlee confirmed to this Committee the existence of Operation Whale Watch and Operation Watchtower, drug smuggling operations involving the CIA, U.S. military, with knowledge of the National Security Council. He mentioned drug flights from Central America to the United States for the CIA, with stops at places he marked on maps that he provided to (http://toshplumlee.info/pdf/sengaryhart.PDF)Senator Gary Hart (http://toshplumlee.info/pdf/sengaryhart.PDF) > and Staff.
Plumlee testified under oath that there was close cooperation between Mexican and U.S. government personnel in drug smuggling (there is other evidence in later testimony from XXXXXX. which confirms sections of Plumlee's testimony. This defies comprehension. Plumlee described his undercover activities to this Committee, including the practice of the Mexican police and its military protecting drug traffickers, something that will be described in considerably more detail in later testimony. — Transcribed summation of tape of 1991 Congressional testimony of former CIA contract pilot William Robert “Tosh” Plumlee
[A link to full testimony, which was classified sensitive by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, can be found here (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/Plumlee.Testimony.PDF).]
• While a great deal of the corruption plagues the law enforcement agencies in Mexico, the Mexican military and other institutions are also vulnerable to the corrupting influences of the narcotics trade. — 1997 Congressional testimony of Thomas A. Constantine, DEA administrator (http://www.fas.org/irp/congress/1997_hr/s970312c.htm)
• … Despite increased intelligence efforts targeting the command and control and identifying the leaders of the Carrillo-Fuentes organization, key lieutenants have not been apprehended in Mexico. For example,....." con't ...read article below: NARCO NEWS Bill Conroy April 05,09

Private-sector Arms Sales to Mexico Sparsely Monitored by State Department



Posted by Bill Conroy (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/bill-conroy) - April 5, 2009 at 11:45 am
Only Three Inquiries Targeting Firearms Exports Conducted Since 2007


The Department of State has weighed in officially on whether the sale of military weapons to Mexico through U.S. private-sector arms exporters might be a source of the high-caliber firearms now being employed by drug trafficking organizations in the bloody drug war south of the border.
The response is not very reassuring.
The U.S. State Department oversees a program that requires private companies in the United States to obtain an export license in order to sell defense hardware or services to foreign purchasers — which include both government units and private buyers in other countries. These arms deals are known as Direct Commercial Sales [DCS].
According to an analysis of the DCS reports, some $1 billion in defense hardware was approved for export to Mexico via private U.S. companies between fiscal year 2004 and fiscal year 2007 — the most recent year for which data was available.
U.S. officials in recent months have attributed the rising firepower of Mexican narco-syndicates — who now are in possession of military grade firearms and explosives — to smuggling rings being supplied through fraudulent purchases at gun shows, gun stores and from gun dealers inside the United States. But the magnitude of military hardware flowing into Mexico legally through the DCS program, coupled with the well-documented, extensive corruption within the Mexican military and law enforcement agencies, has prompted concerns that the DCS program itself may well be a major source of the U.S. military munitions now in the possession of narco-trafficking groups.
[See prior Narco News story, “ (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/bill-conroy/2009/03/legal-us-arms-exports-may-be-source-narco-syndicates-rising-firepower)Legal U.S. arms exports may be source of narco-syndicates rising firepower” (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/bill-conroy/2009/03/legal-us-arms-exports-may-be-source-narco-syndicates-rising-firepower) for more details.]http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/090304_ricks_res.jpg
Narco News recently presented the following questions to the State Department concerning the DCS program:
1. Given that the DCS program is subject to criminal manipulation [as evidenced by the Blue Lantern report] and given that there is a well-documented history of narco-corruption within Mexican law enforcement and the military, is the Department of State concerned that a major source of the weapons now being used in the escalating bloodshed in Mexico's drug war may in fact be the DCS program itself?
2. If so, are there any actions being taken by the Department of State to address that situation?
3. If it is not a concern, why not?
4. Finally, given the documented evidence of corruption within Mexican law enforcement and the military, is it fair to say that DCS weapons exports represent a far bigger and far more easily accessible source of arms for Mexican criminal organizations than do weapons obtained from private citizens in the U.S.?
[The State Department’s Blue Lantern (http://www.globaltradeexpertise.com/news_files/5ea3f261bf6b2660d61a1ad203d48a1e-221.php) program is designed to provide end-use monitoring for DCS exports. The fiscal year 2007 Blue Lantern report, the latest available publicly, reveals that a total of only 705 end-use checks were initiated on approved DCS exports worldwide while some 81,000 “license applications and other export requests” were acted on by the State Department during that year.]

Official Deflection
In response to the Narco News query, Jason Greer, public affairs officer for the Bureau of Political-Military Affairs at the Department of State, provided a long, jargon-laden response via e-mail. That response failed to answer directly the questions submitted by Narco News, though it did contain two revelations of note. [To view the State Department’s entire response, go to this link (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/StateDeptResponse.PDF).]
First, Greer confirmed that the State Department since January 2007 initiated only three Blue Lantern end-use inquiries involving the export of firearms to Mexico. Greer adds that one of those cases came back with a favorable finding, one unfavorable and one case is still pending.
That means over the course of 2007, 2008 and the first three months of 2009, the State Department program set up to monitor potential DCS fraud only examined three export deals. In fiscal year 2007 alone, according to the DCS report released by the State Department, a total of some $240 million in military hardware was approved for export to Mexico — and that doesn’t even include the additional hundreds of millions of dollars in exports likely approved since then.
In the case of the one “unfavorable” finding, Greer explains that a U.S. firearms exporter had “submitted eight separate license requests based on a single purchase order.”
Greer continues:
The value of that order and the collective value of the license requests exceeded $1 million and therefore met the requirements for Congressional notification. … All eight license requests were returned without action requiring the applicant to submit one export license request for the total value of the transaction ….
And the end result of that misstep for the exporter, according to Greer, is that the export of the weapons “was subsequently approved following Congressional notification.”
With that strong defense of the State Department monitoring of the DCS program, Greer declares without ambiguity:
None of the Blue Lantern inquiries concluded during this time indicate the diversion of U.S. Munitions List items to illicit or unauthorized end-users in Mexico.
Do you feel assured?
If not, then this part of Greer’s response will do little to relieve your agitation:
In addition, all firearms licenses approved by [the State Department] for commercial resale in Mexico are exported to the Ministry of Defense (MOD), Mexico. The MOD is the import authority for firearms and is also responsible for licensing of Mexican firearms dealers. Upon receipt of the firearms, the MOD transfers the firearms to the end-user authorized on the [State Department-issued] export license.
The Mexican Ministry of Defense (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SEDENA), of course, oversees the Mexican military. In fact, a reading of Mexico’s firearms law (http://www.davekopel.org/Espanol/mexican-firearms-statutes.htm) reveals that the Defense Ministry has a monopoly on approving and overseeing all licenses, sales, transport and storage of arms and munitions in Mexico, whether for private-sector players or other government units — including municipal, state and federal law enforcement units.
So, if you are a smart narco-trafficker, and they are smart, it might pay to spread some money and influence around Mexico’s Ministry of Defense to assure the necessary diversion of firearms to your cause.
One former DEA agent describes the situation this way:
The Mexican military has always been a problem. If all those weapons are going through the Mexican Defense Ministry, then there’s your answer right there [as to where the narco-syndicates are obtaining their high-caliber weapons]. … What do you think happens if anyone complains to the Mexican military that they did not get all the weapons they ordered?

The Evidence
It’s worth noting that the Mexican military, like law enforcement agencies in Mexico, has a long history of being tarred with charges of official corruption. Following is a sample of that troubling track record.
• Sensitive documentation provided by law enforcement to this committee states:
"[William Robert “Tosh”] Plumlee was a former deep-cover military and CIA asset from 1956 to 1987 with a long history of CIA activities in Central America, Cuba, and Mexico."
… Mr. Plumlee confirmed to this Committee the existence of Operation Whale Watch and Operation Watchtower, drug smuggling operations involving the CIA, U.S. military, with knowledge of the National Security Council. He mentioned drug flights from Central America to the United States for the CIA, with stops at places he marked on maps that he provided to (http://toshplumlee.info/pdf/sengaryhart.PDF)Senator Gary Hart (http://toshplumlee.info/pdf/sengaryhart.PDF) > and Staff.
Plumlee testified under oath that there was close cooperation between Mexican and U.S. government personnel in drug smuggling (there is other evidence in later testimony from XXXXXX. which confirms sections of Plumlee's testimony. This defies comprehension. Plumlee described his undercover activities to this Committee, including the practice of the Mexican police and its military protecting drug traffickers, something that will be described in considerably more detail in later testimony. — Transcribed summation of tape of 1991 Congressional testimony of former CIA contract pilot William Robert “Tosh” Plumlee
[A link to full testimony, which was classified sensitive by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, can be found here (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/Plumlee.Testimony.PDF).]
• While a great deal of the corruption plagues the law enforcement agencies in Mexico, the Mexican military and other institutions are also vulnerable to the corrupting influences of the narcotics trade. — 1997 Congressional testimony of Thomas A. Constantine, DEA administrator (http://www.fas.org/irp/congress/1997_hr/s970312c.htm)
• … Despite increased intelligence efforts targeting the command and control and identifying the leaders of the Carrillo-Fuentes organization, key lieutenants have not been apprehended in Mexico. For example, Eduardo Gonzalez-Quirarte has been identified as a key manager for the Carrillo-Fuentes organization along the border. He is responsible for arranging shipments of cocaine across the border and ensuring that money is transferred back into Mexico. He has links to corrupt elements of the Mexican military and the law enforcement community, which makes him a significant leader in future Carrillo-Fuentes operations. — 1998 Congressional testimony of Donnie Marshall, DEA Chief of Operations (http://www.usdoj.gov/dea/pubs/cngrtest/ct980318.htm)
• According to an extensive classified report by the Drug Enforcement Administration and other intelligence assessments, the arrest last year of the former official, [Mexican] Gen. Jesus Gutierrez Rebollo, followed secret meetings between Mexican Army officers and the country's biggest drug mafia, officials say.
Exactly what transpired remains unclear. But the officials say there is growing evidence that military officers discussed a deal to let the drug gang operate in exchange for huge bribes, and that some such arrangement may have been in place before the gang's leader, Amado Carrillo Fuentes, died after extensive plastic surgery last year. — March 1998 story in the New York Times (http://www.nytimes.com/1998/03/26/world/us-officials-say-mexican-military-aids-drug-traffic.html)
• The Mexican military also has experienced narco-related corruption within its ranks. — February 2000 Congressional testimony of William Ledwith, DEA chief of international (http://www.fas.org/irp/congress/2000_hr/ct022900.htm)operations (http://www.fas.org/irp/congress/2000_hr/ct022900.htm)
• The investigation ultimately revealed the involvement of corrupt Mexican law enforcement elements, military and public officials, in the execution of [DEA special agent Enrique “Kiki”] Camarena's (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enrique_Camarena) murder. — May 2000 Congressional testimony of William Ledwith, DEA chief of international operations (http://www.usdoj.gov/dea/pubs/cngrtest/ct051600_01.htm)
• In interviews, four senior U.S. officials, a senior Mexican intelligence official and three independent analysts all expressed concern about the expanding role of the Mexican military in the drug war. … ?"Corruption is more serious in the Mexican military than just about any other Latin American military," said a U.S. official, speaking on condition of anonymity. "The reason is not that the Mexicans are any more venal; it's that we're talking about huge amounts of money because drugs flow into Mexico and that makes them more vulnerable." — December 2005 story in the Dallas Morning News (https://lists.tni.org/pipermail/dd-la/2006-January/006056.html)
• The Mexican army has experienced thousands of desertions in the last few years. According to an investigation of the newspaper Reforma (http://www.reforma.com/), between 2001 and 2006, the army has lost an average of 30,000 members per year. Although the rate of desertion has decreased to 17,000 in 2007, this is still a very significant number; especially considering where these soldiers go after leaving the armed forces. — May 2008 blog entry on the Foreign Policy Association Web site (http://mexico.foreignpolicyblogs.com/2008/05/14/the-other-war-of-the-mexican-armed-forces/)
• A list of over 20 military agents allegedly for hire was found in one of the Beltrán Leyva brothers' safe houses in Culiacán, Sinaloa.?The information that was in a house belonging to Alfredo "El Mochomo" Beltrán Leyva, detained this past January 21, reveals that the Sinaloa [narco-trafficking] clan had in its possession files from the Assistant Attorney General's Office for Specialized Investigation of Organized Crime (SIEDO in its Spanish initials) and from the Sinaloa Attorney General's office about investigations that were in process. — October 2008 story published by Narco News (a translation of a story published by the Mexican newspaper Reforma) (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/kristin-bricker/2008/10/narcos-infiltrate-mexican-military)

More Food for Thought
Despite the widely published mainstream media meme that 90 percent of the weapons being used by Mexican narco-criminals “ (http://www.reuters.com/article/politicsNews/idUSTRE52M7S720090323)are traced back to U.S. gun dealers,” (http://www.reuters.com/article/politicsNews/idUSTRE52M7S720090323) it seems there is another part of that narrative that is not being communicated — likely because it undermines the meme itself.
Last week, Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, held a hearing in the field — in El Paso, Texas, located along the U.S. border with Mexico. In his opening statement (http://www.boston.com/news/politics/politicalintelligence/2009/03/kerry_in_solida.html) for that hearing, Kerry conceded the following:
Only about one out of every four weapons seized by Mexican authorities last year was submitted to the ATF so they could be traced back to purchasers and sellers in the United States. The Mexican government should provide the ATF with fuller access to these weapons.
So our own State Department concedes that the military weapons being shipped to Mexico are filtered through the Mexican military and ample public record indicates that this military has a history of corruption, yet the State Department since 2007 has only conducted end-use monitoring investigations on a paltry three arms-export transactions approved for Mexico through the DCS program — which in fiscal 2007 alone was responsible for shipping more than a quarter billion dollars worth of military hardware to Mexico. Still, we are asked to accept the State Department’s assurance that all is well with the program and there is no record of arms being diverted from the Mexican military to drug trafficking organizations.
And now a U.S. Senator concedes that three-quarters of the weapons seized by Mexican authorities are never sent to the U.S. for tracing. So where do those weapons come from, and why is the Mexican government failing to “provide the ATF with fuller access to these weapons” as Kerry is encouraging?
On top of these puzzling dilemmas, we now discover from a recent report by the Washington Post that former military commanders are taking over local Mexican police commands and supplying them “with automatic weapons and grenades.”
From the Washington Post (http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2009/04/02/20090402mexico-army0402-ON.html) story:
The government is attempting to vet and retrain 450,000 officers, most at the state and municipal levels, employing lie detectors, drug tests, psychological profiling and financial reviews to weed out corruption and incompetence. Nearly half of the 56,000 officers vetted so far have failed.
The government is also forging agreements with each of Mexico's 31 states and its federal district, Mexico City, for the military to deliver automatic rifles, high-caliber ammunition, grenade launchers and fragmentation grenades to state and municipal officers who obtain federally mandated security clearances.
Are we to believe, in this drug war, that lie detector machines, psychological profiling and sparse Blue Lantern reviews are any match for the devil’s bargain that marks the narco-trafficking trade: "Plata o Plomo" — take the money or you’ll be plugged with lead?http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/180px-SandraÁvilaBeltrán.jpg
Sandra Avila Beltran (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandra_Ávila_Beltrán), born to a family of drug smugglers and married twice to former Mexican police commanders turned traffickers who have both since been assassinated, is now herself sitting in prison facing narco-trafficking charges in Mexico.
In a recent interview with CBS’s 60 Minutes (http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=4836946n), Beltran makes it clear, in her mind, that it is the narco-syndicates — empowered by the billions of dollars that flow from prohibited drug sales north of the Mexican border — that have the inside track in this war:
Large shipments of drugs can come into the Mexican ports or airports…. It’s obvious and logical. The government has to be involved in everything that is corrupt. … You’d have to wipe out the government to wipe out drug trafficking.
Stay tuned….

2nd part of deep cover investigation: also ref; Bill Conroy articles

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/huff-wires/20090319/lt-mexico-drug-capture/ (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/huff-wires/20090319/lt-mexico-drug-capture/)

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/04/02/vicente-carrillo-leyva-wa_n_182367.html (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/04/02/vicente-carrillo-leyva-wa_n_182367.html)

".... Both Vicente Carrillo and Vicente Zambada arrested by the Mexican military and both the sons/nephew of the real big shots with the Juarez and Sinaloa orgainizations.

Given how this works, I expect both the Juarez cartel, under Vicente the elder, and the Sinaloa cartel under El Mayo Zambada to strike back -- likely at the Mexican government itself, as an implied arrangement was likely broken to protect Calderon's political hide against the ire of the U.S.

Both of these young mobsters were arrested without a shot being fired in upscale neighborhoods in Mexico City, so it appears they felt no threat nor were they given any advanced warning. Who ever had been paid off was compromised, but the revenge will be swift.

A similar type of outburst of violence followed the arrest of Alfredo Beltran in January 2008. Chapo is still at large, and seems to benefit from this disruption, assuming he can withstand the blowback. Interestingly, in the Beltran case, it was Chapo's kid who became the victim, murdered, allegedly in retribution for dropping the dime on Alfredo Beltran.

That pattern here is not to be ignored..

Of course, both of these sons could end up walking in a few months, after the heat dies down, so it might all be a fix. But my guess is there was some deep treachery here and that payback is coming. ...".

.http://www.google.com/search?q=cache:rxVi_VuncNUJ:www.stratfor.com/analysis/mexico_security_memo_may_19_2008+arturo+Beltran+ar rested&cd=5&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us (http://www.google.com/search?q=cache:rxVi_VuncNUJ:www.stratfor.com/analysis/mexico_security_memo_may_19_2008+arturo+Beltran+ar rested&cd=5&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us)

Following the May 13 arrival of troops in Sinaloa state, federal and local government officials confirmed that the Beltran Leyva brothers were cutting ties with El Chapo. One of the three brothers, Arturo Beltran Leyva, is believed responsible for ordering the targeted assassinations of Edgar Millan Gomez and Roberto Velasco Bravo, two high-ranking federal law enforcement officials in Mexico City. Another brother, Alfredo Beltran, was a high-level commander for the Sinaloa cartel until his arrest in January in Culiacan in an operation led by Millan Gomez. There is speculation that the intelligence that led to Alfredo Beltran’s arrest came from El Chapo, and that the death of Edgar Guzman Beltran, El Chapo’s son, last week was retribution for that betrayal.
Significantly, since the capture of the five operatives of the hit squad El Nica — which killed Millan Gomez and Velasco — allegedly contracted out by Arturo Beltran, we have not seen any further assassinations of high-level Mexican federal officials. We have seen the recent resignations of several high-level local police officials, however. (end)

note: ...from inside Mexico "guns and drugs" an inside report soon to come:

Peter Lemkin
04-06-2009, 11:25 AM
So, these 'military grade' (if not Military provided) weapons the 'Cartels' have now are to protect 'the trade', just because they could provide the big bucks for them, or for some other favors? Some war ON drugs! Its a war, and it involves drugs, but somehow the 'on' part doesn't fit. Like 'bringing freedom and democracy' to foreign lands by killing and plundering them. Who writes this stuff - these clever little slogans? Carry on T. Take care down there!

Tosh Plumlee
04-10-2009, 07:14 PM
note: information soon to be released by the Mexican Army:

(... I doubt the US media will cover any of this, or the real war down here because of relations with Mexico over the NFTA modification agreements which are on going negotiation in Washington DC, at this point in time.

The Mexican American border drug wars at this point is not a subject American politicians wants to hear comming from the media or to be talked about openly. The Border Drug War has become political in nature, but Mexicans as well as Americans on both sides of this border continue to be kidnapped, shot, and killed daily. The mainstream media has been asked "not to cover these events, because it may cause panic along the border and in some border towns"...)


The photos were taken while traveling with the Mexican Army inside Mexico, last week.

(one) Mexican Ranch used for gun shipments and gravesite for Juarez missing and murdered, located one half mile south of new border fence and approx 35 miles east of Palomas Mexico and approx 40 miles west of Juarez Mexico. A very dangerous place and remote drug crossover point.

Referenced: US Border Patrol and the American Mexican joint military Task Force Team; HQ El Paso, Texas and Juarez, Mexico... joint venture.... (photos taken by Tosh Plumlee 4-06-09)

(two) Three people were murdered by drug and gun runners inside this old shot up car, about seven years ago, while escaping the ranch and trying to get back across the US border. The ranch is about one mile south of this location from the ranch..the cross members in the forground of ranch picture is the new four foot high border fence. (ref; US Border Patrol info)

The Mexican Army is currently south and east of the ranch about eight miles looking for more burried bodies connected to this ranch as well as others closer to Juarez. (ref; Col Sancheze Luna Carransas Mexican Army and Wm Tosh Plumlee TDY; AMTFT-7; Operation 'Firestop', BASE OPS)

note: In reference to new border fence (pic #5) Its like this for 80miles (Columbus NM to EL Paso Texas) US 4 feet high at a cost for construction approx 1 million dollars per mile..for new road and fence installation. The old barbwire fence can still be seen behind new fence.

Peter Lemkin
04-10-2009, 08:24 PM
note: information soon to be released by the Mexican Army:

(... I doubt the US media will cover any of this, or the real war down here because of relations with Mexico over the NFTA modification agreements which are on going negotiation in Washington DC, at this point in time.

The Mexican American border drug wars at this point is not a subject American politics wants to hear comming from the media or to be talked about openly. The Border Drug War has become political in nature, but Mexicans as well as Americans on both sides of this border continue to be kidnapped, shot, and killed daily. The mainstream media has been asked "not to cover these events, because it may cause panic along the border and in some border towns"...)

The photos were taken while traveling with the Mexican Army inside Mexico, last week.

(one) Mexican Ranch used for gun shipments and gravesite for Juarez missing and murdered, located one half mile south of new border fence and approx 35 miles east of Palomas Mexico and approx 40 miles west of Juarez Mexico. A very dangerous place and remote drug crossover point.

Referenced: US Border Patrol and the American Mexican joint military Task Force Team; HQ El Paso, Texas and Juarez, Mexico... joint venture.... (photos taken by Tosh Plumlee 4-06-09)

(two) Three people were murdered by drug and gun runners inside this old shot up car, about seven years ago, while escaping the ranch and trying to get back across the US border. The ranch is about one mile south of this location from the ranch..the cross members in the forground of ranch picture is the new four foot high border fence. (ref; US Border Patrol info)

The Mexican Army is currently south and east of the ranch about eight miles looking for more burried bodies connected to this ranch as well as anothers closer to Juarez. (ref; Col Sancheze Luna Carransas Mexican Army and Wm Tosh Plumlee TDY; AMTFT-7; Operation 'Firestop', BASE OPS)

Thanks for keeping us posted. Four foot new fence?! The average Mexican is not very tall, but they all can get over a 4 foot fence - who's kidding whom? I've collected minerals on the border in San Deigo County, CA and seen both the Border Control and Illegales passing me by. How is the Mexican Army as far as modern weapons and communications, night-vision gear etc. Motivation/Morale? Thanks.

Bruce Clemens
04-10-2009, 08:49 PM
http://maps.google.com/maps/mm?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=31.780655,-107.032768&spn=0.002198,0.005493&t=k&z=18

Hope the link works- I found a place about the right distance from Juarez and from the border on Google Maps. Just not enough resolution to be sure, but don't see anyplace else in that vicinity.

Bruce Clemens
04-10-2009, 08:53 PM
Thanks for keeping us posted. Four foot new fence?! The average Mexican is not very tall, but they all can get over a 4 foot fence - who's kidding whom?Looks like they're more interested in keeping vehicles from crossing than people. Trouble is- it works both ways...

Tosh Plumlee
04-10-2009, 09:05 PM
I think thats it if I got the right link... anyway here are the cord... from my GPS hand held:


N 31degrees 46' 49.96
W 107 degrees 01' 59.94" about 1/4 mile south of the Border..

http://maps.google.com/maps/mm?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=31.780655,-107.032768&spn=0.002198,0.005493&t=k&z=18


Today, the Mexican Army is onsite about six or seven miles S/E of ranch at a place known as " The Crater". They are digging for bodies at that location as well as another about three miles south of the ranch. They have been in this area for the past few days.

To find the "Carter", and where the Mexican Army is camped today, follow the road from the ranch S/E and stay to the right at all forks. This road will lead to the site

Bruce Clemens
04-10-2009, 09:41 PM
Verified! The coordinates of the compound I found match yours exactly!
There appears to be a large crater-like feature south east of the ranch, but it is not as far as 6 or 7 miles. Looks to be about 2 1/4 miles. Lots of vulcanic peaks within what looks like a crater. Could that be the place they are looking? The road from the ranch goes right to it.

Bruce Clemens
04-10-2009, 09:45 PM
Got it. Here's a place just adjacent to the crater. Looks like some sort of corral and dwelling.
http://maps.google.com/maps/mm?hl=en&ie=UTF8&t=k&ll=31.753843,-106.985877&spn=0.002053,0.00544&z=18

Tosh Plumlee
04-10-2009, 09:47 PM
Yes thats it. The seven or so miles I mentioned was the first campsite of the MX Army... (I miss read my notes from Wed.) The Crater's cord are (Hand Held GPS) are: N 31 46' 04.78" ... W 107 00' 30.86 The suspect grave sites are about 1/2 mile west of the main road from top of carter rim.


On the other side of the mountain or hill S/E is another ranch #2 and those roads lead from that ranch to MX hiway #2 to Juarez.

The other ranch 1/4 mile south of the border main road goes south to hiway #2. The S/E road from ranch 1 to crater I think dead ends at the Carter. ( north west across the volcanic mtn., is the other ranch This is from my notes while on site last week. Anyway keep your eye on this area for the next few weeks... I think something might "pop-up" from that area... no pun intended.

Bruce Clemens
04-10-2009, 09:52 PM
What are they using to look for the graves?

Tosh Plumlee
04-10-2009, 10:05 PM
Ground Penetrating radar and metal detectors and informats information from a drug dealer arrested last week near Mexico City.

Peter Lemkin
04-13-2009, 01:28 PM
The Juarez drug war... or the cartel border wars.

Radio interview with Mike Levine, being taped today... to air sometime Monday 4-13-09

http://wbai.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=34&Itemid=36 for live and at WBAI archives here after http://archive.wbai.org/allshows.php and here http://www.expertwitnessradio.org/archives/shorrock.html

I'll post the time of the live show shortly.

Tosh Plumlee
04-14-2009, 11:03 PM
Peter here is the link: A second part about the the US Military weapons being lost or stolden in Mexico and getting into the Cartel's gangs hands will be aired in the next few weeks or days. Also, keep you eye on CNN these next few days. Here is the link in case anyone is interested.

http://www.expertwitnessradio.org/

Tosh Plumlee
04-15-2009, 03:34 AM
Some of the Intel I was told which led to the bust came from TF-7 the joint task force: This was mentioned a few days ago but confirmed today by AP and the Mexican Army.

Mexican detained with anti-aircraft machine gun


http://d.yimg.com/a/p/ap/20090414/capt.fcfde362b5c0438c8679913530fb3a58.lt_mexico_gu ns_mxev107.jpg?x=213&y=320&xc=1&yc=1&wc=273&hc=410&q=85&sig=a1H.fEm7IHRm2IkFZAN6RQ-- (http://news.yahoo.com/nphotos/anti-air-craft-machine-gun-first-weapon-its-kind-seized-Mexico/photo//090414/481/fcfde362b5c0438c8679913530fb3a58//s:/ap/20090415/ap_on_re_la_am_ca/lt_drug_war_mexico;_ylt=AvVFIX4Y4rs0upjvU5uYfIq9Ix IF;_ylu=X3oDMTE5bDhjNG00BHBvcwMxBHNlYwN5bl9yX3RvcF 9waG90bwRzbGsDYW5hbnRpYWlyLWNy)AP – An anti air-craft machine gun, the first weapon of its kind seized in Mexico, is displayed to the media …

By E. EDUARDO CASTILLO, Associated Press Writer E. Eduardo Castillo, Associated Press Writer – 1 hr 35 mins ago
MEXICO CITY – Mexican authorities arrested a woman guarding an arsenal that included the first anti-aircraft machine gun seized in Mexico, police said Tuesday, as the army announced the capture of an alleged top drug cartel lieutenant.
The arsenal belonged to a group linked to the powerful Beltran-Leyva drug cartel, federal police coordinator Gen. Rodolfo Cruz said. It also included ammunition, five rifles, a grenade and part of a grenade launcher.
Mexican drug cartels, battling a fierce crackdown by soldiers and federal police, have increasingly gotten hold of higher-powered weapons, even military-grade arms such as grenades and machine guns. That has left police — particularly state and municipal forces — grossly outgunned, and many officers have quit following attacks.
Cruz said the confiscated .50-caliber, anti-aircraft machine gun can fire 800 rounds per minute and is capable of penetrating armor from more than 5,000 feet (1,500 meters). Police on a routine patrol Monday found the gun fitted atop an SUV at a house in northern Sonora state.
Authorities did not release any other details about the gun, including its make, where it was manufactured or where it was sold.
The arrested suspect, Anahi Beltran Cabrera, apparently is not related to the Beltran-Leyva clan, Cruz said.
The U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives has traced many guns seized at scenes of drug violence in Mexico to U.S. commercial sources. But determining the source of military-grade weapons such as grenades and fully automatic machine guns is more complicated.
The ATF says the grenades are mostly smuggled in through Central America, and have been traced back to the militaries of many countries, from South Korea to Spain and Israel. Some may be leftovers from the Central American civil wars.
Assailants have fired on government aircraft performing anti-drug missions in Mexico in the past, but apparently never with the caliber of weapon found Monday.
In 2006, a helicopter on a federal drug-eradication mission crashed while trying to escape ground fire, and a second helicopter was damaged by gunfire in the Pacific coast state of Guerrero.
Mexico is upgrading its northern and southern border checkpoints in an effort to detect and seize more guns and other contraband, installing equipment that will weigh and photograph each car and truck coming into the country.
President Barack Obama has promised to do more to stop gun trafficking from the United States to Mexico. He has pledged to dispatch nearly 500 more federal agents to the border, along with X-ray machines and drug-sniffing dogs.
Also Tuesday, the Mexican army announced the capture of Ruben Granados Vargas, an alleged lieutenant for the Beltran-Leyva drug cartel in the Pacific coast state of Guerrero.
Gen. Luis Arturo Oliver said soldiers caught Granados Vargas and two other suspects with four rifles and 2.6 pounds (1.2 kilograms) of opium on Monday.
Granados Vargas allegedly ran the cartel's drug planting, harvesting and trafficking operations on the coast west of the resort of Acapulco.
He is implicated in a number of kidnappings and killings in the region, including attacks as part of a turf war with an alleged Sinaloa cartel rival that left 17 people dead last year, organized crime prosecutor Marisela Morales said.
Granados Vargas' wife, sister-in-law and two sons were later killed in retaliation, according to prosecutors.

Mexico's drug violence has claimed more than 10,650 lives since President Felipe Calderon launched a military-led offensive against trafficking cartels in December 2006.
In March, the government sent thousands more troops to the northern border to quell escalating violence. The government announced Sunday that drug-related homicides fell 26 percent across the country in the first three months of the year, compared to the same period in 2008.
Late Tuesday, Mexico's Senate authorized the navy to participate in training with the U.S. Navy on how to detect drug smugglers. The two-week exercises in Florida, which start April 20, will also include ships from Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, France and Germany.
___ Associated Press writer Mark Stevenson contributed to this report.

Bruce Clemens
04-15-2009, 05:20 PM
I wonder which alleged border town U.S. gun shop the media will claim THAT came from ?!

Tosh Plumlee
04-15-2009, 06:23 PM
That was not the only thing found at this place... that was only what they wanted released to the media.... there is more to this puppy than whats been released. Perhaps more details after Obama's trip to Mexico City.

"... confidental memo to JOC -J2.......

...........
I do not know how this could be checked out but... if you remember a sensitive source mentioned there were military weapons that were taken off the GAO books after the 101st and 82nd Airborne held maneuvers in Honduras back in the mid eighties. There was a GAO report on these lost weapons sometime around that time frame. There were Stinger missiles, grenade launchers, millions of rounds of various ammo, night vision goggles, helicopter parts, etc that went to Panama's Noriega and then into the Escobar, Ochoa cartel hands.

I think what was recently found in Mexico is a very small part of those missing weapons. I think we can get the numbers, although I have been told that the Mexican authorities have told ATF that the ID numbers have been filed off of that gun, but they have others which have been ID'ed......."..

Mexican Intell has also told the joint task force that they will be releasing information of another captured high profile drug Lord... the rumor is that it is "Guzman", and he will be turned over to American military at the border... we will perhaps see real soon...

I am going back to Coyote Hill today and will be out of cell phone range most of the day.... there is an Intel report that there is to be a "run" across the border going south from Columbus, I am told it is planned for today. I hope to get close up pictures and lic numbers and photos of the drivers, They are going to use another Ryder Truck reg in Arizona, I am told.

My sources have told me this information has been received from a Mexican military intelligence unit working out of Juarez, also I have received information from a sensitive source that the BP will not be in this area when the cross over is suppose to happen. (???)

If I can get more information on the other Ryder Truck which was found abandon near here yesterday or the day before, I will forward it to you... It might fit into something you have already uncovered... (we will see if this information from our sources checks out... so far there are three for four on Mexico Intel info)..... I still don't know what the motive is for feeding this info.... could be a set up to make the CIA look bad for having a UC team inside Mexico... anyway I am xxxx... however, Mexico just confirmed that they are working with a Navy SEAL team starting April 20, 09. (reference article I sent you last night) That would tie in with the US Ranger Team working Juarez and surrounding areas.... could be a joint assassination team down here tracking some of the cartel's gang members for all I know.

Anyway, just trying to get information out before the fact so as to hang it in someones ass in case I am turned on for political reasons.... I don't not trust the "Powers that Be in the DC beltway" on any of this stuff......".

Tosh Plumlee
04-15-2009, 06:48 PM
Just in Hot off the wire:

By DEVLIN BARRETT
Associated Press Writer
WASHINGTON (AP) - Mexican drug cartels are spreading south into
Central America, U.S. drug enforcement officials said Wednesday, as
the Obama administration put new pressure on drug kingpins ahead of
the president's trip to Mexico City.
Drug Enforcement Administration officials said there are growing
signs the stepped-up law enforcement efforts on the U.S.-Mexico
border are driving the cartels south toward Central America.
"We're looking at what happens south of Mexico as well, because
that's just as important as what's happening on our border," said
DEA Chief of Operations Thomas Harrigan. "With more and more
success the Mexican government has, literally they're pushing these
cartels further south and potentially it could be a problem in
Central America."
Harrigan said it's possible the extra law enforcement efforts
could "push the cartels into Central America."
It's already happening, said Anthony Placido, the DEA's chief of
intelligence.
There have been significant seizures of cartel weaponry in
Guatemala, and shootouts among Mexican cartels with operations in
Central American countries. The cartels "definitely have" moved
south, said Placido.
"We've seen running gun battles in places like Guatemala and
Honduras between rival Mexican cartels," he said.
Last month in an appearance before Congress, U.S. State
Department official David Johnson said that Central American
officials "have identified gangs, drug trafficking, and
trafficking of arms as the most pressing security concerns in that
region."
The acting head of the DEA, Michele Leonhart, told reporters
that more efforts along the U.S.-Mexico border alone will not be
enough to dismantle the cartels.
"A seizure on the border is not going to break the backs of the
cartels. What breaks the backs of the cartels are the partnerships
with the U.S. and Mexican counterparts in country, in Mexico," she
said.
Separately, the White House on Wednesday announced that three
Mexican organizations had been added to a list of suspected
international drug kingpins: the Sinaloa cartel, Los Zetas, and La
Familia Michoacana.
The move came a day before President Barack Obama travels to
Mexico.
The three Mexican groups were added to the U.S. government's
blacklist of drug syndicates, aimed at financially cutting off
significant foreign narcotics traffickers, their organizations and
operatives worldwide.
The list was created by the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin
Designation Act but is known commonly as the Drug Kingpin Act.
Those on the list are denied access to the U.S. financial system
and all trade and transactions involving U.S. companies and
individuals.
La Familia Michoacana, also known simply as La Familia, moves
massive amounts of cocaine from Colombian drug dealers, according
to U.S. officials.
Los Zetas was formed by ex-military men who became hitmen for
the other cartels.
The Sinaloa cartel, often referred to as the Mexican Federation,
began in the 1970's, and now controls most of the seaports along
the Pacific coat of Mexico, officials say.
The president has already promised to dispatch nearly 500 more
federal agents to the U.S.-Mexico border, along with X-ray machines
and drug-sniffing dogs.
Also Wednesday, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano is
expected to announce she has chosen a former federal prosecutor to
the new post of "border czar" to oversee efforts to end cartel
violence along the U.S.-Mexico border and slow the tide of people
crossing illegally into the United States.
Napolitano is expected to name Alan Bersin to the post at an
announcement in El Paso, Texas.
-----

Tosh Plumlee
04-15-2009, 07:41 PM
American Mainstream Media will not report what is really going on down here across the border... They want you to think the gangs and cartels have moved south into Central America. The border war here in Juarez is still going on and people are still being kidnapped tortured and murdered everyday by the Los Zetas. Its not all the Mexican army or Police but impostors in some cases and a few turns working both ends of the game for money.

Inside Juarez report: April 15,09

Norte of Juarezreports this morning that, after being kidnapped from his home on Thursday, apparently by elements of the armed forces, the body of Ed uardo Gonzalez Ramirez, 40, was found beaten to death at 1:10 a.m. on Friday at the intersection of Damian Carmona and Rodolfo Fierro, in the colonia Jose Marti. He died of a severe injury to the pelvis. Witnesses reported two official military vehicles appeared at the victim's home between 2:00 and 3:00 p.m., military personnel entered the home without a warrant and began beating the victim, who screamed at his mother not to let them carry him away. Mr. Gonzalez was then taken by the men. Mr. Gonzalez was a mechanic. Maria del Refugio Ramirez, the victim's mother told Norte, "If my son did something wrong, that's what authorities are for, to judge what happened, but not to have soldiers torture them, kill them, and throw the body away."

The victim's family is expected to turn the case over to the Chihuahua State Commission on Human Rights for investigation. Diario de Juarez reports that in a separate incident Mr. Julio Escamilla Torres, an electrician, was treated for several fractured ribs and a severe injury to his leg at the General Hospital. Family members assert that persons dressed as soldiers stopped his vehicle at the corner of Zihuatanejo and Privada de Cobre and, finding him in possession of various screwdrivers, which they took to be possible weapons, began beating him with rifle butts.

Diario de Juarez, covering this story, quotes a spokesman who asserts that "in relation to the presumed participat ion of the armed forces in acts which ended the life of Eduardo Gonzalez Ramirez...and resulted in an injury to a person by the name of Julio Escamilla, the Command of the Joint Chihuahua Operation denies that military personnel, acting as such within the scope of this Operation, participated in any way in the foregoing acts."

Meanwhile, in the case of Javier Eduardo Rosales Rosales, 21, (Reported here below) a spokesperson for the State Justice Department's North Zone said an investigation was underway to determine whether military personnel were involved in the kidnapping that resulted in his death. Rosales was a radiologist at the Los Angeles Hospital. He and another man, Sergio Fernandez, were kidnapped by men in uniform on Tuesday April 7. According to Fernandez, after two days of being tortured, the two were left alone in the early morning hours on Thursday, April 9. They left the scene but Mr. Rosales died of his injuries shortly thereafter. Mr. Fernandez left the scene to look for help and made it home by himself. The body was discovered on Friday.

On Sunday night two more men were murdered in Cd. Juarez. One body was found at 9:18 p.m. on the corner of Costa Rica and Ninos Heroes. He appeared to be between 35 and 40 years old and had gunshot wounds in his back. Another man was found dead at 9:20 on Sunday on the corner of Anahuac and 2 de abril, with gunshot wounds to the head. Five spent209mm. cartridges were found near the body.
http://res1.blogblog.com/tracker/6377841408627237363-8124564157277208065?l=lapoliticanewmexico.blogspot .com

Tosh Plumlee
04-16-2009, 03:13 AM
note from Plumlee in reference to article:

As the article points out, this is a real Narco terrorist war down here along the United States and the Mexican border. It has been creeping north from Colombia for the last twenty five years.

Various agencies of the US government and our elected officials have been warned repeatedly-- throughout many years-- and, by a host of government undercover operatives and federal officials, that this narco terroist war would soon imbed itsel within our country. But those warnings fell on deaf ears... and now the drug war has crossed our borders and settled in our cities. It can be found in our politics, in our corporations, and in our banking systems. And our elected officials or still blind and dumb to this escalating threat to our National Security.

The following CNN article, from a very good friend who is also fighting in the real drug war, is posted here for anyone who might be interested in the real story concerning the border war in Mexico soon to be played out in our American cities:

article follows:

"... There are no welcome signs on the approach to Camargo.
It's a hardscrabble Mexican border town and home turf for "Los Zetas," a gang of hitmen and corrupt former special forces cops on the bankroll of the Gulf Cartel.
Local journalists explained if we went there we'd be getting "tangled up in the hooves of the horse." They said Zeta gunmen recently smashed one reporter's fingers with a hammer as a warning to the media to stay away.
The plaza was deserted -- for a few minutes at least. Then the throb of engines broke the Sunday morning peace. Scores of pickup trucks with heavily tinted windows began circling. Occasionally a window would crack open. We were clearly being watched.
A black SUV pulled up alongside the soda stand. One of the occupants stepped out. First I saw the ostrich skin cowboy boots, then the highly polished 9 mm pistol strapped to his side. It was loaded with a longer-than-usual ammunition clip, custom-made to pack extra bullets. It was a brazen flouting of Mexican law to carry a gun that way.
No words. Not even a stare. But his message seemed unequivocal. Our visit to Camargo lasted just 20 minutes. Taking the strong hint, we immediately left town.
Much as we wanted to explore the underbelly of the drug war raging in Mexico, it was clear the capos, or bosses, and their hired guns were in no mood to talk. Their business thrives best in the shadows. Our best chance of getting some insight was to track down a cast of peripheral characters who live in the gray areas, somewhere between the extremes of right and wrong.
The hospitality was little better in nearby Miguel Aleman. Customers, even an argumentative drunk, fell silent as we ordered a beer in a dingy cantina. A couple of tired-looking prostitutes retreated to a far corner. They may have been down on their luck but they knew talking to outsiders wasn't worth the cost. Here the Zetas are well-known for enforcing their law of silence at gunpoint.
Along this stretch of the border Los Zetas are kings. From here their bloody reach stretches far across Mexico and deep into Central America. They run immigrant smuggling, drug trafficking, prostitution rackets, video piracy and local politics.
In the glitzy industrial city of Monterrey, we met a marijuana dealer smoking his own merchandise in the bathroom of a dance club.
The man, whom we can't name for his safety, explained how he had been recruited at gunpoint two years earlier by the Zetas to be what they call a "landowner" (terrateniente in Spanish) -- in charge of cocaine distribution in a handful of neighborhoods.
He said Zeta gunmen bundled him into a truck and with assault rifles aimed at his head they gave him three options -- pay them $100,000, begin working for them or die.
Over the next few days, he said, the same gunmen scared off or killed rival drug dealers, leaving him in charge of what he said was a $4,000-a-day business.
It all ended, he said, when Mexican soldiers kicked down his door. He was never detained but his cover was blown. Local Zeta commanders thanked him for not ratting on them by giving him permission to retire from the business.
But recently he's gone into business for himself selling $2 bags of pot. He realizes working independently of the Zetas may be fatal.
"Maybe I'm stupid or something, but I don't know how to do anything else. If they catch me it's simple, they'll kill me. It's just not allowed to work freelance," he said.
An old friend of mine in Monterrey knew the marijuana peddler well and vouched for his story. He never made good on his promise to give us a recorded account. He went on a 24-hour drug binge. When we caught up with him again he was smoking crack, sweating profusely and paranoid his former paymasters would exact revenge.
Mexico's tit-for-tat vendettas look like uncontrolled chaos.
Mob assassins are no longer content with efficient execution-style killings. Sinaloa cartel hitmen regularly place pig masks on the faces of their Juarez cartel victims. And in a grim seasonal touch, killers in Juarez decapitated a cop and placed a Father Christmas hat on his severed head.
But in a sidewalk cafe in Guadalajara, "Jose" explains there is a clearly defined set of narco-rules that must be followed. A small-time Latin American cocaine trafficker I've known for years introduced me to Jose.
Jose is old school. He tells me he's been in the cocaine trade since the early 1980s almost since it began, has worked internationally and done a stretch in prison
"From the outside it might look like the cartels are just going around killing people. But on the inside there's a code of conduct, rules. You might not want to kill somebody but you have to because it's all about respect," he said. "This cannot work if there's no respect. Above all, the capos use logic to solve the problems."
Jose added that he believed groups of corrupt officials and law enforcement officers were using the militarization of the border region not as a means to crush the drug cartels but as a way of forcing them to pay a bigger slice of the drug profits as bribes.
"The authorities and the cartels use the rule of 10. By that I mean for every 10 kilos of cocaine we move, we have to give three to the authorities and keep seven for ourselves," he explained. "When times are bad the authorities may arrest somebody or grab an entire consignment and that's a way for forcing up their percentage take."
Jose's assertion might seem like feverish conspiracy theory if it weren't for the growing list of Mexican officials, ranging from local cops and foot soldiers to generals and men at the highest levels of law enforcement, who've been busted for allegedly profiting from the drug trade.
In November, Mexico's former drug czar was detained on suspicion that he may have accepted $450,000 a month in bribes from drug traffickers. He had been in charge of the attorney general's office that specializes in combating organized crime.
Tomorrow, Penhaul looks at the gang's dead triggermen and the lives they left behind. ..." (end)

Good work my friend... we need more like you and your associates, on the front line of this "Drug War".

Peter Lemkin
04-16-2009, 12:36 PM
Thanks T. Wake me up when the 'Drug War' is over an I'll smoke a J to celebrate!........... Grow your own, is my motto. Seriously, very sinister things happening and glad you're still telling truth to power on this. Keep us posted.
Seems there are some heavy duty munitions and even rockets being used on 'both' sides of this faux war.

Tosh Plumlee
04-17-2009, 09:24 PM
For anyone who is really interest in how the drug cartels gets hold of US Military hardware, then the following report should be of some interest.

The Mexican Army has received over one billion US dollars in US Military hardware in less than one year. Over half of these high grade weapons received by Mexico have been lost, stolen, or cannot be accounted for.

During the last six months a American secret military Task Force team working with a specialized Mexican unit from Mexico City, has located over sixteen hundred high grade US military weapons and hardware in a Juarez warehouse controlled by the Zetas and the gulf Cartel. This is only one of many storage facilities scattered throughout Mexico that contain US Military hardware.

This documented story from inside Mexico has and will not be covered by the United States mainstream media because of political reasons on both sides of the border. This loss of weapons, once inside Mexico, is the United States government and the Homeland Security's active program in protecting us from this northward creeping drug war which is now a solid threat to out National Security.

The weapons which have been found by the Mexican government scattered throughout Mexico are not weapons which can be transported across border checkpoints in the back of pickup trucks or in autos. Its extremely hard to sneak an Anti-aircraft gun or a stinger missile across a border check point without raising an eyebrow or two. Nor can you readily buy them at Pawn Shops or Gun shows in the United States.

http://www.fas.org/programs/ssp/asmp/factsandfigures/government_data_index.html (http://www.fas.org/programs/ssp/asmp/factsandfigures/government_data_index.html)

U.S. Arms Transfers: Government Data


FAS Resources (http://www.fas.org/programs/ssp/asmp/factsandfigures/government_data_index.html#fasdata) | Other Databases (http://www.fas.org/programs/ssp/asmp/factsandfigures/government_data_index.html#otherdata) | Reports (http://www.fas.org/programs/ssp/asmp/factsandfigures/government_data_index.html#reports)

American arms manufacturers have two major channels through which they can sell major weaponry to foreign countries: foreign military sales ("FMS"), in which a government-to-government agreement is negotiated by the Pentagon; and direct commercial sales ("DCS"), in which industry negotiates directly with the purchasing country and must apply for a license from the State Department.
The United States government also transfers arms to other countries by giving away weapons from U.S.military stocks for free or at greatly reduced prices, classified as excess defense articles (EDA) or emergency "drawdowns." The United States also provides military training (http://www.fas.org/asmp/campaigns/training.html) to many foreign countries. These transfers are also managed by the Defense Department. For more information about types of U.S.arms transfers, read the "Ways and Means" (http://www.fas.org/asmp/library/handbook/WaysandMeans.html) chapter of The Arms Trade Revealed....".


http://fas.org/programs/ssp/asmp/factsandfigures/government_data/section655_FY2007.html

Additional background information in process of being updated:

RETURN (http://www.state.gov/index.cfm) to the current State Department web site.

U.S. Department of State
Bureau for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs http://www.state.gov/www/images/bnr_narcotics.gif
The Bureau for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) implements the International Narcotics Control element of the U.S. foreign assistance program, which is intended to enhance the institutional capabilities of foreign governments to define and implement strategies and national programs that prevent the production, trafficking and abuse of illicit drugs. These international programs focus on law enforcement and interdiction capabilities, criminal justice system reform, eradication of drug crops, alternative development, and demand reduction. INL's Aviation Division supports host governments worldwide in their efforts to locate and eradicate drug crops, interdict drug production and trafficking activities, and develop their own institutional counter-narcotics aviation program.
Programs (http://www.state.gov/www/global/narcotics_law/narcotics.html#programs) | Reports (http://www.state.gov/www/global/narcotics_law/narcotics.html#reports) | Remarks (http://www.state.gov/www/global/narcotics_law/narcotics.html#remarks) | Press Statements (http://www.state.gov/www/global/narcotics_law/narcotics.html#press) | Fact Sheets (http://www.state.gov/www/global/narcotics_law/narcotics.html#fact)
Programs
The Role of U.S. Government Agencies (http://www.state.gov/www/global/narcotics_law/control.html)
Narcotics Rewards Program (http://www.state.gov/www/global/narcotics_law/rewards.html)
Country Programs (http://www.state.gov/www/global/narcotics_law/programs.html)
Reports
International Narcotics Control Strategy Report (http://www.state.gov/www/global/narcotics_law/narc_reports_mainhp.html)
Remarks
12/13/00 (http://www.state.gov/www/policy_remarks/2000/001213_sheehan_house.html): Ambassador Sheehan, Testimony Before the House Judiciary Committee Subcommittee on Crime (Drug Trafficking)
11/20/00 (http://www.state.gov/www/policy_remarks/2000/001120_mccaffrey_pressconf.html): Barry McCaffrey, Director, Office of National Drug Control Policy; Thomas R. Pickering, Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs; and Guillermo Fernandez de Soto, Foreign Minister of Colombia, Press Conference at Casa de Narino, Bogota, Colombia
10/12/00: (http://www.state.gov/www/policy_remarks/2000/001012_beers_criminal.html) Assistant Secretary Rand Beers statement before the Criminal Justice, Drug Policy, and Human Resources Subcommittee of the House Committee on Government Reform, Washington, DC (Plan Colombia)
09/21/00: (http://www.state.gov/www/policy_remarks/2000/000921_beers_testimony.html) Assistant Secretary Rand Beers Statement before the Western Hemisphere Subcommittee of the House International Relations Committee, Washington, DC (Plan Colombia)
09/15/00: (http://secretary.state.gov/www/statements/2000/000915.html) Secretary Albright remarks at Stakeout Following 6 + 2 Meeting on Afghanistan, New York, NY
09/15/00: (http://secretary.state.gov/www/statements/2000/000915a.html) Secretary Albright statement on 6 + 2 Meeting on Afghanistan, New York, NY
07/25/00: (http://www.state.gov/www/policy_remarks/2000/000725_beers_mdma.html) Assistant Secretary Rand Beers remarks before the Senate Caucus on International Narcotics Control, Washington, DC (Drug Ecstasy)
06/09/00: (http://www.state.gov/www/policy_remarks/2000/000609_beers_panama.html) Assistant Secretary Rand Beers remarks before the Criminal Justice, Drug Policy and Human Resources Subcommittee, House Committee on Government Reform, Washington, DC (Counternarcotics Cooperation With Panama)
04/26/00: (http://www.state.gov/www/policy_remarks/2000/000426_beers_hcir.html) Assistant Secretary Rand Beers remarks before the Hispanic Council on International Relations, Washington, DC (U.S. Efforts to Combat International Narcotics and Crime)
04/04/00: (http://www.state.gov/www/policy_remarks/2000/000404_beers_sasc.html) Assistant Secretary Rand Beers statement before the Senate Armed Services Committee, Washington, DC (Plan Colombia)
03/21/00: (http://www.state.gov/www/policy_remarks/2000/000321_beers_annualcert.html) Rand Beers, Senate Caucus on International Narcotics Control, Washington, DC (A Review of the Annual Certification Process)
02/25/00: (http://www.state.gov/www/policy_remarks/2000/000225_beers_sfrc.html) Rand Beers, Western Hemisphere, Peace Corps, Narcotics and Terrorism Subcommittee, Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Washington, DC (Plan Colombia)
01/11/00: (http://www.state.gov/www/policy_remarks/2000/000111_beers-etc_colombia.html) Rand Beers, Assistant Secretary for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, Peter Romero, Acting Assistant Secretary for Western Hemisphere Affairs, and Arturo Valenzuela, Special Assistant to the President for Inter-American Affairs at a special briefing on U.S. aid to Colombia, Washington, DC ($1.6 Billion Aid Package to Colombia)
1999-1996 Remarks (http://www.state.gov/www/global/narcotics_law/remarks.html#narc_rmrk)
Press Statements
01/19/01: (http://secretary.state.gov/www/briefings/statements/2001/ps010119.html) Counternarcotics Cooperation With Colombia
12/19/00: (http://secretary.state.gov/www/briefings/statements/2000/ps001219a.html) Bolivia's Coca Reduction Efforts
11/29/00: (http://secretary.state.gov/www/briefings/statements/2000/ps001129.html) Colombian Rebel Connection to Mexican Drug Cartel
11/16/00: (http://secretary.state.gov/www/briefings/statements/2000/ps001116a.html) Pakistani Counter-Narcotics Delegation Visits the United States for Consultations
11/01/00: (http://www.state.gov/www/global/narcotics_law/001101_wh_ltr.html) White House Press Statement: Text of Annual Drug Majors List (see fact sheet (http://www.state.gov/www/global/narcotics_law/fs_001101_cert_process.html))
10/19/00: (http://www.state.gov/www/global/narcotics_law/001019_wh_ltr.html) White House Press Statement: Letter to Congress on Narcotics Traffickers in Colombia
05/12/00: (http://secretary.state.gov/www/briefings/statements/2000/ps000512c.html) Mexico: Rewards for Ramon Arellano-Felix and Benjamin Arellano-Felix
05/10/00: (http://secretary.state.gov/www/briefings/statements/2000/ps000510a.html) Pakistan: Sentencing of Sakhi Dost Notezai
05/04/00: (http://secretary.state.gov/www/briefings/statements/2000/ps000504b.html) Mexico: Arrest of Ismael Higuera-Guerrero
03/01/00: (http://www.state.gov/www/global/narcotics_law/000301_pres_certs.html) White House Press Statement: Annual Presidential Certifications for Major Drug Producing and Transit Countries
03/01/00: (http://www.state.gov/www/global/narcotics_law/1999_narc_report/000301_whpress_statement.html) White House Press Statement: Presidential Determination on Major Illicit Drug Producing and Drug Transit Countries
02/25/00: (http://secretary.state.gov/www/briefings/statements/2000/ps000225.html) Narcotics Certification Briefing
02/02/00: (http://secretary.state.gov/www/briefings/statements/2000/ps000202.html) Mexico: Unprecedented Cooperation at Sea
01/19/00: (http://secretary.state.gov/www/briefings/statements/2000/ps000119.html) Thai Authorities Seize 126 Kilograms of Heroin
01/12/00: (http://secretary.state.gov/www/briefings/statements/2000/ps000112b.html) Peru's Coca Reduction Efforts
01/11/00: (http://secretary.state.gov/www/statements/2000/000111.html) Statement by Secretary Albright (U.S. Assistance to Colombia)
1999-1998 Press Statements (http://www.state.gov/www/global/narcotics_law/press.html#narc_press)
Fact Sheets
01/17/01: (http://www.state.gov/www/regions/wha/colombia/fs_010117_faqs.html) The Aerial Eradication of Illicit Crops: Answers to Frequently Asked Questions
12/11/00: (http://www.state.gov/www/global/narcotics_law/fs_001211_demand.html) INL International Demand Reduction Initiatives
11/01/00: (http://www.state.gov/www/global/narcotics_law/fs_001101_cert_process.html) Majors List and The Certification Process
08/16/00: (http://www.state.gov/www/regions/wha/colombia/fs_000816_andn_counternarc.html) Counternarcotics Efforts in the Andean Region
08/04/00: (http://www.state.gov/www/regions/wha/colombia/fs_000804_fol-airports.html) Combating Drug Traffickers Through Forward Operating Locations
08/04/00: (http://clinton6.nara.gov/2000/08/2000-08-04-fact-sheet-on-increased-us-assistance-for-columbia.html) Presidential Decision Directive on the Colombia Initiative: Increased U.S. Assistance for Colombia (White House)
07/19/00: (http://www.state.gov/www/regions/wha/colombia/fs_000719_plancolombia.html) Plan Colombia
07/10/00: (http://www.state.gov/www/regions/wha/colombia/fs_000710_demand.html) Demand Reduction
04/17/00: (http://secretary.state.gov/www/travels/2000/fs_000417_kyrgyzstan.html) The United States Government Border Security Assistance Programs in Kyrgyzstan
02/00: (http://travel.state.gov/drug_warning.html) Travel Warning on Drugs Abroad
01/11/00: (http://www.state.gov/www/regions/wha/fs_000111_colombia.html) Colombia Assistance Package
1999-1998 Fact Sheets (http://www.state.gov/www/global/narcotics_law/press.html#narc_fact)
[end of document]

Magda Hassan
04-18-2009, 02:56 PM
It seems pretty clear that the US government is involved in this at some level. Names. Dates. Offices. Deparments. Is any one going to be named and made accountable for this arms traffic?

Tosh Plumlee
04-18-2009, 03:56 PM
Yes Magda. I assure you things are in the works. The new administration is very much interested in going for the sources of most of the past deeds or misconduct in relation to the abuse of power in the drug war and other matters.
It is a very complicated matter and the President and most of his administrative staff are in process of tracking down some of the persons and agencies responsible for these past miss deeds.

I can't speak for the President, but I do know, from other sources, which have confirmed to me, that directives have been assimilated to various agencies stating that, "... the old ways of doing business will no longer be tolerated. ..". I think this can be seen most recently in the responds of the Latin American people in reference to the Presidents trip to these countries this week; Venezuela and Cuba are good example of this. Regardless of ones political views right or wrong, there are now good people tracking some of these individuals and their past miss deeds and atrocities with the hope of bringing them to Justice..., public or secretly.

By its very nature, to discuss the "whens" and "whys" and the "right" or "wrongs", as well as the "WHO" brings the augrement into the political arena and pulls the problems away from their real objectives-- in my view.., something I try to stay away from. I tend to agree with some that its time to work for positive change in our policies and let 'Carma" and "others" of the "darkside" deal with the past misfits and "evil doers" which have isolated our country from carring the real banner of Justice for all, to all..

I do not support the policy of, "...kill um all.., and let God sort um' out', respond to our problems. I 'm a field operative and thats all I know and too, "its not my YOB Man...". I believe in what goes around will come around.., and those who play with the lives of others and used the sword will be in time brought to justice, although perhaps in ways we do not quite understand as yet.

Peter Lemkin
04-18-2009, 06:24 PM
[I]without raising an eyebrow or two[/B]. Nor can you readily buy them at Pawn Shops or Gun shows in the United States.

A real flair for the understatement!.......:bandit:

Well the MSM might not be reporting this, but your posts here must be raising a an eyebrow or two somewhere.

Tosh Plumlee
04-18-2009, 09:58 PM
Peter In my view there are not enough people on this forum to make a difference... the Forum is not promoted enough or known about in the areas that could make a difference. It seems to me that we have become a chat forum and a forum to entetain and be heard only between a select few.

If we really wanted our views heard then we should forward the information posted on this forum to the four conors of the earth... to our elected officials..., the media..., and to anyone else who might be in a position to get the truth of the matter out into the mainstream.

Magda Hassan
04-19-2009, 01:24 AM
Well, I forwarded it to the media organisation I mentioned to you Tosh and I was told by some one who knows some one working there 'the shit hit the fan' but I am unable to clarify what that means. They have all of your post as of a week or so ago. I'm still trying.

Tosh Plumlee
04-19-2009, 03:40 AM
Yes Magda You are one of the few who really puts forth the effort. We need more on this forum and in other places to take the time and get valid information to the media and we need to do it by sheer numbers armed with factual information which perhaps force them to cover the truth of these matters and not cater to the political whims of their upper management and senior editors looking for political handouts or favors.

You have forwarded some of the material which I have posted on this forum and in your words you were told…, “…all kinds of shit hit the fan”, or to something to that effect. Have you wondered why that was said instead of “… that’s all bullshit…” They know and the good journalist who really want to do their job in a professional manner are blocked by the powers that be, which are imbedded within their organizations and the most senior levels. If these dedicated people push too hard then they are pushed out the door or character assassinated and their careers destroyed

You asked me, after reading one of my post: “…who warned you Tosh?

I too was warned the other day by mail after I sent some of my findings on the border war down here in New Mexico to a Washington DC paper and a NY paper; Although the reply was not from either of these papers someone evidently read some of the material and took it upon their self to sent the letter from San Diego.

“… Mr. Plumlee, I think it would be best if you did not make references to “classified’ information in your material. This could cause you to have some concerns for legal matters and perhaps your safety or perhaps even the well being to your family…

Now I know how this game is played. If there was bodily harm meant for me by those powers that be, then I would never know it. It would just happen. It was the hope that I would run with it in a paranoid state and make myself look like a fool. I have made that mistake in the past.

That was the reason I put that little disclaimer on the bottom of the post to this forum. I too, can send messages and I know what is being monitored on these forums… in that respect I am perhaps using this forum for my own ends.

None the less, it is the information that I am trying to get into the mainstream…. Like;

“… You can’t get Anti- Aircraft weapons, or Stinger missiles, or grenade launchers across the Mexican border going south in the back of a pickup truck or the backseat of a Honda, without raising a few eyebrows at the border crossing.

If you remember I posted a report with pictures from the Mexican AP news media about an Anti-Aircraft machine gun with thousands of rounds of ammo, being found mounted on a pickup truck in Mexico. That was not all that was found at that location, but that was blocked by ATF and that other agency that we know so well. Some the material at that location was traced back to the United States military and was ship into Mexico legally some years ago by the Direct Commercial Sales (DCS) program.(Blue Lantern Report) And some of the weapons recently found were traced back to the Panama Contra days of 1986-89, some of those weapons were lost or damaged beyond repair and taken off the GAO books. These lost or missed place weapons eventually ended up in one of the Colombian Cartels hands and were passed along to the Mexican counterparts in time. However, we (we being the American people) were told they all came from a Pawn Shop here in the United States. The United States mainstream media has accepted this report and have moved on to other matters of lesser importance.

I also documented a weapons storage warehouse in Juarez with hundreds of boxes of new weapons, night vision goggles, electronic surveillance equipment, and hundreds of rounds of ammo as well as explosives. Narco News reported these findings along with background information or the source. The various locations of buried bodies which both the Mexican authorities as well as the American authorities know and knew about were also documented and pictures taken while riding with the Mexican Army. These are not allegations, but facts.., Facts that the American mainstream media does not want to know. And I claim it’s for political reasons… gun control? Perhaps… NFTA negotiations? Perhaps, to cover these stories would create bad relations with Mexico? Perhaps. But regardless how you cut the cake we are being lied to and kept in the dark as to what is really going on down Mexico way and its borders with the United States.

Now I know and you know they do not want to really know this stuff; because to know is to report… if its BS then report it as such… if not… then shit will hit the fan, again… and some heads will roll… in Mexico as well as in the United States…. pardon the Pun.

Tosh Plumlee

Peter Lemkin
04-19-2009, 06:10 AM
Tosh, while I appreciate and agree it is good to send to media outlets and congress, et al., there is a way a story can spread and 'get out' via the internet and both should be done. For example, posting this on many related websites [not Forums] will strart the ball rolling. I'd suggest a few, there are SO many others. You simply submit it to them. Wikileaks, Prisonplanet, Democracynow, The Expert Witness Show, Truth Alliance Network, Fairness and Accuracy In Reporting, and there are 100 others others here can suggest or send it to. What would be good would be to make up a 'packet' of all the best articles [yours or others] on this matter with a short paragraph stating what its all about and send to such sites and media outlets, or post as attachment here and we can do so. Ten tell 100; 100 tell 1000; 1000 tell anyone who will listen.....

David Guyatt
04-19-2009, 09:42 AM
Hi Tosh. I've been away for a few weeks (and am still away in fact but just droppping by) and so am not up to speed on things - but I will spend time reading when I return tomorrow evening or Tuesday. Take care.

Tosh Plumlee
04-19-2009, 03:59 PM
Thanks Peter for pointing out the instructions on "How To" ... now you do it.

.... thats my point. I have done most of the things you mentioned. In fact I will be on the Maira Heller program in CA, in May as well as another I can't recall at the moment for June. I have been on the Expert Witness show with Mike Levine many times and the OC Weekly as well as the San Diego Weekly..... One person beating his own drum asking for others to investigate, confirm, and report their findings to the organizations of which you mentioned as well as the main media outlets appears self promotion. Its the substance of the story, in my view, not the person that has to be given to these outlets you mentioned, and given to them by many different people in order for it to work. Otherwise I see it as "self serving" and then the focus becomes on the person and not the story... so you need to be a "doer" and not a "talker"..... sent the packet you mention to as many as you can.., with your return address on it and let the chips fall where they may.... get in the bloat and row with me... Thanks again Pete for your interest. Your friend Tosh

Tosh Plumlee
04-19-2009, 04:15 PM
Hey David... things are heating up down here in the borderland south of New Mexico and the mainstream public is being lied too as to the real facts of how Mexico's cartels and gangs are getting the guns to the gangs ..,and too, on what type of guns they are getting. Its a real circle jurk and the mainstream media does not want you not to know about all the details of how United States high grade military hardware is getting to these gangs and cartels... they want you to think they are all coming from Pawn Shops and Gun Shows in the United States.

Have a good read, I will be back in Mexico next week. They (The Mexican Army )is going to another ranch to dig up some more bodies that they think were buried there four years ago. I hope to get more pictures of the recovery... some of the bodies are rumored to be US citizens and the State Department has known about this location and the aledged Americans buried there for over three years. I see this mess as more politice being played on both sides of the border.... but our mainstream media and their powers that be will not allow you to know this for whatever reasons...

Tosh Plumlee
04-20-2009, 08:06 PM
Note: Last week I posted the picture of the Anti Aircraft 50cal gun with over a thousand rounds of ammo, and the AP Mexico article. These weapons more than just the Gun were found from information obtain from the Joint Mexican American Task Force (TF-7) operating inside Mexico. The American public is being lied to by ATF and other agencies. Its still the same old inter-agency turf wars of old... Who gets the credit for the find and the intelligence gathering.

This FORUM received this information last week with pictures, before the fact,..., from a Task Force Team operating inside Mexico.
This is not a rifle and did not come from a Gun show or a pawn shop.. whats goin on here? The ATF is misleading the public on this weapon that was found in the Cartels hands. Why?

Mexican arms race: bigger guns for drug cartels

http://d.yimg.com/a/p/ap/20090419/capt.a945c513a754428fa927a72d15360ff9.mexico_drug_ war_mxgb110.jpg?x=213&y=142&xc=1&yc=1&wc=410&hc=273&q=85&sig=IO91gU7KYQwwcVB7at2MZA-- (http://news.yahoo.com/nphotos/drug-cartel-federal-police-drug-traffickers/photo//090419/481/a945c513a754428fa927a72d15360ff9//s:/ap/20090420/ap_on_re_la_am_ca/lt_drug_war_cartel_firepower)AP – Police remove weapons that were seized from suspected drug traffickers after presenting the weapons and …



By ALEXANDRA OLSON, Associated Press Writer Alexandra Olson, Associated Press Writer – Mon Apr 20, 3:33 am ET

MEXICO CITY – An escalating arms race among Mexico's drug cartels casts doubt on whether Mexico or the U.S. can stop the flow of weaponry, despite renewed vows last week from presidents of both countries.

Stockpiles captured by Mexican soldiers show that warring traffickers are now obtaining military-grade weaponry such as grenades, launchers, machine guns, mortars and anti-tank rockets.


Some drug gangs have even sought explosive material that some experts worry could be used in car bombs and improvised explosive devices of the kind used in Iraq and Afghanistan. Soldiers found 14 sticks of TNT among an arsenal of hundreds of rifles and grenades seized in November from a house in Reynosa, across the border from McAllen, Texas.

But so far, attempts at using bombs have been unsuccessful as drug gangs haven't yet developed the skills to build effective ones, said Stephen Meiners, a Latin America analyst with Stratfor, a private U.S.-based group. Authorities suspect the Sinaloa cartel tried to kill a Mexico City police officer last year with a homemade bomb that killed only the attacker.

"Once you have a bomb maker that has mastered that skill, unless that bomb maker is caught, he can keep constructing those devices and send them out to be deployed," he said.

One of the most worrisome weapons yet was seized this week just south of Nogales, Ariz.: a powerful gun mounted on the back of an SUV and protected by a thick metal shield. Police said it belonged to one of the Beltran Leyva drug gangs.
Mexican and U.S. authorities disagree on just what type of gun it was. Federal police coordinator Gen. Rodolfo Cruz maintains it was .50-caliber anti-air craft machine gun. ATF, the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, said it was an unmodified .50-caliber semiautomatic rifle made by TNW, a U.S. firearms manufacturer.

( NOTE: Look at the picture of the Gun posted here last week. (below) You can clearly see that this is not a rifle or a 50 cal gun...It was said my the Mexican Intel that its ben modified to use larger caliber ammo... ..you do not get these type of guns from Gun Shows or Pawn Shops Take a hard look at the picture posted below, last week. from the
AP in Mexico.)


ATF investigators traced the gun — along with seven others seized at a house in Sonora state on Monday — to suppliers in the United States, said Bill Newell, special agent in charge of the ATF in Arizona and New Mexico.
While crudely built, the truck-mounted rifle would give traffickers a powerful advantage against lightly armed police, Newell said: A gunman could protect a whole convoy with sweeping fire while protected by the metal shield.

"Imagine being a two- or three-man police team at a rural checkpoint and these guys roll up with this thing," Newell said. "You'd be slightly intimidated, wouldn't you?"

President Barack Obama says he will crack down on the smuggling of weapons easily purchased lawfully in the United States and then taken to Mexico, which has strict gun-control laws.
But Mexico's drug gangs are clearly digging in for this war, which has already claimed more than 10,670 lives since Calderon deployed 45,000 troops to confront the cartels at the beginning of his presidency in December 2006.
Even as the governments try to choke off the U.S. weapons supply, the gangs are clearly trying to expand their arsenals beyond the assault rifles and semi-automatics they can get in the United States.
These and other, much heavier weapons are readily available on the global black market, particularly from stockpiles left over from Central America's civil wars.
Civilians are increasingly being targeted. In October, assailants hurled a grenade at the U.S. consulate in the northern city of Monterrey. In January, a TV network's offices in the same city were attacked.
The grenades used in both attacks were similar to one thrown into a nightclub in Pharr, Texas, in January, according to the ATF. That one didn't explode.
The agency suspects they came from a Monterrey warehouse where the Gulf cartel had been stockpiling weapons, including South Korean-made K75 fragmentation grenades.

The cartels are still far from obtaining enough arms and training to overpower Mexico's military, which is much better weapons coordination, Meiners said.
On Wednesday, only hours before Obama's visit, 15 gunmen were killed but only one soldier died when a convoy of armed men fought with troops patrolling a drug trafficking hotbed in remote, mountainous Guerrero state.
But local police are outgunned and have left the battle to the military — showing how hard it will be to achieve what Mexican President Felipe Calderon and Obama agreed will be success — a drug war which local police can handle without military help. "We only have 20 police, and we cannot risk entering in operations against the narcos," said Santiago Bustos, the second-in-command of the police in San Nicolas del Oro, where Wednesday's shootout happened...". (end)


(posted last week April 14,2009 Deep Politics Forum)

Mexican detained with anti-aircraft machine gun

(notice the bore of this weapon its bigger than a .50 cal as well as the ammo... some in Mexico Intel said it was modified to fit larger ammo)




http://d.yimg.com/a/p/ap/20090414/capt.fcfde362b5c0438c8679913530fb3a58.lt_mexico_gu ns_mxev107.jpg?x=213&y=320&xc=1&yc=1&wc=273&hc=410&q=85&sig=a1H.fEm7IHRm2IkFZAN6RQ-- (http://news.yahoo.com/nphotos/anti-air-craft-machine-gun-first-weapon-its-kind-seized-Mexico/photo//090414/481/fcfde362b5c0438c8679913530fb3a58//s:/ap/20090415/ap_on_re_la_am_ca/lt_drug_war_mexico;_ylt=AvVFIX4Y4rs0upjvU5uYfIq9Ix IF;_ylu=X3oDMTE5bDhjNG00BHBvcwMxBHNlYwN5bl9yX3RvcF 9waG90bwRzbGsDYW5hbnRpYWlyLWNy)AP – An anti air-craft machine gun, the first weapon of its kind seized in Mexico, is displayed to the media …
article Mexico AP April 14,2009

NEW INFORMATION AN UPDATE:
(04-20-09)

NEW UPDATE: (4-20-09)


This FORUM received this information and article last week with pictures, before the fact,..., from a Task Force Team operating inside Mexico.

This is not a rifle and did not come from a Gun show or a pawn shop..

Whats goin on here? The ATF is misleading the public on this weapon that was found in the Cartels hands. Why?

Mexican detained with anti-aircraft machine gun

(notice the bore of this weapon its bigger than a .50 cal as well as the ammo... some in Mexico Intel said it was modified to fit larger ammo)

note: ATF ID'ed this weapon as a "rifle"




http://d.yimg.com/a/p/ap/20090414/capt.fcfde362b5c0438c8679913530fb3a58.lt_mexico_gu ns_mxev107.jpg?x=213&y=320&xc=1&yc=1&wc=273&hc=410&q=85&sig=a1H.fEm7IHRm2IkFZAN6RQ-- (http://news.yahoo.com/nphotos/anti-air-craft-machine-gun-first-weapon-its-kind-seized-Mexico/photo//090414/481/fcfde362b5c0438c8679913530fb3a58//s:/ap/20090415/ap_on_re_la_am_ca/lt_drug_war_mexico;_ylt=AvVFIX4Y4rs0upjvU5uYfIq9Ix IF;_ylu=X3oDMTE5bDhjNG00BHBvcwMxBHNlYwN5bl9yX3RvcF 9waG90bwRzbGsDYW5hbnRpYWlyLWNy)AP – An anti air-craft machine gun, the first weapon of its kind seized in Mexico, is displayed to the media …
article Mexico AP April 14,2009


http://us.mg4.mail.yahoo.com/ya/download?mid=1%5f122846%5fAJYPw0MAAGurSe1TSQ0woGYl vRA&pid=2.2&fid=Sent&inline=1

Bill Newell, special agent in charge of the ATF in Arizona and New Mexico.
"...While crudely built, the truck-mounted rifle...".

Well to me this does not look like a 'rifle' This is a 50 cal fully automatic Deck Mount Browning fully automatic machine gun.

AND I do not think you can find one of these at a US Pawn Shop or a Gun Show.... and too, I think it would be very hard to sneak it across a border check point.

Why does the ATF,government agencies,as well as the media out right lie to us about these US Military weapons being found in the Cartels hands?

In fact there were three browning fully automatic machine guns found in this raid not to mention other high grade US Made military weapon and other equipment found that was not mentioned by ATF or the media....

(More to come on this very soon)

information obtained from a very sensitive source operating within a secret military Task Force operating inside Mexico.

Tosh Plumlee
04-21-2009, 05:21 AM
NEW UPDATE: (4-20-09)

Note: Last week I posted the picture of the Anti Aircraft 50cal gun with over a thousand rounds of ammo, and the AP Mexico article. These weapons more than just the Gun were found from information obtain from the Joint Mexican American Task Force (TF-7) operating inside Mexico. The American public is being lied to by ATF and other agencies. Its still the same old inter-agency turf wars of old... Who gets the credit for the find and the intelligence gathering.

This FORUM received this information and article last week with pictures, before the fact,..., from a Task Force Team operating inside Mexico.

This is not a rifle and did not come from a Gun show or a pawn shop..

Whats goin on here? The ATF is misleading the public on this weapon that was found in the Cartels hands. Why?

NEW Article:

Mexican arms race: bigger guns for drug cartels

http://d.yimg.com/a/p/ap/20090419/capt.a945c513a754428fa927a72d15360ff9.mexico_drug_ war_mxgb110.jpg?x=213&y=142&xc=1&yc=1&wc=410&hc=273&q=85&sig=IO91gU7KYQwwcVB7at2MZA-- (http://news.yahoo.com/nphotos/drug-cartel-federal-police-drug-traffickers/photo//090419/481/a945c513a754428fa927a72d15360ff9//s:/ap/20090420/ap_on_re_la_am_ca/lt_drug_war_cartel_firepower)AP – Police remove weapons that were seized from suspected drug traffickers after presenting the weapons and …



By ALEXANDRA OLSON, Associated Press Writer Alexandra Olson, Associated Press Writer – Mon Apr 20, 3:33 am ET

MEXICO CITY – An escalating arms race among Mexico's drug cartels casts doubt on whether Mexico or the U.S. can stop the flow of weaponry, despite renewed vows last week from presidents of both countries.

Stockpiles captured by Mexican soldiers show that warring traffickers are now obtaining military-grade weaponry such as grenades, launchers, machine guns, mortars and anti-tank rockets.


Some drug gangs have even sought explosive material that some experts worry could be used in car bombs and improvised explosive devices of the kind used in Iraq and Afghanistan. Soldiers found 14 sticks of TNT among an arsenal of hundreds of rifles and grenades seized in November from a house in Reynosa, across the border from McAllen, Texas.

But so far, attempts at using bombs have been unsuccessful as drug gangs haven't yet developed the skills to build effective ones, said Stephen Meiners, a Latin America analyst with Stratfor, a private U.S.-based group. Authorities suspect the Sinaloa cartel tried to kill a Mexico City police officer last year with a homemade bomb that killed only the attacker.

"Once you have a bomb maker that has mastered that skill, unless that bomb maker is caught, he can keep constructing those devices and send them out to be deployed," he said.

One of the most worrisome weapons yet was seized this week just south of Nogales, Ariz.: a powerful gun mounted on the back of an SUV and protected by a thick metal shield. Police said it belonged to one of the Beltran Leyva drug gangs.
Mexican and U.S. authorities disagree on just what type of gun it was. Federal police coordinator Gen. Rodolfo Cruz maintains it was .50-caliber anti-air craft machine gun. ATF, the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, said it was an unmodified .50-caliber semiautomatic rifle made by TNW, a U.S. firearms manufacturer.

( NOTE: Look at the picture of the Gun posted here last week. (below) You can clearly see that this is not a rifle or a 50 cal gun...It was said my the Mexican Intel that its ben modified to use larger caliber ammo... ..you do not get these type of guns from Gun Shows or Pawn Shops Take a hard look at the picture posted below, last week. from the
AP in Mexico.)


ATF investigators traced the gun — along with seven others seized at a house in Sonora state on Monday — to suppliers in the United States, said Bill Newell, special agent in charge of the ATF in Arizona and New Mexico.
While crudely built, the truck-mounted rifle would give traffickers a powerful advantage against lightly armed police, Newell said: A gunman could protect a whole convoy with sweeping fire while protected by the metal shield.

"Imagine being a two- or three-man police team at a rural checkpoint and these guys roll up with this thing," Newell said. "You'd be slightly intimidated, wouldn't you?"

President Barack Obama says he will crack down on the smuggling of weapons easily purchased lawfully in the United States and then taken to Mexico, which has strict gun-control laws.
But Mexico's drug gangs are clearly digging in for this war, which has already claimed more than 10,670 lives since Calderon deployed 45,000 troops to confront the cartels at the beginning of his presidency in December 2006.
Even as the governments try to choke off the U.S. weapons supply, the gangs are clearly trying to expand their arsenals beyond the assault rifles and semi-automatics they can get in the United States.
These and other, much heavier weapons are readily available on the global black market, particularly from stockpiles left over from Central America's civil wars.
Civilians are increasingly being targeted. In October, assailants hurled a grenade at the U.S. consulate in the northern city of Monterrey. In January, a TV network's offices in the same city were attacked.
The grenades used in both attacks were similar to one thrown into a nightclub in Pharr, Texas, in January, according to the ATF. That one didn't explode.
The agency suspects they came from a Monterrey warehouse where the Gulf cartel had been stockpiling weapons, including South Korean-made K75 fragmentation grenades.

The cartels are still far from obtaining enough arms and training to overpower Mexico's military, which is much better weapons coordination, Meiners said.
On Wednesday, only hours before Obama's visit, 15 gunmen were killed but only one soldier died when a convoy of armed men fought with troops patrolling a drug trafficking hotbed in remote, mountainous Guerrero state.
But local police are outgunned and have left the battle to the military — showing how hard it will be to achieve what Mexican President Felipe Calderon and Obama agreed will be success — a drug war which local police can handle without military help. "We only have 20 police, and we cannot risk entering in operations against the narcos," said Santiago Bustos, the second-in-command of the police in San Nicolas del Oro, where Wednesday's shootout happened...". (end)


(posted last week April 14,2009 Deep Politics Forum)

Mexican detained with anti-aircraft machine gun

(notice the bore of this weapon its bigger than a .50 cal as well as the ammo... some in Mexico Intel said it was modified to fit larger ammo)

note: ATF ID'ed this weapon as a "rifle"




http://d.yimg.com/a/p/ap/20090414/capt.fcfde362b5c0438c8679913530fb3a58.lt_mexico_gu ns_mxev107.jpg?x=213&y=320&xc=1&yc=1&wc=273&hc=410&q=85&sig=a1H.fEm7IHRm2IkFZAN6RQ-- (http://news.yahoo.com/nphotos/anti-air-craft-machine-gun-first-weapon-its-kind-seized-Mexico/photo//090414/481/fcfde362b5c0438c8679913530fb3a58//s:/ap/20090415/ap_on_re_la_am_ca/lt_drug_war_mexico;_ylt=AvVFIX4Y4rs0upjvU5uYfIq9Ix IF;_ylu=X3oDMTE5bDhjNG00BHBvcwMxBHNlYwN5bl9yX3RvcF 9waG90bwRzbGsDYW5hbnRpYWlyLWNy)AP – An anti air-craft machine gun, the first weapon of its kind seized in Mexico, is displayed to the media …
article Mexico AP April 14,2009


http://us.mg4.mail.yahoo.com/ya/download?mid=1%5f122846%5fAJYPw0MAAGurSe1TSQ0woGYl vRA&pid=2.2&fid=Sent&inline=1

Bill Newell, special agent in charge of the ATF in Arizona and New Mexico.
"...While crudely built, the truck-mounted rifle...".

Well to me this does not look like a 'rifle' This is a 50 cal fully automatic Deck Mount Browning fully automatic machine gun.

AND I do not think you can find one of these at a US Pawn Shop or a Gun Show.... and too, I think it would be very hard to sneak it across a border check point.

Why does the ATF,government agencies,as well as the media out right lie to us about these US Military weapons being found in the Cartels hands?

In fact there were three browning fully automatic machine guns found in this raid not to mention other high grade US Made military weapon and other equipment found that was not mentioned by ATF or the media....

(More to come on this very soon)

information obtained from a very sensitive source operating within a secret military Task Force operating inside Mexico.

David Guyatt
04-21-2009, 07:59 AM
My guess is that this weapon is a 20 mil - does that fit with what you've been told Tosh?

Tosh Plumlee
04-21-2009, 05:33 PM
Up Date Mexican Drug War:

“…. check out video of an attempt to free financial head of the Beltran Leyva drug smuggling ring , occurred outside Tepic airport, 30 gunmen attacked the convoy taking bad guys to jail. 8 police officers died.
the vehicle carrying the drug cartel members was able to escape…”.

http://videos.eluniversal.com.mx/n_videos/showVideo.php?id=12063 (http://videos.eluniversal.com.mx/n_videos/showVideo.php?id=12063)


These boys were attacked by very sophisticated weapons rumored to be US supplied to the Mexican Army via the United States Direct Commercial Sales (DCS) program. The weapons used in this attack were stolen from the Mexican Army’s arsenals by deserters of the army who helped start the “Zetas”, a gang associated with the Gulf Cartel and the Sinaloia…”. It seems Mexico has a real problem keeping control of the Guns we ship them to help fight the drug war. Over 30% of the weapons shiped gets to the Cartels... a story the American media does not want to cover. Why?


(picture 'A real Rambo with a real gun...However, the American media and ATF says its only a rifle if its found in Mexico..., so they say)

Tosh Plumlee
04-21-2009, 06:28 PM
My guess is that this weapon is a 20 mil - does that fit with what you've been told Tosh?

Yes David. I have been told it is a 20mm BUT also the 20mm is a rack load and not a belt fed machine gun... the 20mm has also been said by some to be a cannon... these (in the pic) were often used as "Deck Guns" and used for Anti-Aircraft on board ships. They were used in the Magon Delta of Nam on some of the Phaler boats I have been told.. (50 cal short barrel... 20mm rack and belt fed and 40mm but much larger. However, point being... its one hell of a gun and the cartel has a bunch of 'um' I have been told by very sensitive sources inside the Mexican Army Intel.

I do not think you can get one of these across the border in a pickup truck or buy one at a Pawn Shop or Gun show here in the US.. None-the -less... ATF and The Homeland Security are the 'Experts' on these maters. They know the difference between a rifle, a machine gun, or a cannon. We are in good hands... Perhaps I just need to let them do their job in protecting me.

Tosh Plumlee
04-21-2009, 06:46 PM
Hey David... does anybody really read this stuff other than a select few? I was just wondering.

David Guyatt
04-21-2009, 08:23 PM
Thanks Tosh. I once knew a guy who used to "play" with a 20mm in Afghanistan. Used to be connected to the so called "Buffalo guns" situation up there contracted by the French on behalf of you know who to teach the tribesmen to "reach out and touch" people and things.

They used to be Jeep mounted and were obtained from the black market I was told -- the old Hispano type that was the star of the RAF's WWII Spitfire fighter. I have also seen a picture of one stripped down and used as a shoulder weapon (honest to God!). I wouldn't like to be sitting behind that baby when you depressed the trigger.

Sure, lots of people read what you write, it's just that most don't have anything they can usefully add. Which is entirely understandable when you consider the subject matter, I think you'd agree.

But I really do appreciate it can feel lonely sometimes.

Been there. Done that. Journalistically speaking obviously. It's not always a bag of fun. Buy hey, if anyone said it was going to be easy we wouldn't have wanted to do it, right... :angel:

Tosh Plumlee
04-22-2009, 09:41 PM
WILLIAMSON COUNTY

( ref;Tyler Texas and Austin Texas reports; Juarez UC operations TF7 MX)


Taylor cocaine sting nets 12

DEA says it's been investigating 'wholesaler,' others for years.

By Miguel Liscano (mliscano@statesman.com)
AMERICAN-STATESMAN STAFF
Wednesday, April 22, 2009
Authorities say Benito Saucedo Hernandez was moving up to 20 pounds of cocaine a month through Taylor for at least two years.
He'd buy the narcotic along the Mexican border, transport it in vehicles to Williamson County and sell it to local distributors, authorities said. U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agent Greg Thrash said law enforcement officials had known of Hernandez's organization for several years, but Hernandez was skilled in surveillance and flew under the radar.
That is, until Monday, when authorities caught up with him.
"They all finally raise their head, and their head gets caught in the net," Thrash said.
By Monday, federal and local law enforcement authorities had arrested Hernandez and 11 others in Taylor and Elgin. Eight of them, including Hernandez, were arrested Monday when officials simultaneously executed four narcotics search warrants.
Officials also seized two guns, about a half a kilogram, or about a pound, of cocaine and approximately $20,000 during the searches, Thrash said.
The arrests came after more than two years of investigation into cocaine distribution in the Taylor area, Thrash said.
He said Hernandez was the leader and others arrested were either buying cocaine from him or helping him sell it.
"He was essentially a wholesaler," Thrash said. "The Benito Hernandez organization was quite significant. And it's extremely significant in a smaller town such as Taylor."
Thrash did not have a dollar estimate of how much money officials think Hernandez was making.
Hernandez and eight others were indicted in federal court April 7 on charges of conspiracy to distribute more than 5 kilograms of cocaine and possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute, according to court documents. The first charge is punishable by up to 10 years in federal prison; the second charge is punishable by up to 20 years. Officials did not release the names of those who are indicted but not in custody.
In addition to Hernandez, the following people face federal charges: Arturo Garcia, 34, of Taylor; Pauline Gamboa, 34, of Leander; Gabriel Anthony Ross, 28, of Taylor; Ivan Navaro Almazon, 25, of Elgin; Willson Chealiang Ng, 37, of Austin; Slade Leighton Brockman, 28, of Granger; and Higinio Almazan, 26, of Elgin.
Also, Carmene Dominguez, 42, and Javri Euan, 17, both of Taylor, and Mario Almazan of Elgin were charged with possession of cocaine, a second-degree felony punishable by up to 20 years in prison. Eduardo Garcia, 19, of Taylor was charged with possession of marijuana, a Class B misdemeanor, punishable by up to 180 days in jail.
Officials said more arrests are expected in the case.

(... more to come shortly from Mexico City and a Army Intel unit...)

...... did you guys catch this...? ... now be fair in your field reports... how did he know this? ... we're all on the same team. Right? ... did'nt mean to jump your release... are we having fun yet? :fisheye:

Tosh Plumlee
04-23-2009, 11:57 PM
HOME | Masnoticias La Red del Norte, Chihuahua,Chih, México, 23 de 04 del 2009
http://www.notired.com.mx/portal/cochis.jpg (http://www.congresochihuahua.gob.mx/)http://www.notired.com.mx/portal/chiwasgob.jpg (http://www.chihuahua.gob.mx/)Internacional Imprimir Mandar a un Amigo Comentar Lider del cartel de los "Arellano Felix" detenido.http://www.mnoticias.com.mx/fotos/Arellano%2023-04-09.jpg Isaac Manuel Godoy Castro, alias "Dany" o "Martín" presunto lider del cartel de los Arellano Felix. Un presunto operador del Cartel de Tijuana fue detenido junto con seis presuntos cómplices en la frontera mexicana con Estados Unidos.

Isaac Manuel Godoy Castro, alias "Dany" o "Martín", es señalado como el líder de una célula bajo las órdenes directas de uno de los nuevos líderes del Cartel de Tijuana, identificado como Fernando Sánchez Arellano, "El Ingeniero", informó en un comunicado la Secretaría de la Defensa Nacional (Sedena).

Godoy, presentado el jueves ante los medios junto con los seis presuntos integrantes de su célula, figura en la base de datos de la agencia antidrogas estadounidense DEA como uno de los nuevos rostros del Cartel de Tijuana, también conocido como de los hermanos Arellano Félix, señaló la Sedena.

"Dany" y sus seis cómplices fueron detenidos el martes en Tijuana, fronteriza con California y a unos 2.300 kilómetros al noroeste de la ciudad de México.

Las autoridades les decomisaron un arma larga, una corta, 900 kilos de marihuana y cuatro vehículos.

El Cartel de Tijuana, que ha sido señalado de haber sido dirigido por los hermanos Arellano Félix (siete hombres y cuatro mujeres), fue considerada hasta hace varios años de ser la organización más poderosa del narcotráfico.

La organización comenzó a debilitarse luego de la detención o muerte de algunos de los hermanos, aunque se mantiene en operación el cartel.

La Procuraduría General de la República ha identificado a "El Ingeniero" y a Teodoro García Simental, "El Teo", como dos de los nuevos líderes del cartel y por quienes ofrece una recompensa de 30 millones de pesos (unos dos millones de dólares).

La violencia del narcotráfico y el crimen organizado ha dejado más de 10.700 muertos desde que inició el gobierno del presidente Felipe Calderón en diciembre de 2006.

Fuente; nuevo herald (end(

__________________________________________________ _____________

Magda Hassan
04-24-2009, 03:36 AM
Oh, absolutely Tosh, hence the need for forums like this.

The trouble with the story is that there is no advertising revenue angle. A related product or service like Narcanon is a non-profit and can't afford to take out advertising on the MSM pages if they ever devoted an inch of column space to these stories. And its such a downer too. Much more interesting to have a story about Lindsay Lohan dating men again.

But please keep posting anyway and we will keep trying to get it to the mainstream.

Tosh Plumlee
04-24-2009, 03:38 AM
El Chapo Guzman: the National Action Party's Drug Baron



Posted by Kristin Bricker (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/kristin-bricker) - April 19, 2009 at 5:44 pm by Ricardo Ravelo, Proceso (http://www.proceso.com.mx/)
translated from the original Spanish (http://radioamlo.blogspot.com/2009/03/de-proceso-semanal-el-capo-del-panismo.html) by Kristin Bricker

Beyond simply revealing an approximation of El Chapo Guzman's fortune, his inclusion in Forbes' list of billionaires is a blow in the media that brings attention to the immense fortune that the Sinaloa cartel moves through its financial network in Mexico and in the United States. In order to dismantle this organization, the businesses that were listed in DEA and Treasury Department press releases would have to be thoroughly investigated, which is something the National Action Party (PAN) administrations of Vicente Fox and Felipe Calderon have not done. It is estimated that drug trafficking money is linked to about 78% of legal Mexican activities.

Untouched by the PAN-led federal government--the Vicente Fox administration in particular, during which he escaped from the Puente Grande maximum security prison in Jalisco--Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman Loera now leads the most powerful drug trafficking organization in the country, with large networks in South America, Central America, and the United States.

In an interview with Proceso in February 2005, then-president of the National Commission on Public Security, Jose Antonio Ortega Sanchez, referred to him as the "drug trafficker of the [Fox] administration." He said, "It is evident that [the drug baron] is being protected, because the PGR [Federal Attorney General's Office] always arrives late when it has information about where he can be found. It would seem that he is the drug trafficker protected by the authorities who are obliged to detain him." (Proceso 1476)

Now, Forbes Magazine's most recent report includes the Mexican drug baron in its list of billionaires. However, it's not the first time a drug trafficker has been included in the famed list. In 1989 the US publication included Colombian drug trafficker Pablo Escobar Gaviria.

Edgardo Buscaglia, a Columbia University professor of economics and law and an investigator for the Technological Institute of Mexico (ITAM), believes the Forbes report about El Chapo's fortune doesn't have a trustworthy methodology.

Buscaglia, who is also an adviser to the United Nations Institute for Training and Research, was asked, "In your opinion, what's the purpose of including a drug baron in the list of the world's richest men?"

"The Forbes publication is relevant as a blow in the media, but I think that the United States intelligence agencies are sending very clear signals to President Felipe Calderon that he should begin an investigation into the Sinaloa cartel and dismantle the network of fronts that are behind the capital that this criminal group moves. In the US they want the financial investigations to focus on both sides of the border."

The investigator explains that the United States' perception of Mexico is "grave and worrisome." Drug money is linked to 78% of legal Mexican activities. Moreover, "the Sinaloa cartel is not limited to Mexico. Rather, there are serious reports that it is present in 38 countries. That's why Mexico is seen as a dangerous exporter of violence and ingovernability."

He adds, "El Chapo Guzman can have millions of dollars or much more, but it is difficult to confirm it. A surprise isn't out of the question given the Forbes report's lack of solid data. But I insist that this is about a blow in the media. There are estimates of the amount of money the drug traffickers launder, but it hasn't been possible to prove how much earnings they really have."

"To calculate those values, we need an investigation into the financial and criminal map in these 38 countries' economic sectors, something which hasn't been done in a comprehensive manner," he says.

"So, the point of the Forbes publication was political pressure?"

"The message is clear: the Mexican government must destroy the entire protective network that securely manages the Sinaloa cartel's money--a network that could include politicians and businessmen; it must, for better or for worse, break those untouched financial networks, because if that doesn't happen, a brutal political blow could strike Calderon if the names of the businesses and the people linked to the Sinaloa cartel are made public outside of Mexico."

Buscaglia points out that the Forbes report lacks veracity because it only credits El Chapo Guzman with the alleged earnings from drug trafficking and not what he allegedly earns through the 25 criminal activities undertaken by drug cartels: human trafficking, piracy of intellectual property, the slave trade, extortion, and kidnapping, among others.

What he doesn't doubt is that in Mexico the Sinaloa cartel and El Chapo have enjoyed full impunity. They don't feel harassed or even bothered by the Mexican government's actions. That's why Guzman's financial network, as well as the impunity he enjoys, are the primary supports of his power and strength.

Buscaglia has studied organized crime's behavior in 84 countries, including Afghanistan, Kosovo, Colombia, and Guatemala. His claims are echoed in reality: since his escape from the Puente Grande, Jalisco, prison on January 19, 2001, Joaquin Guzman Loera has consolidated one of the most solid criminal enterprises in existence. The investigator calculates that its presence could span up to 50 countries.

The eight years of PAN regimes in Mexico--from December 2001 to December 2009--have been the most profitable for Guzman Loera from a criminal and financial point of view. The PGR and the Ministry of Public Security (SSP) consider him to be the most powerful drug baron in Mexico.

Rise to Power

As soon as he felt freedom on the afternoon of January 19, 2001, El Chapo Guzman sought refuge with the Beltran Leyva brothers--currently his bitter rivals--and received support from about emblematic figure in drug trafficking: Ismael "El Mayo" Zambada.

Months after his escape, Guzman Loera hatched on of his most ambitious plans to consolidate his narco-enterprise project, which hasn't been without betrayal and death. In order to achieve it, the drug baron had to break his old ties with the Juarez cartel and Vicente Carrillo Fuentes, the boss of the organization headquartered in Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua.

Said plan was put together in Monterrey, according to a letter signed by a Beltran Leyva deputy, which was annexed in the criminal investigation PGR/ SIEDO/ UEIDCS/ 013 /2005 and sent to the President in October 2004.

That document reveals that El Chapo Guzman convened his partners in a business meeting in Monterrey, Nuevo Leon. Ismael "El Mayo" Zambada Garcia, Juan Jose "El Azul" Esparragoza Moreno, and Arturo "El Barbas" Beltran Leyva attended the meeting.

In a key part, the letter says, "About three months ago, in the city of Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, a meeting occurred between various people with links to organized crime.... The reason for the meeting was to plan the murder of Rodolfo Carrillo Fuentes (murdered in September 2004), and once he was executed, to try to incriminate another opposing group, which would be Los Zetas, the objective of these actions being in part to end the Carrillo Fuentes family's hegemony over that cartel or organization..."

Guzman Loera's other plans consisted in wiping out Los Zetas and declaring war on the Tijuana cartel.

It all went according to plan: Rodolfo "the Golden Boy" Carrillo was executed, serious attacks began against Los Zetas, and according to intelligence sources, the information that El Chapo Guzman gave to federal authorities "turned out to be key" in detaining Benjamin Arellano Felix and "cutting off the head" of that era's most terrible criminal group.

From 2001 to present, El Chapo Guzman has not only consolidated the Sinaloa cartel, his organization, as the most prosperous in the country. He's also been impossible to arrest, despite the fact that Attorney General Eduardo Medina Mora and Secretary of Public Security Genaro Garcia Luna have said that they won't stop chasing the Sinaloa drug baron.

Despite said persecution, El Chapo Guzman takes public walks and, since the end of the Fox administration, there have been public references that he is accustomed to dine in fine restaurants in Jalisco, Sinaloa, Coahuila, and Chihuahua, where when he enters the building other diners' cell phones are confiscated to prevent them from calling the police.

For example, in mid-2006, security cameras in the city of Durango detected El Chapo Guzman when he was driving a four-wheeler. According to municipal authorities, the drug baron was wearing work-out clothing. On that occasion a persecution was begun, supposedly to detain him, but the narco was lost in traffic.

The images obtained from the cameras allowed the PGR to see the Sinaloa cartel boss' new face. It was confirmed that he underwent plastic surgery to change his appearance: his cheeks were trimmed, his skin was tighter, and the wrinkles around his eyes were gone.

Network Without Borders

Even though Mexican and US authorities have not been able to quantify Mexican cartels' true earnings, they have identified, beginning in 2000, part of the financial structure that serves drug trafficking interests through alleged money laundering operations.

Since 2000, for example, the US Treasury Department has issued various alerts about just over a thousand people who, according to its reports, are in Mexico and linked to drug trafficking.

The Treasury Department reports state that there are businesses such as Nueva Industria de Ganaderos de Culiacan S.A. de C.V., property of Ismael "El Mayo" Zambada--El Chapo Guzman's primary partner--that are currently promoted by the federal government and that during the Fox administration received support from the Ministry of Economy through the Small and Medium Enterprise Fund (Pymes in its Spanish abbreviation).

According to a report from the US Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), issued in August 2008, from 2000 to mid-2008, the US government registered 121 businesses "that have served as fronts for laundering drug trafficking money."

The Mexican government has repeatedly stated that those reports lack credibility, that there is no evidence that the businesses mentioned as part of the "money laundering machinery" are implicated in illicit activities.

According to the OFAC report, said companies are primarily dedicated to importation, exportation, consulting, currency trading, services, mining and transportation, as well the pharmaceutical, real estate, and food industries.

Information obtained from the PGR shows that, of the 121 businesses in the Treasury reports, 48 belong to the Tijuana cartel and 34 to the Arriola Marquez family (located in Chihuahua and a Juarez cartel partner), while 25 more are linked to El Mayo Zambada and his family.

While in Mexico the blows to Sinaloa cartel's financial structure haven't been convincing, since 2007 the United States has put the spotlight on Joaquin Guzman's main partner: Ismael Zambada Garcia.

That year, and as a result of a 20-month-long DEA investigation, the Treasury Department linked six businesses to Zambada's money laundering activities. They are: Establo Puerto Rico, S.A. de C.V.; Jamaro Constructores S.A. de C.V.; Multiservicios Jeviz, S.A. de C.V.; Estancia Infantil Niño Feliz S.C.; Rosario Niebla Cardosa, A. en. P.; as well as Nueva Industria Ganadera de Culiacan.

The Treasury Department also identified Mexican national Margarita "La Emperatriz" Cazares Salazar as one of the key Sinaloa cartel figures dedicated to money laundering. Later the PGR had to admit it.

The investigations in the United States into this criminal group and its boss, El Chapo, began to show results. They now include names of people who make up a complicated financial network that operates in both countries.

With his power and influence, Guzman Loera sidestepped control mechanisms through an intricate operations network in currency exchange houses and banking institutions that allowed him to acquire 13 planes to put them to work in his organization trafficking cocaine between Colombia, Venezuela, Central America, Mexico, and the United States.

After the Treasury Department confirmed said operations, in mid-2007 the PGR put together the investigation dossier PGR/ SIEDO /UEIORP /FAM /119 /2007, still active, in which it was revealed that the Sinaloa cartel bought the planes through the Puebla Currency Exchange House.

According to the investigation, that financial institution used the triangulation of operations in which over 70 businesses participate. In that way they were able to wire USD$12,951,785 to fourteen United States companies that are dedicated to acquiring and insuring aircraft.

According to the investigation, the architect of the triangulation scheme was Pedro Alfonso "El Piri" Alatorre Damy, also known as Pedro Barraza Urtusiastegui or Pedro Alatriste Davalos, who was imprisoned in 1998 for money laundering during Operation Milenio, which shed light on the cartel run by Armando and Luis Valencia. After obtaining his freedom, El Piri returned to his adventures and became involved in the Sinaloa cartel's financial operations.

The cost of drugs has varied according to its quality and, more importantly, transportation. If a shipment is dropped off close to the border, it has a higher cost than if it were unloaded in a different territory. But according to the book, "El Negocio: the Mexican Economy Trapped by Drug Trafficking by journalist Carlos Loret Mola (Grijalbo Publishing, 2001), a kilo of marijuana costs a thousand dollars on the wholesale market.

However, Loret estimates that "the value can reach up to US$2,500 amongst wholesale distributors--that is, those who purchase large quantities in order to later sell them at retail in the streets and neighborhoods in the United States."

"The market conditions for coca growers are similar: in South America a kilo of coca goes for USD$2,500 in rural areas, while amongst distributors it can be sold for up to $45,000.

"And heroine? A gram of the stuff, very low quality, can be bought on Mexican streets for about ten dollars. But if it crosses the border, it can cost up to $318.

Edgardo Buscaglia says that in order to discover how much the mafias of the world earn, it is necessary to have access to their financial maps. "In Mexico this investigation must be done. It is fundamental for dismantling the networks and to end the complicity that has allowed organized crime to rule."

Tosh Plumlee
04-27-2009, 08:33 PM
On the Bloody Border: Mexico's Drug Wars

By Tim Padgett / Juarez

Pedro Rojas is the sort of wealthy Mexican who's usually in control of his world. "I don't panic or scare easily," says Rojas, a business owner and rancher from the Mexican border city of Juárez. But last year narcos, or drug traffickers, moved into his upscale neighborhood--punks in cowboy attire and sparkling pickup trucks buying expensive homes. Rojas and his neighbors were awakened at night or horrified in broad daylight by assault-rifle fire and the screaming of tires as cars raced away after kidnappings. One afternoon, local children watched as a pickup rammed down the door of a house, sparking a gun battle that left four people dead in the street. Out at Rojas' ranch, the situation was worse. The drug gangs, whose trafficking route for marijuana, cocaine and heroin passes near a cluster of haciendas that includes Rojas', demanded protection money from the ranchers. When they balked, the gangs burned down the ranch houses, then abducted and executed one of Rojas' best friends.
Since then, the gangs have dumped the severed heads of other victims in front of suburban town halls. So Rojas (not his real name, which he asked to be changed for security reasons) took his family across the Rio Grande to live in an apartment in El Paso, Texas. "I feel fearful, impotent," he says. Worse, he adds, is the realization that the police in Juárez not only are incapable of stopping gangs but are "working with them. Our police institutions have been overrun by narcos. Changing that will take many years and some very big cojones." (See pictures from the streets of Juarez. (http://www.time.com/time/photogallery/0,29307,1892938,00.html))
It has taken many years for Mexico to finally make that admission, decades in which the country's powerful and violent drug cartels have been allowed to terrorize far too many neighborhoods in too many cities like Juárez. Summoning his army to fill in for unreliable cops, Mexican President Felipe Calderón has brought the fight to the gangs, but their furious backlash has left more than 7,000 Mexicans murdered since the start of last year — almost 2,000 in Juárez alone. Still, through the fog of the drug war, especially on the bloodied border, it has become clearer to see what needs to be done to rein in the drug-related crime that, as President Barack Obama said in a visit to Mexico this month, is "sowing chaos in our communities" — both American and Mexican. For starters, Juárez Mayor José Reyes Ferriz, who has received death threats from the gangs, is trying to purge the city's corrupt, 1,600-member police force and hopes to build a more professional department twice the size. "We have no choice left," he tells TIME.
Mexico's recognition that it has to reform its law-enforcement system coincides with a belated U.S. confession. An insatiable demand for drugs north of the border, the Obama Administration concedes, together with rampant smuggling of guns and laundered drug profits into Mexico, is just as responsible for the crisis. Obama is sending 500 new federal agents to the border this year to snare more weapons and money moving south, and last week he appointed a border-policy czar, former federal prosecutor Alan Bersin. The U.S. Administration also intends to put more emphasis on reducing demand by expanding programs like drug courts that mandate rehab.
Solutions on the Front Line
In El Paso, which is receiving a stream of Juárez exiles like Rojas, plenty would like to see an even broader shift in policy. The city council recently voted unanimously to ask Washington to consider legalizing marijuana, whose casual use is widely considered no more harmful than that of alcohol. The move would seriously crimp the drug cartels' cash flow, estimated at more than $25 billion a year. El Paso's mayor vetoed the resolution, but "the discussion is changing," says council member Beto O'Rourke, who insists the U.S. has for too long relied too heavily on military aid to producer and trafficker nations and on stiff sentences for drug possession at home. "If you live on the border, you see that the old drug-policy emperor has no clothes."
The border suffers the bulk of the drug war's carnage — and perhaps because of that, it's where some of the freshest ideas for fighting the war can be found. A tragic wisdom has emerged at this dusty junction of developed and developing worlds. On one side of the Rio Grande is Juárez, whose maquiladora assembly plants fuel dreams of modernity but which is now one of the hemisphere's most dangerous cities. On the other side is El Paso, which is one of the U.S.'s safest communities (16 murders last year, compared with Juárez's 1,600) but which nonetheless knows that its future is linked to that of Juárez. "Washington and Mexico City need to know the solutions to this crisis are here on the front line," says Lucinda Vargas, head of the community-development organization Plan Estratégico de Juárez.
Juárez civic leaders like Vargas have long called for the kind of Mexican police and judicial reform that both countries are only now starting to make a priority. Meanwhile, Americans like El Paso County sheriff Richard Wiles want the U.S. to renew the assault-weapons ban that George W. Bush and the U.S. Congress allowed to expire in 2004. If it doesn't, they fear, the few Black Hawk helicopters that Washington ships to Mexico's antidrug warriors won't make up for the thousands of AK-47 rifles and even rocket-propelled grenades pouring into the hands of the gangs. "It's a shame," says Wiles, "that it's taken so many killings in Juárez to make Washington consider that."
See pictures of Culiacan, the home of Mexico's drug-trafficking industry. (http://www.time.com/time/photogallery/0,29307,1827101,00.html)
See pictures of Mexico City's police fighting crime. (http://www.time.com/time/photogallery/0,29307,1811983,00.html)
El Paso itself has been relatively unscathed by the drug wars, in part because the cartels don't want to jeopardize their trafficking corridors on the border's U.S. side. Still, cartel-associated violence is beginning to reach into U.S. cities from the Sun Belt to the Pacific Northwest. Attorney General Eric Holder, who visited Mexico City in April with Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, has called Mexico's drug savagery a "national security threat."
A long-term antidrug strategy doesn't need the sort of hysteria that has had some in Washington comparing Mexico to failing states like Pakistan. "Obama needs to throw a bucket of cold water on that kind of rhetoric," says Tony Payan, a Mexico expert at the University of Texas at El Paso. "He needs a Mexico approach for the next 20 years, not 20 days." Mexico is making some progress. Juárez saw violence spike last year when at least three cartels started a pitched battle for its valuable trafficking turf. (Most of the drugs from Mexico enter the U.S. through Juárez.) Spin-off crimes like kidnapping and extortion mushroomed as well. But the city has been safer since Reyes agreed in March to let 5,000 army troops and 2,000 federal cops take over police duties for the time being. Just before Holder and Napolitano arrived in Mexico, federal agents captured an alleged top boss of the Juárez Cartel, Vicente Carrillo Leyva. Juárez's murder rate dropped from a horrific 10 per day in the final months of 2008 to just five in March. The gangs are lying low for now, and the city's 1.5 million people are venturing back out to the streets. Waiters at the ornate Kentucky Club are thrilled to see visitors walk in again for the bar's famous Rio Grande margaritas. (See pictures of the fence between the United States and Mexico. (http://www.time.com/time/photogallery/0,29307,1814377,00.html))
The level of violence is still shocking. Close to the Kentucky Club, heavily armed police escort an ambulance ferrying a gang member with bullet wounds to a hospital and sit guard in case his rivals try to come in and finish him off. "You watch what's happening, and you burst into tears," says Vargas. "Your spirit lives in the gutter." Severed heads are often left on roadsides and at police stations; the bodies they were once attached to are sometimes hung from bridges and overpasses. A mass grave holding nine corpses was recently discovered outside the city, and in November students found seven bullet-torn bodies outside their elementary school. The next month, the narcos even began extorting Christmas-bonus money from teachers, warning they'd kidnap pupils unless they were paid.
It is not only obvious gang members who have died in the mayhem. More than 50 Juárez cops were murdered in 2008; in February the police chief resigned after the gangs made good on a threat to murder an officer every 48 hours until he stepped down. Among those killed was the director of police operations, assassinated by more than 100 heavy-caliber bullets. The sad reality, however, is that too many of Juárez's police die not in the noble line of duty but because they moonlight for gangs. Last month federal cops arrested a Juárez police captain for allegedly detaining people on the cartels' hit lists and then delivering them to their executions. And the rot goes even higher: in 2008, Calderón's former federal antidrug czar was arrested and charged with allegedly taking $450,000 to feed intelligence to the Sinaloa Cartel. (He denies it.)
Hitting a Hornet's Nest
Mexico's drug plague is a product of both its authoritarian past and its new democratic present. When it ruled Mexico as an elective dictatorship, the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) accommodated but regulated the drug cartels. But after the PRI lost the presidency in 2000 and its quasi-control of the cartels broke down, those groups split into more vicious gangs like the Zetas, a band of former army commandos who now head the Gulf Cartel. Cities from Nuevo Laredo to Cancún were soon reeling from turf battles. The Juárez Cartel, once Mexico's most powerful, is better known today for its bloodthirsty enforcers, La Línea (The Line), believed responsible for a wave of murders of young women in Juárez since the 1990s.
When Calderón was sworn in as President in December 2006, the carnage had become too much to ignore. He began a military offensive against the gangs that now employs some 40,000 troops. Calderón's supporters insist the brutal counteroffensive by the gangs is a sign that they were rattled. Critics call the relentless violence proof that Calderón took a baseball bat to a hornet's nest but wasn't ready for the hornets — and point out that the Mexican army is not particularly well trained for the urban-guerrilla nature of drug wars. Either way, by last year Washington had become alarmed at Mexico's slaughter: Congress approved $400 million in aid for Mexico's drug war, the first installment of what is supposed to be a three-year, $1.5 billion package known as the Mérida Initiative.
See pictures of Mexico's drug wars. (http://www.time.com/time/photogallery/0,29307,1651420,00.html)
See pictures of Mexico City's police fighting crime. (http://www.time.com/time/photogallery/0,29307,1811983,00.html)
The Mérida plan provides hardware like helicopters and intelligence technology. But only a third of the cash is directed at the more important software of police reform. It is police officers, not soldiers, who staff the kind of investigative bodies that bring down organized crime. Says Payan: "This effort is doomed to fail if it's not accompanied by effective [Mexican] cops, and Washington isn't treating that as a large enough piece of the puzzle yet." Reyes agrees. "The U.S. needs to assure that police forces along the border are sufficiently robust," he says, "precisely so they'll be the first line of defense for the U.S."
American officials say privately they're waiting to see whether reform programs like that of Reyes are serious and whether other Mexican mayors and governors will finally join the effort. Juárez's mayor, who is shadowed by six assault-rifle-toting bodyguards, has ousted half his old police force through drug tests, polygraphs and other "confidence exams." Under his pact with Calderón, Reyes now has to recruit more than 2,000 new cops, who, he says, will be among Mexico's best paid and educated. (Aside from a starting annual salary of $9,000 — twice the usual pay for a local cop in Mexico — they'll receive subsidized housing and other perks.)
But changing a police culture can take years, and Calderón can't keep soldiers on Mexico's streets forever. Time rode with a nighttime patrol of federal military and an antigang unit called Lobos (Wolves) through some of Juárez's more dangerous barrios. Residents hailed the convoy as it sped through the canyon-like streets, but some had misgivings about the exercise. As the soldiers and police hauled suspected gang members into a patrol wagon, one woman noted that it wasn't exactly a display of due process. "I don't know if this is our answer either," she said as the patrol stopped outside her bodega. Human-rights complaints are on the rise, and the gangs have even bankrolled public protests against the military operations this year.
It's not just U.S. weapons that are moving south. Many of the thugs being picked up by the military are from the Barrio Azteca gang, which is based in El Paso but whose members are recruited to work for La Línea in Juárez. That makes it all the more urgent for U.S. law enforcement to sap Barrio Azteca's strength on the U.S. side. Six Azteca bosses were recently convicted in El Paso on federal racketeering charges. Sheriff Wiles, a Democrat, believes that this attention to localized border strategies is deepening under the Obama Administration and Napolitano, who was governor of Arizona, a border state. "Our input is more of a priority now," he says. Before unveiling its new border-security plan in March, the Administration held conference calls with local law chiefs like Wiles. Until this year, the El Paso region had only seven agents from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives to interdict weapons-smuggling. Under the Administration's new plan, it could have as many as 50.
Still, until Juárez's crisis finally lifts, there are plenty in El Paso who will demand more and "weigh in on national policy," as O'Rourke, the city-council member, puts it. Talk of legalizing marijuana is growing; the U.N. Commission on Narcotic Drugs in March heard prominent drug researchers argue that cannabis should be sold legally and taxed like tobacco. Ernesto Zedillo and César Gaviria, former Presidents of Mexico and Colombia, respectively, have said the same. And Mexico's Congress is again debating decriminalization of marijuana use, after backing off the issue a few years ago under intense pressure from the Bush Administration.
In the short term, of course, legalization of marijuana — let alone any other drug — is not going to happen. That explains why Juárez is such an interesting laboratory. More industrious than the border Gomorrah of Tijuana to the west but grittier than the pin-striped boardrooms of Monterrey to the east, the city has long been a Mexican forerunner: it was the site of the Mexican Revolution's first military victory, the nation's first maquiladoras and the first opposition mayor during the PRI's long rule. Can it now take a lead in the drug wars by pioneering police reform? "This is our opportunity," says Rojas, who is thinking of returning to Juárez soon. "I think we're taking the right road."
It will be a long one.

Tosh Plumlee
04-28-2009, 11:17 PM
Sammy....You might already have this... if so tell Danny to stay cool and stay down...this is overshadowed by the flu news.......I'll catch up to ya later... T

Attacks kill 7 Mexican police in Tijuana



http://d.yimg.com/a/p/ap/20090428/capt.af023a69e14b4b5298ed4ae270cf7ee7.mexico_drug_ war_mxga103.jpg?x=213&y=150&xc=1&yc=1&wc=410&hc=289&q=85&sig=6epxXoIl3E1IsH1.oQlWcQ-- (http://news.yahoo.com/nphotos/gunmen-opened-fire-police-officers/photo//090428/481/af023a69e14b4b5298ed4ae270cf7ee7//s:/ap/20090428/ap_on_re_la_am_ca/lt_drug_war_mexico)AP – Forensic workers carry the body of one of four police officers, who were killed when gunmen opened fire …





1 hr 9 mins ago
TIJUANA, Mexico – Seven police officers were assassinated in about an hour's time in what authorities said Tuesday was a coordinated effort that followed months of relative calm in a border city stricken by drug-fueled violence. Three officers were injured.
Municipal police detained three or four people after Monday night's attacks, said Jose Manuel Yepiz, spokesman for the Baja California state attorney general's office. He did not have additional details.
After four officers were killed by gunfire outside a convenience store, police scanners hummed with "narcocorridos," or drug ballads. One voice threatened over the airwaves that 30 officers would be killed.
One officer was shot dead in each of three attacks that followed, including one at a police station, Yepiz said.
The killings come as Mayor Jorge Ramos intensifies an effort to rid the police department of corrupt officers.
The city has fired 248 police officers accused of corruption since Ramos took office in December 2006 and about 130 others are suspended pending review for possible dismissal, said Julian Leyzaola, the city's public safety secretary. The city has 2,160 officers.
Leyzaola said in an interview last week that about 15 Tijuana police officers had been killed on the job during Ramos' administration.
Nine police officers were killed last year in neighboring Playas de Rosarito, a city of 130,000 people, including about 14,000 U.S. citizens, Mayor Hugo Torres said. Seven or eight were involved in drug trafficking, he said.
Monday's killings were one of the most brazen since a period of bloodshed that claimed more than 400 lives in the last three months of 2008. According to U.S. and Mexican authorities, Tijuana is a battleground for two drug traffickers — Fernando Sanchez Arellano, heir to the notorious but enfeebled Arellano Felix cartel, and Teodoro Garcia Simental, a renegade lieutenant who broke away in April 2008 in a shootout that killed 14 people.
Nationwide, Mexico's drug violence has claimed more than 10,700 lives since 2006, when President Felipe Calderon launched an anti-drug campaign. About 45,000 soldiers have been deployed to drug-plagued areas.

Magda Hassan
04-29-2009, 09:34 AM
Private-sector Arms Sales to Mexico Sparsely Monitored by State Department


Posted by Bill Conroy (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/bill-conroy) - April 5, 2009 at 11:45 am
Only Three Inquiries Targeting Firearms Exports Conducted Since 2007


The Department of State has weighed in officially on whether the sale of military weapons to Mexico through U.S. private-sector arms exporters might be a source of the high-caliber firearms now being employed by drug trafficking organizations in the bloody drug war south of the border.
The response is not very reassuring.
The U.S. State Department oversees a program that requires private companies in the United States to obtain an export license in order to sell defense hardware or services to foreign purchasers — which include both government units and private buyers in other countries. These arms deals are known as Direct Commercial Sales [DCS].
According to an analysis of the DCS reports, some $1 billion in defense hardware was approved for export to Mexico via private U.S. companies between fiscal year 2004 and fiscal year 2007 — the most recent year for which data was available.
U.S. officials in recent months have attributed the rising firepower of Mexican narco-syndicates — who now are in possession of military grade firearms and explosives — to smuggling rings being supplied through fraudulent purchases at gun shows, gun stores and from gun dealers inside the United States. But the magnitude of military hardware flowing into Mexico legally through the DCS program, coupled with the well-documented, extensive corruption within the Mexican military and law enforcement agencies, has prompted concerns that the DCS program itself may well be a major source of the U.S. military munitions now in the possession of narco-trafficking groups.
[See prior Narco News story, “ (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/bill-conroy/2009/03/legal-us-arms-exports-may-be-source-narco-syndicates-rising-firepower)Legal U.S. arms exports may be source of narco-syndicates rising firepower” (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/bill-conroy/2009/03/legal-us-arms-exports-may-be-source-narco-syndicates-rising-firepower) for more details.]http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/090304_ricks_res.jpg
Narco News recently presented the following questions to the State Department concerning the DCS program:
1. Given that the DCS program is subject to criminal manipulation [as evidenced by the Blue Lantern report] and given that there is a well-documented history of narco-corruption within Mexican law enforcement and the military, is the Department of State concerned that a major source of the weapons now being used in the escalating bloodshed in Mexico's drug war may in fact be the DCS program itself?
2. If so, are there any actions being taken by the Department of State to address that situation?
3. If it is not a concern, why not?
4. Finally, given the documented evidence of corruption within Mexican law enforcement and the military, is it fair to say that DCS weapons exports represent a far bigger and far more easily accessible source of arms for Mexican criminal organizations than do weapons obtained from private citizens in the U.S.?
[The State Department’s Blue Lantern (http://www.globaltradeexpertise.com/news_files/5ea3f261bf6b2660d61a1ad203d48a1e-221.php) program is designed to provide end-use monitoring for DCS exports. The fiscal year 2007 Blue Lantern report, the latest available publicly, reveals that a total of only 705 end-use checks were initiated on approved DCS exports worldwide while some 81,000 “license applications and other export requests” were acted on by the State Department during that year.]

Official Deflection
In response to the Narco News query, Jason Greer, public affairs officer for the Bureau of Political-Military Affairs at the Department of State, provided a long, jargon-laden response via e-mail. That response failed to answer directly the questions submitted by Narco News, though it did contain two revelations of note. [To view the State Department’s entire response, go to this link (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/StateDeptResponse.PDF).]
First, Greer confirmed that the State Department since January 2007 initiated only three Blue Lantern end-use inquiries involving the export of firearms to Mexico. Greer adds that one of those cases came back with a favorable finding, one unfavorable and one case is still pending.
That means over the course of 2007, 2008 and the first three months of 2009, the State Department program set up to monitor potential DCS fraud only examined three export deals. In fiscal year 2007 alone, according to the DCS report released by the State Department, a total of some $240 million in military hardware was approved for export to Mexico — and that doesn’t even include the additional hundreds of millions of dollars in exports likely approved since then.
In the case of the one “unfavorable” finding, Greer explains that a U.S. firearms exporter had “submitted eight separate license requests based on a single purchase order.”
Greer continues:
The value of that order and the collective value of the license requests exceeded $1 million and therefore met the requirements for Congressional notification. … All eight license requests were returned without action requiring the applicant to submit one export license request for the total value of the transaction ….
And the end result of that misstep for the exporter, according to Greer, is that the export of the weapons “was subsequently approved following Congressional notification.”
With that strong defense of the State Department monitoring of the DCS program, Greer declares without ambiguity:
None of the Blue Lantern inquiries concluded during this time indicate the diversion of U.S. Munitions List items to illicit or unauthorized end-users in Mexico.
Do you feel assured?
If not, then this part of Greer’s response will do little to relieve your agitation:
In addition, all firearms licenses approved by [the State Department] for commercial resale in Mexico are exported to the Ministry of Defense (MOD), Mexico. The MOD is the import authority for firearms and is also responsible for licensing of Mexican firearms dealers. Upon receipt of the firearms, the MOD transfers the firearms to the end-user authorized on the [State Department-issued] export license.
The Mexican Ministry of Defense (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SEDENA), of course, oversees the Mexican military. In fact, a reading of Mexico’s firearms law (http://www.davekopel.org/Espanol/mexican-firearms-statutes.htm) reveals that the Defense Ministry has a monopoly on approving and overseeing all licenses, sales, transport and storage of arms and munitions in Mexico, whether for private-sector players or other government units — including municipal, state and federal law enforcement units.
So, if you are a smart narco-trafficker, and they are smart, it might pay to spread some money and influence around Mexico’s Ministry of Defense to assure the necessary diversion of firearms to your cause.
One former DEA agent describes the situation this way:
The Mexican military has always been a problem. If all those weapons are going through the Mexican Defense Ministry, then there’s your answer right there [as to where the narco-syndicates are obtaining their high-caliber weapons]. … What do you think happens if anyone complains to the Mexican military that they did not get all the weapons they ordered?

The Evidence
It’s worth noting that the Mexican military, like law enforcement agencies in Mexico, has a long history of being tarred with charges of official corruption. Following is a sample of that troubling track record.
• Sensitive documentation provided by law enforcement to this committee states:
"[William Robert “Tosh”] Plumlee was a former deep-cover military and CIA asset from 1956 to 1987 with a long history of CIA activities in Central America, Cuba, and Mexico."
… Mr. Plumlee confirmed to this Committee the existence of Operation Whale Watch and Operation Watchtower, drug smuggling operations involving the CIA, U.S. military, with knowledge of the National Security Council. He mentioned drug flights from Central America to the United States for the CIA, with stops at places he marked on maps that he provided to (http://toshplumlee.info/pdf/sengaryhart.PDF)[/URL][URL="http://toshplumlee.info/pdf/sengaryhart.PDF"]Senator Gary Hart (http://toshplumlee.info/pdf/sengaryhart.PDF) and Staff.
Plumlee testified under oath that there was close cooperation between Mexican and U.S. government personnel in drug smuggling (there is other evidence in later testimony from XXXXXX. which confirms sections of Plumlee's testimony. This defies comprehension. Plumlee described his undercover activities to this Committee, including the practice of the Mexican police and its military protecting drug traffickers, something that will be described in considerably more detail in later testimony. — Transcribed summation of tape of 1991 Congressional testimony of former CIA contract pilot William Robert “Tosh” Plumlee
[A link to full testimony, which was classified sensitive by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, can be found here (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/Plumlee.Testimony.PDF).]
• While a great deal of the corruption plagues the law enforcement agencies in Mexico, the Mexican military and other institutions are also vulnerable to the corrupting influences of the narcotics trade. — 1997 Congressional testimony of Thomas A. Constantine, DEA administrator (http://www.fas.org/irp/congress/1997_hr/s970312c.htm)
• … Despite increased intelligence efforts targeting the command and control and identifying the leaders of the Carrillo-Fuentes organization, key lieutenants have not been apprehended in Mexico. For example, Eduardo Gonzalez-Quirarte has been identified as a key manager for the Carrillo-Fuentes organization along the border. He is responsible for arranging shipments of cocaine across the border and ensuring that money is transferred back into Mexico. He has links to corrupt elements of the Mexican military and the law enforcement community, which makes him a significant leader in future Carrillo-Fuentes operations. — 1998 Congressional testimony of Donnie Marshall, DEA Chief of Operations (http://www.usdoj.gov/dea/pubs/cngrtest/ct980318.htm)
• According to an extensive classified report by the Drug Enforcement Administration and other intelligence assessments, the arrest last year of the former official, [Mexican] Gen. Jesus Gutierrez Rebollo, followed secret meetings between Mexican Army officers and the country's biggest drug mafia, officials say.
Exactly what transpired remains unclear. But the officials say there is growing evidence that military officers discussed a deal to let the drug gang operate in exchange for huge bribes, and that some such arrangement may have been in place before the gang's leader, Amado Carrillo Fuentes, died after extensive plastic surgery last year. — March 1998 story in the New York Times (http://www.nytimes.com/1998/03/26/world/us-officials-say-mexican-military-aids-drug-traffic.html)
• The Mexican military also has experienced narco-related corruption within its ranks. — February 2000 Congressional testimony of William Ledwith, DEA chief of international (http://www.fas.org/irp/congress/2000_hr/ct022900.htm) (http://www.fas.org/irp/congress/2000_hr/ct022900.htm)operations (http://www.fas.org/irp/congress/2000_hr/ct022900.htm)
• The investigation ultimately revealed the involvement of corrupt Mexican law enforcement elements, military and public officials, in the execution of [DEA special agent Enrique “Kiki”] Camarena's (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enrique_Camarena) murder. — May 2000 Congressional testimony of William Ledwith, DEA chief of international operations (http://www.usdoj.gov/dea/pubs/cngrtest/ct051600_01.htm)
• In interviews, four senior U.S. officials, a senior Mexican intelligence official and three independent analysts all expressed concern about the expanding role of the Mexican military in the drug war. … ?"Corruption is more serious in the Mexican military than just about any other Latin American military," said a U.S. official, speaking on condition of anonymity. "The reason is not that the Mexicans are any more venal; it's that we're talking about huge amounts of money because drugs flow into Mexico and that makes them more vulnerable." — December 2005 story in the Dallas Morning News (https://lists.tni.org/pipermail/dd-la/2006-January/006056.html)
• The Mexican army has experienced thousands of desertions in the last few years. According to an investigation of the newspaper Reforma (http://www.reforma.com/), between 2001 and 2006, the army has lost an average of 30,000 members per year. Although the rate of desertion has decreased to 17,000 in 2007, this is still a very significant number; especially considering where these soldiers go after leaving the armed forces. — May 2008 blog entry on the Foreign Policy Association Web site (http://mexico.foreignpolicyblogs.com/2008/05/14/the-other-war-of-the-mexican-armed-forces/)
• A list of over 20 military agents allegedly for hire was found in one of the Beltrán Leyva brothers' safe houses in Culiacán, Sinaloa.?The information that was in a house belonging to Alfredo "El Mochomo" Beltrán Leyva, detained this past January 21, reveals that the Sinaloa [narco-trafficking] clan had in its possession files from the Assistant Attorney General's Office for Specialized Investigation of Organized Crime (SIEDO in its Spanish initials) and from the Sinaloa Attorney General's office about investigations that were in process. — October 2008 story published by Narco News (a translation of a story published by the Mexican newspaper Reforma) (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/kristin-bricker/2008/10/narcos-infiltrate-mexican-military)

More Food for Thought
Despite the widely published mainstream media meme that 90 percent of the weapons being used by Mexican narco-criminals “ (http://www.reuters.com/article/politicsNews/idUSTRE52M7S720090323)are traced back to U.S. gun dealers,” (http://www.reuters.com/article/politicsNews/idUSTRE52M7S720090323) it seems there is another part of that narrative that is not being communicated — likely because it undermines the meme itself.
Last week, Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, held a hearing in the field — in El Paso, Texas, located along the U.S. border with Mexico. In his opening statement (http://www.boston.com/news/politics/politicalintelligence/2009/03/kerry_in_solida.html) for that hearing, Kerry conceded the following:
Only about one out of every four weapons seized by Mexican authorities last year was submitted to the ATF so they could be traced back to purchasers and sellers in the United States. The Mexican government should provide the ATF with fuller access to these weapons.
So our own State Department concedes that the military weapons being shipped to Mexico are filtered through the Mexican military and ample public record indicates that this military has a history of corruption, yet the State Department since 2007 has only conducted end-use monitoring investigations on a paltry three arms-export transactions approved for Mexico through the DCS program — which in fiscal 2007 alone was responsible for shipping more than a quarter billion dollars worth of military hardware to Mexico. Still, we are asked to accept the State Department’s assurance that all is well with the program and there is no record of arms being diverted from the Mexican military to drug trafficking organizations.
And now a U.S. Senator concedes that three-quarters of the weapons seized by Mexican authorities are never sent to the U.S. for tracing. So where do those weapons come from, and why is the Mexican government failing to “provide the ATF with fuller access to these weapons” as Kerry is encouraging?
On top of these puzzling dilemmas, we now discover from a recent report by the Washington Post that former military commanders are taking over local Mexican police commands and supplying them “with automatic weapons and grenades.”
From the Washington Post (http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2009/04/02/20090402mexico-army0402-ON.html) story:
The government is attempting to vet and retrain 450,000 officers, most at the state and municipal levels, employing lie detectors, drug tests, psychological profiling and financial reviews to weed out corruption and incompetence. Nearly half of the 56,000 officers vetted so far have failed.
The government is also forging agreements with each of Mexico's 31 states and its federal district, Mexico City, for the military to deliver automatic rifles, high-caliber ammunition, grenade launchers and fragmentation grenades to state and municipal officers who obtain federally mandated security clearances.
Are we to believe, in this drug war, that lie detector machines, psychological profiling and sparse Blue Lantern reviews are any match for the devil’s bargain that marks the narco-trafficking trade: "Plata o Plomo" — take the money or you’ll be plugged with lead?http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/180px-Sandra%C3%81vilaBeltr%C3%A1n.jpg
Sandra Avila Beltran (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandra_%C3%81vila_Beltr%C3%A1n), born to a family of drug smugglers and married twice to former Mexican police commanders turned traffickers who have both since been assassinated, is now herself sitting in prison facing narco-trafficking charges in Mexico.
In a recent interview with CBS’s 60 Minutes (http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=4836946n), Beltran makes it clear, in her mind, that it is the narco-syndicates — empowered by the billions of dollars that flow from prohibited drug sales north of the Mexican border — that have the inside track in this war:
Large shipments of drugs can come into the Mexican ports or airports…. It’s obvious and logical. The government has to be involved in everything that is corrupt. … You’d have to wipe out the government to wipe out drug trafficking.
Stay tuned….

Tosh Plumlee
05-01-2009, 08:29 PM
<H1 class=articleTitle>Again for my protection and that of the Task Force working with the Mexican Army near Polamos Mexico and Columbus NM.

__________________________________________________ __
</H1>T7odj 263MT: 1300

__________________________________________________ ______
May 1st 2009 (draft for release to AP)

Drug smugglers from Mexico move to this side of the border as they flee the Mexican army






COLUMBUS, N.M. -- This dusty little border town with almost no visible means of support has been seeing something of a boom in the past year: Brand-new Lincoln Navigators and Cadillac Escalades with flashy hubcaps are parked just off the bleak main drag. Homes are selling quickly, sometimes for cash.
The source of this sudden wealth? An influx of Mexican drug smugglers, investigators say.
The smugglers are fleeing the Mexican army's occupation of the town of Palomas, on the other side of the U.S.-Mexico border fence, and settling in Columbus, where there has been a law enforcement vacuum. The four-man police force in Columbus has turned over seven times in three years because of scandal or apathy.
"We know the names of the people," said Luna County Sheriff Raymond Cobos, who is based in Deming, 35 miles away. "I know that if I were a person involved in criminal activity, whether it's drug-related, human smuggling related, I certainly would welcome the absence of police."
So far, Columbus has been spared any violence, even though the sheriff's investigators estimate 10 percent of the population of 2,000 may be involved in illegal activity.
"I would say greater," said resident Robert Odom. "If a person wanted to, they could make a good living in Columbus -- not legally, but they can make a lot of money if they are willing to risk going to jail." Ranches and farms in the area are the largest legitimate employers, along with the few shops and cafes in
town. Officially, the median income is less than $15,000 a year, a sum that is hard to reconcile with the sudden prosperity around town.
"There's a lot of people who don't work but have a lot of possessions," Odom said, adding that he often spots local teens driving fancy new cars. "They have hubcaps that cost more than my truck."
Real estate agent Martha Skinner, a former Columbus mayor, said she had her best year in 2008, selling about $500,000 in property in town, some to locals, some to Mexican buyers. The median home value in Columbus is about $52,000.
She said she had a few cash transactions where she couldn't help thinking, "Well, where did they get this money?"
Some residents and local officials say that without the illegal cash, the town might not survive.
Last month, Columbus got a new police chief, Angelo Vega, who said any illegal activity will be met with jail time. "This is a new day for Columbus," he declared.
In Palomas, the Mexican army took over law enforcement a year ago after the local police force was driven out by the drug dealers.
The Columbus police department has been in disarray too, plagued with unqualified officers and allegations of wrongdoing. One chief was arrested on gun theft charges that were later dropped, and two others were never certified police officers.
Working from a temporary trailer with wood paneling and cracked linoleum floors, Vega may be fighting an uphill battle. Around Columbus, some townspeople don't see a problem.
"Criminals don't live here," said Maria Gutierrez, the 48-year-old owner of the Pancho Villa Cafe, where menus include a wanted poster for the Mexican outlaw whose 1916 raid on the United States took place on this patch of desert. "The problem is in Palomas. It's serene here. It's tranquil here."
It is not clear whether the smugglers are legal or illegal immigrants, but local law enforcement authorities say that's not their business, it's the federal government's. And townspeople don't seem to care either way.
Odom said he suspects that the crime plaguing much of Mexico -- more than 10,700 people have been killed since Mexico's president cracked down on the drug trade after taking office in 2006 -- hasn't crossed into Columbus because the smugglers living here don't want to draw any heat from U.S.. authorities.
But the sheriff said things could erupt at any time.
"To me it's kind of like living in proximity to a refinery," Cobos said. "If you have gasoline fumes that you can't properly vent, or control, and you have them in a confined space, all you need is a spark."

Dawn Meredith
05-02-2009, 03:27 PM
Tosh: Do you think this swine flu scare is connected to the other problems in Mexico? A diversion? A way to slow down operations with drug buz there? Or just a cover story for something else that is occurring?

Dawn

Tosh Plumlee
05-02-2009, 06:20 PM
I think its a little of both.., and I am not the only one who thinks that. Before this flu scare the crew operating inside Mexico was already having trouble getting their undercover findings out to proper personal who were, as they say, "The Gatekeepers-of the old Administration".

(I posted same on this information on this forum some weeks ago, because I knew some, in sensitive places, were monitoring this feed)

Relations with Mexico over this "Border War" and the escalations thereof, coupled with the drug policies of old, has caused a difference of opinions within the two party system of the United States, as well as between various factions within Mexico.... The Drug Cartes have embedded themselves so deep within the political atmosphere of Mexico that they can manipulate policy as well as Mexico's reality. These cartels have gained control of a majority of the media outlets as well as the party system of Mexico and to some degree infiltrated our political structure as well as our financial institutions.

We have some politicians in this country who do not want in depth investigations into the Cartels of Mexico, or the cut-out companies used in these illegal operations.., or the personal used in those various operations.. Our secret newly formed joint Task Force working a delicate matter with the Mexican Army, has uncovered direct associations with some officials on this side of the border as well as inside Mexico. This specialized unit was in process of bringing this sensitive intelligence information which they in cooperation with Mexico had obtained from their joint operations to an independent United States investigative committee, which was recently formed by the Obama Administration. Suddenly Mexico was faced with a flu epidemic, which has according to major press reports threatens the world. I do not doubt that there is a flu epidemic on the way... I question how it became one.

The mainstream Media refuses to cover the root cause of the real drug war in depth. However, they jumped all over this creeping epidemic overnight. The killings in Juarez were forgotten. The killings at major border crossings were on fire and escalating at a rapid rate. United States military hardware was being found in the Drug Cartels hands and being used to kill personal in the Mexican Army, as well as law enforcement on both sides of the border, not to mention the good elected politicians of Mexico who were trying to weed out corruption..

You asked me what I think. Well I think its a little of both. Who started this epidemic and why? Is it real? It very well could be . My question? Was it started on purpose to stop ongoing investigations which were forcing to the surface corrupt politicians on both sides of the border?

Sometimes we forget that there is a Shadow Government working throughout the world and it is a real epidemic. .., one which has been spreading for many years. In the weeks and months to come it will remain in the shadows while people worldwide die. Did the anonymous THEY start this epidemic? Who the hell really knows

Tosh Plumlee
05-03-2009, 01:37 AM
Two French students, working on the real origins of bird flu, tortured, killed in London


By George Kadar – American Free Press August 2008

Two French biochemical students, Laurent Bonomo and Gabriel Ferez, were murdered by Israeli Mossad-British intelligence assassination teams on June 29, 2008. Both Bonomo and Ferez were studying at the prestigious London Imperial College researching the origins of bird flu and the link to the alleged vaccines.

The murders were first revealed by France’s Directorate for Internal Security, not by Britain’s Scotland Yard, making it likely that the students were French intelligence officers. London police arrested Daniel Sonnex, 23, and Nigel Edward Farmer in the killings.

A joint French-U.S. Intelligence anti-terrorist task force in Paris, headed by former Secretary of State Colin Powell and former head of French intelligence Jean Crout?, for years has monitored the activity of the Israeli mercenaries. The patriotic American-French team has allegedly prevented various scripted terrorist attacks, i.e. false flags, on both the United States and Europe, with the planning of the attacks actually originating inside the compromised intelligence agencies of the United States, the United Kingdom, Israel and Germany, according to task force sources.

The two researchers had discovered that the alleged bird flu vaccine, H-7, which was designed to neutralize and stop the H5N1 avian flu virus, had been spliced using DNA to actually create a vaccine and an illness producing virus at the same time. The French students had also discovered that the bird flu vaccine, i.e. a virus, had links to U.S., British and Israeli laboratories associated with the noted Mossad agent, Dr. Philip M. Zackerie.

Israeli microbiologist Zackerie, known as “Dr. Zack,” worked for the U.S. bio-weapons lab at Ft. Detrick, Md., where he was photographed handling the strain of anthrax used in the post 9-11 attack according to published reports. He was a consultant at the FBI linked company Gilead Sciences Inc. of Boulder, Colo. Gilead Sciences has been linked to the 9-11 anthrax strain and to the bird flu vaccine.

The two French students, who had their apartment broken into one week before their brutal assassination, also had their lap-top computer stolen and their apartment fire-bombed.

The operation has been traced to a team of 10 Israeli Mossad and British MI5 agents. The two individuals currently under arrest in the United Kingdom were witnesses to the murders, according to task force sources,
and their lives are in jeopardy.

The assassination of Bonomo and Ferez happened just after the recent meetings that took place in Northern Ireland between President George Bush, former President Bill Clinton and current British Prime Minister Gordon Brown.

The two murders also may be related to the recent alleged assassination attempt on French President Nicolas Sarkozy and Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert in Ben Gurion International Airport in Israel.

Officially, an Israeli border patrol officer who was a member of the Druze community shot himself as Sarkozy and his wife were mounting the stairs to their plane. The man’s body then fell from the top of the building where he had been perched. Many believe he was an Arab patsy-to-be before the assassination attempt went awry.

Sarkozy was also aware of the bird flu treason and plans to use it against France as well as the Israeli Mossad hacking of French INTERPOL Internet portals using the U.S. National Security Agency and a headquarters in Amsterdam.


George Kadar is a Hungarian national living in England. He acts as one of AFP’s European bureau chiefs.

Re-produced Courtesy of American Free Press - 645 Pennsylvania Avenue SE, Suite 100 Washington, D.C. 20003
www.americanfreepress.net/html/bio-chemists_murdered_149.html (http://www.americanfreepress.net/html/bio-chemists_murdered_149.html)

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Last updated 02/05/2009

Tosh Plumlee
05-03-2009, 01:47 AM
Pandemic Alert: Deadly Swine Flu about to Explode? (http://www.healthfreedomusa.org/index.php?p=2515)

Natural Solutions Foundation
www.GlobalHealthFreedom.org
[ April 24, 2009 - Please share this Alert! http://www.healthfreedomusa.org/?p=2515 ]
We have continually raised the warning about the potential for a “weaponized” or “engineered” pandemic as an excuse to force people to receive a weaponized vaccination. See for example the following postings on this blog:
07/19/08 - Weaponized Avian Flu Intelligence Report - http://www.healthfreedomusa.org/?p=742 (http://www.healthfreedomusa.org/?p=742)
09/15/08 - Smoke and Mirrors… shards of truth - http://www.healthfreedomusa.org/?p=965 (http://www.healthfreedomusa.org/?p=965)
03/06/09 - Avian Flu “Accident” - http://www.healthfreedomusa.org/?p=2220 (http://www.healthfreedomusa.org/?p=2220)
UPDATE: 04/25/09 - Pandemic eAlert - http://www.healthfreedomusa.org/?p=2531 (http://www.healthfreedomusa.org/?p=2531)
UPDATE: 04/28/09 - Proactive Protection Steps - http://www.healthfreedomusa.org/?p=2581 (http://www.healthfreedomusa.org/?p=2581)
Now we must raise the alarm once again. “Although past weaponization events have failed to trigger the pandemic,” Foundation President Gen. Stubblebine suggests, “we must assume the forces at work will produce what world health officials have called the inevitable pandemic.”
Whether those forces are the chaos of the natural world, the greed-addicted structure of the health care industry and its Big Phama cartel, or the evil intent of individuals or groups, we know not. One need not believe in conspiracies to observe that social and economic conditions may be such that a pandemic is almost a foregone conclusion. For example, several major foundations are providing significant funding to several dozen laboratories around the world that are studying the Avian Flu virus to find out how easy it might be for “terrorists” to weaponize the flu. How many such labs do you think it takes before it is inevitable that an engineered pathogen will escape?
Before you answer that question, remember that just this past January, as related in the second link above, a shipment of annual flu vaccine was “accidentally” contaminated with live Avian Flu virus… nearly triggering the pandemic.
And now, over the past couple days, the story has broken of a potential Swine Flu pandemic (yes, the Swine Flu is back!). We reproduce below several stories about this and are continuing our investigation so that we can issue a Pandemic Flu eAlert shortly to the Health Freedom Action eAlert’s several hundred thousand subscribers. If you do not yet receive the free eAlert, please join at: http://www.healthfreedomusa.org/?page_id=187 (http://www.healthfreedomusa.org/?page_id=187)
A final “smoking gun” is found in one article below, where the particular strain of Swine Flu is said to be a “novel strain” — and in another where it says, “It first looked mostly like a swine virus but closer analysis showed it is a never-before-seen mixture of swine, human and avian viruses, according to the CDC.” this, Dr. Laibow says, can be a hallmark of an engineered virus.
PLEASE TAKE THIS ALERT SERIOUSLY.
Dr. Laibow urges you to make sure you have supplemental silver (ionic or colloidal) available and stockpiled. This nutrient offers hope in a dangerous situation. You can order ionic silver and support the Foundation at the same time by going to: www.Nutronix.com/NaturalSolutions (http://www.utronix.com/aturalolutions) and on the top bar choose “Products” — then on the left menu (near the bottom) choose: “Silver Solution”.
Ralph Fucetola JD
NSF Trustee for Dr. Laibow and Gen. Stubblebine
Our Accomplishments: http://www.healthfreedomusa.org/?page_id=195 (http://www.healthfreedomusa.org/?page_id=195)
We need your support to keep you informed: http://www.healthfreedomusa.org/?page_id=189 (http://www.healthfreedomusa.org/?page_id=189)
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These articles are reproduced as a public service:
[1] April 29, 2009 - Message from Dr. Joseph Mercola
http://www.voteronpaul.com/newsDetail.php?Critical-Alert-The-Swine-Flu-Pandemic-Fact-or-Fiction-899
“Could a mixed animal-human mutant like this occur naturally? And if not, who made it, and how was it released?
Not one to dabble too deep in conspiracy theories, I don’t have to strain very hard to find actual facts to support the notion that this may not be a natural mutation, and that those who stand to gain have the wherewithal to pull off such a stunt.
Just last month I reported on the story that the American pharmaceutical company Baxter was under investigation for distributing the deadly avian flu virus to 18 different countries as part of a seasonal flu vaccine shipment. Czech reporters were probing to see if it may have been part of a deliberate attempt to start a pandemic; as such a “mistake” would be virtually impossible under the security protocols of that virus.”
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[2] More US swine flu cases, Mexico illnesses raise pandemic questions
Lisa Schnirring * Staff Writer
Apr 23, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – Five more cases of an unusual swine influenza virus infection have surfaced, officials from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced today, bringing the total to seven and raising more concerns about human-to-human transmission.
The new cases include two clusters, two 16-year-old boys in San Antonio, Tex., who attended the same school and a father and daughter from San Diego County. Anne Schuchat, MD, interim deputy director for the CDC’s science and public health program, told reporters today at a teleconference that the clusters are consistent with human-to-human spread.
She also said that the World Health Organization has not raised its six-phase pandemic alert level above phase 3 (no or very limited human-to-human transmission).
The fifth new case occurred in a patient from Imperial County, which borders San Diego County. Both counties are home to the first two swine flu patients that the CDC announced on Apr 21.
News of the five new swine flu cases came on the same day Canadian officials warned its public health, medical, and quarantine workers to look for illnesses among Canadians returning from Mexico. Mexico has reported several cases of severe respiratory illness and has asked Canada to assist in finding the source of the illnesses, some of which have been fatal, according to a report today from the Canadian Press (CP).
Schuchat said no swine flu cases have been confirmed in Mexico or Canada, but that CDC officials are discussing the situation with Mexican health officials and representatives from the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO).
Novel strain, relatively mild symptoms
Concerning the seven American cases, Schuchat said, “The good news is that all of the patients have recovered, and one was hospitalized. This is not looking like a very severe influenza.”
Patients experience fever, cough, and sore throat symptoms similar to typical influenza, but some of the patients who had swine influenza also experienced more diarrhea and vomiting than is typical of seasonal flu.
The CDC said genetic sequencing of samples from the first two patients, California children who lived in adjacent counties, show that the swine flu virus contains segments from four different viruses: some North American swine, some North American avian, one human influenza, and two Eurasian swine.
“This virus hasn’t been recognized in the USA or elsewhere,” Schuchat said.
CDC scientists have determined that the novel swine flu virus is resistant to the older antivirals rimantadine and amantadine but is susceptible to oseltamivir and zanamivir.
Schuchat said the CDC expects to see more swine flu cases and that it would provide regular updates on its Web site.
“This is not time for major concern around the country, but we want you to know what’s going on,” she said. Most of the public health response will focus on the California and Texas areas where cases have been identified, but the CDC is urging health departments in other states to heighten their awareness of respiratory illnesses, particularly in those who have had contact with pigs or traveled to the San Diego or San Antonio areas.
Schuchat said the CDC doesn’t know yet if the H1N1 component of this season’s influenza vaccine provides any protection against the swine flu virus, but she said studies are under way to determine if there is any cross-protection.
Expert reaction
Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH, director of the University of Minnesota Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy, publisher of CIDRAP News, said the findings, though concerning, don’t mean that a pandemic is imminent.
However, he said health officials shouldn’t take comfort in the fact that the illnesses so far have been mild. “The first wave of the 1918 pandemic was mild, too,” Osterholm pointed out.
Walter Dowdle, PhD, who worked in the CDC’s virology unit during the 1976 swine flu outbreak, told CIDRAP News that it’s interesting but not greatly alarming that the 2009 swine flu strain contains such an unusual mix of gene segments.
“It’s a real mutt,” said Dowdle, who now works with the Task Force for Child Survival and Development, based in Atlanta. “When you have an evolving RNA mechanism, it’s hard to be surprised by anything.”
The H1N1 component of the seasonal flu vaccine might provide some degree of protection, he said. And if the swine flu virus persists, federal officials could consider adding an additional H1N1 strain to next year’s vaccine.
Marie Gramer, DVM, PhD, a University of Minnesota veterinarian who has studied swine flu, said her preliminary examination shows that the outbreak strain doesn’t appear to closely match anything currently circulating in pigs. However, Gramer added that she has only looked at a small number of viruses and only at the hemagglutinin gene.
Risk message implications
Peter Sandman, PhD, a risk communication consultant based in Princeton, N.J., also listened in on today’s CDC teleconference. While he credited the CDC with getting a clear, calm, and concise scientific message out about the swine flu cases, he said they missed a teachable moment to promote pandemic preparedness.
“Everyone needs to learn how to say ‘This could be bad, and it’s a good reason to take precautions and prepare’ and ‘This could fizzle out,’” Sandman said. “They need to simultaneously say both statements.”
He added that “good risk communicators need to know how to be both scary and tentative.”
Federal health officials are probably treading cautiously around the word “pandemic,” because some accused them of fearmongering when they raised concerns about the H5N1 virus 2 years ago and also because of overreaction during the 1976 swine flu epidemic that led to vaccination missteps.
When talking to the public about pandemic risks, federal officials could take some cues from hurricane forecasters, Sandman said, “and speculate responsibly.”
Canadian officials probe Mexico illnesses
Canada’s Public Health Authority (PHAC) said today in a situation update that Mexican authorities have asked its assistance in determining the cause of two clusters of severe respiratory illnesses that have occurred this month.
A cluster in Mexico City involved 120 cases and 13 deaths; the other occurred in San Luis Potosi, where 14 cases and 4 deaths were reported. Three deaths were reported from other locations: One from Oaxaca in southern Mexico and two from Baja California Norte, near the US border.
The PHAC report said the disease outbreak struck some healthcare workers and that most patients were previously healthy young adults between the ages of 25 and 44. Symptoms included fever, headache, ocular pain, shortness of breath, and fatigue that rapidly progressed to severe respiratory distress in about 5 days.
Mexican officials detected some influenza A/H1N1 and influenza B viruses, but have apparently ruled out H5N1 virus involvement. The PHAC said it received 51 clinical samples from Mexico for testing at its National Microbiology Lab.
Mexico told the PHAC that it had a late influenza season with an increasing number of influenza-like illnesses since the middle of March. The country also had a higher proportion of influenza B viruses than previous seasons.
http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/influenza/panflu/news/apr2309swineflu.html
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[3] Sixty Swine Flu Fatalities In Mexico Confirm Pandemic Start
Recombinomics Commentary 13:30
April 24, 2009
A rare outbreak of human swine flu has killed at least 60 people in Mexico and spread to the United States where authorities are on alert, the World Health Organisation said on Friday.
“To date there have been some 800 suspected cases with flu-like illness, with 57 deaths in the Mexico City area,” Chaib added.
Twenty four suspected cases and three deaths were also recorded in San Luis Potosi in central Mexico.
The above comment confirm that the swine H1N1 in southwestern United States (see updated map) is the leading edge of a H1N1 pandemic that appears to be centered in Mexico.
These deaths should increase the pandemic phase to 6.
Release of sequences from fatal cases in Mexico would be useful.
http://www.recombinomics.com/News/04240903/H1N1_Swine_Mexico_Pandemic.html
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[4] Deadly new flu strain breaks out in Mexico, U.S.
By Alistair Bell and Noel Randewich
MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - A strain of flu never seen before has killed as many as 61 people in Mexico and has spread into the United States, where eight people have been infected but recovered, health officials said on Friday.
Mexico’s government said at least 16 people have died of the disease in central Mexico and that it may also have been responsible for 45 other deaths.
The World Health Organization said tests showed the virus in 12 of the Mexican patients had the same genetic structure as a new strain of swine flu, designated H1N1, seen in eight people in California and Texas.
Because there is clearly human-to-human spread of the new virus, raising fears of a major outbreak, Mexico’s government canceled classes for millions of children in its sprawling capital city and surrounding areas.
“Our concern has grown as of yesterday,” U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention acting director Dr. Richard Besser told reporters in a telephone briefing.
It first looked mostly like a swine virus but closer analysis showed it is a never-before-seen mixture of swine, human and avian viruses, according to the CDC.
“We do not have enough information to fully assess the health threat posed by this new swine flu virus,” Besser said.
Humans can occasionally catch swine flu from pigs but rarely have they been known to pass it on to other people.
The WHO said it was ready to use rapid containment measures if needed, including antivirals, and that both the United States and Mexico are well equipped to handle the outbreak.
Both the WHO and the CDC said there was no need to alter travel arrangements in Mexico or the United States.
CLOSE TO 1,000 SUSPECTED CASES IN MEXICO
Eight people were infected with the new strain in California and Texas, but all of them have recovered. Mexico said it had close to 1,000 suspected cases there.
The CDC’s Besser said scientists were working to understand why there are so many deaths in Mexico when the infections in the United States seem mild.
Worldwide, seasonal flu kills between 250,000 and 500,000 people in an average year, but the flu season for North America should have been winding down.
The U.S. government said it was closely following the new cases. “The White House is taking the situation seriously and monitoring for any new developments. The president has been fully briefed,” an administration official said.
Mexico’s government cautioned people not to shake hands or kiss when greeting or to share food, glasses or cutlery for fear of infection.
The outbreak jolted residents of the Mexican capital, one of the world’s biggest cities and home to some 20 million people.
One pharmacy ran out of surgical face masks after selling 300 in a day.
“We’re frightened because they say it’s not exactly flu, it’s another kind of virus and we’re not vaccinated,” said Angeles Rivera, 34, a federal government worker who fetched her son from a public kindergarten that was closing.
The virus is an influenza A virus, carrying the designation H1N1. It contains DNA from avian, swine and human viruses, including elements from European and Asian swine viruses, the CDC has said.
The Geneva-based U.N. agency WHO said it was in daily contact with U.S., Canadian and Mexican authorities and had activated its Strategic Health Operations Center (SHOC) — its command and control center for acute public health events.
The CDC said it will issue daily updates here
Surveillance for and scrutiny of influenza has been stepped up since 2003, when H5N1 bird flu reappeared in Asia. Experts fear that or another strain could spark a pandemic that could kill millions.
In Egypt, a 33-year-old woman died of bird flu, becoming the third such victim there in a week. The H5N1 bird flu, a completely different strain from the swine flu, has infected 421 people in 15 countries and killed 257 since 2003.
An outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome, or SARS, killed 44 people in Canada in 2003.
http://www.reuters.com/article/topNews/idUSTRE53N22820090424?sp=true
———————————————
[5] SNAP ANALYSIS-New swine flu likely widespread, experts say
25 Apr 2009 21:06:44 GMT - Source: Reuters
By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Editor
WASHINGTON, April 25 (Reuters) - A new and unusual strain of swine flu is likely widespread and impossible to contain at this point, experts agree.
The H1N1 strain has killed at least 20 people and possibly 48 more in Mexico and has been confirmed in at least eight people in the United States, all of whom had mild illness.
Probable cases also were found at a school in the New York City borough of Queens and experts at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say they fully expect to find more cases. Here is why:
* This new strain of influenza has shown it can spread easily from person to person.
* It has been found in several places and among people who had no known contact. This suggests there is an unseen chain of infection and that the virus has been spreading quietly.
* This can happen because respiratory illnesses are very common and doctors rarely test patients for flu. People could have had the swine virus and never known it.
* At least in the United States, it has so far only been found in people who had mild illness, another factor that would have allowed it to spread undetected.
* World Health Organization director Dr. Margaret Chan has said the new strain of H1N1 has the potential to become a pandemic strain because it does spread easily and does cause serious disease.
* CDC experts note that while it is possible to contain an outbreak of disease that is in one limited area, once it is reported in widespread locations, the spread is impossible to control. (For full coverage of the flu outbreak, click on [nFLU]) (Editing by Xavier Briand)
http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/N25472826.htm
———————————————————————-
[6] World eyes deadly flu risk, Mexico City hushed
Sun Apr 26, 2009 11:56am EDT
By Catherine Bremer
MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Governments around the world rushed on Sunday to check the spread of a new type of swine flu that has killed up to 81 people in Mexico and infected around a dozen in the United States.
Mexicans huddled in their homes while U.S. hospitals tracked patients with flu symptoms and other countries imposed health checks at airports as the World Health Organization warned the virus had the potential to become a pandemic.
The epidemic has snowballed into a monster headache for Mexico, already grappling with a violent drug war and economic slowdown, and has quickly become one of the biggest global health scares in years.
Mexico’s tourism and retail sectors could be badly hit. A new pandemic would deal a major blow to a world economy already suffering its worst recession in decades.
In New Zealand, 10 pupils from an Auckland school party that had returned from Mexico were being treated for influenza symptoms in what health authorities said was a likely case of swine flu, although they added none was seriously ill.
The WHO declared the flu a “public health event of international concern.” WHO Director-General Dr. Margaret Chan urged greater worldwide surveillance for any unusual outbreaks of influenza-like illness.
“(We are) monitoring minute by minute the evolution of this problem across the whole country,” Mexican President Felipe Calderon said as health officials counted suspected infections in six states from the tropical south to the northern border.
While all the deaths so far have been in Mexico, the flu is spreading in the United States. Eleven cases were confirmed in California, Kansas and Texas, and eight schoolchildren in New York City caught a type A influenza virus that health officials say is likely to be the swine flu.
The new flu strain, a mixture of various swine, bird and human viruses, poses the biggest risk of a large-scale pandemic since avian flu surfaced in 1997, killing several hundred people. A 1968 “Hong Kong” flu pandemic killed about 1 million people globally.
New flu strains can spread quickly because no one has natural immunity to them and a vaccine takes months to develop.
TRAVELLERS SCREENED
Countries across Asia, which have had to grapple with deadly viruses like H5N1 bird flu and SARS in recent years, snapped into action. At airports and other border checkpoints in Hong Kong, Malaysia, South Korea and Japan, officials screened travelers for any flu-like symptoms.
In China, officials assured people that conventional measures in place were adequate to contain the new threat.
“The measures we’ve been taking against bird flu are effective for this new type of disease,” said Wang Jing of the China Inspection and Quarantine Science Research Institute, in comments carried by state media.
Argentina declared a health alert, requiring anyone arriving on flights from Mexico to advise if they had flu-like symptoms. Continued…
http://www.reuters.com/article/topNews/idUSTRE53N22820090426
—————————————————————-
[7] Swine Flu Could Become More Dangerous
3 hours 8 mins ago
SkyNews © Sky News 2009
* Print Story
The swine flu virus that has killed more than 80 people in Mexico may mutate into a “more dangerous” strain, the World Health Organisation has warned. Skip related content
“It’s quite possible for this virus to evolve… when viruses evolve, clearly they can become more dangerous to people,” said Keiji Fukuda, of the global health watchdog.
Mr Fukuda also called for international vigilance as health experts wait to see whether the virus will turn into a worldwide pandemic.
Over 1,300 people are now thought to have contracted the virulent H1N1 swine influenza after it mutated into a form that spreads from human to human.
The Mayor of New York has confirmed that eight school children are suffering mild symptoms after becoming infected.
And there have been at least 12 other confirmed cases in Texas, Ohio, California and Kansas.
The White House has declared a public health emergency but told the public “not to panic”.
Sky US correspondent Greg Milam said: “It’s important to realise that those affected have only had mild symptoms, and all have recovered or are recovering.
“But the authorities do believe that this outbreak will get worse.”
Canada has become the third country to confirm human cases of swine flu with six people falling ill in Nova Scotia and British Columbia.
Elsewhere in the world, suspected cases have been reported in France, Spain, Israel, New Zealand and the UK.
In France, two people who had returned from Mexico with fevers are being monitored in regions near the port cities of Bordeaux and Marseille.
A 26-year-old Israeli man has also been admitted to hospital after returning from a trip to Mexico with flu-like symptoms.
In Auckland, 10 school children have tested positive for influenza after returning from Mexico.
In the UK, two people have been admitted to a hospital in Scotland after returning from Mexico last week.
They are said to have mild flu-like symptoms but their condition is not causing concern.
Mexican City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard said two more people have died of the virus, taking the death toll to 83.
All schools have been shut in Mexico City, the surrounding area and the central state of San Luis Potosi until May 6.
The WHO says it has a stockpile of the antiviral Tamiflu, which has proven effective against the virus, and is preparing a vaccine if needed.
The H1N1 strain of swine flu is usually only seen in pigs - but in humans can cause symptoms including fever and fatigue.
The WHO says there is “zero evidence” that people are getting infected with the virus from exposure to pigmeat or pigs.
However, many countries say they are stepping up checks on pork imports from the region.
Russia has banned meat imports from Mexico as well as from several US states and Central American countries.
http://uk.news.yahoo.com/5/20090426/twl-swine-flu-could-become-more-dangerou-3fd0ae9.html
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Tosh Plumlee
05-03-2009, 04:15 AM
Drug-war virus spreading like the Swine flu



Posted by Bill Conroy (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/users/bill-conroy) - May 2, 2009 at 10:30 pm
Narco-corruption has infected both sides of the border

Mexican President Felipe Calderon has deployed some 40,000 military troops to battle the drug “cartels” in order to stem the flow of drugs north into the United States.
It’s not working; the drugs keep coming.
The U.S. government has spent billions of dollars over the past four decades trying to stop the flow of drugs from coming north and more recently has ramped up border security in an effort to stop guns from flowing south and into the hands of narco-traffickers.
It’s not working, the drugs and guns keep spreading.
This failed strategy is premised on the notion that drug trafficking organizations (DTOs) are tightly structured hierarchical organizations that can be neutralized by force along a front line — the border.
But, of course, it doesn’t work that way.
Like the Swine flu, the real enemy in the drug war is a virus spread by human contact, and its infection rate is not inhibited by the border or nationality.
Since the early 1970s, when President Nixon declared the “war on drugs,” unleashing this virus, it has spread all across the Americas, often by the very instruments meant to impede it.
No one, regardless of their country of origin or status in society [from indigent street person to U.S. Senator] is immune to this virus (commonly called corruption) — which is spread by the tools of addiction, violence and greed (drugs, guns and money).

Tracking the Virus

As with most diseases deemed deadly, myths typically creep up (propagated by word of mouth and the mainstream-media hype machine) that result in mass disinformation being accepted as fact about the modes of transmission of the illness.
In the case of the drug-war virus, the most recent transmission myth foist upon the public is focused on weapons. The myth is that the virus is now being spread, in large part, by guns and munitions being shipped south by criminal actors in the U.S. to the “cartels” in Mexico. Again, the fallacy of this myth is that it presumes the virus respects borders.
The truth is that the guns being used by the DTOs are coming from multiple sources — including the U.S., Central America and other nations on other continents; and from within Mexico itself, via players in law enforcement and the military who have been afflicted with this drug-war virus.
In November of last year, Mexican law enforcers seized a huge cache of weapons in Reynosa, Mexico, that was linked to the Zetas — a group of DTO mercenary enforcers formed by highly trained special-operations soldiers who defected from the Mexican military. The weapons stash include hundreds of assault rifles as well as grenade launchers, hand grenades and half a million rounds of ammunition — among which was a collection of U.S. military-issued 40 mm artillery shells.
The U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), after a five-month delay — caused, in part, by the reluctance of the Mexican government to allow ATF timely access the serial numbers of the seized weapons — finally reported through the media (http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/local_news/Officials_say_most_weapons_from_raid_came_from_Tex as_dealers.html) in late March of this year that they were able to trace the serial numbers of 383 of the 540 rifles found in the Reynosa arms cache. Most of those guns traced back to U.S. firearms dealers, according to the ATF.
But clearly a not insignificant number of those weapons — including nearly 160 rifles as well as the grenade launchers, hand grenades and artillery shells — were not traced by ATF, assuming the media reports are accurate, and their source remains a mystery. Ironically, according to the State Department, the U.S. approved for export (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/bill-conroy/2009/03/legal-us-arms-exports-may-be-source-narco-syndicates-rising-firepower) to Mexico via private companies more than $1 billion worth of defense hardware between fiscal years 2004 and 2007 alone — including assault rifles, grenades and grenade launchers.
A couple of weeks back, during an interview on a Fox News (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,517389,00.html) show, Thomas Mangan, a special agent with ATF, said that Mexican authorities are recovering from DTOs an increasing number of “true machine guns,” which Mangan said are not being purchased in the U.S.
Mangan said ATF suspects these machine guns, such as the U.S.-made M60, are being acquired by DTOs through Central American sources. Ironically, the M60 (http://www.armyrecognition.com/mexico_army_military_equipment/mexico_mexican_army_land_ground_forces_military_eq uipment_armoured_vehicle_pictures_information_desc .html) is also a machine gun used by the Mexican Army.
A story in the April 27 issue of the Brownsville Herald (http://www.brownsvilleherald.com/news/army_97404___article.html/mexican_soldiers.html), which was not picked up by the national media, reported that the Mexican Army discovered an abandoned car in Matamoras, Mexico, packed with “four assault rifles, two submachine guns, more than 2,000 rounds of ammunitions and 24 cartridges.”
Also in the car were “three radio systems with chargers, as well as two army type uniforms, and a tactical vest,” the Herald reported. The evidence, according to the Herald report, was turned over to the Mexican federal police to investigate.http://narcosphere.narconews.com/userfiles/70/GregorioSaucedaGamboa.jpg
Two days later, also in Matamoras, the Associated Press (http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/ap/top/world/6400060.html) reported that Mexican law enforcement had arrested a major Zeta ringleader, Gregorio Sauceda Gamboa — and in the process seized an arms cache that included five rifles and a clutch of ammunition.
Could that be a coincidence? Likely not.
And if not, we again have military-issued hardware (submachine guns) linked to the Zetas — who defected from the Mexican military, along with more than 100,000 (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/bill-conroy/2009/04/private-sector-arms-sales-mexico-sparsely-monitored-state-department) of their fellow soldiers since 2001.
So what are we to make of all this? Is the United States really the nearly exclusive supplier of weapons to Mexico’s DTOs?
Or is the situation more complicated, the virus more widespread?
Narco News put that question to Bill Newell, special agent in charge of the ATF in Arizona and New Mexico.
Newell concedes that the ATF’s efforts to impede the illegal flow of U.S. guns south into Mexico likely will not solve the problem. He says stopping the gun flow from the U.S. will only lead the DTOs to step up their acquisition of weapons from other non-U.S. sources, because they "are not stupid."
Newell says, for example, a lot of weapons are now coming up from El Salvador and Guatemala — citing the fact that the Zetas are “getting their grenades” from Central America.
"We're a victim of our own success" in cracking down on the U.S. flow of arms, he adds.
Newell also did not disupute that the Mexican government is very selective in the guns it turns over to ATF to trace. Newell stresses that he has no direct evidence of Mexican military corruption playing a role in the arming of the DTOs, but he also agrees that ATF is not getting all of the evidence. He adds that an ATF badge and gun in Mexico is essentially a "paperweight."
And on that front, a U.S. Senator has already weighed in with his concern.
Last month, Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, held a hearing in the field — in El Paso, Texas, located along the U.S. border with Mexico. In his opening statement (http://www.boston.com/news/politics/politicalintelligence/2009/03/kerry_in_solida.html) for that hearing, Kerry revealed the following:
Only about [B]one out of every four weapons seized by Mexican authorities last year was submitted to the ATF so they could be traced back to purchasers and sellers in the United States. The Mexican government should provide the ATF with fuller access to these weapons.

Spreading North
Tosh Plumlee is a former CIA asset and contract pilot who flew numerous missions delivering arms to Latin America and returning drugs to the United States as part of the covert Iran/Contra operations in the 1980s, according to public records (http://toshplumlee.info/pdf/sengaryhart.PDF).
Plumlee still has deep contacts in the spook world, including within the Mexican intelligence world. Plumlee claims that behind the scenes the Obama administration, with the help of a special joint task force involving U.S. and Mexican agents, is attempting to get a handle on the spread of the drug-war virus, but are finding themselves up against a major contagion that does not yield easily and is very capable of evolving into a more virulent strain.

Here’s Plumlee’s take, which he sent to Narco News via e-mail:

".. Relations with Mexico over this "Border War" and the escalations thereof, coupled with the drug policies of old, have caused a difference of opinions within the two-party system of the United States, as well as between various factions within Mexico.... The Drug Cartels have embedded themselves so deep within the political atmosphere of Mexico that they can manipulate policy as well as Mexico's reality. These cartels have gained control of a majority of the media outlets as well as the party system of Mexico and to some degree infiltrated our [the U.S.] political structure as well as our financial institutions.
We have some politicians in this country who do not want in-depth investigations into the Cartels of Mexico or the cut-out companies used in these illegal operations, or the personal used in those various operations. Our secret, newly formed joint Task Force, working a delicate matter with the Mexican Army, has uncovered direct associations with some officials on this side of the border as well as inside Mexico. ..".

So the drug-war virus, according to Plumlee, has infected the U.S. side of the border as well — since the virus spreads easily across borders.
Plumlee points to a small U.S. border community of some 2,000 people where this infection can be seen running its course. Columbus, N.M., is located in southern Luna County, about 70 miles west of El Paso, Texas; some 32 miles south of Deming, N.M.; and just across the border from Palomas, Mexico.
And, according to Plumlee — and a recent report by the Associated Press — this high-desert border town has become a haven for narco-traffickers.
Recently, Plumlee says he spent some time in Columbus, on a hill overlooking the small town with a group of Border Patrol agents who had set up surveillance cameras from afar to keep an eye on two adjoining houses in the community.
Plumlee claims the homes were purchased by narco-traffickers, who paid cash. He adds that as he looked on with the Border Patrol, a group of men at the homes were unloading cargo from two trucks parked near the abodes.
Plumlee says the Border Patrol agents said the cargo was a shipment of weapons.
“How do you know,” Plumlee says he asked the Border Patrol agents.
“Because we have it on tape,” one of the Border Patrol agents responded, according to Plumlee.
Plumlee says the Border Patrol agents have reported the incident to ATF. Unfortunately, he adds, Columbus’ local law enforcement doesn’t have the manpower, firepower or willpower to confront the extent of the problem that now exists in the community.

The recent AP a> (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090501/ap_on_re_us/us_drug_smugglers__town) story backs up Plumlee’s analysis. (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090501/ap_on_re_us/us_drug_smugglers__town)[/URL]

[URL="http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090501/ap_on_re_us/us_drug_smugglers__town"]According to that news report, the narco-traffickers have fled across the border into Columbus from Palomas to avoid the pressure of the Mexican Army. Columbus must seem like a safe haven by comparison, given it’s four-man cop shop “has turned over seven times in three years because of scandal or apathy,” according to the AP report.
However, the problems in Luna County (where Columbus is located) are not limited to the blowback from narco-corruption in Mexico.
In 2007, Narco News reported that an Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) supervisor in New Mexico was alleging that a federally-funded drug task force based in Deming (composed of ICE agents as well as local and state law enforcers) was linked to a disturbing trail of bookkeeping irregularities, multiple mysterious bank accounts and even claims of U.S. law enforcement corruption.
In fact, the ICE supervisor alleged specifically that some $300,000 in federal funds under the control of the Deming task force had mysteriously disappeared.
A subsequent investigation conducted by ICE into the supervisor’s charges did not directly address the missing $300,000. Instead, the report simply states that no evidence was found to support the allegation that the federal funds were “reprogrammed to disguise actual use.”
But it is difficult to dismiss the ICE supervisor’s allegations concerning the $300,000, particularly when considering that the ICE report also confirms that task-force financial records were in disarray, missing or “erased” and that expenditures were not properly documented. Added to that is the fact that the task force’s Deming office was burglarized shortly after the ICE supervisor reported the $300,000 in missing funds.
The ICE investigation also revealed the following:
• The Deming Chief of Police no longer shares information with the task force because the current “task force commander” compromised a source of narcotics-related information and also because the task force does not share information with his office.
• The task force opened five bank accounts for its discretionary funds using the City of Deming tax identification (ID) number without the City’s knowledge or authorization. The accounts were re-designated with the Grand County tax ID when the City of Deming demanded that its number be no longer used.
• The City of Deming withdrew its participation from the Deming task force due to “integrity [alleged corruption] concerns relating to former and current task force commanders. …”
Several New Mexico law enforcement officials linked to the Deming task force have been the targets of past federal corruption investigations, Narco News sources claim. One of those investigations centered on a deputy who allegedly turned up in a wiretap making calls to a Mexican narco-trafficking organization. However, no charges were brought against the targeted law enforcers as a result of the investigations, the sources add.
To date, law enforcement sources tell Narco News, no known criminal investigation has been launched into the activities of the Deming task force as a result of the ICE report findings. In fact, those sources claim the ICE report is now buried away in some drawer at ICE headquarters gathering dust.

(http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090501/ap_on_re_us/us_drug_smugglers__town)
[Full coverage of the task-force scandal, as well as a link to the ICE report, can be found at this (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090501/ap_on_re_us/us_drug_smugglers__town)link (http://narcosphere.narconews.com/node/1581).]


Pandemic
Luna County, New Mexico, and the dusty border town of Columbus are far from alone in geography or time in being victims of the drug-war virus.
How else can we explain the fact that former Starr County, Texas, Sheriff Rey Guerra (http://www.themonitor.com/articles/drug-25905-hinojosa-guilty.html) recently pled guilty (http://www.valleycentral.com/news/news_story.aspx?id=294575) to a drug-trafficking conspiracy charge?
Guerra was accused of passing information to a narco-trafficking group in exchange for cash payments and other gifts. Seems the good sheriff had a weak spot for steak and shrimp dinners.
And then there’s the long-running, and still unaddressed, House of Death (http://www.narconews.com/houseofdeath/) scandal, in which U.S. law enforcers and federal prosecutors allowed one of their informants to participate in a series of brutal murders in 2003 and early 2004 in Juarez, Mexico, in the effort to make a career-boosting drug case.
Plus, there is the reality that U.S. border agents come into contact with the drug-war virus daily, which raises the risk that they will contract the disease. That might explain why, according to a New York Times report (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/05/27/us/27border.html), as of last May there were “about 200 open cases pending against law enforcement employees who work the border.” (And those are only the cases that are known or were not ignored due to political calculations.)
The House of Death informant, a former Mexican cop, in a letter he penned from prison (where he now sits fighting the U.S. government’s efforts to deport him to Mexico, back to a certain death at the hands of the drug lords he double crossed) described how those corrupt arrangements work — at least in the case of the compromised U.S. law enforcer who worked for the narco-trafficking cell that employed the informant.
From the informant’s prison missive (http://www.narconews.com/Issue54/article3180.html):
Upon his arrival at work, the [U.S. Customs] inspector would receive his schedule where he would see when he would be at the different stands [at one of the border bridges at Juarez/El Paso] where the cars came through…. And since they switch off every thirty minutes, he could use one of the beepers that were already programmed to type in and send the messages without needing to use an operator or telephone line.
He [the corrupt inspector] sent the schedule to the nephew [a drug smuggler] specifying at what time and on what line he would be working. In that way, he was the first contingency and would send us the schedule, or as we called it “invitation,” since we were the guests.
But none of this is really new, despite the recent escalated attention being paid to the drug war by the mainstream media — at least prior its efforts in helping to spread fear and loathing over the Swine flu virus.
An internal U.S. Customs memo dated Jan. 29, 1990, helps to elucidate the history of this drug-war virus. The memo, written by John Juhasz, the leader of a border-corruption task force in Arizona at the time (dubbed Firestorm) was obtained by Narco News and published in 2004 as part of its Borderline Security (http://www.narconews.com/Issue32/article893.html) series.
From the memo: (http://www.narconews.com/borderline/FirestormMemo.pdf)
At the present time, it is an accepted fact among federal law enforcement agencies and the U.S. Attorney’s Office [Tucson] that law enforcement corruption in the border communities of Arizona has reached a crisis state.
… Current investigative information in this office indicates heavy involvement in the corruption of two Customs employees by an organization in Cochise County (Arizona), which is believed to include law enforcement and court officials. There are strong indications of the same type of activity in Santa Cruz County, which, like Cochise County, is adjacent to the Mexican border.
Other Federal agencies in Arizona implicate the same organizations as being part of the drug smuggling problem.
However, just as in the case of the case of the more recent alleged New Mexico law-enforcement corruption, the Firestorm task force’s investigation was ultimately deep-sixed by higher powers.
The Arizona task force, which was composed of agents from several federal agencies, was shut down abruptly in late 1990.
In early 2002, former U.S. Customs agent and Firestorm task force member Steven Shelly — as well as other sources — advanced information alleging that a former U.S. Senator was a target of the task force.
“The ‘Firestorm’ task force that was shut down overnight, was shut down as a result of one phone call, because the list of suspects included a former United States Senator…,” Shelly alleges. He makes that claim in a letter sent in March 2002 to several U.S. senators and a congressman.
Several other sources familiar with Firestorm’s operations also confirm that the former senator was in the task force’s investigative sights.
The former senator says he knew of the task force, but stresses he was not aware that he was being targeted for investigation. He adds that any such probe would have been politically motivated, not based on any credible evidence.
Shelly says Firestorm’s “target” was former U.S. Senator Dennis DeConcini, D-Ariz.— who, at the time of the task force, was still serving in the Senate.
But that is the problem with viruses, after all. You never really know for sure the full extent of who’s been infected or not — or where it might spread next.
Mike Levine, a retired DEA agent and now host of a popular Pacifica Radio program (http://www.expertwitnessradio.org/), wrote a best selling book called “Deep Cover” about his experiences with the drug-war virus. In that book, Levine reveals how Edwin Meese, the U.S. Attorney General under President Reagan, blew the cover of a DEA sting operation that had identified corrupt elements of the Mexican military who had agreed to take bribes in order to assure protection for the transport of 15 tons of cocaine through Mexico.
Levine shared his insight into that experience in an e-mail he sent to Narco News:
Back in 1987 (Deep Cover), we "rented" the friggin' Mexican Army with all their US-supplied weapons, to help us smuggle tons of cocaine into the US. We got it on video, sent undercovers to Mexico to watch the Mexican Army clearing our landing fields, gave it all to the Attorney General of the U.S. [Meese] — then he blew our cover, all of this is in a NYTimes best-seller. And what happened?
Right —Nada. Basically you had the Mexican army acting like drug dealers, so now you have drug dealers acting like the Mexican Army.
So I'm trying to understand, What has really changed?
Watch out for that Swine flu, and stay tuned ….

Tosh Plumlee
05-03-2009, 03:48 PM
April 24, 2009

Swine Flu in Mexico- Timeline of Events

Introduction
At Veratect, we operate two operations centers based in the United States (one in the Washington, DC area and one in Seattle, WA) that provide animal and human infectious disease event detection and tracking globally. Both operations centers are organizationally modeled after our National Weather Service using a distinct methodology inspired by the natural disaster and meteorology communities. Our analysts handle information in the native vernacular language and have been thoroughly trained in their discipline, which include cultural-specific interpretation of the information. We are currently partnered with 14 organizations that provide us with direct ground observations in 238 countries. We are a multi-source, near-real time event detection and tracking organization with years of experience in this discipline.
March 30
Veratect reported that a 47-year-old city attorney for Cornwall was hospitalized in a coma at Ottawa General Hospital following a recent trip to Mexico. Family members reported the individual voluntarily reported to the hospital after gradually feeling ill upon returning from his trip on 22 March. The source stated that the hospital did not know the cause of illness. The case was reportedly on a respirator and awaiting a blood transfusion, but sources did not provide symptoms or a suggested cause of illness. This information was available in our web portal to all clients, including CDC and multiple US state and local public health authorities, however no one had connected this man’s illness with a potential crisis in Mexico.
We have learned this case tested negative according to Canadian officials. The only value this event would have had would have been to tip someone to take a closer look at where this individual traveled in Mexico, possibly stumbling on reports of 'unusual respiratory disease- we have absolutely no indication anyone did this, or if they did they found anything to prompt closer scrutiny. We certainly didn't.
April 2
Local media source Imagen del Golfo reported that state health officials recorded a 15% increase in disease over an unspecified period in the highland areas of Veracruz, which includes La Gloria. The increase was primarily due to higher levels of upper respiratory disease and gastroenteritis. Specifically, officials noted an increase in pneumonia and bronchial pneumonia cases. Health officials attributed the increase to seasonal climate changes.
I would like to be clear here- we are aware local media sources apparently reported this on April 2nd, but we ourselves did not nor posted it on April 2nd.
April 6
Veratect reported local health officials declared a health alert due to a respiratory disease outbreak in La Gloria, Perote Municipality, Veracruz State, Mexico. Sources characterized the event as a "strange" outbreak of acute respiratory infection, which led to bronchial pneumonia in some pediatric cases. According to a local resident, symptoms included fever, severe cough, and large amounts of phlegm. Health officials recorded 400 cases that sought medical treatment in the last week in La Gloria, which has a population of 3,000; officials indicated that 60% of the town’s population (approximately 1,800 cases) has been affected. No precise timeframe was provided, but sources reported that a local official had been seeking health assistance for the town since February.
Residents claimed that three pediatric cases, all under two years of age, died from the outbreak. However, health officials stated that there was no direct link between the pediatric deaths and the outbreak; they stated the three fatal cases were "isolated" and "not related" to each other.
Residents believed the outbreak had been caused by contamination from pig breeding farms located in the area. They believed that the farms, operated by Granjas Carroll, polluted the atmosphere and local water bodies, which in turn led to the disease outbreak. According to residents, the company denied responsibility for the outbreak and attributed the cases to "flu." However, a municipal health official stated that preliminary investigations indicated that the disease vector was a type of fly that reproduces in pig waste and that the outbreak was linked to the pig farms. It was unclear whether health officials had identified a suspected pathogen responsible for this outbreak.
And to be crystal clear, the way we used this information was to simply flag an event as worthy of closer scrutiny and higher awareness, as there was absolutely no proof of true involvement of this company in the outbreak- a proper epidemiological investigation is required to prove such links.
Local health officials had implemented several control measures in response to the outbreak. A health cordon was established around La Gloria. Officials launched a spraying and cleaning operation that targeted the fly suspected to be the disease vector. State health officials also implemented a vaccination campaign against influenza, although sources noted physicians ruled out influenza as the cause of the outbreak. Finally, officials announced an epidemiological investigation that focused on any cases exhibiting symptoms since 10 March.
This information was available in our web portal to all clients, including CDC and multiple US state and local public health authorities.
We do know, after checking our web site logs, that the Pan American Health Organization, the WHO Regional Office of the Americas, accessed this specific report in our system on April 10th and again on April 11th.
April 16
Veratect reported the Oaxaca Health Department (SSO) indicated that an unspecified number of atypical pneumonia cases were detected at the Hospital Civil Aurelio Valdivieso in Reforma, Oaxaca State, Mexico. No information was provided about symptoms or treatment for the cases. NSS Oaxaca reported that rumors were circulating that human coronavirus was spreading at the hospital; sources did not provide any response to these statements from the hospital or health officials.
Laboratory samples were sent to Mexico City for analysis; results were expected to be released sometime next week. According to NSS Oaxaca, health officials had intensified preventive measures aimed at mitigating further spread of the disease. Sources reported that the SSO also implemented a sanitary cordon around the hospital.
This information was pushed to CDC in an email alert notification provided by Veratect on April 16 and April 17:
"16 Apr 2009 4:14 PM GMT Respiratory Disease Detailed Mexico (Reforma, Oaxaca) Reforma: Atypical Pneumonia Cases Reported at Hospital", sent at "April 16, 2009 10:08:06 AM PDT" and again at "April 17, 2009 10:08:06 AM PDT" to CDC and at "April 16, 2009 10:27:13 AM PDT" to the California State Department of Health.
April 20
Veratect was urgently asked to provide access to the VeraSight Global platform on 20 April by a client in the US public health community, and indicated they had received word from their counterparts in Canada that Mexican authorities had requested support. This client speculated whether notification of all southern U.S. border states’ public health authorities should be done and were confused as to why the CDC had not issued an advisory. Veratect contacted the CDC Emergency Operations Center to sensitize them about the situation in Mexico. CDC indicated they were already dealing with the crisis of recently detected H1N1 swine influenza in California and possibly Texas.
April 21
Veratect reported the Oaxaca Health Department (SSO) confirmed two adults died from atypical pneumonia at the Hospital Civil Aurelio Valdivieso in Oaxaca, Oaxaca State, Mexico. One of the cases was a 39-year-old female; the other case was an adult male of unspecified age. After the deaths, the hospital established a quarantine in the emergency room due to initial concerns that avian influenza was responsible for the cases. However, the SSO subsequently stated that neither avian influenza nor coronaviruses, including that which causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), were the source of infection. Additionally, the SSO denied the cases represented an epidemic. According to local sources, the SSO indicated that the atypical pneumonia cases were caused by an unspecified bacterial pathogen and were treatable with antibiotics. Sources indicated a total of 16 additional patients exhibited signs of respiratory infection; none of these patients exhibited complications.
Veratect sources indicated the 39-year-old female was treated at the hospital for five days before dying on 13 April. This case was reportedly immunocompromised; in addition to acute respiratory symptoms, she also had diabetes and diarrhea. The SSO contacted 300 people that had been in contact with the woman; sources stated that between 33-61 contacts exhibited symptoms of respiratory disease, but none showed severe complications. The SSO characterized the incident as an "isolated case;" they noted that over 5,000 cases of pneumonia occur annually in Oaxaca.
Another local source reported the SSO launched surveillance measures in the former residential areas of the two fatal cases and in other targeted geographic areas. No additional information was provided regarding the second fatal case at the hospital.
Veratect reported that the Oaxaca State Congress Permanent Committee on Health had undertaken an investigation into the cases. The committee inspected the Hospital Civil Aurelio Valdivieso on 20 April. The director of the medical school at the University Autónoma "Benito Juárez" de Oaxaca (UABJO), along with other medical academics, publicly requested that national health authorities investigate the cases of atypical pneumonia. No information was provided indicating that national health authorities plan to investigate the matter. The director of the medical school also requested the SSO furnish evidence showing that the cases were negative for avian influenza, SARS, and other severe pathogens; his request was echoed by readers commenting on an online user forum.
Veratect also reported the National Ministry of Health issued a health alert due to a significant increase in influenza cases during the spring season in Mexico. Officials indicated that there have been 14 influenza outbreaks throughout the country. The most heavily affected states are Baja California, Chihuahua, Distrito Federal (Mexico City), Hidalgo, Tlaxcala, and Veracruz. Local case counts were not provided.
Officials stated that 4,167 probable cases of influenza, 313 of which were confirmed, have been reported throughout the country in 2009. Case counts for suspected and confirmed influenza cases have tripled in 2009 as compared to the equivalent time period in 2008. The National Institute of Respiratory Diseases recorded two fatal cases of influenza in 2009, but specific dates and locations were not provided.
Health officials stated they were unsure precisely why the incidence of influenza had increased. However, they believed the increased presence of influenza B, in combination with influenza A, was a contributing factor. In response, officials advised anyone exhibiting influenza symptoms to avoid self-medication and seek medical care immediately. Officials had also enhanced epidemiological surveillance for influenza. Lastly, health officials had focused efforts on providing antiviral medications and influenza vaccinations to the most vulnerable segments of the population. According to the Mexican Ministry of Health, 44.3% of the national population was vaccinated against influenza in 2005-2006.
Veratect sensitized the International Federation of Red Cross who in turn requested broader access be provided to the Pan-American Disaster Response Unit (PADRU). Veratect moved to notify several US state and local public health authorities, providing the caveat the situation in Mexico remained unclear due to pending laboratory results. Veratect reached out to World Health Organization (WHO) operations, informing them the Veratect team was on an alert posture and available for situational awareness support. They indicated they and their subordinate, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) were now aware of the situation but had no further information. Veratect also extended contact to the British Columbia Center for Disease Control and offered assistance in tracking the events in Mexico. All contacts indicated laboratory results were pending.
April 22
Veratect reported the Oaxaca Health Department (SSO) indicated 16 employees at the Hospital Civil Aurelio Valdivieso in Oaxaca, Oaxaca State, Mexico had contracted respiratory disease. However, the SSO denied these cases were connected to the recently identified cases of atypical pneumonia at the hospital. No information was provided indicating how many employees work at the hospital or whether the number of respiratory disease cases was higher than average. The source reported that "fear" persisted among hospital physicians concerning the possible presence of a deadly bacteria or virus circulating in the hospital. One anonymous hospital employee criticized hospital management as "unfair" for not providing clear information regarding the first fatal atypical pneumonia case.
An additional source reported the cause of the atypical pneumonia cases remained unknown; it stated that bacteria or virus could have caused the cases. In contrast, according to an 18 April report, the SSO indicated that the atypical pneumonia cases were caused by an unspecified bacterial pathogen and were treatable with antibiotics. The reason for this discrepancy was unclear at this time.
The Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), a national health entity, had now joined the SSO in responding to the cases; reports did not indicate the Mexican National Ministry of Health had joined in the response efforts. The IMSS extended the sanitary cordon surrounding the hospital. Patients exhibiting flu-like symptoms would be sent to the hospital’s epidemiology department for further study. IMSS instructed physicians to hospitalize respiratory disease patients immediately if they meet certain standards for severity of symptoms. Lastly, the hospital’s emergency room would remain closed for an additional 15 days so that cleaning and preventive disinfection could be carried out.
Veratect also reported the Mexican Ministry of Health indicated that an "unusual" outbreak of laboratory-confirmed influenza caused five deaths from 17-19 April 2009 in Mexico City, Mexico. The deaths occurred at the following three hospitals: el Hospital de la Secretaría de Salud (2), el Institute Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias (2), and el Hospital Ángeles del Pedregal (1). According to unofficial sources, the fatal case count was higher than that provided by officials. There were currently 120 influenza cases hospitalized throughout Mexico City. National health officials indicated that influenza vaccines were sold out in Mexico City and that they were attempting to acquire additional supplies of the vaccine.
At this point, the Mexican Health Secretary reportedly stated there was an influenza epidemic in Mexico City and throughout the rest of the county. In response to the cases, the official stated health authorities would launch a public awareness and vaccination campaigns. He stated that 400,000 vaccines would be administered, primarily to medical staff; it was unclear whether these efforts would be focused on Mexico City or any other geographic area. Health officials also ordered the provision of special masks, gloves, and gowns for medical personnel that were in contact with influenza cases.
A total of 13 fatal cases of influenza were reported in Mexico City in the past three weeks. However, several other media sources reported that the 13 deaths were recorded since 18 March 2009; the reason for this discrepancy was unclear. Sources reported a total of 20 fatal cases of influenza throughout Mexico over the disputed timeframe. The other cases were located in San Luis Potosí (4), Baja California (2), and Oaxaca (1). The Director of Epidemiology at the National Center for Epidemiological Surveillance and Disease Control characterized the outbreak as "quite unusual."
No information was provided indicating that the strain of influenza itself was unusual. Rather, several sources indicated that it was "unusual" to record this many fatal influenza cases during this time of year. Influenza cases normally peak from October to February, while these cases had occurred during Mexico’s spring season.
Canada announced a national alert for travelers returning from Mexico with respiratory disease, beginning a campaign of public media announcements. Potentially ill contacts were identified returning from Mexico and isolated in Canada. Internet blogs begin to spin up. CDC indicates concern about the events unfolding in Mexico. Veratect sensitizes the US community physician social network managed by Ozmosis.
April 23
Veratect reported the Secretary General of the Oaxaca Ministry of Health Workers Union confirmed that a doctor and a nurse from the Hospital Civil Aurelio Valdivieso in Oaxaca, Oaxaca State, Mexico were under observation for suspected "atypical" pneumonia. This contradicted statements made by the Oaxaca Health Department (SSO) on 22 April that 16 hospital employees contracted respiratory disease, but none of the cases exhibited atypical pneumonia.
The union official stated that a review by the Oaxaca State Board of Medical Arbitration indicated that the hospital faced serious difficulties caused by overcrowding; he stated that overcrowded conditions created a "breeding ground" for the spread of various epidemics. According to the official, the hospital has 120 beds but the number of patients hospitalized had at times surpassed 240.
Other sources reported that the Department of Livestock, Fisheries, Rural Development, and Feed (SAGARPA) declared on 20 April that Oaxaca, Mexico was free of avian influenza. SAGARPA stated that authorities should remain vigilant in monitoring for the disease among birds.
Canadian local health officials stated that a Rouge Valley resident with influenza-like illness was being monitored at Scarborough Centenary Hospital in Scarborough, Ontario. The precaution was being taken in accordance with an alert issued by the Ministry of Health asking hospitals to watch for severe respiratory illnesses in travelers returning from Mexico. Despite the warning, the Ministry had indicated that evidence is not suggestive of a novel pathogen or influenza strain, according to the source. A representative for the Rouge Valley Health System stated that this case is being monitored related to the alert. The source did not specifically indicate symptoms or that the person had traveled to Mexico. No additional information regarding the case, including age or health status, was reported.
The source stated that hospital employees were asking any patients admitted to the hospital if they had recently traveled to Mexico, which according to the source was a popular tourist destination for Durham-region residents.
Additional Canadian sources indicated Southlake Regional Health Centre officials treated a patient with influenza-like illness (ILI) who recently returned from Mexico. The Ministry of Health recently notified Southlake, in addition to health units across the country, that an outbreak of severe respiratory disease was affecting areas of Mexico; ill travelers returning from that region with ILI symptoms were encouraged to be monitored. Sources did not provide any specific information about the case, including age or current treatment status. Information regarding the individual’s travel to Mexico was also not provided, including destinations and duration of time in country.
The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) noted that an Ontario resident who returned from Mexico on 22 March experienced severe respiratory illness, but has fully recovered and was not considered connected to the current situation. Veratect recently reported on 30 March that a public official from Cornwall, Ontario was hospitalized with an unknown illness following a trip to Mexico; however, it is unclear if the cases are related, or if this was the case referenced by PHAC officials.
Veratect assesses the situation and notes the following:
Affected areas:
Oaxaca, Distrito Federal, San Luis Potosí, Baja California
Distance to nearest international airport:
• Oaxaca airport, located approximately 150 miles from Reforma, is connected via non-stop air traffic to Houston
• Mexico City (Distrito Federal) airport is connected via non-stop air traffic to many cities in the US, Canada, Europe and Latin America, with the most outbound traffic to Los Angeles, Frankfurt, Houston, Dallas, and Amsterdam
• San Luis Potosí airport is connected via non-stop air traffic to Dallas and Houston
• Mexicali airport in Baja California is connected via non-stop traffic to Los Angeles
• Veracruz airport is connected via non-stop air traffic to Houston

Large mass gatherings:
Semana Santa (April ~April 3 – 12, Palm Sunday to Easter Sunday), which is Mexico’s second largest holiday. Mexico’s population is approximately 90% Catholic, which results in substantial population migration patterns during this time period. For instance, in Ixtapalapa (in Mexico City), one million people visit for Semana Santa. Other well-known sites for the holiday include Pátzcuaro, San Cristobal de las Casas (Chiapas), and Taxco. Veratect notes substantial population migration has just occurred that could facilitate the spread of respiratory disease.

Civil Unrest:
The recent surge in organized crime and drug-related violence in Mexico, including homicides, kidnappings, extortion, and theft, has disproportionately impacted Mexican states along the Pacific Coast and U.S.-Mexico border. This factor may confound situational awareness of respiratory disease in Mexico and contribute to problems in epidemiological investigation and response measures. Baja California is one of five states within this region that currently accounts for more than 75 percent of Mexico's drug-related homicides, and has recorded high levels of drug seizures and police corruption cases. Veracruz, a state with high drug cartel activity in the Gulf of Mexico, has recorded little violence, while the state of Oaxaca to the southwest, recently recorded the assassination of a political party leader. Mexico City, in the center of the country, recently arrested a major drug cartel leader, and recorded few homicides this month. The levels of unrest in Hidalgo, San Luis Potosi, and Tlaxcala, however, are very low, and have not reported a single homicide related to organized crime in the past month.

Tosh Plumlee
05-04-2009, 03:37 PM
Time line of report Juarez 0700 May 4 2009 release.

While our Mainstream media is hyping the Flu Epidimic 19 persons killed execution style this weekend in Juarez. ...so much for the American Media covering this event

Three of the people executed were informates to the joint Task Force.

UPDATE" Just received word 11 more were executed over the weekend in southern Mexico. That makes 30 so far this weekend:

No word from CNN, CBS, NBC, FOX MSNBC or ABC. as of noon eastern time. However, breaking news on other matters concerning the flu matter is covered every ten minutes. What gives?

http://www.arrobajuarez.com/editor/img/49fe1dfd449a6?0.961511234148468

19 persons killed execution style this weekend in Juarez. ...so much for the MEX Army's presence


Este fin de semana cerró como uno de los más violentos del año al registrarse 19 ejecuciones.

En respuesta, las autoridades que conforman la Operación Conjunta Chihuahua (OCCH) implementaron retenes en diferentes vialidades y patrullaron diversas colonias de la ciudad, sin que reportaran la detención de los homicidas.

Hasta el cierre de esta edición se habían cometido 549 homicidios dolosos desde el primero de enero; 26 de las víctimas corresponden al sexo femenino, 29 son elementos de los diferentes cuerpos policiacos y reclusorios, además de los 20 internos del Cereso estatal asesinados.

Otro número importante de restos humanos fue localizado en fosas clandestinas. De acuerdo con el seguimiento periodístico que se lleva de este delito, mayo registra 19 víctimas.

A través de los protocolos de comunicación, la Subprocuraduría de Justicia en la Zona Norte informó que el viernes se registraron 12 crímenes, cinco más el sábado y otros dos durante el transcurso de la madrugada del domingo.

Los asesinatos fueron cometidos con armas calibre 9mm y .380, además en cuatro hechos se utilizaron piedras como instrumento para privar de la vida a igual número de personas.

La jornada violenta del viernes, con un total de 12 víctimas, sólo es superada por los 16 homicidios dolosos registrados el 3 de febrero.

La autoridad estatal informó que el primer caso fue un triple homicidio reportado a las 11:10 horas en el cruce de Salmón y águila. Las víctimas hasta el momento permanecen en calidad de desconocidas.

El segundo caso se reportó a las 13:45 horas en el cruce de Ramón Aranda y viaducto Díaz Ordaz, en la colonia Aldama. Mientras que el tercer evento ocurrió en perjuicio de Floriberto Cruz Miguel, de 19 años, quien murió tras ser agredido en las calles Tampico y Tehuacán, de la colonia Valle Dorado.

El cuarto homicidio fue reportado en las calles Trigo y Papaya, de la colonia El Granjero, a las 17:10 horas; la víctima no está identificada.

El quinto crimen se registró en la carretera a Casas Grandes, a espaldas del fraccionamiento Rincón del Solar. Se desconoce el nombre de la víctima.

Otro triple homicidio fue reportado a las 19:20 horas en el exterior de una vivienda ubicada en las calles Oaxaca y Venado, de la colonia Eco 2000.

Las víctimas fueron identificadas como édgar Miranda Jiménez, de 21 años; Samuel Aguirre Rentaría, de 21 y Ernesto Peña Hernández, de 18 años.

A las 20:00 horas se reportó el deceso del comandante de la Policía Municipal de Praxedis G. Guerrero, Jesús Manuel Holguín Cháirez, de 33 años.

Media hora después se reportó otro crimen en las calles Mauricio Corredor y Cobre, de la colonia Aldama. La víctima, no está identificada.

El sábado se reportaron cinco decesos. La autoridad estatal informó que la primera víctima respondía al nombre de José Coronado Méndez, de 38 años. Los hechos ocurrieron en la colonia Villa Esperanza, a las 3:30 horas.

Dos horas después, la Policía Ministerial recibió el reporte sobre la localización de un vehículo calcinado, en cuyo interior se encontraba una persona del sexo masculino. La víctima no ha sido identificada.El hallazgo ocurrió en las calles Piña y Candelilla, del fraccionamiento ángel Trías.

A las 18:33 horas fue reportado el crimen en contra de Arturo Hernández Sánchez, de 36 años, en la colonia Paso del Norte. La víctima estaba dentro de un vehículo Ford Focus color gris.

Posteriormente fue reportado el asesinado de Carlos López Martínez, de 45 años, en el cruce de Poesía Indígena y Paseo de la Gloria.

En la escena del crimen fueron asegurados 11 elementos balísticos de calibres .380 y 9mm.

Finalmente, la autoridad estatal reportó el asesinato de Erick Puchetas Pío, de 15 años, quien fue agredido cuando se encontraba en el cruce de las calles Elisa Griensen y General Severiano Ceniceros, de la colonia Industrial II.

Y durante las primeras horas del domingo fue asesinado Roberto Carlos Galindo Chaparro, de 18 años, en hechos ocurridos en el cruce de Buenos Aires y Puerto México, de la colonia Industrial.

Los investigadores acudieron al lugar y localizaron el cuerpo de la víctima, quien presentó heridas en el cuerpo producidas por proyectiles de arma de fuego. En la escena del crimen los peritos aseguraron seis elementos balísticos de calibre 9mm.

Una hora después, en el cruce de las calles Caracol y Doctor Coss, de la colonia Nueva Galeana, fue reportado el asesinato de Efrén Silos Díaz, de 28 años.

El total de casos son investigados por elementos de la Unidad Especializa en Investigación de Delitos contra la Vida, que no ha dado a conocer hasta el momento el número exacto de carpetas de investigación judicializadas con el presunto responsable detenido.
*body {background:#FFF;}

note Update:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090504/ap_on_re_la_am_ca/lt_drug_war_mexico



Police find 11 bodies dumped in southern Mexico




http://l.yimg.com/a/i/us/nws/p/ap_logo_106.png (http://us.rd.yahoo.com/dailynews/ap/brand/SIG=br2v03/*http://www.ap.org)

http://d.yimg.com/a/p/ap/20090418/videolthumb.0fd193e51da68e0ee676260950d11983.jpg?x =213&y=160&xc=1&yc=1&wc=399&hc=300&q=85&sig=kjCbeqQ7L507SzLAbf3u4w-- Play Video (http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/ynews;_ylt=AjKlGElEUp8WDY.jVycOTb.9IxIF;_ylu=X3oDM TE5M2Qwa3UyBHBvcwMxBHNlYwN5bl9yX3RvcF92aWRlbwRzbGs Dc2hvb3RvdXRsZWF2?ch=4226714&cl=13025210&lang=en)AP (http://news.yahoo.com/i/2523) – Shootout leaves 16 dead in Mexico
Mon May 4, 1:22 am ET
ACAPULCO, Mexico – Police say they found 11 bodies dumped around a southern Mexican state, including seven wrapped in plastic bags and thrown off a bridge.
Guerrero state police say the bodies of five men and two women were found in a river between the Pacific resort town of Acapulco and the city of Cuernavaca. They were wrapped in bags and dumped off a bridge.
The other four bodies were found in a 600-yard ravine in the Guerrero state town of Pilcaya.
The bodies were all found Sunday. Police said they were too damaged to immediately determine how they were killed. Investigators did not have any suspects or possible motive for the killings.
Mexico's warring drug cartels, however, often leave the bodies of rivals dumped in public.


NOTE: I would like to put a sidebar on this.... I know this is a small Forum and not many read it (except a select few in Langley and DC) However, the apathy of the American people and the attitude of the mainstream media is or has destroyed the very fiber of this nation.

The Drug Cartels have moved across our borders and have set up shop openly in places like Columbus NM and other border towns through out the United States while we set on our thumbs.

Some,but not all, of our politicians are deeply entrenched in these illegal operations through their special interest and their hidden political contributions from sources they had rather not name or expose... in short some are on the take just like some in law enforcement. There are a few good ones left, but their ranks are thinning.

What can you do? Send all the information you can gather and ACT... get the word out to our elected officials and to the media, while there are still some left who wants to protect our way of life and report what they find. Its almost to late... we will be reading soon about drug war killings here in the United States in our major cities. In fact its already happening, but not being reported in some cases.

If you elect to do nothing or pass it along to the other guy to do, then these postings become nothing more than "entertainment" and the tickling of the ears for a very few. And too, you have no right to piss and moan when you loose a friend or love one to the national drug war.

Tosh Plumlee
05-04-2009, 11:19 PM
There has been more people executed in Juarez and southern Mexico this week end (May 2-3, 09..., 30 and counting), more than all throughtout the world during this so called 'Pandemic". Over ten thousand people along the border towns from California to southern Texas (over 6000 in Juarez alone) executed this year, (and some reports put the estimates for two years at twenty thousand kidnapped, tortured and murdered) To me that is a real Epidemic.

What gives and for what reasons is the media spreading worldwide panic? Who gives them the PR's to put on the wires for us to hear and read?



----- Forwarded Message ----
From: XXXX

New report released today:

THE GEOPOLITICS OF PANDEMICS


Word began to flow out of Mexico the weekend before last of well over 150 deaths suspected to have been caused by a new strain of influenza commonly referred to as swine flu. Scientists who examined the flu announced that this was a new strain of Influenza A (H1N1) derived partly from swine flu, partly from human flu and partly from avian flu strains (although there is some question as to whether this remains true). The two bits of information released in succession created a global panic.

This panic had three elements. The first related to the global nature of this disease, given that flus spread easily and modern transportation flows mean containment is impossible. Second, there were concerns (including our own) that this flu would have a high mortality rate. And third, the panic centered on the mere fact that this disease was the flu.

News of this new strain triggered memories of the 1918-1919 flu pandemic, sparking fears that the "Spanish flu" that struck at the end of World War I would be repeated. In addition, the scare over avian flu created a sense of foreboding about influenza -- a sense that a catastrophic outbreak was imminent.

By midweek, the disease was being reported around the world. It became clear that the disease was spreading, and the World Health Organization (WHO) declared a Phase 5 pandemic alert. A Phase 5 alert (the last step before a pandemic is actually, officially declared, a step that may be taken within the next couple of days) means that a global pandemic is imminent, and that the virus has proved capable of sustained human-to-human transmission and infecting geographically disparate populations. But this is not a measure of lethality, only communicability, and pandemics are not limited to the deadliest diseases.

'Pandemic,' not 'Duck and Cover'

To the medical mind, the word "pandemic" denotes a disease occurring over a wide geographic area and affecting an exceptionally high proportion of the population. The term in no way addresses the underlying seriousness of the disease in the sense of its wider impact on society. The problem is that most people are not physicians. When the WHO convenes a press conference carried by every network in the world, the declaration of a level 5 pandemic connotes global calamity, even as statements from experts -- and governments around the world -- attempt to walk the line between calming public fears and preparing for the worst.

The reason to prepare for the worst was because this was a pandemic with an extremely unclear prognosis, and about which reliable information was in short supply. Indeed, the new strain could mutate into a more lethal form and re-emerge in the fall for the 2009-2010 flu season. There are also concerns about how its victims disproportionately are healthy young adults under 45 years of age -- which was reported in the initial information out of Mexico, and has been reported as an observed factor in the cases that have popped up in the United States. This was part of the 1918 flu pandemic pattern as well. (In contrast, seasonal influenza is most deadly among the elderly and young children with weaker immune systems.)

But as the days wore on last week, the swine flu began to look like little more than ordinary flu. Toward the end of the week, a startling fact began to emerge: While there were more than a hundred deaths in Mexico suspected of being caused by the new strain, only about 20 (a number that has increased slightly after being revised downward earlier last week) have been confirmed as being linked to the new virus. And there has not been a single death from the disease reported anywhere else in the world, save that of a Mexican child transported to the United States for better care. Indeed, even in Mexico, the country's health minister declared the disease to be past its peak May 3. STRATFOR sources involved in examining the strain have also suggested that the initial analysis of the swine flu was in fact in error, and that the swine flu may have originated during a 1998 outbreak in a pig farm in North Carolina. This information reopens the question of what killed the individuals whose deaths were attributed to swine flu.

While little is understood about the specifics of this new strain, influenza in general has a definitive pattern. It is a virus that affects the respiratory system, and particularly the lungs. At its deadliest it can cause secondary infections -- typically bacterial rather than viral -- leading to pneumonia. In the most virulent forms of influenza, it is the speed with which complications strike that drives death rates higher. Additionally, substantively new strains (as swine flu is suspected of being) can be distinct enough from other strains of flu that pre-existing immunity gained from flus of years past does not help fend off the latest variation.

Influenza is not a disease that lingers and then kills people -- save the sick, old and very young, whose immune systems are more easily compromised. Roughly half a million people (largely from these groups) die annually worldwide from more common strains of influenza, with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) pegging average American deaths at roughly 36,000 per year.

Swine flu deaths have not risen as would be expected at this point for a highly contagious and lethal new strain of influenza. In most cases, victims have experienced little more than a bad cold, from which they are recovering. And infections outside Mexico so far have not been severe. This distinction of clear cases of death in Mexico and none elsewhere (again, save the one U.S. case) is stark.

Much of what has occurred in the last week regarding the new virus reminds us of the bird flu scare of 2005. Then as now, the commonly held belief was that a deadly strain was about to be let loose on humanity. Then as now, many governments were heightening concerns rather than quelling them. Then as now, STRATFOR saw only a very small chance of the situation becoming problematic.

Ultimately, by the end of last week it had become clear to the global public that "pandemic" could refer to bad colds as well as to plagues wiping out millions.

A Real Crisis

The recent swine flu experience raises the question of how one would attempt to grapple with a genuine high-mortality pandemic with major consequences. The answer divides into two parts: how to control the spread, and how to deploy treatments.

Communicability

The flu virus is widely present in two species other than humans, namely, birds and pigs. The history of the disease is the history of its transmission within and across these three species. It is comparatively easy for the disease to transmit from swine to birds and from swine to humans; the bird-to-human barrier is the most difficult to cross.

Cross-species influenza is of particular concern. In the simplest terms, viruses are able to recombine (e.g., human flu and avian flu can merge into a hybrid flu strain). What comes out can be a flu transmissible to humans, but with a physical form that is distinctly avian -- meaning it fails to alert human immune systems to the intrusion. This can rob the human immune system of the ability to quickly recognize the disease and put up a fight.

New humanly transmissible influenza strains often have been found to originate in places where humans, pigs and/or fowl live in close proximity to each other -- particularly in agricultural areas where animal and human habitation is shared or in which constant, close physical contact takes place.

Agricultural areas of Asia with dense populations, relatively small farms and therefore frequent and prolonged contact between species traditionally have been the areas in which influenza strains have transferred from animals to humans and then mutated into diseases transmissible by casual human contact. Indeed, these areas have been the focus of concern over a potential outbreak of bird flu. This time around, the outbreak began in Mexico (though it is not yet clear where the virus itself originated).

And this is key to understanding this flu. Because it appears relatively mild, it might well have been around for quite awhile -- giving people mild influenza, but not standing out as a new variety until it hit Mexico. The simultaneous discovery of the strain amid a series of deaths (and what may now be in hindsight inflated concerns about its lethality) led to the recent crisis footing.

Any time such threats are recognized, they already are beyond containment. Given travel patterns in the world today, viruses move easily to new locations well before they are identified in the first place they strike. The current virus is a case in point. It appears, although it is far from certain, that it originated in the Veracruz area of Mexico. Within two days of the Mexican government having issued a health alert, it already had spread as far afield as New Zealand. One week on, cases completely unrelated to Mexico have already been confirmed on five continents.

In all probability, this "spread" was less the discovery of new areas of infection than the random discovery of areas that might have been infected for weeks or even months (though the obvious first people to test were those who had recently returned from Mexico with flu symptoms). Given the apparent mildness of the infection, most people would not go to the doctor. And if they did, the doctor would call it generic flu and not even concern himself with its type. What happened last week appears to have been less the spread of a new influenza virus than the "discovery" of places to which it had spread awhile ago.

The problem with the new variety was not that it was so deadly; had it actually been as uniquely deadly as it first appeared to be, there would have been no mistaking its arrival, because hospitals would be overflowing. It was precisely its mildness that sparked the search. But because of expectations established in the wake of the Mexico deaths, the discovery of new cases was disassociated from its impact. Its presence alone caused panic, with schools closing and border closings discussed.

The virus traveled faster than news of the virus. When the news of the virus finally caught up with the virus, the global perception was shaped by a series of deaths suddenly recognized in Mexico (as mentioned, deaths so far not seen elsewhere). But even as the Mexican Health Ministry begins to consider the virus beyond its peak, the potential for mutation and a more virulent strain in the next flu season looms.

Mortality

As mentioned, viruses that spread through casual human contact can be globally established before anyone knows of it. The first sign of a really significant influenza pandemic will not come from the medical community or the WHO; it will come from the fact that people are catching influenza and dying, and are doing so all over the world at the same time. The system established for detecting spreading diseases is hardwired to be behind the curve. This is not because it is inefficient, but because no matter how efficient, it cannot block casual contact -- which, given modern air transportation, spreads diseases globally in a matter of days or even hours.

Therefore, the problem is not the detection of deadly pandemics, simply because they cannot be missed. Rather, the problem is reacting medically to deadly pandemics. One danger is overreacting to every pandemic and thereby breaking the system. (As of this writing, the CDC remained deeply concerned about swine flu, though calm seems to be returning.)

The other danger is not reacting rapidly enough. In the case of influenza, medical steps can be taken. First, there are anti-viral medicines found to be effective against the new strain, and if sufficient stockpiles exist -- which is hardly universally the case, especially in the developing world -- and those stockpiles can be administered early enough, the course of the disease can be mitigated. Second, since most people die from secondary infection in the lungs, antibiotics can be administered. Unlike with the 1918 pandemic, the mortality rate can be dramatically reduced.

The problem here is logistical: The distribution and effective administration of medications is a challenge. Producing enough of the medication is one problem; it takes months to craft, grow and produce a new vaccine, and the flu vaccine is tailored every year to deal with the three most dangerous strains of flu. Another problem is moving the medication to areas where it is needed in an environment that maintains its effectiveness. Equally important is the existence of infrastructure and medical staff capable of diagnosing, administering and supporting patients -- and doing so on a scale never before attempted.

These things will not be done effectively on a global basis. That is inevitable. But influenza, even at the highest death rates ever recorded for the disease, does not threaten human existence as we know it. At its worst, flu will kill a lot of people, but the human race and the international order will survive.

The true threat to humanity, if it ever comes, will not come from influenza. Rather, it will come from a disease spread through casual human contact, but with a higher mortality rate than flu and no clear treatment. While HIV/AIDS boasts an extraordinarily high mortality rate and no cure exists, it at least does not spread through casual contact as influenza does, and so the pace at which it can spread is limited.

Humanity will survive the worst that influenza can throw at it even without intervention. With modern intervention, its effect declines dramatically. But the key problem of pandemics was revealed in this case: The virus spread well before information on it spread. Detection and communication lagged. That did not matter in this case, and it did not matter in the case of HIV/AIDS, because the latter was a disease that did not spread through casual contact. However, should a disease arise that is as deadly as HIV, that spreads through casual contact, about which there is little knowledge and for which there is no cure, the medical capabilities of humanity would be virtually useless.

There are problems to which there are no solutions. Fortunately, these problems may not arise. But if they do, no amount of helpful public service announcements from the CDC and the WHO will make the slightest bit of difference...".

note: In Short? A diversion... to fouces our attention in other directions and not question what is really goin on in Mexico.... and other places... its a Game... and we loose.

Tosh Plumlee
05-04-2009, 11:45 PM
Posted: Deep Politics Forum (Current Events) in reference to article which was also posted.


"... There has been more people executed in Juarez and southern Mexico this week end (May 2-3, 09..., 30 and counting), more than all throughout the world during this so called 'Pandemic". Over ten thousand people along the Mexico's border towns from California to southern Texas (over 6000 in Juarez alone) executed this year, (and some reports put the estimates for two years at twenty thousand kidnapped, tortured, and murdered) To me that is a real Epidemic.

What gives and for what reasons is the media spreading worldwide panic? Who gives them the PR's to put on the wires for us to hear and read?...".

Tosh Plumlee (04-04-09)

Tosh Plumlee
05-05-2009, 12:49 AM
I was just asked a question by CNN. Following is my reply:

".. When the next flu season comes, do you recommend that we get flu shots; or wait and get shot by the Drug Cartels?/...".

Tosh Plumlee TF-7 with the Mexican Army, Juarez Mexico

Charles Drago
05-05-2009, 01:50 AM
Tosh,

Have you been vaccinated against the flu strain?

If so, have you received treatment with drugs otherwise unavailable to civilian populations?

CD

Tosh Plumlee
05-05-2009, 03:42 AM
NO. I have refused to be "tagged". I had to sign a release and a whole bunch of forums, of which I read in detail, before I signed them. I will point out that one "sensitive source" from the Mexican Army told me back in the middle of March that school children south of Mexico City were being requiered to be vaccinated. An American health team did the vaccinations. His quote to me was; "...you read between the lines...". I will leave it at that.

I am going to post a few articles that received very little attention as the flu matter took over the medias attention and the border drug war issues were diverted. If you will look closely I think you will see what I mean.

The joint task force was about to release information that the "High Grade" military weapons found in a few undercover operations bust- inside Mexico had came up through Central America and some of those weapons found were from the United States Army, left overs from the Panama war and the Iran-Contra affair. Others were sent to the Mexican Army legally via the Direct Commercial Sales (DCS) agreements to ship arms to foreign countries. These weapons did not come from Pawn Shops or Gun Shows in spite of what ATF and Homeland Security has told the American people.

Following are a few recent article which have been overlooked these past few weeks by CNN, CBS, FOX, MSNBC, ABC, NBC: There were no in depth reporting only a few 'one liners" and sound bites. The only news on some of these articles was from the BBC.

Thursday, April 16, 2009

Mexican Army To End Patrols in Juarez Soon

By Mark Stevenson (http://www.abqjournal.com/cgi-bin/email_reporter.pl?staff=no)
Associated Press

MEXICO CITY — The troubled border city of Ciudad Juarez and the federal government signed an agreement Wednesday to train, recruit and equip enough city police officers to take over from 5,000 army troops now performing security patrols there.

Mayor Jose Reyes Ferriz said the army presence starting in March has cut the number of homicides there by 95 percent, from an average of 10 per day in February to about four per week at present.

Under the agreement, new police officers will be recruited to bring the force to about 2,500 by September and 3,000 by the end of the year.

"We will have a sufficiently strong police force so that when the Mexican army withdraws from patrolling, the police can ensure the security of Ciudad Juarez," Reyes Ferriz said.

The city currently has 1,200 officers and has lost personnel far faster than it can replace them on what was once a 1,700-person force. More than 900 agents were fired, resigned or retired last year, many after failing psychological, background and other checks as part of a campaign to clean up the department.

The agreement also provides for a new police radio system, cameras and other equipment costing about 350 million pesos ($27 million).

"The radios we have now in Ciudad Juarez are analog models that are easily listened to. The criminals find out what is being said on the radios," Reyes Ferriz said. He said criminals often use the police frequency themselves to threaten officers and officials. Reyes Ferriz added that the "constant" threats he received before the army's arrival have ended. He said he believes many were related to his effort to root out police corruption.

Brutal drug cartel wars in Mexico have cost more than 10,650 lives since December 2006, when President Felipe Calderon launched a crackdown against drug traffickers. More than 1,600 people were killed in Ciudad Juarez last year.


Mexican drug cartels have infiltrated colleges and high schools across America (http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/2237440/posts)

bignews.biz ^ (http://www.freerepublic.com/%5Ehttp://www.bignews.biz/?id=799340&keys=Schools-drugs-Mexico-Cartels)| April 24, 2009 | Michael Webster

Posted on Friday, April 24, 2009 10:58:11 PM by Tailgunner Joe (http://www.freerepublic.com/~tailgunnerjoe/)
In last years drug bust at the San Diego State University Federal agents and SDSU police culminated a yearlong investigation into drug dealing around campus and found it to be more sophisticated, more pervasive and more dangerous and far reaching than they expected or have seen before.

These arrests coincided with the first anniversary of a female student freshman's cocaine-related death. According to local newspaper reports ninety-six suspects, including 75 SDSU students, have been arrested on drug-related charges as a result of the undercover operation, launched after Jenny Poliakoff, 19, was found dead in her off-campus apartment after a night of celebration.

One of the main suspects in this international drug investigation is illegal alien Omar Castaneda, a gang member from Pomona with ties to the Mexican Tijuana drug cartels, officials said Castaneda, 36, after his arrest he was arraigned in San Diego Superior Court on charges of possession of cocaine for sale. He is suspected of being a major link between drugs flowing into California from Tijuana and sales at SDSU and other California campuses.

The violent Tijuana drug cartel also known as the Arellano-Felix organization (AFO) has a firm and deadly hold on all drug trafficking activities in Baja and San Diego California. Their reach controls drug smuggling in Sinaloa, Jalisco, Michoacan, Chiapas and Baja, and has strong links to San Diego, California. The AFO dispenses an estimated $1 million weekly in bribes to Mexican officials, police and Mexican army officers and maintains its own-well armed, trained, paramilitary security force.

The DEA considers the AFO the most violent and aggressive of the Mexican border cartels. Here is the DEA's background profile on the AFO and its leaders. Click on or google: Dangerous Mexican Cartel Gangs The SDSU Police Department approached the DEA and county narcotics task-force officials for assistance in December of 07, when it became clear that the drug trafficking on campus was widespread and involved Mexican organized crime drug cartels and their gang members and they feared that it far out striped their ability to handle a potentially very complicated international drug trafficking investigation.

“We were coming in contact with more types of narcotics,” SDSU Police Chief John Browning said. “If you're serious about this, you have to go to someone who has the resources to take it to the next level.” As the investigation was unfolding, the campus dealt with another drug-related death. An autopsy showed that Mesa College student Kurt Baker died Feb. 24 at an SDSU fraternity from oxycodone and alcohol poisoning.

“We know there's drug use in college . . . but when you have an organization that's actually based out of a college area, that's a whole different thing,” said Garrison Courtney of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. “You just don't see that.”

Research indicates that lucrative university and high school campuses are fertile markets for drug dealers. Mexican drug cartels have known this for years and are believed to have infiltrated many of America’s school campuses through cartel gang members.

Federal authorities point to the Mexican drug cartels who are ultimately responsible for border violence by having cemented ties to street and prison gangs like Barrio Azteca on the U.S. side. Azteca and other U.S. gangs retail drugs that they get from Mexican cartels and Mexican gangs. Mexican gangs run their own distribution networks in the United States, and they produce most of the methamphetamine used north of the border.

They have even bypassed the Colombians several times to buy cocaine directly from producers in Bolivia, Peru and even Afghanistan. These same gangs often work as cartel surrogates or enforcers on the U.S. side of the border. Intelligence suggests Los Zetas . Click on or google:

They're known as "Los Zetas have hired members of various gangs at different times including, El Paso gang Barrio Azteca, Mexican Mafia, Texas Syndicate, MS-13, and Hermanos Pistoleros Latinos to further their criminal endeavors. Authorities on both sides of the border believe many of these gang members and other surrogates of the powerful Mexican drug cartels have infiltrated and operate openly on many American school campuses particularly in states bordering Mexico including Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California.

One suspect, Phi Kappa Psi member Michael Montoya, worked as a community-service officer on campus and would have earned a master's degree in homeland security next month. Another student arrested on suspicion of possessing 500 grams of cocaine and two guns was a criminal-justice major. Authorities identified 22 SDSU students as drug dealers who sold to undercover agents. At least 17 others allegedly supplied the drugs. The rest of the suspects apparently bought or possessed illegal drugs.

Authorities said students from seven fraternities were involved in the drug ring, which operated openly across campus. Evidence showed that “most of the members were aware of organized drug dealing occurring from the fraternity houses,” officials said. Drug agents confirmed that “a hierarchy existed for the purposes of selling drugs for money.”

Authorities singled out the Theta Chi fraternity as a hub of cocaine dealing. One alleged dealer, Theta Chi member Kenneth Ciaccio, sent text messages to his “faithful customers” announcing that cocaine sales would be suspended over an upcoming weekend because he and his “associates” planned to be in Las Vegas, authorities said. The same message posted “sale” prices on cocaine if transactions were completed before the dealers left San Diego. Until yesterday, Ciaccio was featured on SDSU's Web site promoting the Compact for Success program, which guarantees certain Sweetwater Union High School District students admission to the university if they maintain a B average.

SDSU President Stephen Weber said that even when campus police decided to ask for help from other authorities, “it wasn't clear that we were going to end up at the point where we were today.” Ramon Mosler, chief of the narcotics division of the District Attorney's Office in San Diego California, said the investigation could have happened on any college campus in America. Mosler said his unit joined in because the university took the unusual step of asking for help.

“Oftentimes administrations don't want us to do this stuff, and that's unfortunate,” Mosler said. “I think it's important to do this every now and then to wake people up. It raises everyone's awareness to the dangers of drugs.” According to the search-warrant affidavit, Thomas Watanapun sold $400 worth of cocaine to undercover agents from a Lexus sedan registered to his father in Los Angeles. Authorities said some of the suspects made little effort to conceal their activities.

Dealers “weren't picky about who they sold to,” Mosler said. Also arraigned was Patrick Hawley, 20, who was arrested on suspicion of armed robbery and selling cocaine near the campus, officials said. According to a 2007 study by the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, nearly half of the nation's 5.4 million full-time college students abuse drugs or alcohol at least once a month.

Law enforcement officials in San Diego say street gangs here continue to have strong ties to organized crime groups in Tijuana. A gunman killed recently in an attack in Tijuana is believed to belong to both a gang in Barrio Logan and the Arellano Felix Drug Cartel. KPBS Reporter Amy Isackson reported.

For years, Mexican drug trafficking groups have recruited U.S. gang members to do everything from smuggle drugs to murder. Tijuana's Arellano Felix Drug Cartel and a gang from San Diego's Barrio Logan neighborhood go back at least 15 years. Many students enrolled in American schools are believed members of gangs many are now coming from the U.S. Military as they rotate out of the services. Many are veterans who where encouraged to join the U.S Military for combat training by Mexican cartels and gang leaders.

The cartels are confronting police and the army on a regular bases in Mexico and hope that these same tactics will soon pay off and enable them to confront the U.S Police in a much more professional, effective and dangerous ways. Richard Valdemar, a 30-year-veteran of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, travels the country lecturing and teaching police about military-trained gang members. Valdemar and other gang experts say gangs are encouraging members to join the military for training to learn urban warfare and learn the latest weaponry.

The military's current emphasis on urban warfare plays into the street-fighting mentality of gangs, experts say. "When individuals go into the military, they are taught how to use weapons, defensive tactics, and the use of a lot of sophisticated techniques," said LaRae Quy, of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. "They take that back on the streets with them. This is a legitimate concern for law enforcement." Valdemar cites former Camp Pendleton Marine Sgt. Jesse Quintanilla as just one high-profile example.

A military court sentenced Quintanilla to death in 1996 for killing his executive officer and wounding his commanding officer. When interrogators asked Quintanilla why he committed the crimes, Quintanilla said it was for "his brown brothers," according to Valdemar. Quintanilla showed them a tattoo on his chest with the word "Sureno," a reference to a California gang, according to court documents. Army recruiting headquarters in Washington, D.C., dismiss the claims as urban myth. An Army spokesman said army background checks are extensive and weed out gang members.

The ARELLANO-Felix Organization (AFO), often referred to as the Tijuana Cartel, is one of the most powerful and aggressive drug trafficking organizations operating from Mexico; it is undeniably the most violent. More than any other major trafficking organization from Mexico, this organization extends its tentacles directly from high-echelon figures in the law enforcement and judicial systems in Mexico to street-level individuals in United States cities.

The AFO is responsible for the transportation, importation and distribution of multi-ton quantities of cocaine, marijuana, as well as large quantities of heroin and methamphetamine, into the United States from Mexico. The AFO operates primarily in the Mexican states of Sinaloa (their birth place), Jalisco, Michoacan, Chiapas, and Baja California South and North. From Baja, the drugs enter California, the primary point of embarkation into the United States distribution network.

The ARELLANO family, composed of seven brothers and four sisters, inherited the organization from Miguel Angel FELIX-Gallardo upon his incarceration in Mexico in 1989 for his complicity in the murder of DEA Special Agent Enrique Camarena. Alberto Benjamin ARELLANO-Felix assumed leadership of the family structured criminal enterprise and provides a businessman's approach to the management of drug trafficking operations.

The AFO also maintains complex communications centers in several major cities in Mexico and the U.S. to conduct electronic espionage and counter surveillance measures against law enforcement entities. The organization employs radio scanners and equipment capable of intercepting both hard line, radio and cellular phones to ensure the security of AFO operations. In addition to technical equipment, the AFO maintains caches of sophisticated automatic weaponry secured from a variety of international sources. Click on or google: Mexican drug cartels and terrorist are recruiting for more fighters to train as soldiers (http://www.americanchronicle.com/articles/view/58757)

A Joint Task Force composed of the Drug Enforcement Administration and the Federal Bureau of Investigation has been established in San Diego, California to target the AFO; the Task Force is investigating AFO operations in southern California and related regional investigations which track drug transportation, distribution and money laundering activities of the AFO throughout the United States. Click on or google: Dangerous Mexican/U.S. Criminal Enterprises Operating Along the Mexican border (http://www.americanchronicle.com/articles/view/60533)

Magda Hassan
05-06-2009, 08:56 AM
A Day Without Tourists

Tijuana Versus the Plague
By Mike Davis "Since everyone is dumping on Mexico these days, you might as well help me do the real thing."
My friend Marcos Ramirez (http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.artistsrespond.org/img/photos/misc/Marcos-Ramirez-Portrait.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.artistsrespond.org/artists/erre/&usg=__ktODtOWlnoUB-c2jywsu5IDn-zM=&h=403&w=536&sz=76&hl=en&start=1&um=1&tbnid=2aqf_I3-UyuZgM:&tbnh=99&tbnw=132&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dmarcos%2Bramirez%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DG%2 6um%3D1) (aka "ERRE") isn't kidding. He's building a new house in Colonia Libertad (http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.mixedfeelings.org/images/g_photo_12.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.mixedfeelings.org/html/gallery_12.html&usg=__WbhDELPELBwXVoUPQxHt_-drasY=&h=200&w=300&sz=30&hl=en&start=1&tbnid=McjuQmPN0XBsNM:&tbnh=77&tbnw=116&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dcolonia%2Blibertad%2Bla%2Bmona%26gbv% 3D2%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DG), Tijuana's oldest and most surrealistically colorful neighborhood, and needs to dispose of some construction debris. I ride shotgun in his pickup while his younger brother Omar, a poet-artist with eyes like Che Guevara's, sprawls in the backseat.
For once in a lifetime, afternoon traffic in Tijuana is unsnarled and ERRE spurs his Chevy Silverado through the Zona Rio roundabouts, past the giant statue of Father Kino and the utopian sphere (http://www.seetijuana.com/guia/guia/sedes-para-eventos/48-Cecut.jpg) of the Cultural Center, until we reach the Avenida Internacional, the long straightaway next to the corrugated steel futility of the border wall (http://photos.upi.com/story/w/5bb90b0e37f40c9210f8f3f41750b88a/Texas-stretch-of-border-fence-sees-delays.jpg).
As the road climbs the mesa, there is a jarring view of landscape disfigured (http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://dir.salon.com/story/news/feature/2005/12/12/border_wall/story.jpg&imgrefurl=http://dir.salon.com/story/news/feature/2005/12/12/border_wall/index.html&usg=__OXgpdXTC980SQtHjEp68VG5VgEU=&h=401&w=500&sz=80&hl=en&start=18&um=1&tbnid=-Xz8n7eH3C9vSM:&tbnh=104&tbnw=130&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dborder%2Bwall%2Btijuana%26hl%3Den%26s a%3DN%26um%3D1) by National Guard bulldozers and the endless churning of terrain by Border Patrol jeeps. But today even the brutalism of Operation Gatekeeper (http://books.google.com/books?id=gGJcDnR3vS0C&dq=operation+gatekeeper&printsec=frontcover&source=bl&ots=DeaeOZVRtL&sig=2gpKq_dTw7QTb2H7PaHrStH5Mcg&hl=en&ei=ITD-SaXnNNSJtgfguK2SDA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=11) is ameliorated by blue skies and a tickle of a sea breeze. ERRE catches the mood and puts on a Beach Boys CD.
I have a sudden inkling of what he must have been like when he was a 15-year-old outlaw skateboarder from Colonia Libertad, careening suicidally down its rutted slopes. Later, he briefly practiced law, but quickly turned away from its corruption to work for 17 years as a skilled carpenter and homebuilder in the United States.
In 1997, he confounded the Border Patrol by erecting a huge Trojan Horse (http://www.art-word.com/insite97/border.htm) (two heads, facing in opposite directions) at the San Ysidro frontier. It exactly straddled the international line. Tijuaneses loved it.
Since then he has created similar provocations from Reading, Pennsylvania, to Yunnan, China, attaining the kind artistic renown that usually guarantees studio space in Soho or Coyoacan. But he stubbornly prefers being, as he puts it, a "Libertarian."
The Silverado lurches into a dirt side street somewhere on the proletarian backside of Chapultepec Heights. ERRE pulls up along a fence, honks his horn, and the debris is quickly unloaded by elves in rags. He hands one of them 100 pesos, or $7. (The minimum wage in the sweatshop maquiladoras is only 55 pesos per day.)
The old city dump is closed, the new one too far away, so like most Tijuaneses, ERRE uses the services of the informal economy. Moreover, in the midst of an unprecedented NAFTA recession, a horror-ridden narco-war, and now a much-hyped pandemic, any act that circulates a few pesos amongst "el pueblo" seems conscientious.
We fishtail out of the dirt alley and return to a paved avenue of restaurants, beauty salons, and car-alarm dealers. Schools and public buildings are closed, morning masses have been suspended, and sports events have been cancelled, but stores and street markets remain open and desperate for business. Customers are sparse, though. Half the population seems to have disappeared. Few people, apart from municipal employees and office cleaners, wear surgical masks, but no one seems to begrudge those that do.
"Looks like the Invasion of the Body Snatchers," I say.
"You should have seen Mexico City," ERRE replies. "I was down there for the Zona Maco Art Fair when the flu pandemonium started. At first it was just a big joke. Everyone was decorating their face masks with Salvador Dali mustaches or big teeth like Bugs Bunny. On mine, I wrote 'Ay cabrón, qué gripón traigo!' ['Oh shit, what a terrible flu I've got!']
"Then the famous archeologist Felipe Solis suddenly died. He was the director of the National Anthropology Museum and the previous week had given Obama a tour of Aztec treasures. There were rumors that he had swine flu. [This was subsequently denied by medical authorities.] That chilled the whole scene. People didn't know what to expect. It was like the Camus novel [The Plague]. Best friends were afraid to give each other an abrazo or a kiss on the cheek.
"What scared me was simply the idea of being sick and helpless so far from my family. Here together, familia Ramirez is almost invincible. You can bury my bones in Tijuana."
We turn eastward, crossing the legendary Avenida Revolución, past the curio stores, discos, and long bars -- remnants of the raunchy Tijuana invented by gringo bootleggers and gamblers during the early decades of the twentieth century.
There are no tourists. Nada. Although the only confirmed swine flu cases locally are across the border in San Diego, Tijuana as usual bears the stigma -- the growing fear of all things Mexican even when they originate, like the demand for drugs or the industrialized livestock (http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2009/apr/27/swine-flu-mexico-health) from which this new flu probably sprung, in the United States.
"Feel lonely, gringo?" ERRE laughs.
To console me, he points out that there are no cops on the streets either.
http://www.nationinstitute.org/pdf/mikedavisbarbarians.gif (http://www.amazon.com/dp/1931859426/ref=nosim/?tag=tomdispatch-20)Three days earlier, drug-cartel gunmen launched simultaneous attacks on police across the city, killing seven in half an hour, one of them in the small station just up the block from the Ramirez family home. Using decoders to break into the police radio frequency, the killers daily taunt the cops, blasting loud narcocorridos and boasting of future assassinations.
"Today all the police are either at the funeral for their comrades or in hiding. The narcos have threatened to raise the death toll to 30 in the next week."
"Why are they so pissed off at the cops?" I ask.
"I think the police confiscated a huge drug cache," younger brother Omar interjects.
We stop at a light. Some desperate squeegee guys without water bottles scuffle over ERRE's windshield. Two soldiers on the corner of Paseo de los Heroes observe the melee with indifference. Masked by black bandanas, they cradle new made-in-Mexico FX-05 assault rifles in their arms.
It is disturbing that the presence of troops should be so reassuring. The Mexican Army has an appalling human-rights record, and some leftists believe that the pandemic emergency has become a mere pretext for the further militarization of daily life -- like shutting down this year's May Day demonstrations.
ERRE shrugs. It is difficult, he explains, to imagine how control of public safety in border cities like Tijuana or Ciudad Juarez can ever be returned to the corrupt, and now terrified, cops. The elites, meanwhile, ensure their own safety by hiring Blackwater-type mercenaries.
Almost on cue, we pass a small convoy of SUVs and what looks like an armored car converted into a bullet-proof limo. Stenciled on the side is the corporate logo of "Panamerican Security de Colombia." (The real Blackwater -- now shamelessly re-branded as "Xe" -- has recently opened a training facility just across from the Tijuana airport on Otay Mesa.)
ERRE yawns. Heavy metal on the streets of Tijuana is no big deal.
By the time we reach Colonia Libertad, it's 4 pm and some bustle is returning to the streets. We park in front of the old family home, across from some chemical tank cars marooned on a branch of the San Diego and Arizona Eastern Railroad. The family guard dog, a middle-aged Chihuahua named Momo, barks dutifully from the roof.
ERRE has to rush to take his dad to a doctor's appointment. Señor Ramirez hails from a proud cowboy town in Jalisco that claims to be the birthplace of the mariachi. After traveling around as a movie projectionist in the villages of the Alta, he came to Tijuana and Southern California in the early 1950s. He worked as an extra in Hollywood, on an aircraft assembly line in San Diego, as a cab driver in Tijuana, and now, almost age 80, oversees the family wrought-iron workshop.
The patriarchal home, like Tijuana itself, has been self-built in increments that faithfully graph the family's economic history. The 1990s boom years, when ERRE was a well-paid carpenter in California, are represented by an impressive faux-Victorian wing with dormers, bays, and gables.
I wisecrack about his hallucinatory "gingerbread casa de sueños."
He smiles, then scolds: "You know this is the Tijuana dream, my parents' dream. We never stop building. We're always making room for more people. When I was a kid, do you have any idea of how many cousins and compadres from my father's pueblo stayed here until they could cross to jobs in California? Hey, amigo, this is Ellis Island."
To underscore the point, brother Omar shows me the key prop in the video he has recently completed about the Ramirez family's neighborhood: the "Lady of Libertad." (http://www.omarpimienta.com/ladyv.html)
Omar says it is based on one of French sculptor Frederic Bartholdi's original sketches for the Statue of Liberty -- the famous lady with the lamp standing on the pedestal of an Aztec pyramid. A local artisan has made copies to sell to the tourists, if they ever return.
Will they?
Since 9/11, irrational fear and toxic bigotry have imposed an informal blockade on Baja California's non-maquiladora economy. Now nativists in San Diego are clamoring for the complete closure of the border.
It would be a catastrophe. A Siamese twin might as well saw away the flesh connecting himself to his brother. Both would die in the end.
After teasing ERRE one more time, I head off for dinner with Omar and his wife. The weather is still delightful and we find a cozy Italian restaurant crowded with nonchalant and fearless diners. For a quiet evening, at least, the mask of the red death slips off the face of Tijuana.
Mike Davis is the author most recently of In Praise of Barbarians: Essays Against Empire (http://www.amazon.com/dp/1931859426/ref=nosim/?tag=tomdispatch-20) (Haymarket Books, 2008) and Buda's Wagon: A Brief History of the Car Bomb (http://www.amazon.com/dp/1844671321/ref=nosim/?tag=tomdispatch-20) (Verso, 2007). He is currently working on a book about cities, poverty, and global change.
http://www.tomdispatch.com/post/175068/mike_davis_road_trip_in_the_plague_years

Tosh Plumlee
05-06-2009, 06:32 PM
Task Force 7 reported this back in March that it was in the works.... but the media drifted into the Swine flu coverage rather that report the Task Forces reports to the Pentagon... The killings will continue.... we set on our thumbs and do nothing... Its here the War is on our soil....


MEXICO UNDER SIEGE

Sinaloa cartel may resort to deadly force in U.S.

Authorities say Joaquin 'El Chapo' Guzman, the reputed leader of the Mexican cartel, has given his associates the OK, if necessary, to open fire across the border.
By Josh Meyer

May 6, 2009

Reporting from Sells, Ariz. — The reputed head of Mexico's Sinaloa drug cartel is threatening a more aggressive stance against competitors and law enforcement north of the border, instructing associates to use deadly force, if needed, to protect increasingly contested trafficking operations, authorities said.

Such a move by Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, Mexico's most-wanted fugitive, would mark a turn from the cartel's previous position of largely avoiding violent confrontations in the U.S. -- either with law enforcement officers or rival traffickers.

Police and federal agents in Arizona said they had recently received at least two law enforcement alerts focused on Guzman's reported orders that his smugglers should "use their weapons to defend their loads at all costs."

Guzman is thought to have delivered the message personally in early March, during a three-day gathering of his associates in Sonoita, a Mexican town a few miles south of the Arizona border, according to confidential U.S. intelligence bulletins sent to several state and federal law enforcement officials, who discussed them on the condition of anonymity.

The Sonoita meeting is considered one of several signs that Guzman is becoming more brazen even in the face of a Mexican government crackdown on his activities and continued turf rivalries with other traffickers.

Information from informants, wiretaps and other sources have prompted a flurry of warnings to authorities in U.S. border states, instructing them to use extreme caution when confronting people suspected of smuggling drugs and illegal immigrants from Mexico or ferrying weapons and cash south from the United States, officials familiar with those warnings said.

Some U.S. intelligence officials suggested Guzman was on the defensive because of enforcement efforts on both sides of the border and because he can no longer afford to ditch valuable cargoes when challenged by rivals or authorities.

Michele Leonhart, acting administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration, said Mexican smugglers were also under pressure because their Colombian partners were no longer extending them credit. "There's a need to get the cash back itself quicker and faster," Leonhart said.

U.S. authorities say Guzman has become increasingly intent on gaining dominance over smuggling routes in Mexico and the United States. To do so, they say, he has escalated his assault on some rival smugglers while forging alliances with others.

"Chapo is at the forefront of the efforts to control the routes into the United States," said Thomas M. Harrigan, the chief of operations for the DEA.

He said virtually all of the violence remained in Mexico, but U.S. authorities were alarmed that attacks on police, soldiers, government officials, journalists and other potential opponents had intensified near the border.

How much risk that poses to U.S. authorities "depends on how desperate the cartels become to move their cargo in the U.S.," said Dan Wells, commander of the Arizona Department of Public Safety's Intelligence Bureau.

So far, the contrast has been stark -- near-daily violence in Mexican border towns with relative tranquillity on the U.S. side, according to data and interviews with law enforcement officials in the region.

For example, Ciudad Juarez had 100 times as many homicides in the 14 months ending in February as neighboring El Paso, which is roughly half its size. In 2008, Nogales in Mexico's Sonora state had 40 times as many homicides as Nogales, Ariz., which is roughly one-ninth as populous.

Deeper into the United States, narcotics agents say they have seen little evidence of spillover from Mexican drug war violence beyond an increase in ransom kidnappings related to collection of drug debts.

But near the Mexico-Arizona border, Robert W. Gilbert, chief patrol agent for the U.S. Customs and Border Protection's Tucson sector, said confrontations between law enforcement and suspected traffickers -- and among traffickers themselves -- had grown more violent.

A shootout occurred several weeks ago when one group allegedly tried to hijack another's load of drugs on one of the main roads leading north to Phoenix. Two of the suspected traffickers were wounded.

"Times have changed," Gilbert said. "The tactics, the aggressiveness. We're victims of our own success." Now, he said, "they'll fight us."

An internal report from the agency, obtained by the watchdog group Judicial Watch, appears to support Gilbert's assessment. It shows reported weapons-related assaults against border officers rose 24% last fiscal year, compared with 2007, and assaults involving vehicles rose 7% in the same period.

Among areas with sharp increases in assaults was the Tucson corridor, the report said. Mario Escalante, a spokesman for the Border Patrol's Tucson sector, said there were 113 assaults against agents in the sector between October and March, and an additional 26 last month.

"They're losing money and they are frustrated, and they are using other tactics to get their loads across," Escalante said.

The tactics include throwing barrages of rocks at agents, ramming their cars into agents' vehicles and sometimes shooting. He said the Guzman warning had put agents on edge.

When authorities stopped a vehicle in Douglas, Ariz., several weeks ago, traffickers on the Mexican side of the border "laid down suppressive fire" to stop U.S. officials from advancing, enabling the vehicle to make it back across the border with a load of marijuana intact, one Immigration and Customs Enforcement official said in an interview.

Arizona Atty. Gen. Terry Goddard said there appeared to be a shift in the rules of engagement on the part of traffickers affiliated with Sinaloa and other cartels.

"They've got to get the dope through, or they won't get paid. . . . These guys are under orders. . . . They have rules of engagement and they follow this direction."

One member of the Shadow Wolves, American Indian trackers who patrol the Tohono O'odham reservation for the Department of Homeland Security on the Arizona border, said that in the past, weapons were largely used by traffickers to protect themselves from bandits.

"But lately, [the bulletins have warned] that they've been carrying them to engage law enforcement," the tracker said.

Tosh Plumlee
05-06-2009, 07:02 PM
AP IMPACT: Mexico's weapons cache stymies tracing

http://d.yimg.com/a/p/ap/20090506/capt.4d7d074ccbcd46c9b9f1386532afe760.mexico_drug_ war_weapons_xlat105.jpg?x=213&y=142&xc=1&yc=1&wc=410&hc=273&q=85&sig=NbAaMEMUk9ZYy.5j.VRkYQ-- (http://news.yahoo.com/nphotos/April-24-2009-photo-seized-weapons-sit-racks-seized-weapons/photo//090506/481/4d7d074ccbcd46c9b9f1386532afe760//s:/ap/20090506/ap_on_re_la_am_ca/lt_drug_war_weapons)AP – In this April 24, 2009 photo, seized weapons sit on racks in a seized weapons warehouse at the Secretary …



By E. EDUARDO CASTILLO and MICHELLE ROBERTS, Associated Press Writers E. Eduardo Castillo And Michelle Roberts, Associated Press Writers – 47 mins ago
MEXICO CITY – Deep inside a heavily guarded military warehouse, the evidence of Mexico's war on drug cartels is stacked two stories high: tens of thousands of seized weapons, from handguns and rifles to AK-47s, some with gun sights carved into the shape of a rooster or a horse's head.
The vault nestled in a Mexican military base is the government's largest stash of weapons — some 88,537 of them — seized from brutal drug gangs. The Associated Press was recently given rare and exclusive access to the secure facility.
The sheer size of the cache attests to the seemingly hopeless task of ever sorting and tracing the guns, possibly to trafficking rings that deliver weapons to Mexico. And security designed to keep the guns from getting back on the streets is so tight that even investigators have trouble getting the access they need.
The warehouse — on a main drag in northeastern Mexico City near the horse racing track — is surrounded by five rings of security. There are two military guards at the door and five more are in the lobby. Inside, another 10 soldiers sort, clean and catalog weapons. Some are dismantled and destroyed, a few assigned to the Mexican military.
The guns are stacked to the two-story ceiling in a warehouse the size of a small Wal-Mart. The rifles lie on 22 metal racks; the pistols hang from metal poles by their triggers.
The cavernous warehouse is impeccably clean, the only smell coming from the coffee the soldiers prepared for their rare visitors. The clash of metal and sounds of the soldiers at work echo off the walls.
The security, bolstered by closed-circuit cameras and motion detectors, makes the warehouse practically impenetrable, said Gen. Antonio Erasto Monsivais, who oversees the armory.
In all, the military has 305,424 confiscated weapons locked in vaults, just a fraction of those used by criminals in Mexico, where an offensive by drug cartels against the military has killed more than 10,750 people since December 2006. But each weapon is a clue to how the cartels are getting arms, and possibly to the traffickers that brought them here.
The U.S. has acknowledged that many of the rifles, handguns and ammunition used by the cartels come from its side of the border. Mexican gun laws are strict, especially compared to those in most U.S. border states.
The Mexican government has handed over information to U.S. authorities to trace 12,073 weapons seized in 2008 crimes — particularly on guns from large seizures or notorious crimes.
But the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, which handles the U.S. investigations, is at the mercy of local Mexican police for the amount and quality of the information.
"Many of these rural municipalities that may come into a gun seizure ... may not even know anything about tracing guns," ATF spokesman Thomas Mangan said.
A police officer in Mexico submits a description, serial number and distinctive markings of the gun. The weapons are then turned over to the military for storage in one of a dozen armories such as the one in Mexico City.
When U.S. investigators need additional details, as they often do, the request goes back to the original police officer, who must retrieve the gun from a military vault — sometimes hundreds of miles away.
Mexican police must ask permission each time they need to look at a stored gun, Monsivais said. Even if that permission is granted, the investigator cannot go past the metal fencing separating a reception desk and the shelves holding the guns. A soldier has to bring out the requested weapons.
The security, language differences and bureaucracy add up to a painstaking process, said J. Dewey Webb, special agent in charge of the ATF's Houston Field Division.
"The military does a very good job when the weapons come into their custody of securing them," he told the AP. "Because of the systems in Mexico, it's very difficult for us to get in."

Webb said recent talks between the two countries were beginning to ease access, but also noted other problems.
Many mistakes are made because of difficulty translating technical terms about firearms, Webb said. A Spanish-language version of eTrace, the Web-based method of submitting tracing information, won't be available until next year.
About a third of the guns submitted for tracing in 2007 were sold by licensed U.S. dealers.
U.S. agents need the information to track the gun back to the manufacturer and determine when it was made and what wholesaler it was shipped to, ATF spokeswoman Franceska Perot said. Agents follow the gun to the local licensed dealer who sold it and determine the buyer.
ATF offices around the U.S. are swamped with tracing requests, trying to determine who actually bought the weapons and whether they were part of a firearms trafficking scheme. The ATF has sent an extra 100 agents to Houston to help unclog the 700-weapon backlog as part of its Project Gunrunner.
The seized weapons are kept in the vaults as long as they are needed as evidence, Monsivais said. Most have been there for years, an indication of how slow criminal investigations proceed and how few crimes are ever solved.
Indeed, the ATF gave the AP data showing the average "time to crime" — the time between when a gun was sold and when it was seized in a crime — is 14 years.
That's an average of four years longer than guns in American crimes, the ATF said. The older the street age, the harder it can be to track how the gun wound up at a crime scene.
When the criminal investigations are complete, most of the weapons are destroyed and melted down. Some of the more powerful arms, such as M16 machine guns and sniper rifles, are added to the military's own arsenal. Showpieces are destined for museums.
Most of the guns traced were originally sold by U.S. dealers in border states, with more than half purchased in Texas. Not only does Texas have the most gun dealers of any state, it makes up 1,200 miles of the 2,100-mile U.S.-Mexico border, with many of the established drug and trafficking routes.
Details on the 2008 tracing requests are not yet available.
It's less clear how cartels are getting military-grade weapons. Amid the shelves of pistols and rifles, there is a 9 mm grenade launcher and a portable shoulder-fired anti-tank rocket launcher.
Such military-grade weaponry represents a tiny fraction of the seized weapons. But Monsivais said he's most worried about the rising caliber of assault rifles and semi-automatic guns that have been found.
"There are weapons that have a lot of firepower and great penetration, like the .50-caliber Barrett ... which can penetrate armored vehicles, body armor, and that normally only militaries use," Monsivais said.
Thirty percent of AK-47 assault rifles seized have been modified to become fully automatic. He said about three of every 1,000 AR-15 assault rifles have been modified to take .50-caliber bullets, the kind of high-powered ammunition designed for sniper rifles.
"In my experience, I had never seen a modified AR-15 rifle," Monsivais said. "It's something new, and it is to a certain extent worrisome that they can have and use this type of weapon." ___

Tosh Plumlee
05-06-2009, 07:06 PM
one hour interview Drug War, Intel Task Force Ops, Washington DC....


user name: wplumlee
password: tosh


http://meria.net/2009/miscellaneous/meria-with-tosh-plumlee-the-real-mexican-virus-in-the-us/

Tosh Plumlee
05-06-2009, 07:13 PM
Taken from an April 29, 2009 article from the AP:


"....In all, the military has 305,424 confiscated weapons locked in vaults, just a fraction of those used by criminals in Mexico, where an offensive by drug cartels against the military has killed more than 10,750 people since December 2006. But each weapon is a clue to how the cartels are getting arms, and possibly to the traffickers that brought them here. ....". (estimates from law enforcement over 10,000 in one year. (2008-09)


If I recal right the Swine flue epidemic to date has killed less that a 300 world wide.

David Guyatt
05-07-2009, 09:20 AM
But the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, which handles the U.S. investigations, is at the mercy of local Mexican police for the amount and quality of the information.

"Many of these rural municipalities that may come into a gun seizure ... may not even know anything about tracing guns," ATF spokesman Thomas Mangan said.

A police officer in Mexico submits a description, serial number and distinctive markings of the gun. The weapons are then turned over to the military for storage in one of a dozen armories such as the one in Mexico City.

Oh really. The ATF have difficulty tracking a weapon's unique serial number which is stamped on the weapon for ---- oddly enough ---- solely the purpose of tracking weapons.

The words crap and bullshit spring to mind. But then again this is the ATF, who are, it seems, staffed by politically blind monkeys - see no evil, hear no evil and say no evil.

Tosh Plumlee
05-07-2009, 10:59 AM
David. You might want to listen to the interview with Meria Heller. It covers some of your thoughts well. I posted this the other day but nobody picked up on it..... not much interest in this so called "Drug Wae".

User ID wplumlee
Password tosh

http://meria.net/2009/miscellaneous/meria-with-tosh-plumlee-the-real-mexican-virus-in-the-us/

David Guyatt
05-07-2009, 11:06 AM
Tosh, I couldn't get your User ID and password to work?

Magda Hassan
05-07-2009, 12:06 PM
Nor could I. I tried a few combinations too.

Tosh Plumlee
05-07-2009, 12:12 PM
I'm sorry guys My mistake;\

User Id wplumlee2006

Password tosh

been some long days

David Guyatt
05-07-2009, 02:15 PM
Thanks Tosh. That works well.

David Guyatt
05-07-2009, 05:24 PM
Tosh, how did the US Airborne weapons stashed (presumably securely?) on the island off Panama, after the Panama Task Force disbanded and returned home, get into the hands of the Mexican cartels?

Tosh Plumlee
05-07-2009, 10:56 PM
Starting Sat May 09,2009 the Meria Heller Show and interview will be available on open forum on Meria's website; It was up for two days. However, I just got a call that its not on open website after to day.

Tosh Plumlee
05-07-2009, 11:43 PM
David: When the 82nd and the 101st Air Borne held maneuvers in Honduras in 1985 (or there abouts) after the maneuvers were over some of the weapons and hardware was declared as damaged beyond repair in air drops and other "accidents " in the field. The record stated that these damaged an unrepairable hardware was destroyed. This hardware was taken of the GAO books. As a result the weapons, helicopter parts and 185 stinger missiles, as well as other material was shipped out of Honduras, by CIA operatives and pilots, to offshore Panama. This was before the Panama invasion and the overthrow of Noriega.

After the Panama war and the PDF was disbanded, some of these weapons were stolden from the security staff assigned to guard these weapons ect, however most were stolden or bought from the security teams of the "Old Guard of the PDF", by various factions of the Ocha and Escobar drug cartels and re routed to Colombia and some through Merxico to various associates of the cartels operating inside Mexico with the PRI and to some extent the DFS parties of Mexican politices.. (Agent field reports classified from DEA agent KiKI Camerena)

(This became known as "The Mexico CIA Thing" of which DEA agent KiKI Camarena found out about in his Mexico DEA field work as well as the private commercial use of C-130 cargo aircraft reg. to the Forest Service of the United States. This material was flown from Santa Elena Costa Rico and Panama to Columbia and Mexico. ( ref;toshplumlee.info Buedia murders and Susan Baldin and Hector Berliez Secret DEA report)

Today some of those old "Hard" weapons are showing up in Mexico in various drug cartel's and their gangs of young Mexicans. The ATF has many complete field reports on this but the old administration of Bush has not or did not authorized the ATF to press Mexico for the ID numbers on these weapons so as to cross check them to the old GAO and DCS reports. Their reason? It could harm relations with Mexico and damage the on going negotiations with Mexico over NFTA and other programs in progress and those pending agreements.

I think you can follow the rest of the story as to why we and the Mexican Army are "out-gunned" today... and too, the ATF field operatives, as well as the Mexican Army, has uncovered some of these misplace US Military weapons there were taken off the GAO books. Some of these lost weapons have been found, by accident, here in the United States in a Few Pawn Shops and a few Gun Shows, but that is only less than one percent of the missing weapons from the 1985 era. The ATF and Homeland Security will not declassifie these field reports. Now we will see what President Obama does with this highly classified information.

On a side note a few years ago there was a shoot out in LA at a bank hold-up. The bandits had automatice weapons and body armour.. those were traced back to the Honduras missing weapons of the 82nd Airborne. This information was never released by ATF on the Administration at the time.

David Guyatt
05-08-2009, 09:24 AM
Thanks Tosh, that explains things very well.

Tosh Plumlee
05-09-2009, 06:48 PM
A secret United State Task Force team working in Mexico with the Mexican Army first ID the flu in March from intelligence information obtained from the Mexican Police .

This was covered to some degree in the interview done on the Meria Heller Show on May 5, 09; Interview with Tosh Plumlee:

Meria with Tosh Plumlee - The REAL Mexican virus in the U.S. (http://meria.net/2009/miscellaneous/meria-with-tosh-plumlee-the-real-mexican-virus-in-the-us/)



Meria Heller:.... Want to hear a sample from this show? Click here (http://www.meria.net/freeshow.mp3) to download the mp3

Article AP Mexico



"Patient Zero" Identified in Mexican Flu Outbreak? (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-kirby/patient-zero-identified-i_b_192008.html)

Mexican Health Secretary Jose Angel Cordova announced Monday evening that officials have identified who they believe to be the earliest known case of the swine flu outbreak: A four-year-old boy in the village of La Gloria , Veracruz , near the huge Granjas Carroll hog operation, which is co-owned by Smithfield Foods of Virginia. But Mexican hog industry leaders and the Governor of Veracruz State argued that the virus originated in China -- and passed through the United States before reaching Mexico .
"Government officials today said they believe the swine flu began in a small community next to a large pig farm in the southeastern state of Veracruz, where a four-year-old boy who got sick in April tested positive for the virus," reported ABC News, which called the small village "Ground Zero," and said the deadly virus "somehow spread to Mexico City." (Huffington Post reported this possibility on Sunday (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-kirby/mexican-lawmaker-factory_b_191579.html))
Until now, the first flu death confirmed by Mexican authorities had been a woman in the southern state of Oaxaca , who died on April 13. But Health Secretary Cordova on Monday "suggested an earlier timeline for documented swine flu cases," the Associated Press is reporting (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/04/27/swine-flu-mexico-faces-cr_n_192003.html).
"Cordova said tests now show that a 4-year-old boy contracted the disease at least two weeks earlier in neighboring Veracruz state, where a community has been protesting pollution from a large pig farm," the AP says. "The farm is run by Granjas Carroll de Mexico, a joint venture 50 percent owned by Virginia-based Smithfield Foods, Inc."

Company officials said there were no "clinical signs or symptoms" of swine influenza in their vast herds anywhere in Mexico , "But local residents are convinced they were sickened by air and water contamination from pig waste," AP says. "There was a widespread outbreak of a particularly powerful respiratory disease in the area early April, and some people reported being sick as early as February. Local health workers intervened in early April, sealing off the town of La Gloria and spraying to kill off flies they said were swarming through their homes."

Cordova said people in the town had normal flu, and only one sample was preserved -- that belonging to the four-year-old boy. "It was only after U.S. and Canadian epidemiologists discovered the true nature of the virus that Mexico submitted the sample for international testing, and discovered what he suffered from," the AP is reporting, adding that the child has recovered and there have been no new cases reported in La Gloria, "But epidemiologists want to take a closer look at pigs in Mexico as a potential source of the outbreak."

A UN team of animal health experts is flying in from Rome to, "examine what surveillance systems are in place to detect swine flu, and review historical data on previous viruses identified in the country," AP says, adding that farmers will be interviewed.

Meanwhile, The Wall St. Journal reported (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124086575485560155.html) Monday night that the Mexican government is testing Smithfield hogs in Mexico , though the huge company insists that its animals are not involved.
"We are very comfortable that our pork is safe," Smithfield president and chief executive Larry Pope told the newspaper. "This is not a swine issue. This is a human-to-human issue." He said Mexican agents had already paid site visits to some Smithfield facilities to test hogs and to "confirm that there is 'no incidence of this virus on our farms.'" Pope said that recent internet postings speculating on the origin of the new virus were "rumors," and repeated that, "We don't have any reason to believe that this has anything to do with Smithfield at all."
"We know of no pigs that are sick, no people on those farms that are sick and no people in our plants" who are sick, he said.
Meanwhile, the Governor of the State of Veracruz , Fidel Herrera, told reporters on Monday that the new virus originated in Asia , and "therefore it is not related to agricultural activity in the area." He said the virus began in China , and from there passed through the United States directly to Mexico City .

And according to El Universal newspaper, officials at Granjas Carroll México are now claiming that "the virus is of Eurasian origin -- and the first cases were found in the United States , making Mexico the receptor nation, more than the generator, of this influenza." No evidence was published to back up that claim, which runs contrary to statements made by nearly all international public health officials.
Also reported in the Mexican press today, Smithfield and Granjas Carroll have agreed to adopt government recommendations to "begin reinforcing its biosecurity measures to prevent workers and animals from being infected, the newspaper Reforma said.
Reforma also reported that Villagers in La Gloria are being threatened, harassed and even jailed for speaking out against the hog giant.

Tosh Plumlee
05-10-2009, 02:59 AM
This information was brought up on this forum before these bodies were found near the ranch (pictures ranch posted mid March & 6 April 09)

The Drug war has crossed our borders..... notice how mainstrean media stays far away from this subject. These people in these graves must have caught the Mexican flu.

this Information was posted on this forum before the fact. pictures by TF7 and Mexican Army..... ref; Plumlee's work near Crater.

Email:

Tosh
this is probably what JTF north and Mex intel were working on '''

"Yes These are the ones. There are more to come in the next few days... I got some good pictures I'll send you for your article. tosh ...".


----- Subject: 7 bodies found in narco grave near Palomas

http://images.diario.com.mx/2009/05/LOC465018CH_1.jpghttp://images.diario.com.mx/2009/05/LOC465018CH_27015.jpghttp://images.diario.com.mx/2009/05/LOC465018CH_27014.jpg

Siete cuerpos, al parecer del sexo masculino, fueron enterrados de manera clandestina en las fosas localizadas en el predio situado a 15 kilómetros del municipio de Rodrigo M. Quevedo, conocido también como Puerto Palomas de Villa.

La mayoría de los cadáveres presentaban características de ejecución y al parecer fueron privados de la vida en un punto distinto al lugar del hallazgo.

Alejandro Pariente Núñez, subprocurador de Justicia en la Zona Norte, dijo que el equipo especializado trabaja en la reconstrucción de los restos óseos, para practicar la necropsia de ley y determinar la causa de muerte de las víctimas, así como su identidad.

El hecho fue reportado a la Procuraduría General de la República para que coadyuve en las investigaciones de confirmarse una posible relación con el crimen organizado.

El subprocurador dijo que este hallazgo ocurrió tras recibir una denuncia anónima la noche del pasado 5 de mayo, a través de la cual una voz masculina reportaba la presencia de huesos y cuerpos enterrados en el área desértica.

“Derivado de una denuncia anónima se realizó un rastreo con personal de la Procuraduría General de Justicia del Estado (PGJE) adscrito al Distrito Galeana”, explicó.

Un equipo especialista en la localización y recuperación de cadáveres formado por peritos en Antropología y Arqueología Forense, así como peritos en criminalística de la PGJE, localizaron siete cuerpos en dos fosas.

Las fosas se encuentran en una zona inhóspita ubicada en un punto medio entre la colonia Guadalupe Victoria y Puerto Palomas, frontera con Columbus, Nuevo México.

A unos 16 kilómetros de ambas localidades, el cementerio clandestino es difícil de localizar no sólo porque el camino que conduce hasta el lugar se encuentra en condiciones poco transitables, sino porque los pobladores poco quieren hablar.

Los sepulcros eran de forma rectangular con una dimensión de 2 metros de largo por 1. 20 metros de ancho y con una profundidad de 50 centímetros, excavadas de forma regular una junta a la otra, con una separación de 60 cm entre ellas.

Pariente explicó que la fauna carroñera, como coyotes, roedores y aves, extrajeron algunos huesos que quedaron dispersos sobre la superficie.

El trabajo pericial realizado por los especialistas consistió en elaborar en la primera fosa, un inventario osteológico. Ahí se determinó que en el hoyo fueron enterrados de manera ilegal tres cuerpos, encontrándose en el relleno 1 casquillo de calibre aún por determinarse, así como restos de cinta “duct tape” (adhesiva) en forma de atadura con algunos filamentos adheridos.

En la segunda fosa, se encontraron 2 individuos esqueletizados completos, en posición anatómica y 2 individuos esqueletizados incompletos, removidos por los animales carroñeros.

También se localizó 1 casquillo de calibre por determinar. Además uno de los cuerpos se encontraba vestido y llevaba las manos atadas con la cinta adhesiva en conjunto con los pies y el cráneo cubierto con este mismo tipo de cinta.

Otro de los cuerpos se encontró vestido, con la manos esposadas en la espalda y el cráneo cubierto con la misma cinta gris.

Parte de los restos fueron esparcidos por la fauna carroñera fuera de las fosas por lo que se deberán clasificar cada una de ellas, para establecer de manera fehaciente a qué cuerpo pertenecen.

Pariente Núñez explicó que los laboratorios de Servicios Periciales y Ciencias Forenses realizan el análisis para la reasociación de los cuerpos, la limpieza de los restos óseos, el análisis osteológico que permitirá determinar el sexo, valoración de edad y estatura, de las víctimas.

Así como la identificación de señas particulares como patologías, huellas de actividad, huellas de violencia, entre otras; así como la descripción de los objetos asociados, y la toma de muestras genéticas.

Indicó que los investigadores buscan indicios sobre las identidades de las víctimas a través de los reportes de personas desaparecidas registrados en Palomas, Janos, Casas Grandes y Ascensión, Chihuahua, de donde presumen pueden ser originarias las personas inhumadas de manera clandestina.

Por este motivo, la PGJE solicitó la colaboración de las personas que hayan sufrido la desaparición de un familiar o conocido para que lo denuncien y se pueda realizar la prueba de ADN a fin de confirmar una posible correspondencia genética, se informó.

Según confirmaron de manera extraoficial autoridades de Ascensión, cabecera municipal de Guadalupe Victoria y Puerto Palomas, la propiedad en la que se encontraron los restos humanos pertenece al rancho La Colorada, pero de ahí no salió ningún habitante a responder sobre el hallazgo.

“El dueño del rancho vive en Casas Grandes, pero creemos que él no tiene nada que ver con esos cuerpos porque esa brecha siempre la ha utilizado pura gente que no se dedica a nada bueno”, asegura una fuente que pide no ser identificada.

Aunque en la zona sólo quedaron varios montículos de tierra de las excavaciones que se hicieron y dos fosas, versiones extraoficiales indican que las autoridades periciales de los municipios de Casas Grandes y Juárez realizaron al menos 10 hoyos de los que lograron extraer las osamentas.

Además quedaron una gran cantidad de mechones de cabello esparcidos por el terreno y los arbustos, retazos de tela, pedazos de cinta adhesiva color gris, piezas óseas, un casquillo calibre .45 y un intenso olor putrefacto.




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------this is what I was working on-----------------------------------


Ranch one location: (GPS hand held location) N 31 46' 49.96 W 107 01' 59.94 MX Ranch 1/2 mile south of new border fence. (3.5 miles south from NM hiway # 9 at mile marker #125 going to the south to new border fence ( #20 thru # 27 fence markers) Be careful its a very dangerous place.

note; S/E of this ranch about two or three miles is the place know as the "Crater". Its a volcanic mountain and on the north side is the crater. On the other side of the mountain (south) is another ranch in question... it could be the 'compond' you asked about.

It would be inside Mexico about four miles south of border ( at fence marker approx #17 on border road):

Before you get to the crater going S/E from ranch one, there is a fork in the road... the east fork goes to the crater and the other goes south around the mountain to the ranch.., from the ranch the south road goes to MX hiway # 2. At the fork in the road (north side of mountain) is where the Mexican Army is using two backholes and ground radar looking for bodies. I was told they found two last week.

... their cover story is they are digging a pipeline in that area. However, sensitive Mexican Army Task Force Intel reports they think aprox 200 bodies could be buried in this are from a shoot out south of Juarez a few weeks ago (or month perhaps 21 killed) They are going back into the area next week.

Previous post: April 09:

XXXXXXX yes...,this is what I was working on-----------------------------------


"... Ranch one location: (GPS hand held location) N 31 46' 49.96 W 107 01' 59.94 MX Ranch 1/2 mile south of new border fence. (3.5 miles south from NM hiway # 9 at mile marker #125 going to the south to new border fence ( #20 thru # 27 fence markers) Be careful its a very dangerous place.

note; S/E of this ranch about two or three miles is the place know as the "Crater". Its a volcanic mountain and on the north side is the crater. On the other side of the mountain (south) is another ranch in question... it could be the 'compond' you asked about.

It would be inside Mexico about four miles south of border ( at fence marker approx #17 on border road):

Before you get to the crater going S/E from ranch one, there is a fork in the road... the east fork goes to the crater and the other goes south around the mountain to the ranch.., from the ranch the south road goes to MX hiway # 2. At the fork in the road (north side of mountain) is where the Mexican Army is using two backholes and ground radar looking for bodies. I was told they found two last week.

... their cover story is they are digging a pipeline in that area. However, sensitive Mexican Army Task Force Intel reports they think aprox 200 bodies could be buried in this are from a shoot out south of Juarez a few weeks ago (or month perhaps 21 killed) They are going back into the area next week.





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PICTURES AND NOTATIONS BY TOSH PLUMLEE 04-09-09 and 03-10-09





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The next Article was posted May 06, 09

Gulf Cartel Declares War on United States
Task Force 7 reported this back in March that it was in the works.... but the media drifted into the Swine flu coverage rather that report the Task Forces reports to the Pentagon... The killings will continue....while we set on our thumbs and do nothing... Its here. The Border War is on our soil....


MEXICO UNDER SIEGE

Sinaloa cartel may resort to deadly force in U.S.

Authorities say Joaquin 'El Chapo' Guzman, the reputed leader of the Mexican cartel, has given his associates the OK, if necessary, to open fire across the border.
By Josh Meyer

May 6, 2009

Reporting from Sells, Ariz. — The reputed head of Mexico's Sinaloa drug cartel is threatening a more aggressive stance against competitors and law enforcement north of the border, instructing associates to use deadly force, if needed, to protect increasingly contested trafficking operations, authorities said.

Such a move by Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, Mexico's most-wanted fugitive, would mark a turn from the cartel's previous position of largely avoiding violent confrontations in the U.S. -- either with law enforcement officers or rival traffickers.

Police and federal agents in Arizona said they had recently received at least two law enforcement alerts focused on Guzman's reported orders that his smugglers should "use their weapons to defend their loads at all costs."

Guzman is thought to have delivered the message personally in early March, during a three-day gathering of his associates in Sonoita, a Mexican town a few miles south of the Arizona border, according to confidential U.S. intelligence bulletins sent to several state and federal law enforcement officials, who discussed them on the condition of anonymity.

The Sonoita meeting is considered one of several signs that Guzman is becoming more brazen even in the face of a Mexican government crackdown on his activities and continued turf rivalries with other traffickers.

Information from informants, wiretaps and other sources have prompted a flurry of warnings to authorities in U.S. border states, instructing them to use extreme caution when confronting people suspected of smuggling drugs and illegal immigrants from Mexico or ferrying weapons and cash south from the United States, officials familiar with those warnings said.

Some U.S. intelligence officials suggested Guzman was on the defensive because of enforcement efforts on both sides of the border and because he can no longer afford to ditch valuable cargoes when challenged by rivals or authorities.

Michele Leonhart, acting administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration, said Mexican smugglers were also under pressure because their Colombian partners were no longer extending them credit. "There's a need to get the cash back itself quicker and faster," Leonhart said.

U.S. authorities say Guzman has become increasingly intent on gaining dominance over smuggling routes in Mexico and the United States. To do so, they say, he has escalated his assault on some rival smugglers while forging alliances with others.

"Chapo is at the forefront of the efforts to control the routes into the United States," said Thomas M. Harrigan, the chief of operations for the DEA.

He said virtually all of the violence remained in Mexico, but U.S. authorities were alarmed that attacks on police, soldiers, government officials, journalists and other potential opponents had intensified near the border.

How much risk that poses to U.S. authorities "depends on how desperate the cartels become to move their cargo in the U.S.," said Dan Wells, commander of the Arizona Department of Public Safety's Intelligence Bureau.

So far, the contrast has been stark -- near-daily violence in Mexican border towns with relative tranquillity on the U.S. side, according to data and interviews with law enforcement officials in the region.

For example, Ciudad Juarez had 100 times as many homicides in the 14 months ending in February as neighboring El Paso, which is roughly half its size. In 2008, Nogales in Mexico's Sonora state had 40 times as many homicides as Nogales, Ariz., which is roughly one-ninth as populous.

Deeper into the United States, narcotics agents say they have seen little evidence of spillover from Mexican drug war violence beyond an increase in ransom kidnappings related to collection of drug debts.

But near the Mexico-Arizona border, Robert W. Gilbert, chief patrol agent for the U.S. Customs and Border Protection's Tucson sector, said confrontations between law enforcement and suspected traffickers -- and among traffickers themselves -- had grown more violent.

A shootout occurred several weeks ago when one group allegedly tried to hijack another's load of drugs on one of the main roads leading north to Phoenix. Two of the suspected traffickers were wounded.

"Times have changed," Gilbert said. "The tactics, the aggressiveness. We're victims of our own success." Now, he said, "they'll fight us."

An internal report from the agency, obtained by the watchdog group Judicial Watch, appears to support Gilbert's assessment. It shows reported weapons-related assaults against border officers rose 24% last fiscal year, compared with 2007, and assaults involving vehicles rose 7% in the same period.

Among areas with sharp increases in assaults was the Tucson corridor, the report said. Mario Escalante, a spokesman for the Border Patrol's Tucson sector, said there were 113 assaults against agents in the sector between October and March, and an additional 26 last month.

"They're losing money and they are frustrated, and they are using other tactics to get their loads across," Escalante said.

The tactics include throwing barrages of rocks at agents, ramming their cars into agents' vehicles and sometimes shooting. He said the Guzman warning had put agents on edge.

When authorities stopped a vehicle in Douglas, Ariz., several weeks ago, traffickers on the Mexican side of the border "laid down suppressive fire" to stop U.S. officials from advancing, enabling the vehicle to make it back across the border with a load of marijuana intact, one Immigration and Customs Enforcement official said in an interview.

Arizona Atty. Gen. Terry Goddard said there appeared to be a shift in the rules of engagement on the part of traffickers affiliated with Sinaloa and other cartels.

"They've got to get the dope through, or they won't get paid. . . . These guys are under orders. . . . They have rules of engagement and they follow this direction."

One member of the Shadow Wolves, American Indian trackers who patrol the Tohono O'odham reservation for the Department of Homeland Security on the Arizona border, said that in the past, weapons were largely used by traffickers to protect themselves from bandits.

"But lately, [the bulletins have warned] that they've been carrying them to engage law enforcement," the tracker said.

Last edited by Tosh Plumlee (http://www.deeppoliticsforum.com/forums/posthistory.php?p=6944); 05-06-2009 at 02:37 PM.


"... Coyote Hill and Guzman lookout Mountain east of Colombus New Mwxico should be watched veryclose these next few weeks. ...". (Tosh)


From previous EMails in March:

"....
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------this is what I was working on-----------------------------------


Ranch one location: (GPS hand held location) N 31 46' 49.96 W 107 01' 59.94 MX Ranch 1/2 mile south of new border fence. (3.5 miles south from NM hiway # 9 at mile marker #125 going to the south to new border fence ( #20 thru # 27 fence markers) Be careful its a very dangerous place.

note; S/E of this ranch about two or three miles is the place know as the "Crater". Its a volcanic mountain and on the north side is the crater. On the other side of the mountain (south) is another ranch in question... it could be the 'compond' you asked about.

It would be inside Mexico about four miles south of border ( at fence marker approx #17 on border road):

Before you get to the crater going S/E from ranch one, there is a fork in the road... the east fork goes to the crater and the other goes south around the mountain to the ranch.., from the ranch the south road goes to MX hiway # 2. At the fork in the road (north side of mountain) is where the Mexican Army is using two backholes and ground radar looking for bodies. I was told they found two last week.

... their cover story is they are digging a pipeline in that area. However, sensitive Mexican Army Task Force Intel reports they think aprox 200 bodies could be buried in this are from a shoot out south of Juarez a few weeks ago (or month perhaps 21 killed) They are going back into the area next week.





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Tosh Plumlee
05-10-2009, 03:42 AM
I am boxing myself in.... when I need some help I do hope some remember these postings.....and go back to others. The specialized American Mexican Task Force Team needs your support.... this is a very dangerous game we are playing..... someone might be needed to bring it all together in case things turn sour during these next few days..... Well that is more information for you... before the fact.... now we will see if this is a forum of action or entertainment. I'm not sure anymore.... tosh

Tosh Plumlee
05-10-2009, 04:36 AM
Descartan a Perote como propagador de brote de influenza http://www.elgolfo.info/web/templates/bulletin_plazza/images/pdf_button.png (http://www.elgolfo.info/web/tiemporeal/36950-descartan-a-perote-como-propagador-de-brote-de-influenza.pdf) http://www.elgolfo.info/web/templates/bulletin_plazza/images/printButton.png (http://www.elgolfo.info/web/tiemporeal/36950-descartan-a-perote-como-propagador-de-brote-de-influenza.html?tmpl=component&print=1&page=) http://www.elgolfo.info/web/templates/bulletin_plazza/images/emailButton.png (http://www.elgolfo.info/web/component/mailto/?tmpl=component&link=aHR0cDovL3d3dy5lbGdvbGZvLmluZm8vd2ViL3RpZW1wb 3JlYWwvMzY5NTAtZGVzY2FydGFuLWEtcGVyb3RlLWNvbW8tcHJ vcGFnYWRvci1kZS1icm90ZS1kZS1pbmZsdWVuemEuaHRtbA%3D %3D) Escrito por Redacción ElGolfo.Info/Carolina Miranda Viernes, 24 de Abril de 2009 14:02 http://www.elgolfo.info/web/images/stories/2009/Abril/23-04/influenza230409.jpgEl sector salud de Veracruz investiga dos casos probables de influenza, aunque aún no confirman ni descartan la presencia del virus, confirmó el jefe de la Jurisdicción Sanitaria V, Orlando Uscanga Muñoz.

Entrevistado en los pasillos de Palacio de Gobierno, si descartó que el brote epidemiológico que está latente en el Estado de México y el Distrito Federal haya iniciado en la región de Perote.

Precisó que en ese municipio si se registraron varios casos de niños que presentaron cuadros infecciosos respiratorios, pero negó que se tratará del virus de la influenza.

“No tenemos todavía casos registrados, pero tenemos dos probables que se deben descartar o confirmar, están en el CEM internados”, enfatizó.

El funcionario de salud aseguró que la Jurisdicción Sanitaria esta alerta y preparados para evitar que se propague esta enfermedad en la región de Xalapa.

Comentó que en los 33 municipios que comprende la Jurisdicción habitan un millón de personas, sin embargo, recordó que el sector vulnerable son los niños menores de 5 años y los adultos mayores de 60.

“Queremos que la gente no se alarme, tenemos todo lo necesario, el parque esta completo y los soldados estamos listos; estaremos haciendo hincapié y checando esquemas de vacunación”, agregó.

Magda Hassan
05-10-2009, 06:01 AM
So these are bodies found on the US side of the border? And they have found seven but expect there are 200 or so bodies in that vicinity? Are the victims thought to be Mexican or US nationals? In any case they are human beings and it is shocking to see anyone end up in a ditch in the middle of no where. All for what? The only antibody for that kind of virus is a bullet proof vest and even then...The task force are using the cover of pipe laying crew?

Tosh, I can't seem to access the photo links below. They just take me to Yahoo sign in.

Tosh Plumlee
05-10-2009, 01:40 PM
Magda: those three pictures are the same as the three which did show below the xed out ones. I do not know how this happen. Also other pictures and there locations were posted around the first of April on a previous thread on the DPF.

In case some missed the interview on the Meria Heller Show, it is up on her website again http://meria.net/ (http://meria.net/) click "free sample (here) and you should be able to hear the interview. It covers some of the postings on tfound on this forum in reference to the border drug wars.

Those seven bodies were found on the Mexican side of the border near the ranch (photos) Polamas Mexico across from Colombus NM. Others have been found on this side (US) of the border. However, this has not been released as yet because its an "ongoing" investigation.

You heard it first on this Forum.

Tosh Plumlee
05-10-2009, 01:50 PM
Previous Emails (Narco News) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------this is what I was working on-----------------------------------


"Ranch one location: (GPS hand held location) N 31 46' 49.96 W 107 01' 59.94 MX Ranch 1/2 mile south of new border fence. (3.5 miles south from NM hiway # 9 at mile marker #125 going to the south to new border fence ( #20 thru # 27 fence markers) Be careful its a very dangerous place.

note; S/E of this ranch about two or three miles is the place know as the "Crater". Its a volcanic mountain and on the north side is the crater. On the other side of the mountain (south) is another ranch in question... it could be the 'compond' you asked about.

It would be inside Mexico about four miles south of border ( at fence marker approx #17 on border road):

Before you get to the crater going S/E from ranch one, there is a fork in the road... the east fork goes to the crater and the other goes south around the mountain to the ranch.., from the ranch the south road goes to MX hiway # 2. At the fork in the road (north side of mountain) is where the Mexican Army is using two backholes and ground radar looking for bodies. I was told they found two last week.

... their cover story is they are digging a pipeline in that area. However, sensitive Mexican Army Task Force Intel reports they think aprox 200 bodies could be buried in this are from a shoot out south of Juarez a few weeks ago (or month perhaps 21 killed) They are going back into the area next week. ...".





3 Images | View Slideshow (http://us.mg2.mail.yahoo.com/dc/launch?.gx=0&.rand=8377ta8um5j05#) | Download Selected (http://us.mg2.mail.yahoo.com/dc/launch?.gx=0&.rand=8377ta8um5j05#) | Download All (http://us.mg2.mail.yahoo.com/dc/launch?.gx=0&.rand=8377ta8um5j05#)

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3 Images | View Slideshow (http://us.mg4.mail.yahoo.com/dc/launch?.gx=1&.rand=3b56cpl8ihfgj#) | Download Selected (http://us.mg4.mail.yahoo.com/dc/launch?.gx=1&.rand=3b56cpl8ihfgj#) | Download All (http://us.mg4.mail.yahoo.com/dc/launch?.gx=1&.rand=3b56cpl8ihfgj#)

http://thumbp1.mail.vip.gq1.yahoo.com/tn?sid=2464213610&mid=AIoPw0MAAMRKSgXwJwSmuEd2an4&partid=2&f=1114&fid=Inbox (http://us.mg4.mail.yahoo.com/ya/download?fid=Inbox&mid=1_307562_AIoPw0MAAMRKSgXwJwSmuEd2an4&pid=2&tnef=&YY=1241963052272&newid=1&clean=0&inline=1)

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Tosh Plumlee
05-11-2009, 02:35 PM
For those who may be interested in this subject matter. New release:


xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx



THE BORDER REPORT

http://borderreporter.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/hidta-report-for-marizco-1a-150x150.jpg (http://borderreporter.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/hidta-report-for-marizco-1a.jpg)

I expect the Homeland Security Department to engage in paranoid fantasies; it’s good for budgets, great for morale, and delineates a nice, clear boundary between friend and foe. That’s the game.
The latest fantasy is somewhat astounding in that the Feds attribute the new threat to their successes on the border. I guess I expect that, too. What I don’t expect is a newspaper the stature of the Los Angeles Times to allow itself to be used as a tool for those fantastic delusions. But that’s exactly what the paper did yesterday (http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-mexico-chapo6-2009may06,0,5537420.story) when it published a story about an internal law enforcement report that Joaquín Shorty Guzmán had lain down the order to kill any Fed that gets in the way.
The report itself exists; no question there. The only problem is, it wasn’t Chapo who wrote it. It was issued in February after Chapo visited (http://borderreporter.com/?p=853) Trincheras, near Sonoyta, Sonora. It’s been discounted as not credible, say sources in the FBI whom I asked this morning. Lending to the belief that it’s not credible, here is a similar and more recent one from the Chihuahua/Texas border, warning U.S. law enforcement that the Zetas are also planning to kill U.S. agents. Either the Feds need a wider variety of snitches or Sinaloa and Tamaulipas are holding a contest.
This one from New Mexico actually holds a little more water than the Chapo alert because it gives some specifics about how the Zetas have been seen practicing with paintball guns on traffic stops.
Going back to the LA Times for a moment, I knew I’d read this quote correctly yesterday but I still had to read it a few times over because it was incredible in its sheer audacity:
Here’s Border Patrol’s Tucson Sector chief Robert Gilbert expounding to the Times on the attacks on his agents: “The tactics, the aggressiveness. We’re victims of our own success.” Now, he said, “they’ll fight us.”
I’d love to know which successes the Border Patrol would like to point to. The agency can point to apprehensions all it wants, gotaways are the only number that matters and I know for a fact that narcotic street prices are as stable as ever, perhaps he meant job security.



http://borderreporter.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/report-2a.jpg


Then they happily filled in the reporter with all the conjecture he needed for his piece:
A crew of bajadores took out another crew on the highway to Phoenix (happens about twice a month going back to 2003).
Agents in Tucson Sector were assaulted 113 times between October and March. True. One of those was cracked in the head with a cinderblock. Unless Chapo has issued orders to lay siege Donkey Kong-style (http://borderreporter.com/?p=957), I’m fairly certain that was an attack by some angst-filled slob on the southside.
There was a suppressive fire incident in Douglas three weeks ago. That was fairly impressive with Customs helicopters and floodlights – but also old hat in southeastern Arizona. Agua Prieta cowboys pinning down the Feds until their load trucks can slip back into Sonora is a story as old as Pancho Villa.
Again with the “barrages of rocks,” a little above that. Does the Times believe that the Sinaloa Federation, the dominant supplier of a $58 billion a year cocaine addiction industry in the U.S. alone is hucking rocks at Border Patrol agents?
The Chihuahua bulletin gives a better level of detail about what may be expected in New Mexico and Texas. The bulletin was issued April 23 alleging that the Zetas have issued orders that if you lose a load to a U.S. agent, you die.
The orders came with an example of a recently murdered drug smuggler who had lost a load of narcotics a few days before, the intel report notes.
One particular detail that caught my eye was this one: “Los Zetas members have been training for confrontations with law enforcement by practicing traffic stops using paintball guns.”
The underscoring difference between the Zetas and the Sinaloans is that the Zetas may actually be stupid enough to pull a stunt like this. Their public relations has always been horrible; nobody’s going to forget what they did to Nuevo Laredo anytime soon.
So maybe it’s true, and maybe it’s Sinaloans blaming Zetas who are blaming Sinaloans, no sé. But this we do know; the last time shooting incident involving a Border Patrol agent in Tucson Sector was January 2008; the agent opened fire (http://borderreporter.com/?p=395) on the driver after the guy tried driving off with the agent trapped by the door. The last time someone hunted a Border Patrol agent in Tucson Sector was summer 2005 when Los Numeros took down two agents with high-powered rifles near Nogales. Of course, there was that minor incident a few weeks ago when one Border Patrol agent shot another in the back here in Tucson, but apparently nobody wants to talk about that …

Tosh Plumlee
05-11-2009, 07:28 PM
Interview with a hitman
Todd Bensman interviews a former Mexican soldier who changed sides,
joining a drug cartel.
By Todd Bensman
Published: May 8, 2009 07:39 ET
Updated: May 9, 2009 09:20 ET
-A +A

SAN ANTONIO , Texas — Through Department of Homeland Security contacts,
Texas journalist Todd Bensman arranged in November 2008 to interview a
former Mexican special forces soldier who went AWOL and joined the
Gulf Cartel's notoriously brutal The Zetas enforcement gang. The Zetas
are responsible for thousands of murders and for operating houses of
torture all along the Mexican side of the Texas border.

The cartel foot soldier had left the organization several years prior
to the interview, and had become a cooperating witness for the U.S.
government in the upcoming trial of extradited Gulf Cartel leader
Osiel Cardenas Guillen in Houston .

The former gunman was produced for Bensman to interview on strict
condition that his name and other revealing details not be publicly
disclosed, for his protection. Bensman questioned the Zeta about how
his gang procured American weapons.

How long were you in the military?

Seven years.

Then in the cartel, what was your job? What did you do?

Basically, I was a hitman.

Your job was to do what?

Bodyguard and things like that. Kill people, kidnap, all kind of stuff
like that.

That's an interesting change from the military.

Yeah. It's almost the same, but without permission.

What does it pay? How much did you make?

About $500 per week.

You would be an expert from your military training. Were you ever
involved in the procurement of weapons?

Not directly, but I saw little things of how they introduced the
weapons in the country, into Mexico .

How did it work?

The same person that works for the organization here in the United
States, they get the weapons and they carry them to Mexico ... They
never had any problems to cross them into Mexico at the border.
Sometimes they use secret compartments to hide the weapons, but not
all the time. The principal way was crossing the river or by the
international bridges.

Who would buy the weapons?

I'm not sure about that because I never was there. But the same people
that work for the organization here in the U.S. , I don't know how to
explain in English, they have to be U.S. citizens to buy the weapons.
They get some people to buy the weapons, every kind of them, and then
pay them for it ... . The people who was working here in U.S. selling
the drugs, they were the same that get the weapons. It was people who
was working directly for my boss, so he said "don't bring me money,
bring me weapons."

What kinds of weapons did you have, did you carry?

When I was in the organization, we asked for them to bring weapons
like Heckler and Koch, MP5, and M-16 or something like that, AR-15,
but the most we wanted Heckler and Koch and Colt AR-15 'cuz they were
the better weapons. We knew about weapons, so we ask them for the best
weapons we could use for that work.

<!--pagebreak-->

Who would you ask?

The leader of the escort. He was a nearby person, close person. We ask
them to bring us Barrett rifles, .50 caliber, 'cuz we have them in the
military, so we knew about them. Grenades and all kinds of stuff.

You knew how to use the weapons?

Actually, the escort leader, he had been a sniper in the army, in the
military, so he knew exactly what he wants.

When you would receive an AR-15, would you convert it to automatic?

Sometimes, yeah. There was a person in Mexico that could do that
change. Just adding a little piece of metal. In Spanish is the safety
thing. Don't know it in English.

So you always had American weapons?

Yeah, actually, the MP5s we got were made in Germany , but they brought
them from the U.S.

Always automatic?

Yes sir.

What do you do now?

Manual job. I'm a craftsman or something like that.

How long did you work for the organization?

Three years.

When you received these weapons, did you take away the serial numbers?

No sir. It isn't necessary ... Most of the times, the local
authorities, the state police or the municipal police, they protect us
all the time, so we don't need to erase nothing. We don't cover the
parts or nothing.

Did you keep your weapon, the same one, all the time, or was there a
central warehouse, where were these weapons kept?

When we were in service, because we had days off too, we kept the
weapons all the time with us. But when we were tourists, there were
safety houses, each small group have their own safety houses to keep
the weapons and vehicles and every kind of stuff. So before you go to
the home, you have to pass through the safety house, leave all your
equipment, weapons and everything, and then you go to the home.

It's interesting to me because there was a ban on these kind of guns,
you couldn't buy these guns very easily, how did you get these assault
weapons?

I don't have no idea.

Where did you get the military weapons?

We received hand grenades all the time. From the U.S. , we don't know
where they came from. One time we got some oldie machine guns, this
one with three-foot stand, it was brought. There were two of them.
They were Browning, I guess. Caliber 7.62. And some grenade launchers,
Just the grenade launcher, that you can put on the guard-hand to the
rifle. That kind of grenade launcher.

<!--pagebreak-->

How did you get ammunition?

When we need some ammo, just cross somebody who can come here to the
United States legally. They would go to the store and buy some ammo.
Whatever the caliber because you don't need an ID or be a citizen or
resident or nothing.

How much ammunition did you see?

Buckets filled with it. You could enter into the safety houses and see
buckets full of ammunition. So you could go and see whatever caliber
do I need and take your own ammunition, magazines and everything.
There's no restriction for buying. There weren't, but I don't know if
there is already.

What did you use these weapons for?

Oh, (to) kill people, or hurt people. Use them as a tool for kidnap
and for escort drugs.

After you hurt or killed somebody, did you keep the weapons or throw them?

Yes sir. The same gun to kill persons in different events. If you are
caught with the weapons, they never noted that the weapon was used in
so many crimes. They don't do the investigation, how do you say the
CSI things, tests for the weapons to match the crimes. They don't do
that in Mexico , so it was no problem to keep the same weapon.

How many people in your group?

In my escort group, about 40 persons.

Was everybody armed better than the local police or the military?

Yeah, but a lot of, for the first thing, we got uniforms. The local
police didn't have uniforms. Many times, they couldn't afford them. We
had better vehicles. Better radio communications, and much better
weapons because we had automatic and the same weapons and we had ammo
in it. Sometimes we cuff some cops and take their weapons and they
don't have ammo. I remember one time we took a pistol from a guy who
tried to stop us, so when we take the weapon, I show it to my boss and
I told him, he has no ammo and he tried to stop us. What is he
thinking about? The most times, we were better armed than the local
police. Not the army, just the local police.

Why is all this happening, all this shooting and killing, decapitations?

It's a big war. Many organizations started war in two or three
different fronts at the same time, so they are making alliances with
another group who has money to get weapons and to get supplies for
keep the war. I mean there are groups who has the training because all
the members are military, but there are groups that have the money
because they are working more often with drugs here to the U.S. so
they are receiving more money. These groups are working together to
fight their enemies.

Why not just stay in the military?

I told you, I had a problem in the military, so I left the military.
About a couple of months then I met him and he offered me the work ...
.. It was a legal problem. I was working on a special commission and I
had a legal problem over there.

Were there a lot of military people like you who were going to the cartel?

Yeah.

What were their reasons?

Many reasons. Some for the money. Some for they have nothing to do ...
.. As your work, you know a lot of people. As you go to one part, you
say, I know this guy and I know this guy. And that guy knows another
two. It's a long chain.

<!--pagebreak-->

And they only paid you $500 a week? That's a lot of money to you?

It wasn't too much for me, but it was enough in that moment. When I
started to work for him. Then some of us got a raise $1,000 per week.

Did you ever get bonuses?

Sometimes, yeah.

What were your favorite weapons you always got in America ?

M-16, AR-15 and HK.

How were they kept or stored?

We get them in safety houses. We have a little storage for the
weapons. They were not a main storage, but each group had their own
safehouse. There were a lot of little storage of weapons around the
cities where we were working at. The same way the ammo. You could find
buckets full of ammo, divided by calibers. For rifles or for hand
weapons.

They never told you to go easy on ammunition?

No, 'cuz it's a tool for that work. You can't limit the use of that
'cuz it's a tool. It's a tool for the job.

You were always more powerful?

The police in most of the cities of Mexico are bad armed, so we had
better power of fire than them. They are getting stuff, even the
grenades, on the Internet and asking them to be sent to Mexico City .
They bring it to your house, there's no inspection, theres; nothing,
cuz in Mexico , nothing happens.

Read more about Mexico 's drug war:

Clash of the cartels: a guide

Meet the drug lords

Investigation: US retailers fuel Mexico 's drug wars
Source URL (retrieved on May 11, 2009 12:14 ):
http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/mexico/090506/interview-hitman

Tosh Plumlee
05-12-2009, 12:40 AM
What the Hell is going on down here? The media will not even look at what is hapening this is the Mexican epidemic. how do we stop the killings?... how do we let the American people know what we just found?... Two of these bodies have been ID as missing America's..., Washington DC and Homeland just told this Task Force crew... 'We are looking into this".., same thing they told them in March before the Swine flu outbreak... that is what they Told us last month when we received a phone from the Gov of NM. That is what Senator John Kerry told the media when he was down here in March.

We were in Columbus New Mexico across from Palomas Mexico yesterday (Sunday May 10 09.., and the town people told us they are scared to even talk about what is going on in Columbus... they said they have begged Homeland Security to come down so they can show them... The only respond they have received to date is "We are looking into it and we have a plan". A fricking forum letter.

People die and its not from the flu. boy what a can of worms our elected officials are.

note: Released today Palomas Mexico/Columbus NM 3:57 P.M. to be media release review: ........

10 BODIES FOUND UP TO NOW IN TWO GRAVES
- SOME OF THE BODIES ARE INTACT
- COYOTES AND OTHER SCANVENGERS SPREAD REMAINS THROUGHOUT THE DESERT AREA (IT WILL BE DIFFICULT TO IDENTIFY THOSE REMAINS)
- THE CLOTHING ON SOME OF THE BODIES IS STILL INTACT (MEANING THEY MAY HAVE RECENTLY BEEN BURIED)
- PIECES OF DETERIORATING CLOTHING, DUCT TAPE AND BULLET SHELL HAVE BEEN FOUND AT THE SITE
- THE HEAD OF ONE OF THE BODIES WAS COMPLETELY WRAPPED WITH DUCT TAPE
- POLICE LOOKING INTO MISSING PERSON CASES IN PALOMAS AND NEARBY AREA TO SEE IF THEY MAY BE SOME OF THE BODIES FOUND AT THE SITE

Linda Minor
05-12-2009, 03:23 AM
Mexico’s Drug War: Soldiers versus Narco-Soldiers
[/B]
[I]La Prensa San Diego, News Analysis, Alex Sánchez, Posted: Jun 04, 2007
...

Los Zetas
More mysterious and less transparent than the regular Mexican military are Los Zetas. Little is known about the members of the “military wing” of various drug cartels, in part to spare the Mexican military the embarrassment that scores of former special forces have been lured into being criminals for much higher wages. It is known that Los Zetas are often former members of the Mexican Special Air Mobile Group.

In the late 1990s, this unit was sent to the Mexican state of Michoacán, where it is believed that the unit’s command made its initial contacts with the leaders of the Gulf Cartel. Over the next several years, the desertion level within the elite group began to mount. It is now known that most of these former soldiers were hired by the Gulf Cartel, becoming essentially hit men and contract killers. It is unclear how many Zetas are currently under the control of the Gulf Cartel, but various reports put the number at no more than several hundred....

Zeta operations are not directed solely at fighting the Mexican security forces. The different drug cartels operating in the country are in a constant struggle for territory and greater control of the drug flow. The Zetas therefore also fight the security wings of other drug cartels. Some of these groups include “Los Negros” of the Sinaloa cartel and “Los Chachos” of the Juarez cartel. It is unknown whether the other cartels are also employing former soldiers as hit men, but if they are not yet, it seems only a matter of time until they do.

Finally, the Mexican military will essentially be fighting the various cartels without the help of the police. It is well known that many members of the Mexican police are on the drug-traffickers’ payroll, which explains their ineffectiveness in tackling organized crime.


http://www.elandar.com/bush/amigos.html

George W. Bush Jr.
Friend and ally of Ernesto Ancira Jr. Roy Barrera Sr.

Ernesto Ancira Jr., Friend of George and Laura Bush, co-chair Adelante con Bush, Bushes (Jr. and Sr.) campaigned for him in 1992 State Senate run. On board of The Dominion.
Friend and/or associate of: Guillermo Ávila; Gus García; Roy Barrera, Jr.; Cousin of Alonso Ancira

Roy Barrera Jr.
Head of San Antonio Republican party, Adelante con Bush (Sr.), Bush Team 100, campaigning for W, said to be cabinet contender.

Enrique Fuentes León, lawyer for Gulf Cartel, linked to Ruiz Massieu and Colosio assassinations, CONVICTED of bribery, now imprisoned in Mexico in connection with murder of Nellie Campobello. Has OUTSTANDING WARRANT in U.S. on attempted bribery charges.
...
Lawyer for Gulf cartel CONVICTED of bribery, partner in Planeta Mexico with Rogelio Gasca Jr. Bought large tract of Dominion property, sold part of it to Image Homes Ltd, which sold it to Crescent Real Estate, a company George W. Bush invested in. (more under Roy Barrera, Jr.) Linked to assassination of José Francisco Ruiz Massieu (below).

Manuel Muñoz Rocha
FUGITIVE wanted in connection with assassination of PRI politician José Francisco Ruiz Massieu. Was paid $500,000 by check issued from Bank Audi, Geneva. Last seen in San Antonio with Enrique Fuentes León.

Manuel Pacheco
Admitted money launderer CONVICTED, partner in Planeta Mexico with Enrique Fuentes León.

Gary Jacobs
President of Laredo National Bank, owned and run by Carlos Hank Rhon and Carlos Hank Gonzalez. Donated $61,000 to George W. Bush. In another case, was fined last spring by FEC for violating campaign finance laws.

Carlos Hank González
Known as the PRI king-maker, the “Dinosaur” of the party, his family has been investigated for cartel links, murder and money laundering, NOT CHARGED.
...



by Julie Reynolds
Research assistance by Victor Almazán and Ana Leonor Rojo

Those who say that George W. Bush has scant knowledge of foreign affairs don’t understand his family’s relationship with Mexico.

If one event could be said to make that relationship visible, it had to be the state dinner given eleven years ago by President Bush for Mexico’s president, Carlos Salinas. It was an elegant yet boisterous gala, where the biggest movers and shakers in Texas and Mexico congregated and celebrated. This group was to become W’s Mexican legacy, a gift of ties and connections passed on from the father to his son.

What was not visible was that the group included two men with numerous links to drug cartel figures. These men helped George W. Bush win the Latino vote in Texas. Which raises a few questions: How did these guys get into the Bush circle? What else do they do for him? And, to rephrase a famous query, what did the presidential candidate know and when did he know it?

A glance around the fourteen tables at the 1989 dinner showed that pains were taken to arrange them so that no one appeared more important than the others. There was a smattering of celebrities — Anthony Quinn, Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Barbara Walters and Larry King. Bush’s son Jeb and his Mexican wife Columba joined the soirée, too.

The Mexican president had spent a long day with President Bush signing trade pacts, the precursors of NAFTA. Salinas brought his so-called Dream Team: his commerce secretary, finance minister, and his personal Machiavelli, Jose Córdoba. It would later be astounding to see, as the decade unfolded, how many of that administration’s proud men and women fell shamefully from grace — some exiled, some imprisoned and some assassinated.

No one knew it then, but many at that banquet would survive to one day help young W beat a path back to the White House. There were loyal “Bushfellas” who were old friends of the family: Commerce Secretary Robert Mosbacher Sr., General Colin Powell, and George Bush Senior’s ever-present friend, Secretary of State James Baker. Gary Jacobs, whose Texas bank was about to be bought by the son of Mexico’s billionaire-politico Carlos Hank González, was also a guest. Tony Garza, then a young judge, is now a Bush cabinet contender. Today, all are advisors or contributors to W’s campaign.

Hidden among the glitterati were two relative unknowns. They were, however, familiar to the group at hand. They were the loyal “Amigos de Bush” from San Antonio: criminal defense lawyer Roy Barrera Jr. and car dealer Ernesto Ancira Jr. In contrast to the Salinas group, the ties of Barrera and Ancira to drug cartels would remain unnoticed for another decade. Their ties to George W. would grow stronger.


In the Name of the Father

George Bush Sr. began his family’s relationship with Mexico in the 1960s, when his Zapata Offshore Oil Company was partner in a border-region oil company called Perforaciones Marinas del Golfo (Permargo), with Jorge Díaz Serrano.

In 1988, the financial newspaper Barron’s reported that the two Jorges — Bush and Díaz Serrano — used prestanombres (“name-lenders”) to hide Bush’s investment in Permargo from the Mexican government, skirting Mexican foreign-ownership laws. Barron’s also accused the Securities and Exchange Commission of destroying related documents after Bush became vice president in 1981.

Bush Sr. met Carlos Salinas’s father, Raúl Salinas Lozano, back when the latter was Mexico’s commerce secretary. The families’ friendship has continued through the years. Raúl Salinas, the president’s brother, has told investigators that Jeb and Columba Bush joined him three times for vacations at his hacienda Las Mendocinas. It was the same estate where he reportedly hosted an infamous 1990 party for the cream of Mexico’s drug cartels, which Jeb and Columba did not attend.

Twelve years ago presidents-elect Carlos Salinas de Gortari and George Bush Sr. met in Texas in a meeting that was called “The Spirit of Houston.”

“That meeting shaped the relationship between both countries for years to come,” Antonio Ocarranza, former Zedillo aide and president of the consulting firm Public Strategies Inc.(PSI) office in Mexico City told the Dallas Morning News. PSI is owned by several generous George W. Bush supporters, including Bush pioneer Roger Wallace.

Today, as governor of Texas, George W. Bush has assumed the role his father once had as president. He meets regularly with Mexican officials, from President Zedillo to Secretary of Energy Luis Téllez, to discuss joint energy pacts and trade issues.

“I’ve had foreign policy as the governor of Texas, and that is with Mexico,” George W. Bush said during the New Hampshire primary.

While he is in public shaking hands, Bush’s friend Ernesto Ancira works backstage in the international energy sector. Which comes naturally: Ancira’s family and their partners practically own the energy business in Mexico. The Bushes, of course, know everyone in the oil business in the US. It’s a nice match, the Bushes and the Anciras.

Let me make one thing clear: there is no evidence that Ernesto himself runs afoul of the law. Ancira is, rather, a point man in what Mexican journalist Juan Ruiz Healy calls “El Grupo Texano de George W. Bush.” He happens to have quite a few friends who are connected with drug cartels. In addition, there are some disturbing links between Ernesto’s group of friends in San Antonio and the assassination of Mexican politician José Francisco Ruíz Massieu. Since Ernesto has been a friend and a helper to the man who may be president, I believe they are connections worth exploring.


“ERNESTO IS VERY FRIENDLY, very fun-loving,” a real estate agent told me as we cruised Ernie Ancira’s turf, “The Dominion,” a securely-gated San Antonio development where a number of Mexico’s elite have invested in million-dollar homes.

Ernie, she said, loves to barbecue. Has money. Likes to socialize.

Ernie — auto dealer Ernesto Ancira, Jr. — is one of San Antonio’s most popular and respected business leaders. Every year, he’s in the lists of top Latino entrepreneurs. Last April, his Ancira Enterprises Inc. made the number two slot — with $575 million in revenue — in Hispanic magazine’s list of the fastest-growing Latino companies.

“My mother was paranoid about her kids’ success,” he once said. “It’s like there was a tremendous hurry to accomplish.”

Truly a binational man, Ernesto Ancira Jr., was born in San Antonio in 1944, but spent his formative years close to his industrialist cousins in Mexico, who are in-laws of the Salinas family. In the 1960s he rose to become the top assistant to his mentor, Claudio X. González, one of the country’s most powerful businessmen. González later became President Salinas’s foreign investment advisor.

Ancira’s family in Mexico has long been part of the power elite. The Ancira name is prominent in the city of Monterrey; that northern commercial center’s most elegant old hotel bears the name of Hotel Ancira.

But in the 1970s, the Ancira family ran into problems back in Texas. Ernie’s father was implicated in a money laundering scandal at his company, San Antonio Foreign Exchange. The elder Ancira moved back to Mexico, but there he was named by US authorities as a participant in an $8 million tax fraud scheme.

Ernie Junior, however, chose to return to Texas and prosper. In San Antonio, he hooked up with an ex-FBI agent and former city manager, Ralph Winton, and in 1972 they started a used car business together. Within a scant six years, Ancira bought out his partner, and Ancira Winton Chevrolet was earning $150 million and growing.

Ernesto became a civic leader and a Republican heavyweight. He chaired the Alamo Bowl and still heads the Southwestern Bell PGA Golf Tournament. He was LULAC’s 1987 Empresario of the Year, and he received a MALDEF Corporate Responsibility Award the same year.

And he met the Bushes. He co-chaired “Adelante con Bush” when George Senior ran for president, and along the way, he befriended George W. He is one of the folks George W. Bush’s people call his “100 closest friends,” a group that kicked off W’s presidential campaign last year with $1000 donations.

Ancira learned to schmooze with politicians big and small, sometimes annoying local Republicans when he supported an occasional Democrat. He paid for a 1994 trip for Congressman Henry Bonilla to meet Mexican officials in Ciudad Victoria. Twice he bestowed travel gifts on Bush’s Commerce Secretary Robert Mosbacher, Sr. He reportedly piloted his Cessna to host airborne meetings so that Mosbacher and his Mexican counterpart, Jaime Serra, could privately discuss NAFTA. Young Ernie was a millionaire, a friend of the Bushes, and he was literally flying high. His family — movers and shakers all — would have expected no less.


Early Cartel Connections

As he developed business and political contacts, Ernesto Ancira also cultivated friendships with men connected to Mexican drug cartels. One of the first was financier Guillermo Ávila.

As early as 1987, Ávila was part of an Ernesto Ancira troika, a flashy threesome-about-town starring Ancira, Ávila and developer Gustavo García. The three were often seen together in San Antonio in the late 1980s, until Ávila and his partners were busted for drug money laundering.

Ernesto wrote to the US Attorney in the case and said that Ávila was a “responsible individual” who had a “positive impact on our community.” Their kids even went to the same private school.

But Ávila and his partners had transferred $500,000 of supposed drug money — provided by a law enforcement sting — in and out of accounts in the US, Mexico, the Cayman Islands and the British Virgin Islands. In addition, Ávila owned an El Paso house that was raided in connection with the seizure of 21 tons of cocaine from his brother-in-law’s Sylmar, California warehouse, an all-time international record. The Juarez cartel’s Carlos Tapia Anchondo was living in Ávila’s home, and the drugs belonged to one of the cartel’s top men, Rafael Muñoz Talavera.

When he entered the courtroom, Ávila winked at friends and family. But when the prosecutors played tapes of the defendants accepting “dirty” money, the party was over.

Ávila was found guilty of conspiracy to launder monetary instruments on behalf of drug traffickers. Incredibly, he served a little over a year in prison. Afterward, he was banished from the US and moved to San Luis Potosí. The boss, Rafael Muñoz Talavera, was gunned down on a Juarez street in 1998.

Ávila got off easy. He could credit his astute attorney, Roy Barrera Sr., whose son and partner Roy Jr. was a guest of the Bushes at the White House dinner. “Little Roy” is now a top-notch trial lawyer and a close Bush advisor.

Though Roy Senior is a Democrat, Little Roy is a staunch Republican who has been in the trenches with W and Ernesto Ancira ever since they all campaigned for President Bush in the late 1980s, under the banner of “Adelante con Bush.”

It was during those campaign years that George Junior bonded with many of his Latino allies in the state and made the friends he would later lean on when his political ambitions got into gear. By and large, the Latino alliances Bush touts so loudly these days are not social workers or school teachers, and they are certainly not working-class. Like most in W’s circle, they are Texas heavy-hitters who got rich from their astute blending of business and politics.

Barrera Jr. quickly got close to the Bush family, and has stayed close. Both Bushes campaigned for him when he ran for state attorney general in 1986. In ‘88, he was part of a group of eight Bush allies called the “Victory Squad.” During the president’s 1992 campaign, Little Roy and Barbara Bush even teamed up and drove a mobile home from Austin to San Antonio to stump for the candidate. That same year, Barrera became head of the Bexar County (San Antonio) Republican party and has chaired it ever since.

Once one of the youngest judges in Texas, Roy now fancies himself as Bush’s right arm. He recently passed business cards around at a national conference of credit unions, saying that he represented the governor’s office. Last winter, Barrera braved the ice with W to knock on New Hampshire doors before the primary, and this summer he was one of the few Latino delegates at the Republican National Convention.

Ernie Ancira was among the friends and fans at Roy Jr.’s fortieth birthday bash at San Antonio’s Macaroni Grill, reported in detail by the San Antonio Express News. The group took turns roasting each other: handsome, charismatic Ernie almost stole the show from Roy. He was jokingly named “the new wet dream of the Republican party, Otto von Ancira,” by Republican Judge Tom Rickhoff. Roy and Ernie, both good-looking, became hot young GOP legends. They were touted as part of the “Republican Comeback,” said to embody the New Republican: young, wealthy and Hispanic.

But old ghosts have repeatedly blocked the course of Little Roy’s political life. During Barrera’s ill-fated 1986 attorney general’s race, Vice President Bush hailed him as an “outstanding young Texan,” and said Barrera would “stand up to the drug pushers in our schools and in our state.”

But the fact is, Roy has earned a slice of his income from the drug pushers’ bosses, and he’s done a decent job of keeping them out of prison, too. The Barreras, father and son, have a unique distinction: they are among Texas’s best narco-lawyers.

And we’re not talking school-yard pushers. Along with Corpus Christi attorney Tony Canales, the two Barreras represent the cream of criminals from Mexican cartels when they have the bad fortune to get dragged before US courts.

Among the choice clients the Barreras have defended are the Juárez cartel’s US “coordinator” Juan Chapa Garza (now serving thirty years for drug trafficking and money laundering), and Mario Alberto Salinas Treviño, a cocaine runner and alleged murderer, whom the FBI also links to the 1985 murder of Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agent Enrique Camarena. But there is one Barrera client who stands out as the most fantastic and treacherous of all: the “consigliero” of the Gulf cartel, Enrique Fuentes León.

“There are going to be more deaths, eh?”

Fuentes León, the cartel’s lawyer arrived in San Antonio in 1991, a time when, financially and politically, the Anciras were on top of the world. They were building their empire in Mexico under Salinas and in Texas under the Bushes.

Enrique Fuentes León joined the Ancira and Gus García troika, replacing the now-exiled Ávila.

It was during this time that Ernesto and his cousins began to invest in luxury real estate, and the others — the Mexican industrial elite — joined him. Ernesto got in on the new gated golf course development north of San Antonio, The Dominion, where Guillermo Ávila once sat on the board, and Ernie still sits.

Behind the imposing stone arch, the Ancira family’s neighbors are a who’s who of Mexico’s corporate and government power structure. The Zambrano-Treviños of the giant cement firm CEMEX bought property there, as did the head of Mexico’s Hotel-Motel Association and half a dozen other big shots. Many of them paid cash. Even the new President of Mexico’s brother, Rodolfo Zedillo, bought his Dominion house for cash in October 1994, right around the time he started an $8 million business deal funded by the Juárez cartel.

But by far the biggest piece of acreage in Dominion was bought by Enrique Fuentes León, a fugitive sought in Mexico for bribing judges on behalf of a rich Acapulco playboy who raped, tortured and killed a six-year old girl. Fuentes León fled to Chile, then Argentina. Then he arrived in Texas with a visa that said he was an investor.

Invest he did. Fuentes León bought some one hundred-plus acres in Dominion in the early 90s, and he soon acquired over $6 million in San Antonio real estate.

The DEA reportedly grew interested in him when he represented Gulf “capo” Juan García Ábrego in a Matamoros trial. Though he was still wanted in Mexico, Fuentes León somehow traveled in and out of the country often, using brand-new Mexican passports. A law enforcement investigator in charge of Fuentes León’s arrest told me that Ancira sometimes flew Fuentes León in his private plane, but Ancira says he never met him.

The investing continued. In 1993, Fuentes León, and a group of investors attempted to purchase the San Antonio Light newspaper, but the Hearst Corporation — or perhaps the Justice Department, which usually looks into major newspaper sales — never accepted the offers. Fuentes León did buy the popular disco Planeta Mexico owned by Ancira’s friend in the energy sector, Rogelio Gasca Jr. A new partner, Manuel Pacheco, came in on the deal but was later arrested and given a fifteen-year sentence for money-laundering.

With his visa about to expire, Fuentes León made fruitless pleas to America’s high and mighty — including George W. Bush, who called his father, the president, on Fuentes León’s behalf (see El Andar Winter ‘99). Fuentes León was finally arrested, and attempted bribery and drug money-laundering charges were ready to be filed against him, too.

The Barreras took the case.

At the hearing, a remarkable tape was played, recorded while Fuentes León arranged to bribe an undercover INS agent. The tape was made in the summer of 1994, a few months after the assassination of presidential candidate Luis Donaldo Colosio. Fuentes León bragged that his son Enrique, also a lawyer, was “one of Zedillo’s people.” In a moment of bravado, Fuentes León told the INS agent, “I know how they killed Colosio.” And he said something even more chilling: “In the end, in August... there are going to be deaths and all that shit, eh? ... There are going to be more deaths.”

And so it was: José Francisco Ruíz Massieu, the Guerrero governor who had wanted Fuentes León to face charges in Mexico, was assassinated soon after. El Financiero columnist Jorge Fernández reported that Ruíz Massieu was scheduled to be killed in August, but because of a problem with one of the would-be hit men, the event actually took place in September.

Raúl Salinas, the president’s brother, was eventually convicted for authoring the murder. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) agents insisted that another man wanted for orchestrating the assassination’s logistics was with Fuentes León moments before his arrest in San Antonio. The man, Manuel Muñoz Rocha, simply walked away, because at the time the agents didn’t know he was a fugitive with a $1 million price on his head. The INS official in charge of the arrest, Gary Renick, says that all three agents who were present separately identified Muñoz Rocha from photos. Now retired, Renick still says he is convinced that Muñoz Rocha was present at Fuentes León’s arrest.

An employee of Fuentes León then testified she overheard her boss talking with a man she was sure was Ernesto Ancira’s friend Gustavo García, just a few days after the murder occurred. The employee said that she believes she heard the men talk about the murder and she is sure that they said they needed to send more money to “Muñoz.”

The DEA has reportedly found that a top drug enforcement officer on the Gulf cartel payroll met with Fuentes León and Muñoz Rocha in a “city in the United States” a few weeks before the killing. And an FBI report noted that one witness told agents that Fuentes León “has a lot of information about Ruiz Massieu.”

Manuel Muñoz Rocha disappeared at the very moment of Fuentes León’s arrest, and was never officially seen again. But one curious footnote to his San Antonio stay lingers: Muñoz Rocha’s visa, which he used to enter and leave the US a few weeks before and after Ruiz Massieu’s assassination, listed a conspicuous address: “The Dominion, San Antonio.”

Gus García: The Third Man

With the third member of Ancira’s San Antonio troika, developer Gustavo García, the Grupo Texano became a multinational operation.

García has been under investigation by the DEA for cocaine trafficking in Florida and Venezuela, and by local police for money laundering in San Antonio. He has not been charged.

He’s head of the Brita water purification franchise in Mexico, and he owns around a hundred million dollars’ worth of San Antonio real estate along with his partner, Lebanese-Mexican businessman Anuar Name (pronounced nah-may).

The only visible sign of Name’s presence in San Antonio is the gleaming office tower he and Gus García own together. The Mercantile building is an impressive, mirrored ribbon of a building, and García wanted to buy it for several years but couldn’t come up with the money. Then, after a lengthy trip to Mexico, he returned victorious, representing Anuar Name, a multi-million-dollar financier of the Salinas campaign.

Name, too, had blemishes on his reputation, but they weren’t well-known. Newspapers reported that Name co-owned a Tijuana disco together with a member of the Caro-Quintero drug cartel of Sonora. Name is also an associate of Egyptian arms dealer Adnan Khashoggi, a friend of Raúl Salinas, and a partner of PRI king-maker Carlos Hank González, whose family has been investigated in the US, Costa Rica and Mexico for links to drug cartels, murder and money laundering (See El Andar Summer/Fall ‘99).

García bought the Mercantile building for Anuar Name in February 1992 for $5 million — in cash. “I have some major tenants looking at it,” García told reporters. Soon after, Name’s friends the Hank family moved in, leasing the entire ground floor for Carlos Hank Jr.’s Laredo National Bank. There, too, Ernesto Ancira installed campaign headquarters for his 1992 run for Texas State Senator.

Anuar Name’s circle also includes Joseph Audi, of the Lebanese Bank Audi, a “private, personal bank” with branches in Beirut, Geneva, Paris, Luxembourg and New York that has been involved in a multi-million dollar arms running and money-laundering scandal. The bank was not charged, but a $6 million account was frozen and one of its depositors was charged with arms running and money laundering.

In late 1993 and early 1994, Name and García re-financed their building several times over (for $1 to $5 million each time), a large part of which came from none other than Name’s friendly neighborhood banker, Bank Audi.

But Bank Audi has a more auspicious claim to fame: its Geneva branch was the issuing bank of a $599,985 payment that made its way through several banks until it landed in an account belonging to Manuel Muñoz Rocha and a hit man convicted in the assault that killed Jose Francisco Ruiz Massieu.

Investigators have never determined who owned that original account in Bank Audi.

The Amigos de Bush

Ernie and Roy Barrera campaigned for President Bush in 1992, and they celebrated what looked like an easy re-election with George W at a “Super Tuesday” rally for the Texas primary. Ancira also thought he was a shoo-in in his run for the state senate, especially when both Bushes came out to campaign for him. George W. optimistically greeted Ernie as “Mr. Senator” well before the election took place.

But Ernesto and President Bush lost on the same depressing day in November, 1992 — Ancira lost the state senate and Bush, the presidency of the United States.

1994 was a turbulent year for the Grupo Texano. Things happened quickly, and so dramatically that the scene was brutal, intoxicating. NAFTA, the jewel in the crown of all involved, from Salinas to the Bushes to Mosbacher to the Anciras, became reality on January first. The same day, Zapatista rebels declared war on the Mexican government, followed by bloody massacres and international outcry. By fall Mexico had suffered the assassinations of Colosio and Ruiz Massieu. Ernesto Zedillo — a Yale man just like the Bushes — was elected President. Then the peso collapsed. Lucky for them, most of Mexico’s wealthy class had already put their money into dollar-based investments — such as San Antonio real estate. So things were looking up, especially after George W. was elected.

The Bush for Governor campaign was easy. The Amigos de Bush — W’s Latino support group — rallied heavily for their man. Bush’s people were elated that he had garnered 29 percent of the Latino vote, approaching the record 38 percent Roy Barrera had earned in his bid for state attorney general. Back in that 1986 race, both Bushes had stumped for Barrera, holding “Voy Con Roy” barbecue fundraisers and rallies. In ‘94, Roy was more than happy to return the favor and celebrate George W’s victory, and especially his coup with the Hispanic vote. After all, Roy and the “Amigos” helped him win it.

Ancira, another “Amigo de Bush,” was feeling good, too. He was rewarded with two Bush appointments: first to the Texas State Workers Comp Board, then to a coveted advisory board position at the University of Texas School of Business. George W.’s influential friend James Leininger gave Ernie a board position in his new conservative think tank, the Texas Public Policy Foundation.

Almost immediately, Governor Bush had to tackle a problem presented by Ernesto’s young cousins from Mexico. The Anciras had teamed up with an old school chum, pharmaceutical heir Xavier Autrey, during President Salinas’s privatization free-for-all of the late 1980s. The “A” kids maneuvered six million dollars of other peoples’ money into billions, buying up mining and energy companies, as well as Mexico’s largest steel company, Altos Hornos de Mexico (AHMSA). Soon their companies were accused of being fronts for the drug trade, and were described as such by analyst R.C. Whalen at a 1993 US congressional hearing. Together with a secretive binational strip-mining operation called Dos Republicas, the Anciras tried to get a Tex-Mex energy deal going by re-vamping a decrepit coal-burning power plant on the border, named Carbon II. They convinced the World Bank, Citibank and Southern California Edison to invest over $250 million in the project. It was a disaster.

The Anciras’ reputation sank as fast as a rust-eaten bucket, and partners and investors began to look for ways out. The Ancira family was accused by shareholders of wasting extraordinary amounts of money on corporate jets, limousines and other luxuries. Not to mention their extensive purchases of San Antonio real estate. Just last year, while the company amassed nearly $2 billion in debt and had to suspend payments, the Anciras began quietly moving property titles to Cayman Island holding companies, with the help of their front man Marcelo Sánchez.

Carbon II should have been the kind of project Governor Bush would have embraced: a model energy venture between Mexico and the US. But as environmentalists’ complaints about air pollution grew louder, Bush’s comments grew guarded. By the time of the project’s final demise in 1995 — due to mismanagement as well as the fact that its approval by Salinas had been blatantly illegal — Bush was given credit for heeding environmental concerns.

By the time his 1998 re-election rolled around, W was already said to be working on his run for the White House, and in Texas he once again relied on the Latino vote. He was also working to strengthen energy ties with Mexico. That fall, he held a press conference with Mexico’s Secretary of Energy Luis Téllez. Together they promised a new era in which Texas and Mexico would essentially erase the border and create a “common market” for gas and electricity production and consumption, as well as an integrated electrical network.

One month later, with help from the Amigos de Bush, George W. surpassed Roy Barrera’s record and pulled in a hefty 39 to 49 percent of the Latino vote. He won in a landslide. He was already counting on the Republican presidential nomination.

Still Running with Wolves

It’s been a wild ride since the 1989 White House dinner. Bush Sr. lost the presidency, and he and his wife Barbara are now campaigning for their son. Carlos Salinas is self-exiled in Ireland and Cuba. His brother Raúl is in prison.

This year, Roy Barrera Jr. is on the campaign trail with W. He has “rumbled,” say the papers, about running for governor. But the shadow of past relationships continues to haunt him.

Last year, Barrera Jr. landed in the hot seat. He represented millionaire Allan Blackthorne after the contract-style murder of Blackthorne’s ex-wife, Sheila Bellush. The case made national headlines because Bellush was stabbed to death in front of her toddler quadruplets, and they crawled in her blood until they were found.

The hit man, José Del Toro, fled to Mexico and was represented by none other than Barrera’s old Gulf cartel client, the prestigious office of Enrique Fuentes León. Barrera was dropped as Blackthorne’s lawyer, and the US Justice Department began investigating who paid Del Toro’s presumably high-priced legal bills. Del Toro said, in a taped interview, that he was told by his U.S. lawyer that Barrera had hired Fuentes León. Roy’s father admits that the Barreras and the Fuentes León family have remained close through the years. The Justice Department’s findings have not been revealed.

Roy Barrera, however, is rumored in the press to be hoping for a ride with W. to Washington, his eye on a cabinet position. Bush aides say it’s premature to talk about it, but Texas is all a-buzz with murmurs.


ERNESTO ANCIRA’S car dealership is expected to top $600 million in sales this year. Ancira was one of the first to donate to Bush’s presidential exploratory committee, but lately has remained behind the scenes. Surprisingly, the Republic National Committee and Bush campaign people in charge of Hispanic outreach say they’ve never heard of Ancira. “He must be very grass roots,” a spokesperson told me.

Well, not exactly.

Ernie can’t stop getting involved with guys who get in trouble. He’s now one of the “heavy hitters” paying $1,000 each to host a September fundraiser for State Senator Frank Madla, who is under investigation by a federal grand jury. Apparently Madla accepted inappropriate favors from Eddie “The Bingo King” García, murdered in 1998 in what prosecutors called a contract hit.

The Ancira name surfaced again in August when former Mexico City mayor Oscar Espinosa became a fugitive, under an arrest warrant for embezzling $45 million of the people’s money. Mexican newspapers reported he was last seen under the protection of armed guards, provided by the Anciras in their company town in Coahuila.

Gus García’s patron Anuar Name has been named by Mexican law enforcement as the business partner of a ex-governor running from charges of taking Juárez cartel payoffs.


RIGHT AFTER MEXICO’S July elections, some members of the winning PAN party have clamored for the country to re-open investigations into the assassination of Ruiz Massieu and Muñoz Rocha’s activities in San Antonio. Private investigator J. Alberto Villasana told the PAN president in a July 15 letter, “I believe that since Fox and the PAN have won, we should be aware of a very delicate matter: we will soon be facing binational criminal groups to which the previous administrations have been accomplices.”

In Mexico today, there is a changing of the guard. But president-elect Vicente Fox has made it clear that the trend toward massive privatization of industries will continue at full speed — even Robert Mosbacher has hinted he’d like the national oil company Pemex to hurry up and privatize, and he might like a job there, too.

If he is elected, Bush has promised there will be a “special relationship” with Mexico. In his family, the special relationship has long been there.

So — goes the logic — if Ernie has a few unpleasant friends and partners, what of it? Ditto for Bush’s self-proclaimed “representative,” Roy Barrera. As long as he hasn’t touched the dirty goods himself, Bush has been able to benefit from these men’s vote-winning and trade-promoting influence. Does this make Bush guilty by association? If he didn’t know about their cartel connections, probably not. (I called his campaign office and asked if the Governor knew about these relationships, and did not receive a response by press time.) But the question has to be asked: if some of us far outside of the Bush camp know about those connections, how come Bush didn’t?

George W. Bush has made his lust for the Latino vote clear. “If you say a million, I want you to spend two million. If you say you need four million, I want you to spend eight,” W told Lionel Sosa, head of the Bush Latino media campaigns.

What is not clear is who Bush will be willing to consort with to earn that vote. And, if he wins the presidency, what is the true nature of the special relationship he will forge between our two nations, the US and Mexico, in the coming years?

Julia Reynolds is the editorial director of El Andar.

© 2000 El Andar Media Inc.

Tosh Plumlee
05-12-2009, 12:18 PM
We don't hear much about this flu epidemic... everday many die of this type of the border flu from the Mexican cartels... Its already here in the USA Columbus New Mexico is a good example; six dead two Americans died last week.



Mexican Drug Trafficking by Air in Costa Rica

Authorities in Costa Rica released information this past week regarding the investigation of a May 1 helicopter crash in which nearly 900 pounds of cocaine were recovered. The cause of the crash is still undetermined, but government officials have identified the two bodies found at the scene as a Mexican passenger reportedly from Sinaloa state and the Costa Rican pilot, who flew for Costa Rica’s Public Security Ministry for 15 years before reportedly working as a private pilot for various hotels and businesses.
At the crash scene, investigators recovered three cellular phones, a briefcase, documents and the cocaine. Noticeably absent were the aircraft’s global positioning system and a small amount of cocaine, which led investigators to suspect that a third passenger may have been on board and survived the crash. Officials said that the removal of the navigational equipment has made it very difficult to trace the aircraft’s path before the crash, although there are reports that it took off from San Isidro and was headed to Turrialba, a town some 50 miles away, where the pilot was expected at a hotel.
Authorities have also said that they suspect the drug shipment was intended for the Sinaloa cartel, though it is unclear what evidence is being used as the basis for that assessment. Costa Rican immigration authorities have confirmed that three weeks before the crash, the pilot had spent a week in Mexico, though it is not known where he went or whom he met with. However, there are reports that several Mexican nationals — described as “investment partners” of the pilot — had been waiting at the hotel for the helicopter’s arrival.
While this appears to be the first documented case of Central American drug trafficking involving a helicopter, it matches many of the other characteristics of narcotics trafficking in the region (http://www.stratfor.com/weekly/20090326_central_america_emerging_role_drug_trade) . More specifically, the smuggling route appears to be composed of several short legs that employ a variety of vehicles and are apparently managed or coordinated by a Mexican national who has secured logistical support from locals. As more information is uncovered during this investigation, it may ultimately be possible to trace more closely the helicopter’s point of origin and ultimate destination, as well as the various actors involved along the way. Such information will be key to better understanding the new role that Central America is playing in the Western Hemisphere drug trade.


(http://www1.stratfor.com/images/interactive/Mexico_Weekly_05_11_09.htm)
May 4



Authorities in Queretaro, Queretaro state, found the body of a former police chief and another police officer, each with a gunshot wound in the head.
A firefight between police and alleged kidnappers left three people dead, including one officer, in Tequila, Jalisco state.
Police in Santa Ana, Sonora state, found the body of an unidentified man in a trash receptacle with a single gunshot wound in the head.
Authorities in Jesus Maria, Jalisco state, discovered a medium-sized methamphetamine production facility and recovered barrels of various chemicals and assorted weapons and ammunition.
Authorities in Pilcaya, Guerrero state, reported recovering at least 11 bodies from a river. The bodies had been placed in plastic bags and were presumed to have been thrown into the river from a bridge.
A federal police officer died in Mexico City when he was shot multiple times by two men in what appears to have been a targeted killing.
May 5



One soldier died and six were wounded while pursuing a vehicle that failed to stop at a checkpoint and attempted to evade the military patrol. A second suspect vehicle joined the chase and opened fire on the military vehicle, causing its driver to lose control and crash into another vehicle.
A soldier assigned to a battalion in Veracruz state was kidnapped in Culiacan, Sinaloa state, where he was reportedly on vacation. Authorities found the soldier’s body two days later.
Police in Veracruz, Veracruz state, found the bodies of a former Petroleos Mexicanos spokesman and his wife in the couple’s apartment. Police are investigating a possible motive.
An attorney and newspaper journalist in Santa Maria del Oro, Durango state, was reported to have been killed by being shot three times in the head.
May 6



Authorities in Maravatio, Michoacan state, found the body of an unidentified man who appeared to have been tortured and castrated alive before being shot once in the head at close range.
The body of an unidentified man was found in Acambaro, Michoacan state. Next to the body was a note, presumably from organized crime group La Familia, that read in part, “This is what happens to soldiers and rapists, there are still more, take care or get out, avoid this happening to you.”
May 7



Police in Tijuana, Baja California state, found the bodies of two men, one of whom had been beheaded and wrapped in a plastic bag.
Seven suspects were arrested in Las Choapas, Veracruz state, when they clashed briefly with police officers. The arrests occurred after police responded to a kidnapping attempt in which the suspects, presumed members of Los Zetas, reportedly entered the wrong home.
May 8



Soldiers and federal police in Yucatan state arrested Rafael del Angel “El Fayo” Velez Morales, who allegedly is a Gulf cartel member in charge of activities in Cancun, Quintana Roo state. Five of Velez’s accomplices also were arrested.
May 9



One man died in Arteaga, Michoacan state, when he was shot several times in what appeared to be a drive-by shooting.
Gunmen traveling in two vehicles attacked a police building with fragmentation grenades in Lazaro Cardenas, Michoacan state. This is the second attack against the building in 2009.

Tosh Plumlee
05-16-2009, 03:13 AM
WHO CARES? AMERICANS DON'T .... WE"RE TO LAZY TO CARE! KILL UM ALL AND LET GOD SORT UM' OUT!

Killings of 4 Americans in Tijuana sow fear

(http://us.rd.yahoo.com/dailynews/ap/brand/SIG=br2v03/*http://www.ap.org)
http://d.yimg.com/a/p/ap/20090515/capt.afe9551902b74321a996e11bfd02ac9b.mexico_drug_ war_americans_slain_mxga106.jpg?x=213&y=321&xc=1&yc=1&wc=272&hc=410&q=85&sig=fehQ7IJVVDPrzzwZc6fy1A-- (http://news.yahoo.com/nphotos/global-economic-recession/photo//090515/481/afe9551902b74321a996e11bfd02ac9b//s:/ap/20090516/ap_on_re_la_am_ca/lt_drug_war_americans_slain)AP – A man walks through an empty Pasaje Gomez, a commercial corridor in Tijuana, Mexico, Friday, May 15, …



By GUILLERMO ARIAS and AMY TAXIN, Associated Press Writers Guillermo Arias And Amy Taxin, Associated Press Writers – 48 mins ago
TIJUANA, Mexico – The slayings of four young Americans in Tijuana sowed fear in Southern California on Friday as Mexican prosecutors tried to determine whether the youths were involved in the country's violent drug trade or innocent victims of a brutal crime.
The victims, two men and two women in their teens and early 20s, said they were headed for a night of partying across the border only to be found strangled, stabbed and beaten a few days later.
Mexican officials are investigating whether any of the four San Diego-area victims had ties to the drug trade, after a toxicology report tested positive for cocaine on the body of Brianna Hernandez, who was either 18 or 19.
Another victim, Oscar Jorge Garcia, 23, was apprehended in the San Diego area in January 2008 with six illegal immigrants in the car, but never charged in the case, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement spokeswoman Lauren Mack said.
The parents of 20-year-old victim Carmen Jimena Ramos Chavez on Friday described a vibrant Chula Vista High graduate who worked at an amusement park for children and planned to become a hair stylist.
"She was a happy girl, with a desire to explore the world," said her father, Rogelio Ramos Camano, of Chula Vista. "Young people are like that. They think nothing will happen. I was like that, too."
Mexican prosecutors said the victims had been bound and tortured — common tactics by Mexican drug gangs — before being left in a van in a dusty slum on the outskirts of Tijuana.
Jose Manuel Yepiz, a spokesman for the Baja California state prosecutor's office, said investigators were examining a threatening letter to one of the victims from a jail inmate in San Diego.
Prosecutors said they had ruled out the possibility that the killings were a case of drug gangs targeting tourists.
Tijuana, which sits across the border from San Diego, has a reputation as one of Mexico's most violent border cities. Authorities said 843 people were slain there in 2008, many in drug-related violence.
Since taking office in December 2006, President Felipe Calderon has sent more than 45,000 soldiers to combat drug cartels in the country whose turf battles have killed more than 10,750 people over the last two-and-a-half years.
Violence had diminished in Tijuana in recent months, only to pick up a few weeks ago with seven police officers killed in brazen attacks on one day.
Victor Clark, a professor at San Diego State University's Center for Latin American Studies, said criminal ties with any one of the Americans could have spelled disaster for the group.
"Maybe they broke the rules, which means death" when dealing with Mexico's drug cartels, said Clark, a Tijuana resident and native. "And they dragged their friends down with them."
Relatives said the victims were familiar with both sides of the border and navigating the area's bilingual culture — but may have taken their safety for granted.
Ramos said he had often told his daughter, who was born in Tijuana but raised from a young age in the U.S., that Tijuana was too dangerous, and she assured him she was always careful.
But Ramos said he didn't offer any warnings as his daughter got ready ready to go out with her friend Brianna on May 7, even as he watched a news program about killings in Tijuana on Mexican television.

"I think God put that out there so I would do something, but I didn't dare," he said in Spanish, shaking his head, recalling how they were already primped and ready to go.
U.S. tourists, already warned by the U.S. State Department to be cautious in Mexico because foreign bystanders have been killed, now appear even less likely to visit once-popular destinations like Tijuana.
"I'm not going to T.J. unless it's absolutely necessary," Amelia Lopez, a friend of a victim told television station San Diego 6. "Before, you know, you go to eat or have a good time or shopping. Nothing like that."
___ Associated Press Writer Solvej Schou in Los Angeles contributed to this report.

Tosh Plumlee
05-19-2009, 12:49 AM
This will perhaps be my last post on this subject. We have been pulled back from the border and the Task Force has been called back to Ft. Huchuca. The Mexican Army is being slowly pulled back, 1000 to go back to Mexico City next week and 3000 out by Sept.... The cartels have moved back into the old huants and have won this battle along the border. Homeland Security has their head in the sand.

Who cares? It does not effect us Americans. Right?

Fm,..TF 7 Intel Report... one of the last for me... disgusted at apathy... same ole' same ole'..

in Juarez this weekend: classified Task Force field report and recap xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxx Compare this to the flu outbreak.....

".... A very violent weekend across the border with at least 2 dozen homicides reported.
Our Juarez media partner Channel 44 tells us there were 13 homicides across the river on Friday alone , two of those murders involved beheadings, police say the bodies of two men were found handcuffed , their heads laying on the ground near by, the gruesome discovery was in the small town of Porfirio Parra in the Juarez lower valley across from Fabens, on Saturday six persons were gunned down in Juarez , the six homicides included the shooting death of a 15 yr old Coronado High School student. On Sunday another 5 persons were found shot dead in different parts of Juarez. Big question is what happened to the Mexican army presence being a deterrent?

XXXXXXX



NOW FOR THE REST OF MEXICO:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MEXICO SECURITY MEMO: MAY 18, 2009



Zacatecas Prison Break
More than 50 inmates were freed from a prison in Cieneguillas, Zacatecas state, in the early morning of May 16. The inmates reportedly were serving sentences for crimes relating to organized crime, and some of their identities were released as police released public safety bulletins during the ensuing manhunt. Several government officials stated that the group behind the prison break could be linked to the Gulf cartel or Los Zetas, though the basis for that assertion remains unclear.

Based on available information, the rescue occurred at 5 a.m. local time, lasted less than 10 minutes and did not involve a single shot being fired. It began when a group of armed men — some reportedly dressed as federal police officers — arrived at the prison in some 15 vehicles. According to one report, a helicopter also was involved in the rescue. Authorities said these and other details of the rescue suggest that prison officials were complicit in the escape, and nearly all prison guards and directors on duty at the time are in custody. That the prison officials appear to have been bought off also raises questions regarding the accuracy of their description of the rescue.

Though by no means the first such prison break in Mexico, this particular prison break is certainly noteworthy in terms of the coordination involved and the number of prisoners rescued at one time, as well as the fact that a helicopter may have been involved in the rescue (though it is unclear exactly what role it played). Regardless, prison breaks such as this one are an inevitable symptom of Mexico’s rampant corruption and weak judicial system, and can be expected to continue to play a role in the country’s cartel war.

ERPI: A Guerrilla Group's Re-emergence?
Reports surfaced this past week about the May 9-10 appearance of Comandante Ramiro (aka Omar Guerrero Solis), leader of the People’s Insurgent Revolutionary Army (ERPI), a left-wing guerrilla group based in Guerrero state. Ramiro appeared with some 30 ERPI comrades in a remote location in Guerrero, where he gave an interview to several journalists brought there by ERPI members to cover his statements and take photographs. It was Ramiro’s first such public appearance since his 2001 escape from prison.

In his statements, Ramiro accused the governor of Guerrero and the leader of the state’s cattle ranching union of creating paramilitary organizations to fight insurgents like those of ERPI. He claimed that ERPI for several years has battled these paramilitaries along with organized criminal groups, and he provided details of specific engagements as corroboration. These engagements already were well known, though Ramiro said authorities always described them as involving drug traffickers or organized crime, not insurgents. Ramiro also sought to distance himself from organized criminal groups such as drug-trafficking organizations, and accused President Felipe Calderon of protecting Sinaloa cartel leader Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman Loera — a common assertion among El Chapo’s enemies.

Based on these statements, very little appears to have changed in ERPI’s ideology, especially compared with the online communiques the group often releases. ERPI shares a similar ideology with the more well-known left-wing guerrilla group the Popular Revolutionary Army (EPR), from which its leaders split in 1998. While both groups carried out small-arms and sniper attacks on police and soldiers in the 1990s, EPR has more recently shifted its tactics to bomb attacks on buildings and infrastructure designed to limit the possibility of casualties. ERPI, on the other hand, claims to have continued using the same tactics to kill its enemies.

Even though STRATFOR cannot corroborate Ramiro’s claims that it was ERPI members — and not drug traffickers — involved in the firefights he cited, it is nonetheless significant that Ramiro has resurfaced. This development could suggest, for example, that his organization and support network have grown to the point where he is now able to make such appearances without jeopardizing his security. In this context, ERPI warrants a closer look in the coming weeks and months.




May 11

The bodies of two people were found inside a vehicle in Zihuatanejo, Guerrero state, each with several gunshot wounds.
Authorities in Acapulco and Zihuatanejo, Guerrero state, removed several banners hanging from highway overpasses directed at President Felipe Calderon and signed by La Familia.
A group of armed men surrounded and ambushed a patrol, killing three police officers and wounding two in La Huacana, Michoacan state.


May 12

Authorities at Mexico City International Airport seized more than 1,300 pounds of cocaine hidden in cargo on a flight from Colombia.
Two men died after being shot multiple times while driving in Navolato, Sinaloa state.
Soldiers in Ziracuaretiro, Michoacan state, seized more than 8 tons of methamphetamines from a production facility.


May 13

An alleged drug trafficker was wounded during a firefight with soldiers that began after an army patrol came across several men hauling a load of marijuana in Apaxtla de Castrejon, Guerrero state.
A police officer in Mocorito, Sinaloa state, was abducted from his home and later found dead. Police and soldiers responding to the kidnapping exchanged gunfire with the suspects, killing one.


May 14

Several armed men shot and killed a police officer and seven members of his family, including four minors, in Cunduacan, Tabasco state.
Police in Tijuana, Baja California state, identified three people killed May 9 as U.S. citizens. The victims were found wrapped in blankets and bearing signs of torture.
Several men killed a police commander and his bodyguard after opening fire on the pair in Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes state.
At least seven people were reported killed in separate organized crime-related violence in Sinaloa state, including a police officer shot dead near Los Mochis.


May 16

At least five people were reported dead in separate incidents in Sinaloa state, including a 74-year-old man found shot dead in Badiraguato.
A federal police officer was wounded after being shot several times while driving in Tarimbaro, Michoacan state.
A high-ranking police official in Tijuana, Baja California state, died after being shot multiple times while driving to work.

Tosh Plumlee
05-20-2009, 01:30 PM
xxxxxxxxxxxx
xxxxxxxxxxxx



Tosh..... We will be pulling out June 1st.XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

Well things are getting back to normal in Juarez now tthat the army is pulling out.

Also. Another person died in American from the Swine flu I think that makes four?



http://images.diario.com.mx/2009/05/LOC467834CH_1.jpg

2 men shot to death, another wounded in south Juarez yesterday, witnesses told police the 3 were shot by a group of heavily armed
men , investigators say the suspects fired at least 30 rounds at the victims --counting the guy found in a drum inside a car trunk , thats at least 3 homicides yesterday in Juarez, ---once again Juarez is averaging between 3 and 5 homicides a day, more on weekends-,
if last Fridays 13 is any indication--cr

Dos hombres ejecutados y uno más herido de gravedad fue el saldo de un ataque perpetrado por un comando armado ayer en La Cuesta.

El incidente se registró aproximadamente a las 19:30 horas en las calles Cordillera de los Andes cruce con Sierra de Picacho, donde los tres hombres de entre 20 a 25 años se encontraban en el exterior de una vivienda.

De acuerdo a la versión de testigos los agresores viajaban en una camioneta Pathfinder gris y un Stratus blanco desde donde realizaron al menos 30 disparos.

Los balazos hicieron blanco en los tres hombres de los cuales dos murieron y uno más resulto herido.

Al darse el ataque las víctimas intentaron resguardarse de los disparos por lo que uno de ellos quedo debajo de un automóvil Linconl Town Car.

Tras la agresión dos hombres quedaron sin vida, mientras que uno de ellos recibió los impactos en una de las piernas, por lo que familiares lo llevaron de manera inmediata al Hospital Juárez que se encuentra a unos metros del lugar del incidente sobre la Cordillera de los Andes y Oscar Flores.

Una de las personas sin vida vestía una playera color naranja, pantaloncillo corto negro y tenis blancos, mientras que el otro una camiseta oscura y pantalón de mezclilla.

Después de unos minutos de ingresado al Hospital Juárez, familiares solicitaron el traslado del herido a otro nosocomio.
*body {background:#FFF;}body {background:#FFF;}

Linda Minor
05-21-2009, 12:05 AM
The murder rate in Juarez is about equal to that in Houston, Texas.

http://www.khou.com/topstories/stories/khou090103_mp_murder-numbers-drop.3513e2ce.html
January 3, 2009
HOUSTON -- For the second year in a row, the number of murders in Houston has declined. HPD believes the extra academy classes and overtime has put more of their men and women on the streets, resulting in a safer city. But one veteran homicide detective said there's another reason they are seeing less murders. He said it has to do with Houston’s EMS and their medical skills.

“Unfortunately, there is more violence going on. But we have an efficient system between the police department, the fire department, the hospitals and the trauma centers, so we're doing a better job of keeping those folks alive,” said Dr. David Persse, Director of Houston EMS.

In 2006, there were 376 homicides within the city limits. In 2007, the number dropped to 347, and in 2008, it dropped again to 292. ...

Magda Hassan
05-21-2009, 12:40 AM
Linda, do you know what is the main cause of this violence in Houston? Is it drug related? Is it comparable to other cities in the US of similar size and demographics?

Linda Minor
05-22-2009, 12:52 AM
Linda, do you know what is the main cause of this violence in Houston? Is it drug related? Is it comparable to other cities in the US of similar size and demographics?

I don't really know. I moved from there about 10 years ago, but we used to watch one murder report after another on the news. Some weekends there might be 5 or more unconnected murders. It appears that nothing has changed since we left.

Magda Hassan
05-22-2009, 01:46 AM
Over recent years there have been a huge amount women murdered in the Juarez City area and other places where there are maquilladoras.

Tosh Plumlee
05-23-2009, 02:05 AM
Linda: I would recheck the death toll in Juarez for this year and last year..... I think you will find over 1600 just in the Juarez area, this year (6mo). .., over ten thousand in the total border war in the last two years...

Dawn Meredith
05-23-2009, 04:07 PM
Don't worry about swine flu: Obama is going to MANDATE vaccines!!!
JUST SAY NO! They can't arrest all of us.
My husband Erick warned me just before the election that in a short time I would see that Obama would be worse than Bush. Last night I conceded.
Dawn

Tosh Plumlee
05-26-2009, 10:58 PM
xxxxxxxxxxxx
xxxxxxxxxxxx



Tosh..... We will be pulling out June 1st.XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

Well things are getting back to normal in Juarez now tthat the army is pulling out.

Also. Another person died in American from the Swine flu I think that makes four?



http://images.diario.com.mx/2009/05/LOC467834CH_1.jpg

2 men shot to death, another wounded in south Juarez yesterday, witnesses told police the 3 were shot by a group of heavily armed
men , investigators say the suspects fired at least 30 rounds at the victims --counting the guy found in a drum inside a car trunk , thats at least 3 homicides yesterday in Juarez, ---once again Juarez is averaging between 3 and 5 homicides a day, more on weekends-,
if last Fridays 13 is any indication--cr

Dos hombres ejecutados y uno más herido de gravedad fue el saldo de un ataque perpetrado por un comando armado ayer en La Cuesta.

El incidente se registró aproximadamente a las 19:30 horas en las calles Cordillera de los Andes cruce con Sierra de Picacho, donde los tres hombres de entre 20 a 25 años se encontraban en el exterior de una vivienda.

De acuerdo a la versión de testigos los agresores viajaban en una camioneta Pathfinder gris y un Stratus blanco desde donde realizaron al menos 30 disparos.

Los balazos hicieron blanco en los tres hombres de los cuales dos murieron y uno más resulto herido.

Al darse el ataque las víctimas intentaron resguardarse de los disparos por lo que uno de ellos quedo debajo de un automóvil Linconl Town Car.

Tras la agresión dos hombres quedaron sin vida, mientras que uno de ellos recibió los impactos en una de las piernas, por lo que familiares lo llevaron de manera inmediata al Hospital Juárez que se encuentra a unos metros del lugar del incidente sobre la Cordillera de los Andes y Oscar Flores.

Una de las personas sin vida vestía una playera color naranja, pantaloncillo corto negro y tenis blancos, mientras que el otro una camiseta oscura y pantalón de mezclilla.

Después de unos minutos de ingresado al Hospital Juárez, familiares solicitaron el traslado del herido a otro nosocomio.
*body {background:#FFF;}body {background:#FFF;}



two men gunned down at gas station in Chihuahua city , that city is currently experiencing what Juarez went through 6 months ago

Juarez is almost back to that level once again.



two found shot to death (execution style) along rural dirt road just south of Juarez

Tosh Plumlee
05-27-2009, 02:07 PM
SOURCE: (Field report)

MEXICO MILITARY SECURITY MEMO: MAY 26, 2009
XXXXXXXX TO : JSOC Latin America Desk xxxxx XXXXXXXXXXXXX report:

"..... Government Admits Areas Lost to Organized Crime
This past week, several news organizations in Mexico published excerpts from a forthcoming Mexican government report that acknowledges something STRATFOR has asserted for some time: namely, that certain areas of the country are outside the federal government's control. The Interior Secretariat (Segob) prepared the document, reportedly titled "Plan for National Security 2009-2012," as a general framework for confronting a range of issues throughout the next few years.

According to news accounts, the plan's objectives include promoting the recovery of spaces "illegitimately co-opted by third parties, subverting constitutional order." The plan also proposes recovering "full control in territories endemically affected by criminal activity," with a statement that regions most affected by organized crime require a comprehensive response that includes social, political, judicial and security measures.

Although the report does not specify the territories and regions it refers to, STRATFOR has observed in the past that Mexico's border areas have been the historic home of the country's most noteworthy criminal groups. While drug trafficking and organized crime exists throughout the country, the Mexican drug cartels that have amassed the most power over the years nearly all have originated in Mexican cities along the U.S. border. It is in these areas where many of the effects of organized crime -- corruption, lawlessness, impunity, insecurity -- are most salient. In addition, the distance between these areas and Mexico City contributes to the federal government's challenge of exerting control and imposing order.

This fact -- that only the drug cartels with direct access to the U.S. border have emerged as national and international criminal powers -- is not the result of coincidence or luck, but rather is explained by the geography of the drug trade in Mexico and the United States. Understanding this explanation also makes clear the tremendous challenge faced by the Mexican government as it attempts to accomplish the goals laid out in its national security plan. Simply put, no amount of focused social, political or security measures will succeed in resolving the fundamental reasons that organized crime has thrived in this area of the country. Moreover, the effect of such measures will likely be marginal in the long term, with the best outcome the disruption or dismantling of a specific criminal group (though another group can be expected to fill the gap quickly).

Meanwhile, it is significant that Segob has acknowledged that there are parts of the country outside of Mexico City's control -- a condition considered by many to be an indicator of a failed or failing state. The statement's inclusion in this report should be viewed more as a political development than a change in the country's ability to govern itself, given that Mexico's security crisis has existed for several years now.


May 18

Police in La Union, Guerrero state, found the beheaded bodies of three unidentified men inside a taxi on the side of a road near the border with Michoacan state. Their severed heads were later found inside a cooler with a note that read in part, "here are your informants." Authorities believe the victims may have been soldiers.
The charred body of an unidentified man was found with several gunshot wounds in San Juan Nuevo, Michoacan state.
Authorities in Culiacan, Sinaloa state, discovered the body of an unidentified man bound at the hands with two gunshot wounds in the head.


May 19

A firefight between police officers and alleged drug traffickers in Tancitaro, Michoacan state, prompted several army units and nearby police forces to send reinforcements.
An official from the Durango state attorney general's office was wounded after several assailants following her in a taxi in Durango, Durango state, shot her twice.


May 20

Mexican army forces captured alleged Gulf cartel member Nelson "El Luchador" Garza Lozano, after a firefight in Ciudad Victoria, Tamaulipas state. Three local police officers also were arrested on suspicions they were protecting Garza.
Four people died in separate organized crime-related violence in Tijuana, Baja California state, including one business owner killed when he attempted to prevent his brother from being kidnapped.


May 21

At least two police officers were wounded when several gunmen attacked their patrol vehicle outside a police building in Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua state.
Authorities in Torreon, Coahuila state, announced the firing of more than 300 police officers -- approximately one-third of the police force -- for failing a variety of requirements and exams.


May 22

The public security secretary of Zacatecas state announced his resignation in the wake of the state's May 16 prison break.


May 23

The bodies of two unidentified men were found bound at the wrists and bearing signs of torture in Taretan, Michoacan state.
A three-week old infant died when several men armed with assault rifles attacked his family while driving in Chihuahua, Chihuahua state.


May 25

Mexican army forces exchanged gunfire with several armed men at a synthetic drug manufacturing site in San Diego de Alejandria, Jalisco state, eventually detaining seven suspects.
The bodies of seven unidentified people were found inside a vehicle at a ranch in Othon P. Blanco, Quintana Roo state.

Tosh Plumlee
05-27-2009, 02:11 PM
Juarez Mexico Border War heating up again:
SOURCE: (TF7 Field report)

MEXICO MILITARY SECURITY MEMO: MAY 26, 2009
XXXXXXXX TO : JSOC Latin America Desk xxxxx XXXXXXXXXXXXX report:

"..... Government Admits Areas Lost to Organized Crime
This past week, several news organizations in Mexico published excerpts from a forthcoming Mexican government report that acknowledges something STRATFOR has asserted for some time: namely, that certain areas of the country are outside the federal government's control. The Interior Secretariat (Segob) prepared the document, reportedly titled "Plan for National Security 2009-2012," as a general framework for confronting a range of issues throughout the next few years.

According to news accounts, the plan's objectives include promoting the recovery of spaces "illegitimately co-opted by third parties, subverting constitutional order." The plan also proposes recovering "full control in territories endemically affected by criminal activity," with a statement that regions most affected by organized crime require a comprehensive response that includes social, political, judicial and security measures.

Although the report does not specify the territories and regions it refers to, STRATFOR has observed in the past that Mexico's border areas have been the historic home of the country's most noteworthy criminal groups. While drug trafficking and organized crime exists throughout the country, the Mexican drug cartels that have amassed the most power over the years nearly all have originated in Mexican cities along the U.S. border. It is in these areas where many of the effects of organized crime -- corruption, lawlessness, impunity, insecurity -- are most salient. In addition, the distance between these areas and Mexico City contributes to the federal government's challenge of exerting control and imposing order.

This fact -- that only the drug cartels with direct access to the U.S. border have emerged as national and international criminal powers -- is not the result of coincidence or luck, but rather is explained by the geography of the drug trade in Mexico and the United States. Understanding this explanation also makes clear the tremendous challenge faced by the Mexican government as it attempts to accomplish the goals laid out in its national security plan. Simply put, no amount of focused social, political or security measures will succeed in resolving the fundamental reasons that organized crime has thrived in this area of the country. Moreover, the effect of such measures will likely be marginal in the long term, with the best outcome the disruption or dismantling of a specific criminal group (though another group can be expected to fill the gap quickly).

Meanwhile, it is significant that Segob has acknowledged that there are parts of the country outside of Mexico City's control -- a condition considered by many to be an indicator of a failed or failing state. The statement's inclusion in this report should be viewed more as a political development than a change in the country's ability to govern itself, given that Mexico's security crisis has existed for several years now.


May 18

Police in La Union, Guerrero state, found the beheaded bodies of three unidentified men inside a taxi on the side of a road near the border with Michoacan state. Their severed heads were later found inside a cooler with a note that read in part, "here are your informants." Authorities believe the victims may have been soldiers.
The charred body of an unidentified man was found with several gunshot wounds in San Juan Nuevo, Michoacan state.
Authorities in Culiacan, Sinaloa state, discovered the body of an unidentified man bound at the hands with two gunshot wounds in the head.


May 19

A firefight between police officers and alleged drug traffickers in Tancitaro, Michoacan state, prompted several army units and nearby police forces to send reinforcements.
An official from the Durango state attorney general's office was wounded after several assailants following her in a taxi in Durango, Durango state, shot her twice.


May 20

Mexican army forces captured alleged Gulf cartel member Nelson "El Luchador" Garza Lozano, after a firefight in Ciudad Victoria, Tamaulipas state. Three local police officers also were arrested on suspicions they were protecting Garza.
Four people died in separate organized crime-related violence in Tijuana, Baja California state, including one business owner killed when he attempted to prevent his brother from being kidnapped.


May 21

At least two police officers were wounded when several gunmen attacked their patrol vehicle outside a police building in Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua state.
Authorities in Torreon, Coahuila state, announced the firing of more than 300 police officers -- approximately one-third of the police force -- for failing a variety of requirements and exams.


May 22

The public security secretary of Zacatecas state announced his resignation in the wake of the state's May 16 prison break.


May 23

The bodies of two unidentified men were found bound at the wrists and bearing signs of torture in Taretan, Michoacan state.
A three-week old infant died when several men armed with assault rifles attacked his family while driving in Chihuahua, Chihuahua state.


May 25

Mexican army forces exchanged gunfire with several armed men at a synthetic drug manufacturing site in San Diego de Alejandria, Jalisco state, eventually detaining seven suspects.
The bodies of seven unidentified people were found inside a vehicle at a ranch in Othon P. Blanco, Quintana Roo state....".

Tosh Plumlee
05-28-2009, 10:11 PM
The Border Drug War is now a real National Security issue and we (Americans) had better act fast, because it has already crossed our southern borders and is now operating in just about every major American city. The real war on terrorist is found within the drug war raging inside Mexico's northern borders.

For a rough run down, from a Task Force operating inside Mexico, the following interview should be of some interest.

May 06,2009 Interview with Meria Heller

http://meria.net/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/050609.mp3

Tosh Plumlee
05-29-2009, 12:44 AM
New Mexican weapons found in Mexico near border.

photo by Wm. Plumlee 2007 Butterfield Stage Route New Mexico.

Bruce Clemens
05-29-2009, 12:53 AM
Strange juxtaposition, that second picture. The more things change, the more they stay the same.

Tosh Plumlee
05-29-2009, 12:40 PM
For months now I've been posting on this Forum information before the fact.., just shouting into the wind about the border drug war... I've been inside Mexico and Juarez... rode with the army and posted what I have seen. All first hand accounts. The warehouse full of US military weapons obtained by the cartels , bodies being dug up, headless, Mexican ranches used my the gangs ect.... Went in-- side by side --with an American Task Force working with the Mexican Army... posted same.

Summation; The Border War is a thread to the United States National Security..... over six thousand dead this past year, and not from the pandemic... But who really cares? IMO Its all for entertainment. The following INTEL report underscores my point:

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
EXCLUSIVE: CARTELS USE KIDS TO BREACH U.S. BORDER

Conducting interviews on this topic is the founder and president of the Minuteman Project Jim Gilchrist.

Drug cartel members are using a variety of fronts and subterfuges - from fake tamale stands to child decoys - to gather intelligence about enhanced U.S. border security and exploit weaknesses to send in people and drugs, according to a new report obtained by The Washington Times.

The findings, by the U.S. Army's Asymmetric Warfare Group, underline the growing threat to U.S. security from a porous border. Mexican drug cartels continue to probe for gaps in border defenses while fighting one another and Mexican authorities in a violent conflict that has killed more than 7,000 people in Mexico since the beginning of 2008. U.S. authorities also worry that terrorist groups could exploit vulnerabilities in border security.

According to a report earlier this month by the warfare group about the San Diego-Tijuana border area, the cartels are finding novel ways to move contraband and people into the U.S., including wedging children into gaps in the cement pylons at border barriers.

"The smuggling facilitator or families of the illegal migrants will use children to lodge them in the gaps of the cement pylons, at which point a U.S. fire department is called in to free the child," the report said. "This tactic relies on the U.S. first responders' initiative to rescue or save a human life and subsequently creates a physical gap - which generally takes two weeks to repair - to use for border breaching."

The cartels also use torches in backpacks to cut through fences and tamale stands and personal watercraft for surveillance, the report said. They ship drugs through sewers and may be planning to send them into the U.S. on the backs of men parachuting out of planes.

Cartels already have used hang gliders and other ultralight aircraft to move narcotics into the U.S. These craft can carry about 200 pounds of drugs.

The report suggested that the cartels were looking to upgrade the technique by using newer equipment, allowing them to bring in bigger loads.

"Civilian or military trained tandem jumpers could deliver a payload of 750 pounds, while the delivery aircraft would be able to avoid United States airspace," the report said. "The jumpers would be able to land successfully at desired locations using off the shelf GPS and equipment, and at locations previously inaccessible to ultra-light aircraft. This tactic also will permit multiple jumpers to converge on a location increasing payload delivery."

It is estimated that Mexican cartels earn more than $25 billion a year from narcotics trafficking in the U.S. alone, military officials said. A good portion of the money goes to purchase equipment such as semi-submersible boats, submarines and airplanes as well as to pay for spotters, hired to watch U.S. border security personnel.

Military and law enforcement officials also have gathered intelligence that suggests cartels are continuing to build tunnels along the San Diego corridor and to use "sewers and storm drains under the southwest border to smuggle personnel and cargo into the United States."

A roadside tamale stand was part of a strategy to alert middlemen and smugglers to open entry points along San Diego's border fence with Tijuana.

U.S. military intelligence personnel "observed a woman setting up a road-side tamale stand on the south side of the primary fence with the nose of her vehicle pointing towards known fence breach points," the report said. It added that the woman did not have a single customer all day in the sparsely populated area.

In addition, cartel members used taxis and legitimate businesses to smuggle people and drugs without arousing suspicion, according to the report.

The warfare group conducted the operation with Joint Task Force North, part of the Defense Department's counternarcotics and anti-terrorist operations, from Feb. 15 until March 31. U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the U.S. Coast Guard, and state and local law enforcement in the San Diego sector helped the group "observe asymmetric infiltration operations and emerging asymmetric threats" from the cartels.

The report, "Asymmetric Observations Along the U.S.-Mexican Border," was tasked with identifying enemy vulnerabilities and to mitigate terrorist threats as cartel violence escalates. The operation "will provide insight relevant to U.S. Army operations worldwide," the report added.

"We're going to have to pay very, very close attention to Mexico and certainly for this administration," a U.S. Defense Department official told The Times on the condition that he not be named because of the sensitive nature of the issue. Mexico "clearly understands their problem. They, like us, are trying to figure out ways to solve it."

The official added that the U.S. and Mexico are cooperating closely to deal with the situation.

Source: washingtontimes.com
Link: http://washingtontimes.com/news/2009/may/28/crafty-cartels-test-vulnerable-us-border/?feat=home_cube_position1

Jan Klimkowski
05-29-2009, 06:46 PM
For months now I've been posting on this Forum information before the fact.., just shouting into the wind about the border drug war... I've been inside Mexico and Juarez... rode with the army and posted what I have seen. All first hand accounts. The warehouse full of US military weapons obtained by the cartels , bodies being dug up, headless, Mexican ranches used my the gangs ect.... Went in-- side by side --with an American Task Force working with the Mexican Army... posted same.

Summation; The Border War is a thread to the United States National Security..... over six thousand dead this past year, and not from the pandemic... But who really cares? IMO Its all for entertainment.

Tosh - who do you think is really running the cartels?

You of all people know that the real profits are not going to illiterate, tequila-swilling, brothers with bad moustaches - unless the Bush crime family suddenly decide to start sporting hirsute upper lips.

Tosh Plumlee
05-29-2009, 08:47 PM
Jan; To some degree this INTEL field report from Mexican Intel should be considered in reference to your question.
It would be wise to cross check the money flow from this cartel into "cut-out", companies here in the United States and then follow the money into the political assets of some of our elected officials. In doing that, I feel you will find your answer:

Summation:

Mexican INTEL Classified Report obtained by U.S. Military; ANBPENT- Task Force N-7, Ft Bliss, Texas. El Paso, Texas

"... MEXICO: POLITICS AND NARCO-CORRUPTION IN MICHOACAN

Summary
Mexican organized crime group La Familia was planning to interfere in the country's upcoming July 5 national legislative elections, according to a May 29 news report that cites sources in Mexican military intelligence and the federal attorney general's office (PGR). This case shows the deeply rooted nature of public corruption in Mexico, and the reach of the country's criminal organizations.

Analysis


The Mexican organized crime group La Familia had planned to interfere in the country's upcoming July 5 national legislative elections, Mexican media reported May 29, citing sources in Mexican military intelligence and the federal attorney general's office (PGR). La Familia's plan reportedly included financing candidates, coercing voters, and transporting voters to polling places in some of the largest cities in the state of Michoacan, including the state capital, Morelia, as well as Uruapan, Lazaro Cardenas, Patzcuaro, Apatzingan, and Zitacuaro.

The revelation comes just a few days after a joint operation between PGR and Mexican military forces that resulted in the arrest of more than 30 mayors, judges, and other public officials in Michoacan on charges of corruption and links to La Familia. In those cases -- the largest single roundup of public officials during the last few years of the country's cartel war -- the government charges that La Familia members have used their connections with corrupt public officials to secure a safe operating environment for drug trafficking, retail drug distribution, extortion, kidnapping, and other criminal activities.


That a criminal organization such as La Familia had a large number of Mexican public officials on its payroll is not surprising. Even so, this incident illuminates the deeply rooted and widespread nature of organized crime-related official corruption in Mexico.

The extent of organized crime in Mexico ensures that there is no shortage of corrupt officials countrywide. While President Felipe Calderon has pursued a number of anti-corruption initiatives over the last few years targeting such officials, the decision to launch this most recent operation in Michoacan certainly appears like a politically motivated attempt to remind voters ahead of the July 5 legislative elections that Calderon's National Action Party (PAN) remains tough on crime and corruption. So far, the plan seems to have worked: Although the Michoacan state governor and his left-wing opposition Democratic Revolutionary Party (PRD) initially expressed outrage that the arrests took place without the governor's prior knowledge, the PRD leadership eventually backtracked. It clarified that the PRD does support the country's national counternarcotics strategy.

While La Familia is undeniably a powerful player in Michoacan state -- and maintains a considerable presence in the neighboring states of Jalisco, Guerrero, and Mexico -- STRATFOR does not see the group as significant national or international criminal power. Nonetheless, this case appears to shows that even smaller organized crime groups have not only the intent but the ability to corrupt public officials at the federal level. Considering La Familia is just one of many criminal groups in Mexico, it is not a stretch to assume that other groups -- such as the much larger Sinaloa and Gulf cartels, the Beltran Leyva organization and Los Zetas -- are pursuing even more robust plans to make the country's national elections work in their favor.

Indeed, this case provides a reminder of the deep-seated nature of corruption in Mexico: Two and half years after Calderon took office and began cracking down on drug trafficking organizations and corruption, the problems are nowhere near going away. And this case shows that corruption goes far beyond just the police, instead touched all kinds of government officials. Ultimately, fully resolving the problem will involve a long-term effort to address more fundamental issues, including the country's political culture. ...".

Also, If your really interested you might want to hear the interview found on the Meria Heller Show;
(not sure if this link will work.., please advise:

http://www.meria.net/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/050609.mp3

Tosh Plumlee
06-25-2009, 10:16 PM
Mexico president says future of democracy at stake


<<MEX_SOLDIERS_ACAPULCO_25Jun09.JPG>>

Reuters – Mexican soldiers patrol a street in the Mexican beach resort of Acapulco June 10, 2009. Eighteen people were killed in a shootout between drug gangs and soldiers on June 7 and the gun battle was a further blow to Mexico's tourism industry, already reeling from cancellations by foreigners scared away by the swine flu epidemic.

By MARK STEVENSON, Associated Press Writer Mark Stevenson, Associated Press Writer – Thu Jun 25, 12:01 am ET
MEXICO CITY – President Felipe Calderon said Wednesday the future of Mexican democracy is at stake in the government's fight against official corruption and organized crime, and he criticized politicians who he said want to return to the era when gangs were tolerated.

Calderon also called for making legislators more accountable to the public, including reducing the number of Congress members while allowing them to serve more than one term and face voters' judgment in re-election bids.

Speaking at a conference on security, the president gave a scathing appraisal on how far corruption has reached into Mexican government circles ahead of the July 5 midterm elections.

"What is at stake today is not just the result of an election, but rather the future of democracy, of representative institutions," he said. "For years ... crime was allowed to grow expand and penetrate. Perhaps people thought it was a manageable thing."

Calderon said the country, which has seen more than 10,800 deaths in organized crime violence since he took office in December 2006, "is at a historical crossroads."

"To turn one's head, to act as if you don't see the crime in front of you, as some politicians want to do, is no option for Mexico," he said.

He painted a grim picture of the security situation in some of the most violent parts of the country, noting that crime gangs and drug cartels are carrying out "an interminable recruitment of young people without hope, family, opportunities, future, beliefs or convictions.

"They turn up dead in some morgue and nobody claims their bodies, as happens with more than 30 percent of the bodies in the most violent cities, like Ciudad Juarez," across the border from El Paso, Texas.

In Ciudad Juarez, authorities said Wednesday that gunmen in a passing car killed an American teenager and his Mexican cousin as they stood at a corner. Officials didn't release any information about a possible motive, and no arrests were made.

The victims were identified by a relative as Raymundo Perez, 15, a student at El Dorado High School in Socorro, Texas, southeast of El Paso, and his cousin Alan Perez, 18, of Ciudad Juarez. Raymundo Perez lived in Socorro with his grandmother and aunt but spent vacation in Ciudad Juarez, where his parents live.

Earlier in the day, unidentified assailants in Ciudad Juarez tossed gasoline bombs into a billiard hall and a money exchange office. In 2008, more than 30 businesses were burned in the city, where threats of arson are often used by extortionists linked to drug gangs.

In the Pacific coast state of Guerrero, investigators on Wednesday found the bodies of two local police officers who had been shot to death, the state's public safety department said in a statement. It said the officers were kidnapped earlier Wednesday a block away from city hall in the town of La Union.

Calderon repeated calls he made earlier in his political career as a congressman for reducing the number of federal legislators, now 500 seats in the Congress and 128 in the Senate. He didn't offer any specific numbers, but argues that having fewer lawmakers would make it easier to hold them accountable for how well they work.

He also said letting legislators run for re-election would make them accountable to their constituents. In the current system, politicians from president to congressmen to town officials can serve in a specific post for only a single term, generally three or six years.

Hours after Calderon warned about corruption, federal agents and soldiers arrested at least 50 local and state police officers in the central state of Hidalgo, an area control by the Zetas, a gang of hit men tied to the Gulf cartel. ...". xxxxxx

AND our main focus is the middle east and the oil and Taiban, which by the way according to Intell reports is already inside Mexico working their plan to infiltrate across the US Mexico border and set up "sleeper cells" for assassinations conducted inside the United States. They have been crossing over for a few years now... back and forth with a plan. But the American people are not supose to know this... could cause panic... it has been said.

Peter Lemkin
06-26-2009, 05:52 AM
While American Politicians act as if ignoring this, they must know about it...and to some extent it suits them....though I don't know why. It seems to me that criminals are running things on both sides of the border, although it is more run by gangs/cartels with guns and goons South of and by Corporations using economic theft North. Of course the drug-trade South is helped-out by those who stand to benefit financially North, and they even somehow get them weapons mis-directed from military stocks. It is a very ugly scene down there for the average person. Not great in el Norte either..... Are the elites looking for such chaos in the South that the Army of the North is asked to come in and help - thus occupying Mexico? We took the other half by force long ago, perhaps this half we take more by stealth.

David Guyatt
06-26-2009, 07:58 AM
I also wonder if the havoc and unlawfulness suits the US.

The only thing that comes to mind is NAFTA, the trade agreement between US, Canada and Mexico which only expanded to include Mexico in 1994 (from the previous US-Canada arrangement).

Tosh Plumlee
06-30-2009, 01:20 PM
US-Border-Troops, AP; Guard to seek volunteers for border: (xxxx source Task Force 7N:)
June 30 09:

"... WASHINGTON (AP) - The Obama administration is developing plans
to seek up to 1,500 National Guard volunteers to step up the
military's counter-drug efforts along the Mexican border, senior
administration officials said Monday.
The plan is a stopgap measure being worked out between the
Defense Department and the Homeland Security Department, and comes
despite Pentagon concerns about committing more troops to the
border - a move some officials worry will be seen as militarizing
the region.
Senior administration officials said the Guard program will last
no longer than a year and would build on an existing counter-drug
operation. They said the program, which would largely be federally
funded, would draw on National Guard volunteers from the four
border states. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity
because the details have not been finalized.
Officials said the program would mainly seek out guard members
for surveillance, intelligence analysis and aviation support. Guard
units would also supply ground troops who could assist at border
crossings and with land and air transportation.
A senior White House official said Monday that President Barack
Obama is concerned about the situation at the border and wants to
work with Defense Secretary Robert Gates and Homeland Security
Secretary Janet Napolitano on the question of additional resources.
The official said Obama appreciates the level of discussion
between the two agencies, and since the issue is still being
debated, he has not yet made any decisions. The official spoke on
condition of anonymity to discuss internal policy debate.
Earlier this spring Obama promised his Mexican counterpart,
Felipe Calderon, that the United States would help with the
escalating drug war, which has killed as many as 11,000 people
since December 2006.
Attorney General Eric Holder and Napolitano announced a 2009
counternarcotics strategy several weeks ago, saying the U.S. would
devote more resources to fighting the Mexican drug cartels,
including the cash and weapons that flow across the border from the
U.S. into Mexico.
But officials say Gates has expressed concern that tapping the
military for border control posts is a slippery slope and must not
be overused.
Paul Stockton, assistant secretary of defense for homeland
defense, said Monday that options for the new program have been
drafted, but the plan still must be reviewed and acted on by key
cabinet members as well as the president.
"We have been working very closely to build a set of options
that would have the Department of Defense in a very limited way,
for a limited period of time, serve in direct support for CBP,"
said Stockton, referring to Customs and Border Protection.
The administration does not want to announce or begin the effort
until after the Mexican elections this week, officials said.
Rand Beers, undersecretary for national protection at the
Homeland Security Department, declined to say how long the program
would last, only that it would not be lengthy.
Beers said the additional Guard members would stay as long as
needed for the border patrol agents to be trained and given "some
period of time" on the border to gain experience on the job.
The administration has proposed spending $250 million on the
program, but the precise cost will not be known until the details
are worked out, he said.
Officials came to the decision that it is simply not enough for
the United States to provide funding in support of the Mexican
government's counter-drug efforts, said Beers.
The Guard's volunteer mission, Beers and Stockton both stressed,
would not involve law enforcement activities.
The current National Guard counter-drug operation along the
border, which has been in effect for many years, involves about 575
Guard members, who applied for the job through their state program
coordinator.
The additional volunteers, officials said, would largely be
drawn from the more than 50,000 Army and Air National Guard members
in Arizona, California, New Mexico and Texas. There are no plans to
seek Guard members from other states, although that has not been
ruled out.
There is already federal funding in place to hire more than
1,500 border patrol agents.
A previous program - Operation Jump Start - used National Guard
troops to help bolster border patrols for three years. Over that
time, the federal government added border patrol agents, but the
escalating drug war has stretched those forces as they try to
increase surveillance of possible cash and arms traffic.
--- ...".

Magda Hassan
07-01-2009, 04:31 AM
Are you going Tosh? Are any of these boots yours?

It seems if there were not so many National Guard in Iraq that they could be more easily used here.

Tosh Plumlee
07-09-2009, 02:28 PM
We are there now: The following news release from Mexico, of which mainstream media refused to cover, clearly shows the Mexican Border War is going "Hot".


17 persons were killed in Juarez on WED. In one incident alone 4 young men ages 18 to 25 yrs old were shot and killed while travelling in a red Ford (see photo below)




La intensa jornada sangrienta en Ciudad Juárez arrojó doce ejecuciones durante la tarde-noche, entre estas la de cuatro personas en un sólo evento en colonia López Mateso(foto I), y la de una de quinta víctima a escasa distancia del lugar, en la Guadalajara Izquierda (foto II).
Otras siete muertes se registraron en el poblado de Caseta, tres; una en colonias Gómez Morín y Pradera Dorada, respectivamente, y, dos, en la Aztecas.
Los cuatro hombres de entre 18 y 25 años de edad, identificadfos como Oscar Payán, de 23 años, y los otros tres sólo con los nombres de "Horacio, Francisco y Jesús", ocurrió en calles Fracisco Pimentel y Ajusco minutos después de las 21:00 horas.
El grupo fue rafaguedado en el interior de un auto Ford, al parecer de la línea Focus, color rojo; las balas de cuerno de chivo penetraron por los cristales de las cuatro ventanas laterales y el cristal trasero; una de las víctimas logro bajar del auto pero sólo avanzó unos diez metros y cayó tiroteado. Del carro literalmente manaba un hilo ancho de sangre.
Unos veinte minutos antes, muy cerca de la escena, en colonia Guadalajara Izquierda, un hombre llamado Raúl Medrano, de entre 30 y 35 años fue balaceado fuera de su vivienda en calle Islas Célebes.
Luego, a las 22:30 horas, otro hombre, Víctor Jesús Muñoz Arreola, de 45 años aproximdamente. fue asesinado de siete disparos, uno en la frente, en calles Rafael Preciado Hernández y Miguel Estrada, atras de "Tetos Car", en colonia Manuel Gómez Morín (Foto III). Media hora después del crimen, el cuerpo permanecía tirado amedia calle sin que llegaran las autoriades ministeriales.
Por la tarde, a las 17:40 horas, se reportaba el asesinato de tres hombres en calles del poblado de Caseta, con disparos de armas largas; el triple asesinato fue cometidfo por gatilleros que interceptaron el vehículo en el que viajaban las víctimas aún no identificadas
Una hora despues, minutos antes de las 19:00 horas,, un hombre, identificado extraoficialemnte como José David Chávez, de 25 años, fue asesinado en la calle Rancho Aguja, del fraccionamiento Pradera Dorada, cuando conducía una camioneta Pick Up, acompañado de una mujer
Hacia slas 22:40 horas, la frecuencia policiaca reportaba otras dos ejecuciones en calkes de la colonia Aztecas. Las presunyas víctimas eran nombrados sólo como "Luis Armando" y 'Orlando", quienes, según esos datos preliminares, serían hermanos.
Con estas muertes, la cifra de ejecuciones ascendio a 17 tan sólo durante este miércoles.

Tosh Plumlee
07-09-2009, 02:40 PM
Mexico president says future of democracy at stake


<<MEX_SOLDIERS_ACAPULCO_25Jun09.JPG>>

Reuters – Mexican soldiers patrol a street in the Mexican beach resort of Acapulco June 10, 2009. Eighteen people were killed in a shootout between drug gangs and soldiers on June 7 and the gun battle was a further blow to Mexico's tourism industry, already reeling from cancellations by foreigners scared away by the swine flu epidemic.

By MARK STEVENSON, Associated Press Writer Mark Stevenson, Associated Press Writer – Thu Jun 25, 12:01 am ET
MEXICO CITY – President Felipe Calderon said Wednesday the future of Mexican democracy is at stake in the government's fight against official corruption and organized crime, and he criticized politicians who he said want to return to the era when gangs were tolerated.

Calderon also called for making legislators more accountable to the public, including reducing the number of Congress members while allowing them to serve more than one term and face voters' judgment in re-election bids.

Speaking at a conference on security, the president gave a scathing appraisal on how far corruption has reached into Mexican government circles ahead of the July 5 midterm elections.

"What is at stake today is not just the result of an election, but rather the future of democracy, of representative institutions," he said. "For years ... crime was allowed to grow expand and penetrate. Perhaps people thought it was a manageable thing."

Calderon said the country, which has seen more than 10,800 deaths in organized crime violence since he took office in December 2006, "is at a historical crossroads."

"To turn one's head, to act as if you don't see the crime in front of you, as some politicians want to do, is no option for Mexico," he said.

He painted a grim picture of the security situation in some of the most violent parts of the country, noting that crime gangs and drug cartels are carrying out "an interminable recruitment of young people without hope, family, opportunities, future, beliefs or convictions.

"They turn up dead in some morgue and nobody claims their bodies, as happens with more than 30 percent of the bodies in the most violent cities, like Ciudad Juarez," across the border from El Paso, Texas.

In Ciudad Juarez, authorities said Wednesday that gunmen in a passing car killed an American teenager and his Mexican cousin as they stood at a corner. Officials didn't release any information about a possible motive, and no arrests were made.

The victims were identified by a relative as Raymundo Perez, 15, a student at El Dorado High School in Socorro, Texas, southeast of El Paso, and his cousin Alan Perez, 18, of Ciudad Juarez. Raymundo Perez lived in Socorro with his grandmother and aunt but spent vacation in Ciudad Juarez, where his parents live.

Earlier in the day, unidentified assailants in Ciudad Juarez tossed gasoline bombs into a billiard hall and a money exchange office. In 2008, more than 30 businesses were burned in the city, where threats of arson are often used by extortionists linked to drug gangs.

In the Pacific coast state of Guerrero, investigators on Wednesday found the bodies of two local police officers who had been shot to death, the state's public safety department said in a statement. It said the officers were kidnapped earlier Wednesday a block away from city hall in the town of La Union.

Calderon repeated calls he made earlier in his political career as a congressman for reducing the number of federal legislators, now 500 seats in the Congress and 128 in the Senate. He didn't offer any specific numbers, but argues that having fewer lawmakers would make it easier to hold them accountable for how well they work.

He also said letting legislators run for re-election would make them accountable to their constituents. In the current system, politicians from president to congressmen to town officials can serve in a specific post for only a single term, generally three or six years.

Hours after Calderon warned about corruption, federal agents and soldiers arrested at least 50 local and state police officers in the central state of Hidalgo, an area control by the Zetas, a gang of hit men tied to the Gulf cartel. ...". xxxxxx

AND our main focus is the middle east and the oil and Taiban, which by the way according to Intell reports is already inside Mexico working their plan to infiltrate across the US Mexico border and set up "sleeper cells" for assassinations conducted inside the United States. They have been crossing over for a few years now... back and forth with a plan. But the American people are not supose to know this... could cause panic... it has been said.

Tosh Plumlee
07-09-2009, 02:56 PM
We Americans had better get our heads out of our butts on this war and protect our borders. (And go for their oil, as little as it is..... seemed to work for us in the middle east.

Mexico is not failing we are failing Mexico and by our actions, policies, and double standards we aid the cartels in their operations and plans.

We have looked at this situation and found the real enemy is the USA and it appears as a nation we cannot function in this war because its not in our best interest to shut the cartels down... to much money involved to a select few working in the beltway of DC and their advisors....


Latin America Specialist xxxxxC (202)xxxxxx Map from the Article is attached.

Wall Street Journal MARCH 11, 2009 Congress Aims to Police Border Violence

By CAM SIMPSON and EVAN PEREZ WASHINGTON -- The number of federal agents trying to keep drugs and illegal immigrants out of the U.S. has more than doubled in five years. Congress now wants those sentinels to keep watch in both directions -- to stop the smuggling of U.S. guns and cash to Mexico. Both Democratic and Republican lawmakers on Tuesday urged officials from the Department of Homeland Security to halt the flow of weapons and drug profits that has fueled the violence by Mexico's drug gangs. At a hearing, some lawmakers expressed disappointment at the lack of a specific plan from Homeland Security officials to attack the problem, which has claimed thousands of lives. The ranking Republican on the House Appropriations Committee, California Rep. Jerry Lewis, compared the task to the challenge facing the U.S. in Iraq and Afghanistan. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano has said tackling the issue is a top priority. But officials who lead the two biggest DHS agencies involved -- Customs and Border Protection, and Immigrations and Customs Enforcement -- said in interviews they don't have funding currently designated for so-called outbound enforcement. Rep. Hal Rogers, the top Republican on the Homeland Security Appropriations Subcommittee, which held Tuesday's hearing, said U.S. officials are "burying our heads in the sands of Cancún." One angry Democrat, Rep. Sam Farr of California, threatened to hold up the department's funding until there is a coordinated plan for going after the guns. The Mexican government is fighting a war with its drug cartels and their armed enforcers. The gangs are battling for access routes to the lucrative U.S. market and much of the violence straddles the border. The fighting is being waged with thousands of American-purchased or stolen weapons flowing south illegally each year, U.S. officials say. The State Department recently estimated U.S.-originated guns were used in 95% of Mexico's drug-related killings. The number of such murders more than doubled to almost 6,000 last year, up from about 2,700 in 2007. Meanwhile, U.S. authorities seized only 257 weapons heading south at border checkpoints in 2008 -- and a total of just 733 dating back to the start of 2005, according to data Homeland Security officials provided to The Wall Street Journal. The fighting is also fueled by the cash earned by Mexican gangs selling their illicit products in the U.S. The State Department estimated that as much as $22 billion in drug proceeds were sent from the U.S. to Mexico between 2003 and the end of last year, much of it through bulk-cash smuggling. Since July 2005, teams established by ICE to take on drug-cartel operations along the border have seized a total of $22.7 million in cash, a fraction of the estimated drug profits. The teams received $10 million in the budget for the year ended Sept. 30, 2008, but nothing since, officials said Tuesday. Ms. Napolitano has promised a total of $45 million more for border protection next year, but it's unclear how much of that would be directed toward stemming the flow of guns and money to Mexico. A separate hearing Tuesday focused on foreign assistance for Mexico's drug war under the so-called Merida Initiative. The plan, instituted under President George W. Bush, has directed $1.4 billion in aid to Mexico, mostly through training and equipment. Obama administration officials say they are committed to the deal. Justice Department officials recently touted a nationwide campaign targeting Mexico's Sinaloa cartel operations in the U.S., arresting more than 50 alleged members from California to Maryland on one day last month. Calling it "Operation Xcellerator," the department tallied more than 750 arrests in the U.S. and Mexico over the past 21 months and the seizure of more than $59 million in illicit proceeds. Law-enforcement officials acknowledge that the Mexican and U.S. governments have yet to gain the upper hand against these groups' U.S. operations, which reach coast to coast, from dealers in small towns in Maine to big-city coordinators in Southern California. Drug Enforcement Administration officials estimate the Xcellerator operation cost the Sinaloa cartel $1 billion, including drug seizures. That figure is an estimate of what the cartel would have earned from the disrupted drug sales. Write to Cam Simpson at cam.simpson@wsj.com and Evan Perez at evan.perez@wsj.com Printed in The Wall Street Journal, page A3 Copyright 2009 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. Distribution and use of this material are governed by our Subscriber Agreement and by copyright law. For non-personal use or to order multiple copies, please contact Dow Jones Reprints at 1-800-843-0008 or visit...".

AND the BEAT goes on.

Tosh Plumlee
07-09-2009, 03:26 PM
Wall Street Journal
MARCH 11, 2009

Congress Aims to Police Border Violence
By CAM SIMPSON and EVAN PEREZ

WASHINGTON -- The number of federal agents trying to keep drugs and illegal immigrants out of the U.S. has more than doubled in five years. Congress now wants those sentinels to keep watch in both directions -- to stop the smuggling of U.S. guns and cash to Mexico.

Both Democratic and Republican lawmakers on Tuesday urged officials from the Department of Homeland Security to halt the flow of weapons and drug profits that has fueled the violence by Mexico's drug gangs.

At a hearing, some lawmakers expressed disappointment at the lack of a specific plan from Homeland Security officials to attack the problem, which has claimed thousands of lives. The ranking Republican on the House Appropriations Committee, California Rep. Jerry Lewis, compared the task to the challenge facing the U.S. in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano has said tackling the issue is a top priority. But officials who lead the two biggest DHS agencies involved -- Customs and Border Protection, and Immigrations and Customs Enforcement -- said in interviews they don't have funding currently designated for so-called outbound enforcement.

Rep. Hal Rogers, the top Republican on the Homeland Security Appropriations Subcommittee, which held Tuesday's hearing, said U.S. officials are "burying our heads in the sands of Cancún."

One angry Democrat, Rep. Sam Farr of California, threatened to hold up the department's funding until there is a coordinated plan for going after the guns.

The Mexican government is fighting a war with its drug cartels and their armed enforcers. The gangs are battling for access routes to the lucrative U.S. market and much of the violence straddles the border.

The fighting is being waged with thousands of American-purchased or stolen weapons flowing south illegally each year, U.S. officials say.

The State Department recently estimated U.S.-originated guns were used in 95% of Mexico's drug-related killings. The number of such murders more than doubled to almost 6,000 last year, up from about 2,700 in 2007.

Meanwhile, U.S. authorities seized only 257 weapons heading south at border checkpoints in 2008 -- and a total of just 733 dating back to the start of 2005, according to data Homeland Security officials provided to The Wall Street Journal.

The fighting is also fueled by the cash earned by Mexican gangs selling their illicit products in the U.S. The State Department estimated that as much as $22 billion in drug proceeds were sent from the U.S. to Mexico between 2003 and the end of last year, much of it through bulk-cash smuggling.

Since July 2005, teams established by ICE to take on drug-cartel operations along the border have seized a total of $22.7 million in cash, a fraction of the estimated drug profits.

The teams received $10 million in the budget for the year ended Sept. 30, 2008, but nothing since, officials said Tuesday. Ms. Napolitano has promised a total of $45 million more for border protection next year, but it's unclear how much of that would be directed toward stemming the flow of guns and money to Mexico.

A separate hearing Tuesday focused on foreign assistance for Mexico's drug war under the so-called Merida Initiative. The plan, instituted under President George W. Bush, has directed $1.4 billion in aid to Mexico, mostly through training and equipment. Obama administration officials say they are committed to the deal.

Justice Department officials recently touted a nationwide campaign targeting Mexico's Sinaloa cartel operations in the U.S., arresting more than 50 alleged members from California to Maryland on one day last month. Calling it "Operation Xcellerator," the department tallied more than 750 arrests in the U.S. and Mexico over the past 21 months and the seizure of more than $59 million in illicit proceeds.

Law-enforcement officials acknowledge that the Mexican and U.S. governments have yet to gain the upper hand against these groups' U.S. operations, which reach coast to coast, from dealers in small towns in Maine to big-city coordinators in Southern California.

Drug Enforcement Administration officials estimate the Xcellerator operation cost the Sinaloa cartel $1 billion, including drug seizures. That figure is an estimate of what the cartel would have earned from the disrupted drug sales....".

Nothing has been done to date except talk and BS on both sides of our political parties and officials. Over 15,000 people killed in Mexico in two years and we just talk a lot about something we know nothing about or really care about.

It will not be long before you will have the cartels running this country, much like they do now in Mexico.. or perhaps its to late... follow the money.

Tosh Plumlee
07-09-2009, 05:48 PM
From a journalist in hiding from deep inside Mexico. The Cartel just put out a 2 million US dollar award for the head of this reporter who has been on the front lines of this drug war for a number of years. He writes under various names in order to protect his life.

We need more dedicated people, like this reporter, in the fight of the drug war. It is said around Juarez that bets are being place that this reporter will not live to see the New Year.... last week the bets being placed closed at 20 to 1 predicting his murder before the years end.

received via JSOCTF7N 07-07-08 (not classified)

MEXICO: ECONOMICS AND THE ARMS TRADE

On June 26, the small Mexican town of Apaseo el Alto, in Guanajuato state, was the scene of a deadly firefight between members of Los Zetas and federal and local security forces. The engagement began when a joint patrol of Mexican soldiers and police officers responded to a report of heavily armed men at a suspected drug safe house. When the patrol arrived, a 20-minute firefight erupted between the security forces and gunmen in the house as well as several suspects in two vehicles who threw fragmentation grenades as they tried to escape.

When the shooting ended, 12 gunmen lay dead, 12 had been taken into custody and several soldiers and police officers had been wounded. At least half of the detained suspects admitted to being members of Los Zetas, a highly trained Mexican cartel group known for its use of military weapons and tactics.

When authorities examined the safe house they discovered a mass grave that contained the remains of an undetermined number of people (perhaps 14 or 15) who are believed to have been executed and then burned beyond recognition by Los Zetas. The house also contained a large cache of weapons, including assault rifles and fragmentation grenades. Such military ordnance is frequently used by Los Zetas and the enforcers who work for their rival cartels.

STRATFOR has been closely following the cartel violence in Mexico for several years now, and the events that transpired in Apaseo el Alto are by no means unique. It is not uncommon for the Mexican authorities to engage in large firefights with cartel groups, encounter mass graves or recover large caches of arms. However, the recovery of the weapons in Apaseo el Alto does provide an opportunity to once again focus on the dynamics of Mexico's arms trade.

White, Black and Shades of Gray

Before we get down into the weeds of Mexico's arms trade, let's do something a little different and first take a brief look at how arms trafficking works on a regional and global scale. Doing so will help illustrate how arms trafficking in Mexico fits into these broader patterns.

When analysts examine arms sales they look at three general categories: the white arms market, the gray arms market and the black arms market. The white arms market is the legal, aboveboard transfer of weapons in accordance with the national laws of the parties involved and international treaties or restrictions. The parties in a white arms deal will file the proper paperwork, including end-user certificates, noting what is being sold, who is selling it and to whom it is being sold. There is an understanding that the receiving party does not intend to transfer the weapons to a third party. So, for example, if the Mexican army wants to buy assault rifles from German arms maker Heckler & Koch, it places the order with the company and fills out all the required paperwork, including forms for obtaining permission for the sale from the German government.

Now, the white arms market can be deceived and manipulated, and when this happens, we get the gray market -- literally, white arms that are shifted into the hands of someone other than the purported recipient. One of the classic ways to do this is to either falsify an end-user certificate, or bribe an official in a third country to sign an end-user certificate but then allow a shipment of arms to pass through a country en route to a third location. This type of transaction is frequently used in cases where there are international arms embargoes against a particular country (like Liberia) or where it is illegal to sell arms to a militant group (such as the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, known by its Spanish acronym, FARC). One example of this would be Ukrainian small arms that, on paper, were supposed to go to Cote d'Ivoire but were really transferred in violation of U.N. arms embargoes to Liberia and Sierra Leone. Another example of this would be the government of Peru purchasing thousands of surplus East German assault rifles from Jordan on the white arms market, ostensibly for the Peruvian military, only to have those rifles slip into the gray arms world and be dropped at airstrips in the jungles of Colombia for use by the FARC.

At the far end of the spectrum is the black arms market where the guns are contraband from the get-go and all the business is conducted under the table. There are no end-user certificates and the weapons are smuggled covertly. Examples of this would be the smuggling of arms from the former Soviet Union (FSU) and Afghanistan into Europe through places like Kosovo and Slovenia, or the smuggling of arms into South America from Asia, the FSU and Middle East by Hezbollah and criminal gangs in the Tri-Border Region.

Nation-states will often use the gray and black arms markets in order to deniably support allies, undermine opponents or otherwise pursue their national interests. This was clearly revealed in the Iran-Contra scandal of the mid-1980s, but Iran-Contra only scratched the surface of the arms smuggling that occurred during the Cold War. Untold tons of military ordnance were delivered by the United States, the Soviet Union and Cuba to their respective allies in Latin America during the Cold War.

This quantity of materiel shipped into Latin America during the Cold War brings up another very important point pertaining to weapons. Unlike drugs, which are consumable goods, firearms are durable goods. This means that they can be useful for decades and are frequently shipped from conflict zone to conflict zone. East German MPiKMS and MPiKM assault rifles are still floating around the world's arms markets years after the German Democratic Republic ceased to exist. In fact, visiting an arms bazaar in a place like Yemen is like visiting an arms museum. One can encounter century-old, still-functional Lee-Enfield and Springfield rifles in a rack next to a modern U.S. M4 rifle or German HK93, and those next to brand-new Chinese Type 56 and 81 assault rifles.

There is often a correlation between arms and drug smuggling. In many instances, the same routes used to smuggle drugs are also used to smuggle arms. In some instances, like the smuggling routes from Central Asia to Europe, the flow of guns and drugs goes in the same direction, and they are both sold in Western Europe for cash. In the case of Latin American cocaine, the drugs tend to flow in one direction (toward the United States and Europe) while guns from U.S. and Russian organized-crime groups flow in the other direction, and often these guns are used as whole or partial payment for the drugs.

Illegal drugs are not the only thing traded for guns. During the Cold War, a robust arms-for-sugar trade transpired between the Cubans and Vietnamese. As a result, Marxist groups all over Latin America were furnished with U.S. materiel either captured or left behind when the Americans withdrew from Vietnam. LAW rockets traced to U.S. military stocks sent to Vietnam were used in several attacks by Latin American Marxist groups. These Vietnam War-vintage weapons still crop up with some frequency in Mexico, Colombia and other parts of the region. Cold War-era weapons furnished to the likes of the Contras, Sandinistas, Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front and Guatemalan National Revolutionary Unity movement in the 1980s are also frequently encountered in the region.

After the civil wars ended in places like El Salvador and Guatemala, the governments and the international community attempted to institute arms buy-back programs, but those programs were not very successful and most of the guns turned in were very old -- the better arms were cached by groups or kept by individuals. Some of these guns have dribbled back into the black arms market, and Central and South America are still awash in Cold War weapons.

But Cold War shipments are not the only reason that Latin America is flooded with guns. In addition to the indigenous arms industries in countries like Brazil and Argentina, Venezuela has purchased hundreds of thousands of AK assault rifles in recent years to replace its aging FN-FAL rifles and has even purchased the equipment to open a factory to produce AK-103 rifles under license inside Venezuela. The Colombian government has accused the Venezuelans of arming the FARC, and evidence obtained by the Colombians during raids on FARC camps and provided to the public appears to support those assertions.

More than 90 Percent?

For several years now, Mexican officials have been making public statements that more than 90 percent of the arms used by criminals in Mexico come from the United States. That number was echoed last month in a report by the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) on U.S. efforts to combat arms trafficking to Mexico (see external link).

According to the report, some 30,000 firearms were seized from criminals by Mexican officials in 2008. Out of these 30,000 firearms, information pertaining to 7,200 of them, (24 percent) was submitted to the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) for tracing. Of these 7,200 guns, only about 4,000 could be traced by the ATF, and of these 4,000, some 3,480 (87 percent) were shown to have come from the United States.

This means that the 87 percent figure comes from the number of weapons submitted by the Mexican government to the ATF that could be successfully traced and not from the total number of weapons seized by the Mexicans or even from the total number of weapons submitted to the ATF for tracing. The 3,480 guns positively traced to the United States equals less than 12 percent of the total arms seized in 2008 and less than 48 percent of all those submitted by the Mexican government to the ATF for tracing.

In a response to the GAO report, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) wrote a letter to the GAO (published as an appendix to the report) calling the GAO's use of the 87 percent statistic "misleading." The DHS further noted, "Numerous problems with the data collection and sample population render this assertion as unreliable."

Trying to get a reliable idea about where the drug cartels are getting their weapons can be difficult because the statistics on firearms seized in Mexico are very confusing. For example, while the GAO report says that 30,000 guns were seized in 2008 alone, the Mexican Prosecutor General's office has reported that between Dec. 1, 2005, and Jan. 22, 2009, Mexican authorities seized 31,512 weapons from the cartels.

Furthermore, it is not prudent to rely exclusively on weapons submitted to the ATF for tracing as a representative sample of the overall Mexican arms market. This is because there are some classes of weapons, such as RPG-7s and South Korean hand grenades, which make very little sense for the Mexicans to pass to the ATF for tracing since they obviously are not from the United States. The ATF is limited in its ability to trace weapons that did not pass through the United States, though there are offices at the CIA and Defense Intelligence Agency that maintain extensive international arms-trafficking databases.

Mexican authorities are also unlikely to ask the ATF to trace weapons that can be tracked through the Mexican government's own databases such as the one maintained by the Mexican Defense Department's Arms and Ammunition Marketing Division (UCAM), which is the only outlet through which Mexican citizens can legally buy guns. If they can trace a gun through UCAM there is simply no need to submit it to ATF.

The United States has criticized Mexico for decades over its inability to stop the flow of narcotics into U.S. territory, and for the past several years Mexico has responded by blaming the guns coming from the United States for its inability to stop the drug trafficking. In this context, there is a lot of incentive for the Mexicans to politicize and play up the issue of guns coming from the United States, and north of the border there are U.S. gun-control advocates who have a vested interest in adding fuel to the fire and gun-rights advocates who have an interest in playing down the number.

Clearly, the issue of U.S. guns being sent south of the border is a serious one, but STRATFOR does not believe that there is sufficient evidence to support the claim that 90 percent (or more) of the cartels' weaponry comes from the United States. The data at present is inclusive -- the 90 percent figure appears to be a subsample of a sample, so that number cannot be applied with confidence to the entire country. Indeed, the percentage of U.S. arms appears to be far lower than 90 percent in specific classes of arms such as fully automatic assault rifles, machine guns, rifle grenades, fragmentation grenades and RPG-7s. Even items such as the handful of U.S.-manufactured LAW rockets encountered in Mexico have come from third countries and not directly from the United States.

However, while the 90 percent figure appears to be unsubstantiated by documentable evidence, this fact does not necessarily prove that the converse is true, even if it may be a logical conclusion. The bottom line is that, until there is a comprehensive, scientific study conducted on the arms seized by the Mexican authorities, much will be left to conjecture, and it will be very difficult to determine exactly how many of the cartels' weapons have come from the United States, and to map out precisely how the black, white and gray arms markets have interacted to bring weapons to Mexico and Mexican cartels.

More research needs to be done on both sides of the border in order to understand this important issue.

Four Trends

In spite of the historical ambiguity, there are four trends that are likely to shape the future flow of arms into Mexico. The first of these is militarization. Since 2006 there has been a steady trend toward the use of heavy military ordnance by the cartels. This process was begun in earnest when the Gulf Cartel first recruited Los Zetas, but in order to counter Los Zetas, all the other cartels have had to recruit and train hard-core enforcer units and outfit them with similar weaponry. Prior to 2007, attacks involving fragmentation hand grenades, 40 mm grenades and RPGs were somewhat rare and immediately attracted a lot of attention. Such incidents are now quite common, and it is not unusual to see firefights like the June 26 incident in Apaseo el Alto in which dozens of grenades are employed.

Another trend in recent years has been the steady movement of Mexican cartels south into Central and South America. As noted above, the region is awash in guns, and the growing presence of Mexican cartel members puts them in contact with people who have access to Cold War weapons, international arms merchants doing business with groups like the FARC and corrupt officials who can obtain weapons from military sources in the region. We have already seen seizures of weapons coming into Mexico from the south. One notable seizure occurred in March 2009, when Guatemalan authorities raided a training camp in northern Guatemala near the Mexican border that they claim belonged to Los Zetas. In the raid they recovered 563 40 mm grenades and 11 M60 machine guns that had been stolen from the Guatemalan military and sold to Los Zetas.

The third trend is the current firearm and ammunition market in the United States. Since the election of Barack Obama, arms sales have gone through the roof due to fears (so far unfounded) that the Obama administration and the Democratic Congress will attempt to restrict or ban certain weapons. Additionally, ammunition companies are busy filling military orders for the U.S. war effort in Iraq and Afghanistan. As anyone who has attempted to buy an assault rifle (or even a brick of .22 cartridges) will tell you, it is no longer cheap or easy to buy guns and ammunition. In fact, due to this surge in demand, it is downright difficult to locate many types of assault rifles and certain calibers of ammunition, though a lucky buyer might be able to find a basic stripped-down AR-15 for $850 to $1,100, or a semiautomatic AK-47 for $650 to $850. Of course, such a gun purchased in the United States and smuggled into Mexico will be sold to the cartels at a hefty premium above the purchase price.

By way of comparison, in places where weapons are abundant, such as Yemen, a surplus fully automatic assault rifle can be purchased for under $100 on the white arms market and for about the same price on the black arms market. This difference in price provides a powerful economic incentive to buy low elsewhere and sell high in Mexico, as does the inability to get certain classes of weapons such as RPGs and fragmentation grenades in the United States. Indeed, we have seen reports of international arms merchants from places like Israel and Belgium selling weapons to the cartels and bringing that ordnance into Mexico through routes other than over the U.S. border. Additionally, in South America, a number of arms smugglers, including Hezbollah and Russian organized-crime groups, have made a considerable amount of money supplying arms to groups in the region like the FARC.

The fourth trend is the increasing effort by the U.S. government to stanch the flow of weapons from the United States into Mexico. A recent increase in the number of ATF special agents and inspectors pursuing gun dealers who knowingly sell to the cartels or straw-purchase buyers who obtain guns from honest dealers is going to increase the chances of such individuals being caught. This stepped-up enforcement will have an impact as the risk of being caught illegally buying or smuggling guns begins to outweigh the profit that can be made by selling guns to the cartels. We believe that these two factors -- supply problems and enforcement -- will work together to help reduce the flow of U.S. guns to Mexico.

While there has been a long and well-documented history of arms smuggling across the U.S.-Mexican border, it is important to recognize that, while the United States is a significant source of certain classes of weapons, it is by no means the only source of illegal weapons in Mexico. As STRATFOR has previously noted, even if it were possible to hermetically seal the U.S.-Mexican border, the Mexican cartels would still be able to obtain weapons from non-U.S. sources (just as drugs would continue to flow into the United States). The law of supply and demand will ensure that the Mexican cartels will get their ordnance, but it is highly likely that an increasing percentage of that supply will begin to come from outside the United States via the gray and black arms markets....".

PS You will not find this type of reporting in the US mainstream media... Its a Taboo subject.., a very delicate political matter for both side that could effect the cashflow and bottom line in that business and those connected with same. This sensitive information must be kept from the American people for their protection and that of the cartels.... you figure the math and the reasons why.

Anyway... who really cares what goes on inside Mexico. Who on this side of the border really cares about human rights and the Mexican drug war. Its their problem. Right?

Dawn Meredith
07-09-2009, 06:29 PM
All the money wasted on the phony war on drugs could possibley save the economies of both our countries. But the PTB just don't care. They have theirs and the hell with the rest of the world. It's actually very hard to read about this, so much of what is going on in the world today is worse than bad.
No wonder the focus last week was on all Michael all the time. People need an escape from mounting unpaid bills, fear of ...just about everything. When the shit really hits in California people will really wake up. But it will be too little, too late.
Dawn

Tosh Plumlee
07-09-2009, 07:11 PM
Dawn. It will not be long before we as a nation will be Forced to pay attention to what is really going on in this phony drug war and the billions thrown away to the cartel and its supporters in many countries.

It will not be long (in fact its already happened) when we in the USA might get blown apart by a gang working from within Mexico and one of its many cartels, when we are driving home from work...

It has been proven, we (Americans) really do not care what happens to others, in spite of what we claim. As long as it does not effect us directly, or our pocket book, its easy to look the other way and hide our heads in the sand.

We Americans are as phony as a four dollar bill... we talk a lot and BS more, We play silly political games with each other while our freedoms slowly burn.

Hell, I have the solution to all this: For those of you who have not put your heads in the sand I would advise you to get with the rest and put it there or keep it up you butts where its been for a number of years now....

I love my country and that is why I do what I do. And I'll fight and go to hell for Her.....

What did you do in the big war, Daddy? "Had my head in the Sand".... "Ma Ma said that was not where your head was, daddy.

Action Speaks loudly.., and lack of individual actions speak volumes as to what kind of people we really are deep inside.

If I die I do hope its on the front lines of this Mexican Drug War... and not in bed with a Mexican lady of the night.... wait I take that back.... I'll go for the Lady. To hell with the war...

I have to get with the program like all the rest. I am now looking for a pile of sand to hide my head... where it was a while ago stinks. I'm sure we all know that smell.


P.S. I will be on the Hill in DC to testify as to what I found out inside Mexico last Spring... with pictures' which some have been posted on this forum some months ago. However, I said I would go only if it was a public hearing... If not I'll take my chances with the Feds and their batter of legal advisors and "gatekeepers".

I think its a waste of time for all.... but its my duty to attend and honor that little invitation given to me by a Federal Agent last week...

Jan Klimkowski
07-09-2009, 07:15 PM
Tosh - who do you think you're fighting For... and Against... in this "Mexican Drug War"?

Tosh Plumlee
07-09-2009, 07:57 PM
Washington DC..... Mexico..... Colombia. The Senate of the United States... Homeland Security... and the special interest who support and bribe elected officials on both sides of the border. Thats my fight.

There are a lot of good people fighting this war on drugs, but their hands are tied by special interest and those on the take in law enforcement and areas from the political arena of both countries. Its a money thing, always has been..., IMO

I fight for my freedom and for my country and do what I can and have a low tolerance for those who do not protect the freedoms handed us by those who gave their lives and spilled their blood on many battlefields in order to maintain our way of life.., to keep a free nation.

Tosh Plumlee
07-10-2009, 02:56 PM
Within an area smaller than the size of the Los Angles basin of California, the following death toll from murders and assassinations within the Juarez area is staggering. Following is the body count for the year 09:

69 homicides for the month of July as of 7-9-9 (yesterday)
213 homicides for June
129 homicides for May
951 homicides for the year

These homicides include city of Juarez Mexico and surrounding area (approximate 20 mile radius outside city limits)

note: over 10,000 drug cartel, gang drug related murders in Mexico in less than two years. Mexico's border war with the cartels is failing and the United States is failing Mexico.


Does anyone know the pandemic swine flu death toll in the United States, or world wide for that matter?

Has anyone developed a vaccine for the cartel bullet or machete?

Tosh Plumlee
07-12-2009, 11:19 PM
by DEA agent Celle Castillo

SELECTIVE*PROSECUTION*
&*
MY*
DEATH*SENTENCE*

“You’ve*never*lived*till*you’ve*almost*
died.*For*those*who*fight*for*it,*Life*
has*a*flavor,*the*protected*will*never*
know.”*

Jim Lamotte & Ricardo Davis
Green Berets in Vietnam

July 04, 2009

As I stand in the cross hairs of those who target Second Amendment
freedoms, I realize that firearms trafficking is not the only grievance my
government holds against me.

Having spent years as an “expert witness” for the defense, I still believed
in our judicial process. The function of justice is to serve truth. However, at the
end of the day, it had become obvious that my case had become “business as
usual,” and that our government was continuing to tear the fabric of our
Constitution. Our Constitution was written to protect American citizens from our
government.

Many people have asked me why I did not contest my case in a jury trial.
To begin with, I did not have the funds to take my case to trial. I hired my
attorney, Roberto Eddie de la Garza on April 14, 2008, for a plea agreement for
approximately $5,000. In addition, my 84-year-old mother asked me to accept a
2

plea agreement because she did not want to pass away while her only son was
incarcerated.

On January 30, 2009, my appeal attorney filed an Amended Motion for
Release Pending Appeal citing my Sixth Amendment right to effective
representation.

In January of 2009, the Honorable Judge Royal Furgeson ordered a
hearing on the motion for February 19, 2009.

On February 18, 2009, Assistant United States Attorney, State Bar
24062266, Mark Roomberg, filed a Government’s Response to Defendant’s
Amended Motion for Release Pending Sentence.

On February 19, 2009, the Honorable Judge Royal Furgeson did not rule
on my motion for release pending appeal; he intended to wait until he had heard
a brief from my attorney for a later date. However Judge Furgeson did extend my
self-surrender date to July 20, 2009, giving me the opportunity to assist my
attorney on the case. The reason given was that my former attorney, de la
Garza, had hijacked my file from October of 2008 to February of 2009.

On October 22, 2008, on my attorney’s advise, I pled out to two counts:

Superseding Information:

? Count One: Conspiracy to Traffic in firearms without a Firearms
License;
? Count Two: Trafficking in Firearms without a License.

I was sentenced to 37 months incarceration. The Honorable Judge Royal
Furgeson had at first ordered my self-surrender to take place on March 5, 2008.
3


On June 18, 2009, Public Defender, Judy Fulmer Madewell, my appeal
attorney, filed a Appeal Brief with the Honorable Judge Royal Furgeson in
reference to my appeal on the grounds of Ineffective Counsel, “conflict of
interest” and the district court’s error in applying a four-level increase to the
offense level.

On June 30, 2009, the judge ordered a Setting Status Conference for July
10, 2009, ten days before my self-surrender date of July 20, 2009.


History*of*the*Case*

On March 6, 2008, I was illegally arrested in San Antonio, Texas by
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, & Explosives Special Agent Allen Darilek
and ICE Special Agent Marcus Sexton. Their criminal complaint was filed on
March 05, 2008 and signed by United States Magistrate Judge, John W.
Primomo. The said complaint was authored by agent Darilek.

As I read the complaint, I could not believe the absurd and outlandish
allegations that he had sworn.

? COUNT ONE: (PERJURY): The act or an instance of a person
deliberately making false or misleading statements while
under oath. AGENT Darilek swore to this criminal complaint.

First and foremost, Darilek alleged that I had conspired with a convicted
felon, Dominick Colombrito, in purchasing weapons at a gun show. I attempted
to convince Darilek that Mr. Colombrito was not a convicted felon. Indeed, he
4

sold weapons with a Federal license. I questioned Darilek as to whether Mr.
Colombrito had been taken into custody. Agent Darilek assured me that he had
been arrested. Darilek displayed a phony mug shot of Mr. Colombrito. On April
03, 2008, I received a telephone call from Mr. Colombrito assuring me that he
was not a convicted felon and that he has never been arrested by a federal
agency. In my opinion, agent Darilek manufactured this evidence because this
was the only way he could arrest me. I was not a prohibited person, and neither
was the individual who had sold me the weapons. Agent Darilek knowingly and
intentionally violated my constitutional rights. The question is did the Assistant
United State Attorney Mark Roomberg approve the complaint before it was
sworn to? According to the Domestic Operations Guidelines: “The United
States Attorney shall be consulted…shall be furnished progress reports of the
investigation at regular intervals to ASSURE APPROPRIATE PARTICIPATION
BY PROSECUTING OFFICIALS.

? COUNT TWO: PROSECUTORIAL MISCONDUCT is a
procedural defense; via which, a defendant may argue that
they should not be held criminally liable for actions which may
have broken the law, because the prosecution acted in an
“inappropriate” or “unfair” manner. Such arguments may
involve allegations that the prosecution withheld evidence or
knowingly permitted false testimony.

Roomberg failed to report to the court and the defense that agent Darilek
had manufactured evidence in his complaint. The law is very clear. If a federal
employee receives information that another federal employee committed a
crime and fails to report it, he himself has just committee a crime.

de la Garza also failed to bring this information to the court.

5

? COUNT THREE: CIVIL RIGHT VIOLATION (Fourth Amendment)
prohibiting unreasonable searches and seizures.

In the “end justifies the means,” BATFE agent Daniel Casey (McAllen
Field Office) conducted one of the most grievous atrocities any agent can
commit. On March 06, 2008, he illegally searched my residence by coercion.
He threatened the owner that if she did not give permission to search the house,
he was going to call the police, news media, and wait for my grandkids to get
home so they could witness the search. This allegation was made in front of the
other agents, which included ATF agent Robert Flores.

? COUNT FOUR: SELECTIVE PROSECUTION is a procedural
defense in which a defendant argues that they should not be held
criminally liable for breaking the law, as the criminal justice system
discriminated against them by choosing to prosecute. In a claim of
selective prosecution, a defendant essentially argues that it is
irrelevant whether they are guilty of violating a law, but that the fact
of being prosecuted is based upon forbidden reasons. Such a
claim might, for example, entail an argument that persons of
different age, race, religion, or gender, were engaged in the same
illegal actions for which the defendant is being tried and were not
prosecuted, and that the defendant is only being prosecuted
because of a bias. In the U.S., this defense is based upon the 14th
Amendment, which requires that “nor shall any state deny to any
person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.”

For several months the informant in this case, Jay LeMire, was not
arrested in my case until I threatened to expose it to the judge. The government
in an attempt to avoid this violation was forced to arrest LeMire. The injustice
becomes evident when you are made aware that LeMire received five years’
probation for the same violations I had been charged with.
6



? COUNT FIVE: PERJURY

Another allegation on Darilek’s complaint was that I had sold weapons
outside the United States.

This allegation was without merit or any evidence whatsoever. U.S.
Magistrate John W. Primomo did not buy into it and dismissed the charge. Yet,
Judge FURGESON took the allegation to weigh against me into the federal
guideline on my sentencing.

Brief for the Defense/Appellant In the United States Court of Appeals
for the Fifth Circuit U.S. v. Celerino Castillo, III

Page 7: No. 08-51144

The Government admitted that it had no “proof that he was selling to
prohibited person.” “We suspect and we can’t prove that, yes, these guns
were going south of the border.”

On May 29, 2008, I met de la Garza at the Embassy Suites in McAllen,
Texas. de la Garza was in town for a meeting with head of the U.S. Attorney
Office in McAllen (Leonard). I questioned de la Garza what his business was
with the U.S. Attorney. Finally, de la Garza confessed that his son, Andrew de
la Garza, Criminal No. M-07-141-2 had been arrested on February 2007 in
South Texas by BATFE. He had been arrested for straw purchases and other
serious gun violations by the BATFE. I warned de la Garza that he needed to
address the court to see if there was a conflict of interest on his behalf. It was
later reveal that there were allegations that two BATFE agents Robert Flores
and Daniel Casey had been involved in both of our cases. See BATFE EF
7

3120.2 REPORT OF INVESTIGATION, prepared by SA Robert Flores, dated
03-06-08: on the consent search of my parent’s residence. Also see BATFE EF
3120.2 REPORT OF INVESTIGATION prepared by SA Daniel P. Casey dated
03-06-08 on the consent to search my residence. He assured me that there was
no conflict. This should have been my first red flag on what I suspected de la
Garza was up to. I also requested that he file a motion on Outrageous
Government Conduct in regard to the Criminal Complaint. Our lunch was cut
short; because he had the appointment at 1:30PM with the U.S. Attorney’s
Office. de la Garza admitted that both he and Leonard had gone to law school
together. He also stated that he had paid Jack Wolf $50,000.00 to make sure
that his son got off the criminal charge. As of this month de la Garza’s son is
down to one count of the 5 (five) counts he had originally been charged with.

? COUNT SIX: PROSECUTORIAL MISCONDUCT

I requested from my attorney a copy of the Grand Jury transcripts
concerning the criminal indictment, in other words, what agent DERILEK and
AUSA MARK Roomberg had testified to. I suspect the Government had failed to
turn over the Grand Jury transcripts on discovery for obvious reasons. de la
Garza assured me that there were no grand jury transcripts. That should have
been the second “red flag” for me, but I trusted de la Garza because our families
went way back in history. As you will learn later, I was deeply mistaken. de la
Garza continued to promise that he would file the Motions.


In June 2008, I pled out to the two counts of a federal indictment. Guilty
pleas in the absence of trial prevented the judicial search engine from finding out
what actually had happened, thus impeding the pursuit of truth. In other words, I
pled out to two bogus charges.


8

For this hearing, the government gave a heads up to a young female
reporter, who walks the halls of justice for last minute hearings on a Friday
afternoon. I noticed Roomberg texting on his cell phone. Within one hour after
my plea, it was on the radio airways. By the time, I got home, (four hours later) it
was on the local television station. The following morning it was in the local
newspaper. I certainly would love to pull Roomberg’s cell phone calls/texts to
see whom he was calling while in the courtroom. I certainly hope that this
information will be revealed when an inquiry is initiated on to how my case was
mishandled by the government.

Could there also have been a telephone call or text to AUSA Toni Trevino
of the McAllen office? She is the prosecutor who is now being sued by a former
client (defendant) because she withheld evidence in his trial, plus other serious
allegations where transcripts were allegedly altered. The federal courts of
appeals are just sick to death of prosecutorial misconduct and not being able to
do anything about it in the Bush administration. This is a shot across the
prosecution’s bow. This AUSA allegedly had a meltdown in federal judge Ricardo
Hinojosa’s courtroom. The allegation is that she started to cry because she had
lost a case and started blabbering, “it’s not fair”. She is the same AUSA who
had a DEA agent, Amanda Davis, commit perjury before a grand jury. This is a
fact. AUSA Trevino also allegedly received information that someone had
changed the transcripts of a hearing, where she had been chastised by a federal
judge for breaking a plea agreement. She failed to report this allegation to the
proper authorities for criminal investigation. AUSA Trevino is married to Benito
Trevino, an alleged former Republican chairman for Starr County. This picture
should start to get clearer. Trevino once forewarned a defense attorney (Shelby
Wisefield) that I had “best be careful in what I did against the government,
because she was going to do everything in her power to get me arrested.” The
picture is not that blurry now.

9

For the past several months, I vigorously attempted to address my
concerns to the government through my attorney. I felt my attorney was reluctant
to carry out my instructions.

On September 2008, I received a telephone call from de la Garza , who
stated that the government was dismissing my criminal case because they had
failed to charge me with the proper charges. According to Roomberg, their
office had allegedly been the first to initiated Polk vs. U.S. back in the late
1990s. So if they are the experts on Polk vs. US, why the eight months delay?

See attached copies of Transcripts “Guilty Plea” dated October 01,
2008: Page 2: Line 3.

Roomberg:

We filed a motion to dismiss – he’d pled guilty but we filed a motion to
dismiss indictment on a case that was pointed out to me…
Let me take one step back. The reason we superseded was because our
office discovered the Polk case, because the plain language of the statute with
which the defendant was initially charged…

UNITED STATES V POLK

“Precludes an individual being charged with [a crime] where the
straw purchaser bought a firearm for an individual who was not a
prohibited person [such as a convicted felon]. The defendant
[Castillo] was not a prohibited person.” [U.S. Attorney Johnny
Sutton]

Also see copies of Transcripts “Sentencing hearing dated October 22,
2008: Page 7: line 14
10

Go figure, on their intelligence or boldness of outrageous government
misconduct. If our government becomes a lawbreaker, it breeds contempt for
law; it has invited every man to become a law unto himself; it invites anarchy.
The record will reflect that this district office of the criminal law continues that the
“end justifies the means”. This would bring terrible retributions and unrestricted
secrecy in unlimited corruption, as we can clearly see in this case.


According to a New York Times, story dated April 15, 2009, by James C.
McKinley Jr. “At gun shows in these states, (Texas) there is even less regulation.
Private sellers, unlike licensed dealers, are not obligated to record the buyer’s
name, much less report the sale to the A.T.F.”

Roomberg made the case that I had not documented any names of the
people I had sold guns to. I was given four-level increase for trafficking in
firearms. My base offense level was 12 and then was shot up to 21.

On October 1, 2008, my case was dismissed – but not without a catch.
The government was now charging me with Trafficking in Guns without a License
and Aiding and Abetting. I had to scan through the new plea agreement while in
the courtroom. I asked my attorney how was it possible for the government to
prove that I sold a gun. There was never any evidence introduced concerning
who I had sold the guns too. He assured me that the government could do
whatever it wanted to do. He insisted that if I took the plea, I would more than
likely receive probation. This was the real deal, “the government would
dismiss my case, and my attorney would convince me to plea out.” I
argued my point to my attorney that in half of the gun shows, weapons are
routinely sold without a license. I soon learned that this was not the first time that
this U.S. Attorney’s Office had initiated a plea agreement in the courtroom. The
case was the involvement of the Lampazianie family who continue to proclaim
their innocence – despite the fact that they each pleaded guilty to one count of
conspiracy as part of a group plea bargain. The family members contend that
11

the plea deal was slapped together in the courtroom just before the trial was set
to begin in 1999. They also stress that the plea deal was not in writing and was
presented to them as a last-chance offer before facing a trial they believed was
fixed.

? COUNT SEVEN: PROSECUTORIAL MISCONDUCT “one of the
most reprehensible things a prosecutor can do is to attempt to put
into evidence before the court his own altered evidence.”

Prior to signing the agreement, Roomberg stated to my attorney that if I
pled out to this new agreement that I would NOT lose my benefits. Roomberg
assured my attorney that Jay LeMire was pleading to a similar charge, so that he
would not lose his Social Security benefits. My attorney failed to obtain a written
entry of my benefits into the plea agreement. de la Garza also reported this
allegation to Bill Conroy’s story dated February 01, 2009 title, ‘Iran/Contra
whistleblower Cele Castillo increasingly looks like a framed man.’ “De La
Garza also claims that in a discussion outside the courtroom that day, Oct. 1,
Roomberg told him that Castillo would keep his benefits if he pled out to the new
charges. And De La Garza says he relayed that information to Castillo.”


THE COURT:

…I – I will not in any way do anything to remove your benefits, but there –
there are instances where I understand in a sentencing a federal judge
can remove the benefits that people receive from either Social Security,
the Veteran’s Administration, or whatever. It’s not my plan to do that. Is
the Government planning to ask for that?

Roomberg:

No, Your Honor, In fact, in regards to the superseding information, the reason
these particular charges were chosen, we could have picked another charge
causing a false entry – causing a licensed firearm dealer to put a false entry into
their book which would be more of a falsity crime and which to my understanding
from talking to other attorneys would have a far greater impact than this would
because it is not a criminal falsity crime, either the conspiracy or the one
12

substantive count, it would not impact on that. I’m not an expert on that. We’re
not taking a position on it. We’re certainly not seeking that from the Court. But
that – That’s our position.


THE COURT:


“Well, that’s helpful, and I would not order it anyway. You’ve earned
those benefits and –“


My attorney once again assured me that there was no reason why the judge
would not place me on probation, because I had no previous criminal record plus
my health issues would be brought into consideration. He stated that in the worst
scenario, I would get one year, and that I would self surrender in March of 2009.

Between the 1st and the 22 of October 2008, I checked with the
appropriate departments to recheck the status of my benefits. I checked with the
Office of Personal Management (OPM) Government office and they advised me
that I would lose every aspect of my retirement annuity if I was to be incarcerated
for a felony charge. Never to get those benefits again. This would include my
family’s health and life insurance (half a million dollars) that I have had for the
past 28 years. I then proceeded to check with the Veterans Administration
Benefits, and I was assured that my benefits would be reduced upon my
incarceration in excess of over 60 days for a felony conviction. The amount not
payable may be apportioned to a spouse, dependent children or parents. I finally
contacted the Social Security Administration about my benefits and asked them if
I was incarcerated, would I lose my benefits? The individual further stated that
no government court order would change their policy. The question remains as
to how Roomberg was able to make these far-fetched statements about me not
losing my benefits.

If our courts lose their authority and their rulings are
no longer respected, there will be no one left to
13

resolve the divisive issues that can rip the social fabric
apart…The courts are a safety valve without which no
democratic society can survive.
Rose E. Bird,
Chief Justice, Supreme Court of California

On October 13, 2008, when I realized that de la Garza had failed to
address my concerns to Judge Furgeson, I decided to address them in a letter to
Judge Furgeson. On Oct. 22, 2008, Judge Furgeson confirmed that he had
received my letter of concern.

On October 22, 2008, I presented myself for my arguments on my
sentencing before Judge Royal Furgeson. We proceeded to address our five
arguments (objections) that had been implemented in the new Pre Sentence
Investigation Report during an unprecedented two hour sentencing. (See
attachment.) My attorney and I (mostly I) vigorously attempted to make my case
on the following objections.

The first was my objection to the number of weapons that the government
said were involved. The government could only submit proof of the last eight
weapons that I had purchased from LeMire. Only four of those weapons were
seized. Roomberg kept using the phrases to support the government’s position
as “we believe,” “we think,” & “we suppose.” The judge, without any
evidence, rejected our arguments.

The second objection pertained to the trafficking in arms. We made the
argument that I did not sell to a prohibited person or to any person who was
going to commit a crime with the guns, criteria for trafficking in arms. Once
again, the government kept saying, “we believe,” “we think,” and “we
suppose.” The motion was denied. I started to realize that the cards were
stacked against me. It was not going to make a difference what we argued; all
our arguments were going to be denied.
14


See transcripts on “Sentencing” dated Oct. 22, 2008

Page 11; Line12:

Roomberg:

“…normally I don’t discuss this in open court but since the
defendant raised it himself at sentencing…”

Do we have proof that he was selling them to prohibited
persons? NO!

Clarification : This is what I said in regards to the above
statements by Roomberg at my sentencing.

Sentencing Transcripts October 22, 2008


Page 22; Line 14:

Castillo

…The Government knows who it is You know, and he didn’t –
didn’t break the law, you know. He bought them from me just like –
just like another person. He has a Texas driver’s license, he’s from
the U.S. and He’s not a prohibited person.

NEVER did I mention that I spoke with the government. My
explanation was that the surveillance units had seen me meeting
with the individual and had identified him through his license plate.
15


Roomberg knew exactly whom the guns went to, because the agents had
followed me on surveillance when I delivered the shotguns in January of 2008.
Two agents, from two different agencies, have written reports [REPORT OF
INVESTIGATION] to that effect. There is no doubt that the individual who took
custody of the guns did in no way shape or form break the law by taking custody
of the guns. He was not a prohibited person, and the government knew this to
be a fact. The agents on surveillance did not witness any guns changing hands
between this individual and me. This can be confirmed in their surveillance
report. Once again the judge ruled against us.

Page 29; Line 10:

Roomberg:

this person who has dealt the majority – what he just said in court, the
majority of these guns he only knows by a nickname and a general area
where they live … The types of guns are the FN 5.7 and the P 90
which are the assault rifles.”

Roomberg intentionally, knowingly, and recklessly lied to the court.
Roomberg lied about the P90 rifle. This weapon is nowhere to be
found in my case. He just plain made up this allegation.

PAGE 35; LINE 13

THE COURT:

You know, this – this is a close call for me. And it – I have struggled with it and
struggled with it…

16

THE COURT:


…I’m just struggling with this. It seems to me that – if I can have more
information about the purchaser, but the problem is that information seems to be
pretty elusive.

? COUNT SEVEN : PROSECUTORIAL MISCONDUCT

My attorney argued that under relevant conduct issue of trafficking
that I should not be held accountable for conduct that has no basis or
evidence to support the allegations the government was making that I was
involved in trafficking of weapons outside the U.S. Roomberg addressed
to the court that the government had no idea who the guns went to and
that they only had a nickname to go by. Again, the judge ruled against us.

On February 19, 2009, before the Honorable Judge Royal Furgeson,
Roomberg made a serious allegation against me. He alleged, without any proof
to the court, that since by the time of my sentencing, the BATFE had traced two
of the weapon in my case to Mexico. He identified them in his GOVERNMENT
RESPONSE TO DEFENDANT’s AMENDED MOTION FOR RELEASE
PENDING SENTENCE; DATED February 18, 2009. The weapons in question
were one FN-5.7x28 and a P-90 assault rifle. I warned my attorney that the P-90
assault rifle had no bearing in my case. This weapon was never mentioned in
my case, and that I strongly believed that Roomberg was once again lying to the
court. Roomberg never mentioned if these weapons were used in a crime, just
that they had been found. If Roomberg documented the P-90 from BATFE
records indicating that they had been seized in Mexico, he should had gotten the
serial number and the model number. He failed to properly identify these
weapons with serial numbers. It is a good indication that he was just
manufacturing evidence. He never produced any identification for the courts.
When I was first arrested by BATFE, their first statement was that they had found
17

one of the guns in Mexico. This is the M.O that BATFE uses to intimidate a
citizen.

PAGE 9 of said motion: Governments Response to Defendant’s Motion
on February 19, 2009

Roomberg:

Based on new developments in this case, the government believes
the defendant is a danger to the community as well. As discussed at
sentencing, the government speculated that the guns which Defendant, a
resident who lived close to the Mexican border, was purchasing in San
Antonio via the straw purchaser were being smuggled to Mexico for
nefarious purposes. Since sentencing, B ATFE has traced and located
two of the “mata policias,” “cop killer,” weapons to Mexico-a FN 5.7 pistol
and a FN PS-90 assault rifle…

? COUNT EIGHT: PROSECUTORIAL MISCONDUCT

Page 19: line16:

Roomberg:

“That’s what these cop killing guns are meant for. They are not meant
for shooting bambis. Bambi doesn’t wear flak jackets. You don’t need
armor piercing bullets to go hunting.”

During my sentencing and at the latest hearing, Roomberg testified on
numerous times the wrong amount of weapons I was being charged with. The
official total was 35 weapons. He mentioned nine (9) times that there were 32
18

guns. He also falsified testimony on numerous occasions that that the FN 5.7x28
used armor piercing rounds, which it does not. And about Bambi doesn’t wear
flak jackets, it certainly would not matter because flak jackets are not bullet proof.
According to Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, a flak jacket vest is a form of
protective clothing designed to provide protection from shrapnel and other
indirect low velocity projectiles. But how would Roomberg know, he never
served his country. I still own a Vietnam era flak jacket.
Page 20: line: 7

Madewell:

“I would like to point out that it had Government’s response they
mention two guns, one of which was an FN PS 90 assault rifle, but if you
will look in the plea agreement and the indictment, there’s no such weapon
mentioned. I would also like to point out that, although the prosecutor
called the guns at issue cop killers, that according to the ATF government
website, the FN 5.7, 5x7 times 28 – I don’t know to pronounce that part –
millimeter is imported into the United – approved for importation into the
United States as a sporting firearm. The ATF website also says the only
ammunition that is approved for import into the United States is not armor
piercing ammunition. That’s from the ATF’s own website.


On January 13, 2009, I received a telephone call from Mrs. Madewell who
advised me that she had for the past several months attempted to contact de la
Garza to no avail. She stated that she has not worked on my appeal because de
la Garza had not turned the file over to her or even spoken to him. She stated
however, that her secretary had contacted him on several occasions, and he had
promised to turn the file over to them. The appeal attorney claims that her office
has offered to send one of their investigators to pick up the file; but he has
19

declined. I asked her if he had to turn the file over to her, and she replied that
she thought that he did not have to. I then asked how she was going to file the
appeal. She stated that she could not file the appeal without knowing the proper
information. An appointment was made to meet with her the following week.

On March 03, 2009, two days, before my first self-surrender, I finally
received my attorney’s notes dated June 26, 2008. The notes will prove
without reasonable doubt that Roomberg lied to the court. The notes
indicate: the full name of the individual that purchased said weapons
from me. Second: The surveillance unit had identified his truck with paper
plates. (See surveillance reports by agents) And most significantly:
Roomberg made MapQuest from his computer in identifying the
individual.

? COUNT NINE: OBSTRUCTING JUSTICE
The act by which one or more persons attempt to prevent, or do
prevent, the execution of lawful process.

At the prosecutor’s table, ICE agent Marcus Saxton sat in on both my
plea hearing and my sentencing, and he never once corrected
Roomberg’s untruthfulness. Case agent Allen Darilek never showed up
for my last three court proceedings.

The third objection was to relevant conduct-leadership role. The gun deals
were between the “snitch,” Jay LeMire, and me. The government once again
said such things as “we believe,” “we think,” and “we suppose.” If the
government was adamant about not knowing who I was giving the guns to, how
could there be leadership involvement between LeMire and myself? We were
once again denied.

20

Finally, we objected to a downward departure due to health and family under
Sec. H of the sentencing guidelines & USC 3553. After suffering Post
Traumatic Stress Disorder in Vietnam and with the Drug Enforcement
Administration, the judge found no compassion for a worn out veteran of three
wars, who had placed his life on the line on several occasions to preserve his
country. Apparently, it was not good enough. Denied.

The Honorable Judge Royal Furgeson strongly denied that I was a
danger to the community and so did the Probation Department.

There is no proof the 32 guns he bought through a straw purchaser
ended up in cartel hands. “BUT PROSECUTOR SAYS THAT CAN BE
ASSUMED BECAUSE MANY OF THEM – 23 WERE HANDGUNS THAT
CAN FIRE ARMOR-PIERCING AMMO…”

I was sentenced to 37 months incarceration for my actions. The judge was
kind enough to allow me to self-surrender and ordered my surrender for March
05, 2009. The question is how did de la Garza know this back in October 2008
as to when I was going to self-surrender in March?

The Narco News Story wrote a story in regards to the wrong doing in my
case reference to The United States Attorney’s Office. Both de la Garza and I
were interviewed for said story. I assumed it was okay to do the interview since
Roomberg had been interviewed by the San Antonio Express News on their
story of gun running, dated December 14, 2008. The next three entries are from
the newspaper story.

? “We think the person sending the drugs and receiving the guns are
the same, “prosecutor Roomberg SAID.

21

? Prosecutors and BATFE said they hadn’t heard of Castillo before
his arrest in March.

Both prosecutors and BATFE agents had heard of me prior to my arrest.
The BATFE had initiated their case against me back in January 2008. Anyone
in law enforcement knows that when you initiate a case on an individual, you run
his name with all other law enforcement agencies. Because of my activism, and
history as an “expert witness” for the defense, they certainly knew of me. I am
known in government files, believe me. Let’s not forget the sting operation with a
television station I was involved with against BATFE at the Pharr gun show in
January, 2008 of that year. The BATFE was allegedly committing racial profiling
against U.S. citizens.

As for the prosecutors not knowing me, well how soon do they forget that I
testified against the government, as an “expert witness,” in the same courtroom
where I was sentenced? It was the Arturo Gutierrez case. This was where the
government was caught breaking the law. This was a sting operation by the FBI
against several San Antonio police officers. In that case, the case FBI agent,
Manny Ramirez, was fired and his supervisors were asked to resign because of
their misconduct.

Now, I am not a conspiracy theorist, but this cannot go unchecked. Let’s
see if we can use Roomberg’s allegations or (method of operation) that he used
to convict me without any proof. It was revealed that when de la Garza took on
my case, he was under investigation by the State Bar for stealing approximately
$30,000 from client/clients. For the complete story, visit the Texas State Bar web
site and read this month’s (January, 2008) magazine.

On October 15, 2008, de la Garza received a notice from the Texas State
Bar that he was to be suspended for one year, starting Nov. 01, 2008. On
October 22, 2008, de la Garza represented me at my sentencing, still deceiving
22

me concerning his investigation. During my sentencing, the judge had stated that
I have waived the right to appeal my sentencing. As for de la Garza, he had
misrepresented me from the very beginning.

On October 28, 2008, de la Garza emailed me and attached documents
for my appeal on my sentencing. A note on the email: “I am enclosing the
documents you have requested. Please print, sign where indicated and send to
the clerk of the court by FexEx or UPS so it gets there NO LATER THAN
FRIDAY. Appears you must personally sign the appeal, etc. The right hand
doesn’t know what the left hand is saying I guess. Questions-call me.
Remember you need to send the original NOTICE OF APPEAL and one copy
and the original Motion for Court appointed Attorney and Once Copy. Must sign
all in blue.” So, if I gave up the right to appeal my sentence, why is he
representing in filing for the appeal? In a phone call, he stated that Roomberg
had lied to the judge, and that he had the notes to prove he had lied.

In the middle of November of 2008, I spoke to my former attorney de la
Garza. He advised me that he had spoken to the attorney handling my appeal
case and that he had turned over the file to her.

On November 27, 2008, I received a letter from Public Defender appeal
attorney, Mrs. Judy Madewell advising me that she would be handling my appeal
on my sentencing. She also stated that if I needed any questions answered to
contact her.

Did Roomberg and de la Garza conspire in order to convict me? Did
Roomberg ignore the possibility of federal charges, if any, against de la Garza
on the State Bar’s findings? Numerous attempts by the Public Defender and me
were made to attempt to retrieve my files from de la Garza. He found no
concerns or worries that the government would take any action against him. They
are hoping that I will go to prison before this is exposed and then, while I am
23

inside, no one will listen, or I will have an accident. This may be, but all I can say
to these individuals is that I am going to become the nightmare that their mothers
warned them about.

So here we are at the end of this story. The question to some would be
why would the government come after me with bogus charges from the
beginning? During the 1980s, I became an Iran/Contra Whistleblower against
the Reagan/Bush administrations. I exposed our government as complicit in the
drug trade and ARMS SMUGGLING. There were several bi-partisan
investigations in both the House & Senate which confirmed my allegations
against the government. Several individuals involved in these atrocities were
convicted, but later pardoned. In addition, some of them continued to work for
the Bush administration. Why was I targeted by this outrageous government
conduct? I believe that U.S. Attorney Johnny Sutton is very close to the Bush
family and I guess it was payback for all my allegations against the Bush family.

My fiasco has not been the only case the Sutton administration has
conducted. There is The House of Death, where he allowed an ICE informant to
get away with murdering several people in Mexico with the knowledge of their
handlers. There is also the prosecution of Border Patrol Agents Ramos and
Compean. Sutton allowed Osvaldo Davila to give false statements against the
agents. As Congressman Rohrabacher once said, “Davila is a rotten
habitual drug smuggler who should have been the target of Sutton’s
prosecution, instead of the agents.” Congressman Ted Poe also issued a
statement on the Ramos/Compean appeal following a hearing in the 5th Circuit
Court of Appeals in New Orleans, LA: “Today, before the 5th Circuit Court of
Appeals, the US Attorney’s Office admitted that their star witness in the case
against the agents, ‘told some lies’. The rest of us call that perjury. The fact that
the prosecution knowingly allowed their witness to offer false testimony raises
even more red lags about the overzealous prosecution of this case.”

24

Many years ago, I took an oath to protect the Constitution of the United
States and have gladly fought for it on several occasions. I’ve continued this
struggle. However, this time it’s against the criminals in my own government. It
certainly looks like I have lost this battle for my freedom, but I am desperately
trying to learn to live to fight another day. It also bothers the heck out of me how
to interpret this struggle. There is no greater conflict in me than that with regard
to how I feel about my government and how my government feels about me. All I
have ever asked from the courts was for a chance to prove myself. I asked for a
fair and impartial opportunity, nothing that you yourself would not demand.
Bottom line, I was invited to a poker game and was handed a fixed deck. I was
brought up to believe by my father that beneath it all, we as Americans are
decent people, with an abiding scene of integrity and fair play.

Back in 1996, I went before a Federal Grand Jury in Washington D.C, the
same Grand Jury that former First Lady Hillary Clinton testified before on “White
Water.” I testified concerning the allegations of the CIA’s implication in murder,
drug trafficking, and arms smuggling. I was granted whistle blower status.

In 1996, a great and honorable man, the Rev. Joseph Lowery invited Dick
Gregory, Joe Madison, and me to a press conference at the National Press Club
in Washington, D.C. We were protesting the corruption in our government,
specifically within the CIA and DEA. On that day, all three of them went to jail for
me and for the American people. On January 20, 2009, I saw the Rev. Joseph
Lowery give the benediction at President’s Barack Obama’s swearing in. Come
July 20, 2009, it will be my turn to carry the cross and become a political prisoner
of my government. But before I do, I will utilize one other tool that has always
worked on my spirit. I will conduct a pilgrimage to the federal court house in San
Antonio.

I certainly know that I am nowhere close to Senator Ted Stevens’
accomplishments, but I strongly believe the Prosecutorial Misconduct was more
25

severe in my case than in his. The judge in his case, Judge Emmet Sullivan, has
now held Justice Department lawyers in contempt for their Misconduct and most
surprisingly has dismissed the case against Sen. Stevens. His investigation
could lead to reprimands, disbarment, even criminal charges. I certainly hope
that in the Senator’s case, it will lead to more widespread reform – or at least
more effective oversight – of a practice that is more common than many would
like to admit for quite human reasons. The United States Attorney General has
gone where few before him dared to go. Mr. Erik Holder should be praised for
his actions on Sen. Steven’s case.

Roomberg commented in the last hearing “that it was time for me to go to
jail, for my wrong doing.” That may be so, come July 20. In point of fact, our
country can only move forward with confidence if it first cleans its own house.
Checks and balances are what ordinary people are requesting in our judicial
system. Whether Roomberg is punished for his action or not, we must never,
ever accept the defense that somebody was “just following orders”.

On April 10, 2009, my official complaint against the Government was hand
carried by two veteran’s organization, Americas Last Patrol and a member of
American G-I Forum, to the Office of Inspector General and the Civil Rights
division at the Department of Justice. I am requesting an inquiry of how my case
was handled by the prosecution. However, I am fearful that the old guard is still
present that will protect Roomberg. All I know is that I don’t want to spend the
rest of my life in prison, questioning whether I should have done this or that.

On February 27, 2009, I was awarded 100% disability from the Veterans
Administration. However, it was not for my Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
(50%), but for my coronary artery disease. The VA revealed that I have chronic
recurring congestive heart failure with a two vessel coronary artery bypass graft.
They also reported that I have chronic congestive heart failure. Most significant I
have (left) ventricular dysfunction with an ejection fraction of less than 30
26

percent. My incarceration will certainly be my death sentence. But, most likely,
Roomberg would say, “they have doctors in prison.” I proudly served my
country, so individuals like Roomberg are able to have that freedom.

Democracy is two wolves & a lamb (Castillo)
voting on what to have for lunch. Freedom is
an armed lamb contesting the vote.

A true American patriot must always be ready to defend his country
against his Government. I certainly earned those rights, even if it means going to
jail.

Respectfully,

Celerino “Cele” Castillo, 3rd
Former DEA Agent
United States Army
Infantryman Viet-Nam
Powderburns@prodigy.net
W.W.W. Powderburns. Info

Tosh Plumlee
07-13-2009, 02:36 PM
from the LA Times July12

The 2 1/2-year offensive has uncovered deep corruption and sparked violent gang wars, presenting a stark reality: The longer and harder the war is fought, the more complex and daunting it becomes.
Reporting from Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, and Mexico City -- In the baddest precinct of Mexico's most violent city, Jose Manuel Resendiz is the law.

The army officer packs two pistols and a semiautomatic rifle as he patrols the Delicias district of Ciudad Juarez, the bullet-scarred border city that is the emblem of Mexico's drug-war mayhem.



Riding in a Ford pickup with five gun-toting soldiers, he pulls over suspicious-looking cars, sets up impromptu roadblocks to search for drugs and weapons, and tends to the nuisance calls that make up a cop's life: robberies, street fights, fender benders.

"I am an army lieutenant colonel," Resendiz said. "But now we're all police."

Ciudad Juarez resembles a city under military occupation as President Felipe Calderon ratchets up his war against drug traffickers.

Calderon launched the military offensive 10 days after assuming office in December 2006, saying it was necessary to restore government authority in parts of the country. Today, 2 1/2 years later, Calderon and Mexico face a stark reality: The longer and harder the war is prosecuted, the more complex and daunting it becomes.

The offensive has exposed corruption so widespread that key institutions, from police forces to city halls, appear rotten to the core. And a battered society has grown increasingly worried about the effects of the massive military deployment on its democracy.

A cascade of setbacks -- prison breakouts, kidnappings of federal officials, killing of priests -- has led to questions about whether Calderon was prepared for the breadth and depth of the problem.

By disrupting the cartels' operations, the offensive intensified turf struggles among the traffickers. About 11,000 people, some of them bystanders, have died in the violence.

"They hit a wasp nest, and the wasps are stinging," said Jose Luis Pineyro, an expert on national security at Mexico City's Autonomous Metropolitan University. "There definitely wasn't a well-structured plan to know what kind of threat they were confronting."

Government forces have scored victories, almost all credited to the military: They've arrested more than 66,000 suspects, seized tons of cocaine and marijuana, and intercepted guns, grenades, airplanes -- even drug-laden, submarine-like vessels.

But every success is offset quickly by a fresh surge in violence, sometimes in unexpected places such as the tourist magnet of Acapulco. No state has been spared bloodshed or scandal. To date, the government has not gone after major money-laundering operations, the fuel that keeps the cartels going, and none of the current leaders of the main cartels has been captured.

"It's very hard to stop this trend," a senior military official in Ciudad Juarez said, speaking of the unyielding bloodshed. "We are fighting an enemy we don't know and don't see and only feel their results."

The drug gangs appear as strong and as vicious as ever as they fight not just for smuggling routes but for shares of the growing domestic market. Mexican cartels are now the dominant force in an industry once led by Colombians.

More than 45,000 troops have been deployed in these 2 1/2 years to hot spots across the nation. It's not just boots on the ground: Army generals and colonels have taken command of law enforcement in seven states and, from Juarez to Tijuana to Cancun, have supplanted civilian authority.

Ciudad Juarez, a city of 1.3 million, remains the test case, embodying the reach of Calderon's strategy and its risks. The military buildup in Juarez came after months of extraordinary violence. About 1,600 people were killed last year, including more than 200 in November alone.

In February, the police chief quit after several officers were shot dead and signs appeared threatening that more would be killed unless he stepped down. Other posters threatened the life of Mayor Jose Reyes Ferriz. The governor of the state, Chihuahua, was ambushed in the state capital. (He survived, but his bodyguard was killed.)

Juarez officials appealed for federal help, and in March, Calderon's government sent 5,000 troops and 1,900 federal police officers -- adding to the 2,500 soldiers and police already there.

Reliance on army

A retired general, Julian Rivera Breton, was appointed public safety chief, and an active-duty colonel, Alfonso Cristobal Garcia Melgar, was installed as police director. In all, 30 current or former military officers now hold supervisory roles in the police department.

At the height of the violence, in February, there were 10 or more killings a day. The number has dropped to an average of four to eight a day, and bank robberies and car thefts are also down, authorities say. Still, the homicide rate for the first six months of 2009 is higher than it was last year, according to media tallies. Kidnapping and extortion remain rampant.

Hit men in Juarez, who used to ambush enemies with AK-47 and AR-15 assault rifles fired from fancy SUVs, have had to change their tactics. These days, most killings are done with pistols, and the getaway car is often a beat-up Honda. But the bloodshed goes on.

"The killings we're seeing right now are young people that are trying to get started in a life of crime," said Reyes, the mayor. "The whole change in the city has created circumstances that are much more favorable for us to get everything under control."

The military presence in Juarez is striking. Police pickups and military trucks packed with troops are everywhere. Soldiers answer 911 calls, arrest drunken drivers and respond to shootings. Factory warehouses have been converted into makeshift encampments, full of colorful, store-bought dome tents.

In November, killers were able to break into the police radio frequency and play narcocorrido music as a sign an officer had been killed, or was about to be. Now, officials are developing a secure radio system.

Mistrust of police had been so high that residents were reluctant to call 911 out of fear that their names would be leaked to gangsters. Now, Reyes said, a hotline is being established to route calls to a center in an undisclosed Latin American country.

Graft-ridden police

Reyes said the military deployment is a temporary measure to give city officials time to clean up the police force. "We all knew there was police corruption," he said, but "nobody knew how deep it was." He plans to nearly double the size of the force, to 3,000 by the end of the year, and to use a strict vetting process.

Calderon's administration says troops are likely to remain deployed throughout Mexico for the rest of his tenure, which ends in 2012, because it is believed it will take that long to purge and retrain the police.

"This fight is not viable without the army," said Monte Alejandro Rubido, a senior security official in Calderon's government. "What has surprised us is how quickly the business of street sales, and the violence from it, grew and spread, in areas where there had not been trouble from organized crime. Corruption and intimidation, that's how they penetrated."

Troops were dispatched in February this year to the northern border state of Nuevo Leon, Mexico's wealthiest and long a symbol of relative stability. Traffickers quickly mobilized low-level dealers and their families to protest the military presence and to create the impression that the traffickers had a broad social base. Monterrey, the capital, and other cities were paralyzed for days.

Then the army started arresting police in Monterrey and other Nuevo Leon municipalities. In early June, troops backed by federal agents rounded up dozens of police officers and several commanders. When the police got wind of what was happening, they challenged the troops and tried to block roads.

As punishment, the federal authorities ordered the police to turn in their rifles. A day later, they confiscated their cellphones, suspecting the cops were using them to pass intelligence to traffickers.

A politician from the Monterrey area's richest district was caught on tape describing the power of the drug lords. Mauricio Fernandez is heard saying that the area was relatively peaceful because the Beltran Leyva cartel wanted it that way.

"Their families live here," he said. "You don't think it's the police [that maintain order], do you?"

In the central state of Zacatecas in May, prison guards were caught on videotape watching unperturbed as 53 traffickers, gunmen and other inmates casually walked out of a maximum-security jail.

In Calderon's home state, Michoacan, army and federal agents swept into city halls and police stations in May, arresting 10 mayors and 17 other officials accused of aiding an especially violent cartel called La Familia ("The Family"). Traffickers in Michoacan, who specialize in methamphetamine, choose candidates for elections and force residents to pay tribute to the cartel rather than taxes.

The army's role has expanded to such an extent that this month troops staged raids in the capital, Mexico City. Soldiers can enter homes and businesses without warrants and detain people without charges.

Critics worry that this could undermine the country's fragile democracy. Others fear that the military, one of Mexico's most respected institutions, will fall prey to the corruption that has corroded so many police departments. Ten army officers were arrested in June for allegedly passing information to fugitive drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman.

Army abuses cited

Activists say soldiers trained for combat, not police work, have run amok at times.

Margarita Rosales, a laundry worker in Juarez, said her son, Javier, 21, was found dead in April after he and a friend were seized by soldiers and federal police after a night of drinking. His body bore marks of a severe beating, she said. Rosales said the friend told her that Javier, an X-ray technician, was singled out because he was heavily tattooed.

"He didn't sell drugs. He wasn't involved in that kind of thing," she said. "If they had found kilos of drugs, kilos of cocaine -- but why? There is no reason why."

Gustavo de la Rosa Hickerson, human rights ombudsman for the state of Chihuahua, said his office has received 200 complaints of abuse by the military, including allegations of suspects being tortured to extract information, wrongful detention and seven killings. Nationwide, complaints against the army tripled between 2007 and 2009.

Army officials say hitmen are dressing in military-style garb to abduct rivals. Soldiers in the Juarez area recently arrested 25 armed men, most of whom were wearing army-type uniforms.

Enrique Torres, spokesman for the joint military-civilian operation in Ciudad Juarez, said the government takes allegations of abuse seriously and will prosecute offenders in military courts. He said the army in Juarez was investigating 126 reports of abuse.

For all the improvements in Ciudad Juarez cited by the mayor, many residents are unconvinced that much has changed.

"There are still a lot of killings," said Magda Duran, a 45-year-old factory worker. She stood on the porch of her home in the city's ramshackle Delicias section as soldiers and police searched houses, including hers, for the victim of a reported kidnapping.

"They scare me," Duran said of the troops. "They intimidate me."

On this evening, a squad of 16 soldiers and police from Lt. Col. Resendiz's precinct prowled in a pair of pickups past darkened beer joints and concrete shanties that hunker behind gates made of bedsprings and freight pallets. In grass-less yards, children grinned and waved. The soldiers waved back. Grown-ups stared, but none waved.

The rolling army patrol was summoned to a bleak neighborhood called Rancho Anapra. In the waning desert light, a man lay lifeless in the dusty street. He had been shot four times, in full view of a dozen houses.

Residents regarded the arriving troops with bored expressions, amid a cacophony of barking dogs.

There were many bystanders, but few witnesses. "Puro mirón," grumbled a military police officer. "All just onlookers. We could ask them, but nobody will know anything. Nobody saw anything."

The scene encapsulates one of the government's biggest challenges in the drug war: overcoming the deep mistrust of ordinary Mexicans. "Only when something happens -- that's when they come," said one of the bystanders, Laura Valdivia, 36, who works in a factory that makes fake Christmas trees.

Other than his name, Daniel Chavez, and age, 35, no one seemed to have much to say about the victim, whose torso was a spider's web of tattoos.

The crowd slowly evaporated. In darkness, the body was hauled away and the soldiers clambered back onto the pickups, knowing as little as when they arrived.

Tosh Plumlee
07-13-2009, 08:37 PM
Associated Press July 13,09

THE BORDER REPORT
The government of Chihuahua seems to find it appropriate to turn its Anglo residents into weapon-toting vigilantes and let them deal with any future kidnappings or murders that come down on the Mormon communities in the state.
The attorney general stepped up to offer training in the polygamist community of LeBaron after a brutal execution earlier this week. Benjamin LeBaron was kidnapped along with a relative, taken from his home under threat of a grenade attack. He was beaten of his family, some reports say the killers attempted to rape his wife; the two bodies were found on a dirt trail outside of town on Monday. In response, his brother Julian says the community’s cut a deal with the state.
“The governor is telling us that he can make it happen if we give him people that know how to use weapons. … that if they already have a knowledge of how to use weapons that he could train them and give us at least a couple of guys in 30 days,” LeBaron told The Associated Press.
Chihuahua state Attorney General Patricia Gonzalez says: “We are taking the necessary steps to make them community police.”
It’s a deadly crucible and one, I predict, that’s going to turn sloppy fast. The Mormon community is spoiling for a fight, the problem is the whack-jobs who are giving them one are feral and violent, backed by a corrupt police force and an apathetic government that’s done little to stem the flow of violence anywhere else in Mexico’s biggest state. As some of you astutely noted, those being blamed for the murder job are members of La Linea. The obvious question needs to be raised, why aren’t Mexicans who deal with the same type of situations every day, in Palomas, in Nicolas Bravo, in Ciudád Juárez, having the same courtesies extended to them? Mexico has some of the toughest gun restrictions in the world, it’s illegal to carry more than a .32 caliber pistol or a hunting rifle and even for those, you need stringent Army permissions. The Anglos receive blessings from the government to arm themselves and mobilize. Mexicans are simply cursed.
The message I’m getting is loud and clear: Mexicans caught up in violence, kidnapping and murder probably deserved it. It’s the same rationalization we hear every day: the cartel violence only affects those who are involved, wealthy and powerful Anglos with dual citizenship cannot possibly be involved.
I’ve often wondered at Mexico’s relationships with the Mormon communities in Chihuahua and Sonora. Colonia LeBaron was founded nearly a century ago by Latter Day Saints churchmembers who wanted to continue practicing polygamy. In 2002, the state of Arizona raided the small northern state community of Colorado City, searching for Mormon leaders wanted on child polygamy charges. Some of those fled to Chihuahua where, we’ve always been told, they weren’t accepted because polygamy is one thing and child exploitation an entirely different matter. Some 15 percent of Colonia LeBaron’s married folk are in polygamous relationships, a status that is as illegal in Mexico as it is in the U.S. Yet the communities are mostly left alone, untouched and unmonitored, its populace working as farmers, businessowners and ranchers.
Two months ago, a 17-year-old from the community was abducted for ransom. That led to some 25 arrests in nearby Nicolas Bravo. Then Meredith Romney, a powerful maquila owner and LDS leader, was kidnapped about two weeks ago. That little piece of news was kept out of the media until BorderReporter.com readers dragged it out of the shadows. The Mormon community, perhaps not realizing the level of corruption and ineptitude they were dealing with (??!), staged protests, demanding better security measures from the Mexican government. That’s something Mexicans have screamed ad nauseum from Baja California to Nuevo León to D.F. – and mostly ignored. Here’s a story out of Culiacán from today’s protest of an unsolved massacre of nine people a year ago. Benjamin LeBaron led many of those protests; his murder was the result.
What we’re left with is an enraged community of Mormons with powerful allies north of the border and the backing of the state government preparing to defend itself against armed gangs. And if that’s not the beginning of a new chapter in this desmadre of a drug war, I’m not a border reporter.

Tosh Plumlee
07-14-2009, 12:49 PM
Police find 12 tortured bodies in Mexico

MEXICO CITY -- Prosecutors said they found the bound, blindfolded and tortured bodies of at least a dozen people Monday on a roadside in the western state of Michoacan, which has become a flash point in Mexico's war on drugs.
Initial reports indicated that 11 men and one woman were likely killed elsewhere at least a day earlier and dumped near the town of La Huacana, officials in the state attorney general's office said.
It was one of the largest execution-style slayings since the killing of 24 men whose bodies were found bound with duct tape and shot in the head in September in a rural area west of Mexico City. In August 2008, the decapitated bodies of 12 men were found outside the southern city of Merida.
The officials, who spoke on customary condition of anonymity, said the number of victims could increase as police continue investigating the scene.
Also in Michoacan on Monday, the bodies of two men who had been tortured and executed were found near an airport in the state capital, Morelia.
In both cases, the methods used by the killers were those often used by drug cartels to eliminate rival traffickers.
In the Michoacan port of Lazaro Cardenas on Monday, gunmen attacked a hotel where federal police stay, wounding at least one officer, the officials said.
Michoacan, President Felipe Calderon's home state, is at the center of his drug war and has been wracked by a wave of killings and arrests in recent weeks.
In May, federal authorities arrested local Michoacan mayors in an unprecedented sweep against politicians accused of protecting cartels, specifically the La Familia cartel. Eight mayors remain jailed on organized-crime charges.
On Saturday, authorities arrested Arnoldo Rueda Medina, a reputed important La Familia operative.
Since then, gunmen have repeatedly ambushed federal forces and opened fire on police patrols and stations. Attacks across western Michoacan state over the weekend left five police officers and two soldiers dead.
Calderon has sent more than 45,000 troops to drug hotspots across Mexico, including Michoacan, since taking office. Cartels have responded with a vengeance. More than 11,000 people have been killed by drug violence nationwide since 2006, when the federal offensive began.
Drug violence has also plagued Mexico's northern border region.
Gunmen in Tijuana opened fire on a police patrol car on Sunday, killing one officer and wounding three others amid drug violence that has seen at least 18 policemen slain so far this year in the border city.
The attack happened less than a day after another drive-by shooting targeting police left two bystanders injured, according to a Tijuana police statement. Tijuana, located in Baja California state, is located across the border from San Diego, California.
State Attorney General Rommel Moreno announced Monday that he is creating a special investigative group to stem the attacks on police, which he said are part of an intimidation campaign by organized crime gangs.
"Today, unfortunately, the criminals are trying to pressure authorities by killing police officers," Moreno said.
Also Monday, authorities reported the abduction of the police chief of the rough northern border city of Piedras Negras, in the state of Coahuila.
Rogelio Ramos was pulled from his patrol car and kidnapped Monday morning, state Public Safety Director Jose Castillo said.
Officials said the kidnapping could be related to efforts to curb corruption by militarizing the police force in Piedras Negras, across the border from Eagle Pass, Texas.
Castillo's predecessor, Arturo Navarro, was shot and killed in April - less than three weeks after he took over the local force with the aim of purging alleged corruption.

Tosh Plumlee
07-14-2009, 07:11 PM
Mexico-Drug War, 0127 July 14,09
URGENT Release, Mexico AP

Mexico identifies 12 slain as military officials
Eds: APNewsNow.
MORELIA, Mexico (AP) - A state prosecutor says officials have
identified 12 people who were tortured, killed and dumped along a
mountain highway as military intelligence officials.
Interim Michoacan state prosecutor J. Jesus Montejano says the
case has been handed over to the federal attorney general's office.
The bound, blindfolded and tortured bodies of the 11 men and one
woman were found late Monday near the town of La Huacana. Such
killings in the past have been blamed on drug gangs.
Initial reports indicated the 12 were likely killed a day
earlier.
The massacre is one of the heaviest blows to federal forces in
President Felipe Calderon's war on drug gangs. Since Calderon took
office, more than 11,000 people have been killed by drug violence.

Tosh Plumlee
07-15-2009, 10:35 PM
From the secret American/ Mexican Joint Task Force TF-7N operations from Feb 2009 until June 2009:

Some details are still Classified as to these operations. However one 26 year old Capt in the Mexican Army Intel who I rode with while in Juarez last Spring, was one of the bodies found Monday in a mass grave. He had been kidnapped while on patrol and his body found a week later. He had been tortured and murdered and the body burned. He was such a nice kid and had a damn good future.... what a shame.

From Mexico City: July 14, 2009

Security/Human Rights News

International Peace Brigades for Chihuahua?


A well-known Mexican border state politician and social activist called
this week for international human rights observers to come to the state of
Chihuahua.

Interviewed on CNN’s Aristegui program, Victor Quintana, Chihuahua state
legislator for the center-left PRD party and advisor to the Democratic
Campesino Front, said the Mexican government’s anti-drug Joint Operation
Chihuahua failed to end narco-violence, encouraged human rights abuses and
left the citizenry defenseless, as evidenced by the kidnap-murders this
month of Mormon community activist Benjamin LeBaron and his brother-in-law
Luis Widmar in northern Chihuahua.

“This is a sign of the failed state we are living in,” Quintana contended.

In a 24-hour period from the afternoon of July 14 to 15, seventeen people
were reported slain gangland style in Ciudad Juarez and other parts of the
state of Chihuahua.

According to the longtime political leader, people uninvolved in the fight
between rival drug cartels are increasingly falling victim to bands of
criminals on the one hand and Mexican security forces on the other. The
National Human Rights Commission (CNDH) does not have investigators
specifically assigned to monitor Joint Operation Chihuahua, Quintana told
host Carmen Aristegui.

“We need peace brigades and people from the international community to act
as witnesses,” Quintana said. “It is not a (political) party, ideological
question but a profound, ethical one, and the first step is to rescue the
principle of the sacredness of life, even the lives of those who don’t
respect it.”

Recent developments including the LeBaron-Widmar murders have led many in
Chihuahua to urge a rethinking of Joint Operation Chihuahua, Quintana
said.

“A generalized clamor exists in Chihuahua to change the model of Joint
Operation Chihuahua,” Quintana added. “It’s time that Felipe Calderon
render an accounting to the people ofChihuahua.”

The lawmaker’s comments coincide with a rising tide of public opinion in
Mexico that views President Calderon’s drug war as literally going down in
flames.

Backed by Washington, Operation Joint Chihuahua and similar campaigns rely
on massive deployments of army troops and Federal Police, militarization
of civilian police functions, restrictions on the constitutional right to
free transit, and random searches of the citizenry. The result, according
to the CNDH and independent human rights organizations, is the widespread
violation of human rights.

Alleged human rights abuses by federal forces prompted the US-based Human
Rights Watch this week to request US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton
suspend 15 percent of the funds destined for anti-drug, binational Merida
Initiative, or Plan Mexico as it is called by some, in reference to a
similar US aid package for Colombia.

Human Rights Watch’s appeal was seconded by the All Rights for All
network, a grouping of leading Mexican human rights groups. Edgar Cortez,
executive secretary for the organization, joined others in recommending
that the Calderon anti-crime strategy see a “revision.”

Cortez suggested that curtailing money laundering and cross-border arms
trafficking could be a more effective strategy than the current one of
displaying overwhelming shows of force and making entire communities
suspect. “Perhaps there would be more damage to these (crime) groups,”
Cortez said.

Recent gun battles and other manifestations of extreme violence in
Michocan and other states have likewise encouraged key Mexican lawmakers
to call for revamping the drug war strategy.

While agreeing it was necessary to keep the army involved until adequate
police forces are available, Sonora Senator Manlio Fabio Beltrones of the
PRI party said the anti-crime fight should be subject to constant
reevaluation and updating. The success of federal operations, Beltrones
said, should not be measured solely on the basis of daily body counts.

Supporters of Operation Joint Chihuahua and the broader drug war were also
outspoken in recent days. Ciudad Juarez Mayor Jose Reyes Ferriz told
reporters that the military operation has reduced crimes including auto
thefts, commercial robberies and bank heists.

“We have to make adjustments, but there is no radical change in the method
of operating,” Reyes said, adding that the municipal government was
examining whether to request a six-month extension of the army’s presence
until March 2010. “We can’t say the operation has been a failure, because
it hasn’t concluded,” the mayor said in separate comments.

Murder is one crime that definitely has not gone down since the initiation
of Joint Operation Chihuahua. The latest press accounts report more than
1,000 people murdered in Ciudad Juarez alone during the course of 2009- a
rate much higher than in 2008 before the reinforcement of the army and
federal presence in the border city.

In multiple declarations this week, President Felipe Calderon vowed to
stay the course. Mexico, Calderon said, “won’t take and should not take a
step backwards.” The anti-drug offensive, the Mexican president insisted,
was touching off “desperate reactions” by crime groups feeling the
pressure of the federal boot.

Despite the president’s upbeat assessments, drug cartels significantly
escalated their confrontations with Mexican security forces this week. In
a broad swath of attacks in Michoacan and other states, La Familia drug
cartel in particular demonstrated a sophisticated level of coordination
and tactical ingenuity.

As of July 15, at least 15 members of the Federal Police had been slain in
Michoacan since the arrests last week of two mid-level La Familia leaders,
“La Minsa” and “El Chivo,” in Morelia, Michoacan, and Petatlan, Guerrero,
respectively. In one fiery attack, dozens of police vehicles were torched.

Elsewhere, pitched daytime battles that included explosions and resembled
scenes from Gaza or Baghdad erupted in Nuevo Leon and Veracruz, leaving at
least 8 suspected gunmen dead.

Since President Calderon assumed office in December 2006, more than 11,000
Mexicans have perished in narco-related violence.

Monte Alejandro Rubido Garcia, technical secretary for the National
Security Public System, said this week that approximately 90 percent of
the victims were delinquents, with the remainder belonging to the security
forces. Citizens who are not involved in drug trafficking or other
criminal activities should rest assured that they are not “the target of
violent actions of delinquent groups,” Rubido said.

The federal official’s body count ignored the growing number of civilians
killed or injured in cross-fire, including the man and his 10-year-old
daughter who were recently slain in Chihuahua City when the truck they
were riding in was strafed by bullets from gunmen blasting away at each
other on the street.

Tosh Plumlee
07-15-2009, 10:49 PM
Buzz UpSendSharePrint

AP – FILE - This Saturday, July 11, 2009,file photo shows police escorting Arnoldo Rueda, an alleged coordinator …
By JULIE WATSON, Associated Press Writer – 26 mins ago
MEXICO CITY – It was the boldest, most widespread coordinated offensive ever mounted by drug traffickers against the Mexican government.
Within minutes of the weekend arrest of the La Familia drug cartel's operations chief, the gang launched deadly attacks in President Felipe Calderon's home state. In the worst, 12 federal agents were killed execution-style, their tortured bodies piled along a roadside as a warning for all to see.
The attacks following the weekend capture of Arnoldo Rueda spread quickly to at least 10 cities, including towns in two neighboring states. Officers' hotels were shot up. Grenades were tossed at police posts.
At least 18 federal agents and two soldiers were killed in the attacks and ambushes. Nearly two dozen officers were wounded.
Near the bloodied bodies of the 12 agents dumped in a heap Monday off a mountain highway near La Huacana was a message: "Let's see if you try to arrest another one."
It was a blatant challenge to Calderon, who has deployed federal police and troops in an attempt to halt the country's escalating drug trade.
Calderon insists that the backlash to Rueda's arrest proves the cartel has been hurt.
"The arrests of dangerous leaders by the federal government in recent months is seriously affecting their operations and generating chaos in their ranks," Calderon said. "Thus the violent and desperate reaction that we've seen these days."
Government critics said the offensive revealed that federal forces are unprepared for the battle against heavily armed crime syndicates with extensive intelligence networks embedded within police forces.
They also said it undermines Calderon's repeated claims that violence shows the thugs are on the run.
A cartoon in the left-leaning La Jornada newspaper Wednesday depicted a bound and blindfolded policeman with a gun to his head. "Don't worry," says a tied-up colleague kneeling beside him. "It's just another desperate action by organized crime because they're cornered."
Mexico's national security spokesman, Monte Alejandro Rubido, said a La Familia suspect detained Monday told authorities gang leaders had sent an order to attack federal forces within minutes of Rueda's arrest in the Michoacan state capital of Morelia.
Dozens of gunmen carrying high-powered weapons and grenades attacked the station where Rueda was held. They failed to free him, but three federal agents were wounded by grenade fragments.
Convoys of other hit men fanned out across Michoacan and the neighboring states of Guerrero and Guanajuato.
Assailants gunned down two soldiers riding on a bicycle in their off hours outside their base in the town of Zamora. In Apatzingan, federal agents came under fire while sleeping at a hotel in a farming town ringed by mango orchards. Others were ambushed in patrol cars on lonesome highways. Three federal agents were fatally shot as they raced to a reported car accident, which turned out to be an ambush.
"This clearly shows federal forces are vulnerable," said Jorge Chabat, a Mexican drug expert. "The government needs to rethink its police protection scheme. If they don't, no one is going to want to be a police officer or soldier. There is not enough protection for them."
The government has not said whether federal agents are quitting out of fear, although several towns have seen local police leave in droves after feeling threatened.
Calderon has sent an estimated 45,000 soldiers and tens of thousands of federal agents to drug hot spots — from Mexico's steamy Gulf coast to its colonial mountain villages to its desert outposts.
Many wear ski masks as they ride through the towns in army vehicles and in the back of federal police pickups with their assault rifles drawn.
But at the end of the day, many federal agents retire to hotels in towns so small that everyone knows everyone else's business. While soldiers stay on military bases, gunmen have picked them off when they go on leave.
Experts say cartels have an extensive spy network that includes police, politicians, taxi drivers, waitresses, hotel employees and others paid to track the movements of soldiers and police.
Federal forces in Michoacan arrested 10 mayors and 20 state and municipal officials in May for allegedly protecting La Familia. Many were from the towns targeted in this weekend's attacks.
The success of such networks was evident in the offensive: Near the Pacific coast, gunmen fired on a private tour bus carrying federal officers who were trying to conceal their identities. The driver and one officer were wounded.
The 12 federal agents whose bloodied bodies were found Monday piled just off a mountain highway near the town of La Huacana were believed to have been kidnapped Sunday on their day off. A message left nearby read: "Let's see if you try to arrest another one."
The agents were in a remote region of Michoacan to gather intelligence.
Mexico's federal attorney general's office announced Wednesday the former mayor of La Huacana, who finished his term in 2007, allegedly gave information to La Familia about operations of federal forces in the area.
"The government was overly confidant drug traffickers would not react so violently," said Jose Luis Pineyro, a drug expert at Mexico's National Autonomous University. "It's another sign that Calderon's strategy is flawed because it is reactive and does not try to prevent the possible hits by drug traffickers."
Congressman Juan Francisco Rivera, of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, said the United States shares the blame by feeding cartels high powered weapons bought easily north of the border.
"As long as they don't suspend the indiscriminate sale of arms in 10,000 stores along the U.S. border, Mexican police and soldiers are going to keep dying," said Rivera, the head of Congress' security commission.
Pineyro says the government needs to rotate its forces more often, alert agents to take precautions after a major arrest and limit their movements during their off hours.
Gen. Rodolfo Cruz, who oversees federal forces, said relatively few police and soldiers were killed, given the number of attacks — showing they are adequately prepared.
The cartel, however, may have succeeded in convincing the public otherwise.
Ciro Gomez Leyva, a columnist for Milenio newspaper, called the ambushes a "Tet offensive," referring to the offensive by the North Vietnamese army that failed but created a perception among the American public that the war could not be won.
Voters showed they are growing tired of Calderon's battle by delivering a stinging loss to his National Action Party in midterm elections July 5, though it campaigned as the only party willing to take on cartels. The drug war has left more than 11,000 people dead since Calderon took office in 2006.
"These attacks are demoralizing police and terrorizing the population into not helping officials," Pineyro said. "The government's war is flawed."

Tosh Plumlee
07-15-2009, 10:55 PM
Where in the Hell is the United States government on this?

It might get opened up when the details come out on the Florida killings and the DEA report on this matter... rumor.. "one of the Mexican Cartel is connected to this".. (not confirm as yet... I,m working on it and will post my findings even if classified...) I am trying to do my part... is there anyone else out there? If true... the Mexican cartel has struck the first blow here in the United States.

Magda Hassan
07-16-2009, 01:26 AM
Where in the Hell is the United States government on this?

It might get opened up when the details come out on the Florida killings and the DEA report on this matter... rumor.. "one of the Mexican Cartel is connected to this".. (not confirm as yet... I,m working on it and will post my findings even if classified...) I am trying to do my part... is there anyone else out there? If true... the Mexican cartel has struck the first blow here in the United States.
I'm here Tosh. I'm trying to get this out where I can. Cross posting and trying to bring it to people's attention. Thanks for all you do Tosh and for persisting with it.

Tosh Plumlee
07-16-2009, 02:16 PM
Thanks Magda... your a "doer" and a fine asset to this forum and to the truth. Thanks for being a positive instrument in the fight.

The following is others who put their efforts and time and money into this matter of the Border Drug wars: God knows the mainstream media does not want this can of worms on their plate. Duck and Run, mentality. My Thanks go out to 'Carlos" a fine journalist and investigative reporter from the El Paso area for keeping me up to date on events in and around Juarez.

From El Paso July 15,2009

"...Philadelphia radio staffers visit on border security tour


Dom Giordano, a veteran radio talk show host for The Big Talker 1210, WPHT, CBS Radio in Philadelphia spoke to his listeners from within sight of the border fence on the 17th floor of the Doubletree Hotel in downtown El Paso Wednesday. (Rudy Gutierrez / El Paso Times)
EL PASO -- Members of a Philadelphia radio show have traveled 2,500 miles in an RV to get a firsthand look at immigration and border-security issues in El Paso.
"While you see these issues discussed in the news all the time, it's different once you get down to the area itself and see how the situation really is," said talk-show host Dom Giordano, of radio station WPHT.
Sponsors helped Giordano and his crew make the trip. Joey Vento, owner of Geno's Steaks in Philadelphia, contributed $30,000.
Known for the controversial sign asking his restaurant customers to order in English, Vento is on tour with the show. He will be on the air today.
"I think we should get rid of all the illegals and let the people in that have paid their dues," Vento said in an interview. "You have people trying to get into this country by the rules, and they have to wait 15 to 20 years or more."
Other guests will include artist Abel Saucedo, Juárez Mayor Jose Reyes Ferriz, Border Patrol agents and ranchers along the U.S.-Mexico border. Former U.S. attorney Johnny Sutton, known for prosecuting U.S. Border Patrol agents Ignacio Ramos and Jose Campeon, who shot a drug smuggler in 2007, will also be on the show.
Giordano said he would like to speak with U.S. Rep. Silvestre Reyes, D-Texas.
"The congressman says things aren't as bad as we in the media report or make it seem," Giordano said. "We are open to hear what he has to say and what his perception of the El Paso-Juárez area is so that
we can know whether or not the media is part of the problem or part of the solution."
The Philadelphia crew is broadcasting from the Doubletree Hotel in Downtown El Paso.
It has already visited Charlotte, N.C., and Dallas. After the El Paso broadcasts end today, Giordano and his crew will head to Phoenix before driving back to Philadelphia....'.

Alex Hinojosa may be reached at ahinojosa@elpasotimes.com

Tosh Plumlee
07-16-2009, 03:20 PM
Buzz UpSendSharePrint

AP – In this image released by Mexico's Federal Police, police officers stand at attention during funeral …
By MARK STEVENSON, Associated Press Writer – Thu Jul 16, 8:13 am ET
MEXICO CITY – The Mexican government is vowing never to cut deals with drug traffickers after a man claiming to be the leader of a violent cartel called a television station to suggest a pact.
A man who identified himself as drug cartel leader Servando "La Tuta" Gomez called a local television program in the western state of Michoacan on Wednesday to say his gang's wave of deadly attacks on police are only a response to police action against cartel members' family and friends.
"What we want is peace and tranquility," the man told the CB Television station in Michoacan. "We want to achieve a national pact."
"We want the president, Mr. Felipe Calderon, to know that we are not his enemies, that we value him, that we are conscientious people," the caller said.
Officials have named Gomez as the leader of the La Familia cartel who ordered a series of attacks on federal police this week in which 18 federal agents and two soldiers were killed.
Neither Michoacan nor federal officials would comment on whether the caller was indeed Gomez, the government quickly reacted, issuing a formal statement ruling out any such deals.
"The federal government does not ever dialogue, does not negotiate, does not reach deals with any criminal organization," Gomez Mont said. "There is no other alternative for their members but to submit to the law."
The caller issued a rambling defense of the La Familia's actions, saying federal police and prosecutors "come and fabricate guilty charges; they are picking innocent people in Michoacan state."
Federal police have arrested and charged eight mayors in Michoacan for aiding the drug cartel, and have arrested some leading cartel figures at events like baptism parties for relatives. The arrest of another gang leader earlier this week apparently set off the reprisal attacks.
Gomez Mont denied traffickers' families were being targeted, saying "authorities act against those people who are arrested and put on trial because of their actions, not because of their family ties."
The caller said the La Familia had rules and standards, like kidnapping only politically connected people and "those who refuse to pay" — a reference to extortion. He acknowledged, "We know our work is disliked by the public."
Gomez Mont said "the criminal groups that the Mexican government are fighting are made up of criminal cowards without scruples" who "try to mask or justify their acts with all sorts of justifications."
The violence in Michoacan has become so bad that on Wednesday, the U.S. Embassy issued a statement advising U.S. citizens about attacks in the state and warning them to avoid large crowds.

Tosh Plumlee
07-21-2009, 02:27 PM
News items you will not find in American mainstream media coverage:

Monday July 21, 2009:

Several Juarez Mexican media outlets report 3 men shot outside Mormon chapel in Zaragoza, just east of Juarez.
the men were NOT Mormons; two dead at the scene one critical.
Unfortunately these were not the only homicides
in Juarez on Monday. There were another 5 shot throughout the city on Monday and twelve murdered last Monday. The number of daily homicides in Juarez Mexico is averaging about ten a day .....not counting the other 60 a day nation wide. So far in two years over 11500 to date have been tortured and murdered:

Other reported killings that the American Media refuses to cover, or that the American people in general are not interested in hearing about.

Lady walking her three year old son and their dog, all three gunned down in drive by shooting in Juarez Mexico:

Elderly man (86) murdered in his store front business. The gunman, walked up laughing and shot the man for no reason then left a card 'Ace of Spades" on the body as a warning to other store keepers not to trade with rival gangs of the Zetas.

Young boy, four years old, kidnapped and found murdered the next day in a back street of Juarez. The family had no connections with drug trafficking.

And the Body Count goes on and on... But, who really cares?

Six killed in Jarkarta... and who will be on Idol next year and one of our State Governors found God after getting caught after an affair seems to be the topics of interest these days.

Friday: Five bodies found in mass grave near the border town of Palomas Mexico across from Columbus New Mexico.

Tosh Plumlee
07-21-2009, 03:28 PM
INTEL REPORT (Mexican/American Special operations Task Force)

XXXXXXX XXXXXXX XXXXXXXX (classified)

".... Regional trend: Mexico’s cartel violence
The pace of the cartel war in Mexico has held steady throughout 2009 so far and there is little to suggest that there will be major changes in the third quarter. At the current rate, cartel-related deaths for the year are on track to reach close to 7,500 — 1,500 more than in 2008. The cartels controlling Mexican drug trafficking are at war with the government and each other. Alliances and rivalries among the cartels remain highly unstable, and the degree of volatility in these relationships makes it difficult to predict the course of the violence.
Since 2006, the Mexican military has been pushed into a wide range of counternarcotics operations normally conducted by law enforcement agencies, such as drug eradication, maritime and airborne interdiction, signals intelligence operations, local security patrols, raids and arrests. In the third quarter, Mexico will reexamine the appropriateness of these roles for the Mexican military, which did not traditionally perform these functions. The debate is unlikely to reach a conclusion by the end of the quarter, but it is one that is well worth watching as the outcome could change the way the cartel war is fought.
The months ahead also likely will shed more light on the shifting geography of cartel operations. Central America’s rising importance as a drug trafficking route will make the Mexican border with Guatemala increasingly important to the cartels and will continue affecting the security situation in the region....".

Keith Millea
07-22-2009, 02:09 PM
Boots on the groung heading south.Drug cultivation heading north.When I first read that the police were finding marijuana gardens that were comprised of 1,000 to 3,000 plants several years ago,I immediatly knew this was not your usual grower.It had to be the Mexican gangs(cartels).Well,now the police have found the second large opium poppie growing operation in the last month.Yep,they're here in the Northwest.How long will it take before we are a full fledged "Narco State"??????????

http://news.opb.org/article/5459-opium-poppy-plants-discovered-yamhill-county/

Magda Hassan
08-18-2009, 12:46 PM
MEXICO SECURITY MEMO: AUG. 17, 2009 (not classified)



Mexican Drug Cartel Violence in the United States
Police in El Paso, Texas, announced Aug. 11 that they had arrested three suspects in the May 15 shooting death of Jose Daniel Gonzalez Galeana, a Juarez cartel lieutenant that had been acting as an informant for the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency. Gonzalez was shot multiple times outside his home in an upscale El Paso neighborhood. Among the suspects was an 18-year-old U.S. Army soldier stationed at Fort Bliss, who the other suspects said had been hired by one of the leaders of the group to pull the trigger. The group's leader, Ruben Rodriguez Dorado, was also among those arrested. Rodriguez was also a member of the Juarez cartel who had been working as an informant for ICE, and he is believed to have orchestrated Gonzalez's assassination in retaliation for cooperating with law enforcement.

Separately, the district attorney's office in San Diego, announced Aug. 13 a series of indictments against 17 members of the Los Palillos kidnapping and drug trafficking gang linked to the Tijuana-based Arellano Felix Organization (AFO). The gang is accused of having committed nine murders, a series of kidnappings, and trafficking marijuana and methamphetamines from Mexico to the United States. Authorities also said that some members of Los Palillos -- who include Mexican and U.S. citizens -- are accused of firing on a police officer during a chase and dissolving dead bodies in corrosive substances in order to destroy evidence, a common means of disposing of bodies in Tijuana and elsewhere in Mexico. Police believe Los Palillos established itself in San Diego several years ago after a falling out with a faction of the AFO.

These two cases represent new but not necessarily surprising examples of the expansion of Mexican cartels into the United States. In addition to the lack of informant control and protection, the El Paso example highlights the security risks associated with Mexican cartel members increasingly moving to the United States. This case clarifies that at least in some instances, Mexican cartels continue to target their enemies, regardless of where they live. Targets living in the United States are not off limits.

The San Diego example represents a different but no less significant risk. As opposed to cartel bosses on the Mexican side of the border tasking operatives in the United States to commit killings -- which appears to have happened in El Paso -- Los Palillos appears to have been a Mexico-based drug trafficking organization that simply relocated to the United States, conducting the same type of crimes north of the border.

In both of these cases, it is important to note that the groups involved did not demonstrate a shift in targeting or tactics from the cartels' norm in the United States toward the way they have been operating in Mexico. Neither is accused of anything as provocative as, for example, ordering the murder of a police officer or kidnapping victims outside of the criminal or illegal immigrant community. This does not mean that these risks do not exist, but only that the threshold has not yet been crossed. The more that these Mexico-based groups establish themselves in the United States, however, the risks of an escalation also increase.


Rifts Within PAN Over Cartel War Strategy?

Former Mexican President Vicente Fox said Aug. 14 that the military should be pulled off the streets as soon as possible, and thatstate and local governments should begin playing a larger role in the cartel war. Fox's statement is significant because it comes amid an intensifying debate regarding the role of the Mexican military in the country's cartel war, and it makes him the first major representative of President Felipe Calderon's National Action Party (PAN) to publicly question the federal government's strategy of relying so heavily on the armed forces.

Fox did not elaborate on his comment, or specify when exactly the military should withdraw or what duties it should perform. And on the surface, his position is not too different from that of Calderon, who has said repeatedly that the military is being used only until the federal police are capable of taking over, a process that is optimistically scheduled to be completed by 2012. However, Fox's implication that the transition should happen sooner was enough to prompt a statement from the Interior Ministry affirming, "The supreme commander of the armed forces is Felipe Calderon."

Fox and Calderon have had policy disagreements in the past, but in the cartel war, Fox and the rest of PAN have generally expressed support for Calderon's strategy. STRATFOR has been watching for possible disagreements between Calderon and opposition parties following the results of the July 5 legislative elections, which could make it far more difficult for Calderon to pursue his agenda. Fox's statement ratchets up existing tensions between rival factions of the PAN, and is an indication that Calderon is facing serious policy challenges close to home. Fox's move is likely an attempt to gain the upper hand within the ranks of PAN, and how the power plays shake out will undoubtedly influence the policies of the PAN presidential candidate in 2012.

In the meantime, the critical challenge to Calderon and his war against the cartels will come not from political infighting, but instead from a measurable shift in public opinion. At the moment, Calderon's policies in the cartel war appear to have substantial public support, but should Mexicans turn against the government's effort, Calderon will come under pressure to change direction.

Click image to enlarge



Aug. 10

Mexican military forces near Culiacan, Sinaloa state, arrested two men in possession of 17 firearms, including two Barrett .50 caliber rifles.
Authorities in Tapachula, Chiapas state, arrested a man suspected of a grenade attack on a government office in July.



Aug. 11

Police in Monterrey, Nuevo Leon state, will no longer be able to observe traffic or people from parked patrol cars, based on a city ordinance that took effect Aug. 11. The new law was motivated by concerns that police could be conducting surveillance for drug trafficking or kidnapping organizations.

Aug. 12

A prison warden was unharmed but three of his bodyguards were killed when several persons attacked his convoy with assault rifles in Chihuahua, Chihuahua state.
A group of armed men in Mazatlan, Sinaloa state, threw two fragmentation grenades into a house, killing one man.
The former police chief in Ajuchitlan del Progreso, Guerrero state, died when a group of attackers shot him several times.



Aug. 13

Mexican President Felipe Calderon met in Bogota with Colombian President Alvaro Uribe, who said that 86 Colombian police officers had been in Mexico during the past few months to help train Mexican police in counternarcotics operations.

Aug. 15

Police in Chalco, Mexico state, arrested eight members of La Familia Michoacana believed responsible for kidnappings and drug dealing in several nearby towns.
More than 700 Mexican customs agents were fired following indications of widespread corruption in the agency. Customs officials later said that they were being replaced with more than 1,400 new agents and the military was assisting the transition.
Authorities in Ciudad Altamirano, Guerrero state, found the dismembered body of an attorney. His head, hands and feet had been placed in a cooler, with the rest of his body in several plastic bags.
Several men fired on a family from Las Cruces, New Mexico with assault rifles in Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua state. Two children were wounded, and one man and two women -- including a pregnant woman -- were killed.

Aug. 16

A city employee in Gomez Palacio, Durango state, died when he was shot several times.
Four people died when a group of assailants opened fire on a home in Zapotitlan Tablas, Guerrero state.
The bodies of two unidentified people were found with gunshot wounds and bound at the hands and feet in Acapulco, Guerrero state.
Several mend armed with assault rifles and handguns opened fire in a bar in Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua state killing eight people and wounding four.

Jan Klimkowski
08-18-2009, 05:43 PM
Among the suspects was an 18-year-old U.S. Army soldier stationed at Fort Bliss,

Hmmmm.

Fwiw - Fort Bliss is alleged to be the covert home of the military intelligence version of MK-ULTRA.

Magda Hassan
08-19-2009, 03:55 AM
-----XXXX classified).... TF7..... )


(following not classified) Mexican Army Security memo xxxx xx ...."


by C xxx ...... X xxx........ Elpaso Aug. 18, 2009... sensitive


Cd. Juárez – A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent is being investigated on possible corruption charges after running an informant network that has imploded throughout the El Paso law enforcement community, a Mexican law enforcement source in Juárez said this morning.
The agent, who goes by the nickname VeeJay or DeeJay (he wasn’t certain), was moved out of the area after his primary informant, Jose Daniel Gonzalez Galeana, was shot dead in El Paso. Gonzalez, if you recall (http://borderreporter.com/?p=2144), was a high level cartel figure for La Linea, the crew of killers operating under the auspices of Vicente Carrillo Fuentes. He was shot and killed outside his girlfriend’s home on Pony Trail Drive, near the home of El Paso police chief, Gregory Allen. Last Monday, El Paso police arrested Ruben Rodriguez and two other men, including a U.S. Army soldier out of Fort Bliss. (Galeana is pictured above in this photo courtesy of Crime Stoppers, El Paso.)
The Juárez Cartel believed Gonzalez had given up Pedro Sanchez Aranas, El Tigre; the number three man of the Juárez Cartel’s infrastructure. As a result, Rodriguez was sent in to kill the informant.
Police sources in El Paso aren’t saying much but my sources in Juárez say VeeJay was running both informants, Rodriguez and Gonzalez. Now, I’m told, the agent is being investigated to see if he had any ties back to the cartel.
Gonzalez’s murder is the highest level cartel assassination performed on the U.S. side of the border and one of the creepiest. The case has chilled relationships between local and federal law enforcement in El Paso because the El Paso Police Department was never told Gonzalez had been living so close to the chief of police. It’s also raised suspicions on the Mexican side that the ICE agent was compromised, as classic a man bites dog story as any I’ve ever heard.
Gonzalez was shot eight times outside his girlfriend’s $364,000 home. He was identified as the owner of a trucking company when he died. Publicly, the Feds were alarmed because Gonzalez was a high-level cartel figure, the first to be executed on the U.S. side that they ever acknowledged in this latest Mexican drug war. What the Feds didn’t say was that Gonzalez was working as an informant for ICE when he died. Or that ICE had given him a S-Visa, a visa for snitches, I think Gonzalez was given the S-5, meaning no State Department oversight.
Sanchez, his former cartel boss, was arrested in Hidalgo in May 2008 at the hands of the Mexican Army. Gonzalez, it’s said, was the man who gave him up. What I’ve never known is whether Gonzalez gave him up because he was taking money for the Feds or because he stood to succeed Sanchez in the hierarchy of the Juárez Cartel.
What is known is was shot eight times when he fell. Last Monday, El Paso Police arrested Rodriguez, soldierMichael Jackson Apodoca, 18 who is accused of being the triggerman and Christopher Andrew Duran, a 17-year-old who drove the getaway car. Duran wasn’t supposed to be at the site of the hit, Juárez Cartel associates I spoke with claim. On Wednesday, a 16-year-old was also arrested in the execution.

Rodriguez admitted to El Paso police that he was also a snitch but told the cops that he had been instructed to hunt down Gonzalez.
I spoke with the El Paso police department; they didn’t have much new to offer except to note that they were the arresting agency on the hit. No DEA, no FBI, and definitely, absolutely, no ICE agents were involved in the arrest.
It’s a mess. Was this ICE agent, the handler for snitches, in fact a snitch himself, one working for the Juárez cartel? Rodriguez is a known killer, so’s Gonzalez, whose crew, La Linea, has been responsible for scores of murders in Mexico, I’m not sure anyone knows how many. Both men were too high up to be the triggermen, instead, they were the autóres intelectual working Juárez these days.
Does ICE really believe that it’s practical, even moral, to run killers as snitches on drug traffickers? It appears the agency does think so, yes. It’s how we’ve ended up with the situational ethics quandary we’re in today. Or,desmadre.
One only need look at the case of Guillermo Ramirez Pereyo, AKA Lalo. Lalo was ICE’s informant within the Juárez Cartel the last time a situation like this came up, 2004. He participated and knew of the murders of at least a dozen men in Juárez but ICE kept him on the payroll anyway and never moved against him until they lost control of the man and he started talking about taking down a DEA agent. In that case, ICE saw fit to run an informant they knew was a killer in exchange information, not on the cocaine industry of the cartel’s business of a counterfeit cigarette operation being run in Juárez.
VeeJay or whatever the agent’s name is, has just started up a whole new level of questions that need to be asked of the federal law enforcement community in El Paso.
The three were a bit of a mess as far as hitmen go. Court records show that about ten days after killing Gonzalez, the three were involved in an attempted theft of a trailer full of flat-screen televisions. Rodriguez had an Alejandro Escalante post his $10,000 bond. Jackson, the soldier and Duran both had bondsmen pay their $10,000, all on Aug. 4,

Magda Hassan
08-19-2009, 03:56 AM
http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/player/popup/index.php?cl=15112463

Jan Klimkowski
08-19-2009, 05:13 PM
ICE had given him a S-Visa, a visa for snitches, I think Gonzalez was given the S-5, meaning no State Department oversight.

Democracy in action.

Ed Jewett
08-20-2009, 06:01 AM
Among the suspects was an 18-year-old U.S. Army soldier stationed at Fort Bliss, Hmmmm.

Fwiw - Fort Bliss is alleged to be the covert home of the military intelligence version of MK-ULTRA.

And (correct me if I am wrong) the place where the Greater D.C. Beltway sniper-from-the-trunk (should I say boot?) hailed from?

Tosh Plumlee
10-06-2009, 11:56 PM
Hey Tosh check this out... Its here... tighten up old friend S... is about to happen real soon... Bob


XXXXXX XXXXXX AP Oct 6 2009 forward

Federal investigator claims he faced retaliation for failing to play ball with a cover-up


What can best be described as a bombshell revelation has surfaced in a long-running state-secrets case filed by a former DEA agent, Richard Horn, against past high-level employees of the CIA and State Department.
A court pleading filed in the litigation indicates that a former supervisory agent with the State Department Inspector General’s Office (OIG) has agreed to testify under oath that an investigative report he prepared in the Horn matter “was rewritten without his knowledge or permission, and his signature forged, and his intended conclusions changed.”
In addition, the former State Department investigative agent, Paul E. Forster, according to the court filing, plans to testify that his “counterpart” at the CIA’s Office of Inspector General (an individual named Michael E. Grivsky) also was subjected to similar treatment.
From the court pleading:
Forster knows his counterpart at the CIA [Grivsky] also wrote a report concerning Horn’s allegations and that his report sustained Horn’s allegations, which essentially was that the CIA undermined Horn’s and DEA’s counter-drug operations in Burma, but Forster knows Grivsky’s report was re-written and the original copies recovered and then were ordered to be destroyed by an Agency supervisor.
Forster knows that the conclusions in Grivsky’s report were changed to protect and better support the CIA and [CIA Station Chief in Burma at the time, Arthur] Brown, who had undermined Horn and the DEA in Burma.
… Forster will testify that his counterpart at the CIA, Grivsky, stated that he and Forster were expected by their respective agencies to bury the allegations made by Horn and that they were expected to prepare a joint report that erroneously concluded that Horn’s claims were unfounded and untrue.
And in another interesting revelation contained in the court filing, Forster reveals that the State Department, like the CIA, controls and operates its own spying equipment.
From the pleading:
Forster knows that the Department of State also has eavesdropping devices similar to those at issue in this case. Forster knows this because it was revealed to him by a high-level Senior Foreign Service Officer who has considerable first-hand knowledge. This ranking executive shared much relevant and very specific information with Forster. Forster also spoke independently with two DS agents who confirmed the existence of the DOS [Department of State] capabilities.
Narco News has previously reported at length on the Horn case in a 2004 story that was based on leaked court pleadings. That story can be found at this link.
Horn’s lawsuit was filed in 1994 against the CIA’s Brown and State Department Chief of Mission in Burma Franklin Huddle Jr. — who were both stationed in Burma in the early 1990s at the same time Horn served as DEA’s country attaché.
In the litigation, both Brown and Huddle are accused of violating Horn’s constitutional rights by conspiring to plant an eavesdropping bug in his government-leased quarters in Burma. Horn also alleges in the lawsuit that the eavesdropping was part of a larger effort by Brown and Horn to undermine DEA’s anti-narcotics mission in Burma.
From Horn’s lawsuit:
While stationed in Burma [in Southeast Asia], Horn made substantial progress working in concert with the Burmese government to improve its performance to address major drug issues, and Burma is and was the leading opium producing country in the world and is a major source country for the heroin that enters the United States. Even though the country of Burma was making substantial progress in its drug law enforcement efforts, Defendant Charge Huddle was sending reports to the Department of State stating that the government of Burma was not making any progress. Horn strongly encouraged Defendant Huddle to more accurately report on the drug situation in Burma to policy makers in Washington.
Horn alleges further that as a result of his efforts to expose Brown and Huddle’s dishonest agenda, the two launched a campaign to discredit him — which included illegally eavesdropping on his conversations in order to, among other motivations, dig up some dirt. The eavesdropping effort failed to produce any damaging information against Horn, yet in September 1993, Horn alleges, Huddle used his State Department authority to expel the DEA agent from Burma.
Brown, Huddle and the CIA itself have denied any role in setting up surveillance on Horn while he was stationed in Burma, according to court pleadings.
Inconvenient Report
Horn, prior to filing his lawsuit, reported the alleged misconduct on the part of Brown and Huddle to the State Department Inspector General’s Office, resulting in a joint investigation by State’s Forster and CIA’s Grivsky. The report of that investigation was completed in 1996 but not made available to Horn and his attorney, in redacted form, until this year.
In July of this year, Horn’s case, filed in federal court in Washington, D.C., finally made it onto the radar of the mainstream media. The federal judge in the case, Royce Lamberth, clearly upset with a pattern of CIA dishonesty, ordered the court pleadings in Horn’s case to be unsealed and made available for public viewing. (The case, until that point, had been cloaked under a “state-secrets privilege” ruling due to alleged “national security” concerns and all of the pleadings filed under seal.)
In another recent development in Horn’s case, the Washington Post reported last week that Horn and the government had ironed out a “tentative settlement” in the litigation — with a final agreement on that front anticipated by the end of October.
The Forster pleading likely has to be among the considerations in the government’s decision to move toward a settlement, given the devastating impact the OIG agent’s revelations have on the case filed against Huddle and Brown — which is being defended by Justice Department attorneys.
Forster also plans to testify once deposed under oath, according to the court pleading, that both he and Grivsky were subjected to retaliation due to their decision to pursue the investigation into Horn’s allegations with “honesty and integrity.’
From the court pleading:
Robert K. Terjesen, Assistant Inspector General for Investigation at the Department of State’s Office of Inspector General, told Forster that Forster’s career would suffer if Forster failed to do what was expected of him with respect to the Horn investigation, and what was expected of Forster was to “dump” the case and cover-up many of the true and substantial facts.
… Forster can testify that his counterpart at the CIA, Mr. Grivsky, was ostracized and otherwise punished by his superiors in the CIA in retribution for his efforts to conduct the investigation of Horn’s allegations with honesty and integrity.
Forster will state that his counterpart at the CIA asked him to go to the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence and complain to them about how Forster and Grivsky’s investigations were being undermined by their own respective agencies, among other grievances. Forster personally made those complaints as Grivsky requested. Grivsky advised Forster that Grivsky’s career would immediately suffer if he, Grivsky, made the presentation to the Senate Select Intelligence Committee.
… Forster can testify that Robert Terjesen … and another CIA employee, whose identity Forster knows, would regularly meet and discuss how they could manipulate the investigation and ensure that the Agencies’ desired outcome (i.e., no findings in favor of Horn) was achieved.
The court pleading, filed in late August, indicates that Forster, who is suffering from health problems, was slated to be deposed for the Horn case in Jacksonville, Fla., at some future date and time to be scheduled. It is not clear, at this time, whether the deposition has yet taken place.
However, the court pleading, filed by Horn’s attorney, Brian Leighton, provides a general overview of what Forster would say under oath at the deposition — and also alludes to the fact that additional information damaging to the government is likely to surface during his testimony.
From the pleading:
While the gist of Forster’s information is stated above, he knows of much additional information, that if deposed, it would be information to which he would testify, but it is additional information that has not been disclosed herein, because of possible classification [national security] issues.

reference; W.Plumlee; M Palmer, K. Camerana, Previous testimony interviews of 1993 and 2004 Senate Intel Com SCOM

Magda Hassan
10-07-2009, 12:43 AM
More like a big big deep black lie. (though I know it is a reference to Levine's book) I wonder how they will deal with this? They are not looking good.

David Guyatt
10-07-2009, 02:34 PM
http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/bill-conroy/2009/07/former-dea-agents-lawsuit-exposes-cia-fraud


Former DEA agent's lawsuit exposes CIA "fraud"
Posted by Bill Conroy - July 26, 2009 at 4:16 pm
Litigation also claims spook agency engages in wholesale spying on other federal agencies
The CIA was recently caught with its pants down.
As part of the course of his 15-year legal battle with the CIA, former DEA agent Richard Horn finally got the opportunity to demonstrate to the world that the emperor of clandestine activity has no clothes.
The secretive government agency is now coping with the embarrassing exposure of its deceit in a lawsuit filed by Horn, who previously served as the DEA’s country attaché in Burma (now officially known as the Union of Myanmar) from June 1992 to September 1993. In addition, the events that prompted the CIA’s lie appear to point to serious dysfunction within the agency that potentially poses a threat to the very U.S. national security it is charged with protecting.
The judge in Horn’s civil case, which is still pending in federal court in Washington, D.C., recently ruled that the CIA had committed a fraud on his court by failing to reveal in a timely manner that a CIA employee — who is key to Horn’s case — is no longer considered a covert operative. In fact, that employee, Arthur Brown, who served as CIA station chief in Burma at the same time Horn was DEA’s top gun in that Southeast Asian nation, had his official CIA cover lifted in 2002. The judge, Royce Lamberth, determined, based on pleadings filed in Horn’s case, that those responsible for the fraud allegedly include several attorneys with the CIA’s Office of General Counsel, and Brown himself.
The assertion of Brown’s covert status was key to the government’s defense in the Horn case since it was from that premise that former CIA Director George Tenant argued in 2000 court pleadings that Horn could not proceed with his case because the evidence he would need to present to prove his allegations was protected by state secrets privilege — a legal cloak designed to protect national security interests.
After Tenant filed his declaration with the court invoking state secrets privilege, Judge Lamberth discovered that several CIA attorneys were likely aware as early as 2002 that Brown was no longer officially deemed to be undercover, yet those attorneys and Brown failed to inform the court. That deception resulted in a ruling by Lamberth, and subsequently a U.S. Appeals Court, that hamstrung Horn’s case under national security restrictions and led to Brown being dismissed as a defendant in the case.
Earlier this week, Horn’s case finally made it onto the radar of the mainstream media after Judge Lamberth, clearly upset with the CIA’s dishonesty in the case, ordered that the court pleadings in Horn’s case be unsealed and made available for public viewing. The judge also ordered that Brown be reinstated as a defendant in the case and also indicated he would entertain civil, and possibly criminal, sanctions against Brown and several CIA attorneys as a consequence of the “fraud” they allegedly perpetrated against the court.
Narco News has previously reported at length on the Horn case in a 2004 story that was based on leaked court pleadings. That story can be found at this link.
Horn’s lawsuit was filed in 1994 against Brown and State Department Chief of Mission in Burma Franklin Huddle Jr., who also was stationed in Burma at the same time Horn served as DEA’s country attaché. In the litigation, both Brown and Huddle are accused of violating Horn’s constitutional rights by conspiring to plant an eavesdropping bug in his government-leased quarters in Burma. Horn also alleges in the lawsuit that the eavesdropping was part of a larger effort by Brown and Horn to undermine DEA’s anti-narcotics mission in Burma.
From Horn’s lawsuit:
While stationed in Burma, Horn made substantial progress working in concert with the Burmese government to improve its performance to address major drug issues, and Burma is and was the leading opium producing country in the world and is a major source country for the heroin that enters the United States. Even though the country of Burma was making substantial progress in its drug law enforcement efforts, Defendant Charge Huddle was sending reports to the Department of State stating that the government of Burma was not making any progress. Horn strongly encouraged Defendant Huddle to more accurately report on the drug situation in Burma to policy makers in Washington.
Horn alleges further that as a result of his efforts to expose Brown and Huddle’s dishonest agenda, the two launched a campaign to discredit him — which included illegally eavesdropping on his conversations in order to, among other motivations, dig up some dirt. The eavesdropping effort failed to produce any damaging information against Horn, yet in September 1993, Horn alleges, Huddle used his State Department authority to expel the DEA agent from Burma.
More from Horn’s litigation:
These actions by the Defendants [Brown and Huddle] were taken in furtherance of their political and personal agenda to thwart and undermine DEA’s mission in Burma … and to retaliate against Plaintiff [Horn] for Plaintiff's urging that the truth regarding Burma's drug enforcement efforts, which were substantial, be told to the U.S. Congress and the executive branch; whereas the DOS [Department of State] and CIA in its report to Congress desired to deny Burma any credit for its drug enforcement efforts. Plaintiff's “whistleblowing” would harm the dishonest DOS and CIA agenda, and thus the reason for Defendants’ actions. [Emphasis added.]
Twisted Course
Horn’s case will now proceed, for the most part, in the light of public sunshine, under special procedures designed to protect, yet still entertain as evidence, sensitive government disclosures, according to Judge Lamberth’s recent rulings.
However, current CIA Director Leon Panetta is still seeking to invoke the state secrets privilege claim in the Horn case going forward, requesting that certain evidence, such as portions of two Office of Inspector General investigations into Horn’s allegations, be declared off limits for purposes of evidence in Horn’s case due to their national security implications.
But Judge Lamberth has already taken issue with Panetta’s claims, pointing out that his declarations on that front — one classified and one unclassified — contain contradictory information.
From a recent ruling issued by Lamberth:
Confusingly, Director Panetta’s unclassified declaration appears to significantly conflict with his classified declaration. His unclassified declaration states that: “Plaintiff [Horn] has provided a declaration in which he stated that the alleged wiretap at issue [the one allegedly planted in Horn’s government home in Burma through the orchestrations of Brown and Horn] … was allegedly the result of an eavesdropping transmitter placed under a coffee table located in [Horn’s] residence in Burma. … To the extent that this is his allegation, he is permitted to proceed with discovery to determine whether such a transmitter was used.”
Panetta later states, however, that [Horn] cannot inquire into information about the “U.S. Government’s capabilities to conduct electronic surveillance.” If a method of intelligence is unclassified and publicly available, it is not immediately apparent why it suddenly becomes a state secret to even argue that it could be used by the U.S. Government. Moreover, [Horn] makes a credible argument not only that the device is publicly known, but that the fact that the government uses this type of device is publicly available, as this type of device is on display at the Spy Museum in Washington, D.C. Indeed, Panetta’s classified … declaration significantly conflicts with the unclassified declaration and appears to acknowledge that the plaintiff can present evidence as to the coffee table eavesdropping transmitter, even if it is used by the U.S. government.
That battle is still to be fought in Horn’s case. But there is a larger issue raised in the Horn case that seems to shed some light on the CIA’s still ongoing extraordinary efforts to shield elements of the case under the draconian cloak of state secrets privilege.
The larger issue appears to be revealed in some of the other charges raised in Horn’s litigation. In addition to the eavesdropping allegations and the accusations that State Department Chief of Mission Huddle was sending misleading reports to Congress and executive branch agencies about Burma’s anti-narcotics efforts, Horn also contends that CIA Chief of Station Brown attempted to sabotage a DEA informant and also sought to undermine DEA’s high-level liaison contact with the government of Burma.
From Horn’s pleadings:
Included in this category was Horn's complaint that Brown surreptitiously obtained and delivered a sensitive DEA document, which he well knew was signed by a DEA informant, to an official of the government of Burma. [Horn] asserts this act was accomplished without ever consulting Plaintiff [Horn] or a representative of DEA. [Horn] asserts that Brown knew the government of Burma would likely engage in some form of retribution against the informant after seeing the document.
… In approximately September, 1992, Mr. Brown asked me [Horn] to introduce him to DEA's liaison contact. I refused, not wanting the Government of Burma to confuse the DEA mission with the CIA mission. DEA's mission was much different than the CIA's mission. It was the Government of Burma who designated who was to be each of the U.S. Government agencies’ liaison persons operating in Burma. Since the Burmese Government had designated DEA’s liaison in Burma, I, in conjunction with my superiors, believed that it was inappropriate for me to introduce my liaison contact to Brown, nor did DEA believe it was appropriate for Brown to share DEA’s liaison contact, since it was the Government of Burma that chose who was the contact. … Subsequently, in approximately November, 1992, Defendant Huddle told me that Defendant Brown approached him suggesting that he (Huddle) order me to restrict DEA liaison to police, and specifically, DEA discontinue contact with its present high-level contact [within the Burmese government]. Huddle told me he denied Defendant Brown's request. Huddle asked me to hold this conversation in confidence and not to reveal to Defendant Brown that I knew his motives.
Those revelations are important when connected with another piece of information disclosed in a declaration filed by Horn with the court. That declaration reveals that Horn had asked for help from Brown and the CIA in targeting a major narco-trafficker who was operating from an office in Rangoon, Burma.
More from Horn’s court pleadings:
During the same month, Horn discussed electronic eavesdropping with Brown. Horn asked Brown if his agency had the capability and interest to assist Horn in conducting an electronic telephone intercept (in DEA parlance a Title III, or in CIA parlance a "teletap") on the business phone of a major international trafficker who had an office in Rangoon [Burma].
[Emphasis added. A large block blacked-out text follows the above sentence in Horn’s declaration.]
The Agenda
Assuming Horn’s allegations are on the money, it does not seem an unreasonable speculation that part of Brown and CIA’s motives in thwarting DEA’s mission in Burma at the time might have been to protect the narco-trafficker, and possibly others, who would be compromised by a DEA investigation. And why would Brown, or the CIA, do such a thing if those DEA targets were not somehow deemed valuable to the CIA — possibly active CIA assets?
If that is the case, it might explain why the CIA, with the help of the State Department, sought to defang Horn in Burma.
In fact, as part of his litigation, Horn filed a class-action complaint on behalf of DEA agents who he claims have been subjected to similar clandestine efforts by CIA to sabotage their work overseas. The court dismissed the class-action complaint, but Horn’s attorney told Narco News that the issue might well be raised again as the case proceeds in the wake of the CIA’s past alleged deceits.
From the class-action complaint filed by Horn:
The interception of Hom's conversation [in Burma] was accomplished through a concerted effort by the Department of State, the CIA, and the NSA [which is part of the Department of Defense]. When later stationed in New Orleans as a Group Supervisor for DEA, Special Agent Horn [who is now retired from the DEA] acquired reliable information that it was a pattern and practice of the three Defendant agencies to intercept conversations that DEA agents and others had either from their GLQ's [government-leased quarters] in foreign posts, or from DEA offices at American Embassies, and Consulates and other locations at foreign posts. This pattern and practice was not isolated to this one incident in Rangoon, Burma, nor was it isolated to Special Agent Horn, nor was it isolated to the country of Burma, but instead, it was a pattern and practice of the three Defendant agencies to conduct such activity in other foreign posts wherein DEA has offices.
… Special Agent Horn and all of the DEA foreign post class Plaintiffs allege that it is a pattern and practice of these three Defendant agencies to unlawfully intercept and disclose conversations of DEA agents, other DEA employees, and family members at and from DEA agent offices, and their GLQ's and other locations at foreign posts, on a worldwide basis, and that this pattern and practice has existed for many years, and continues to be done by the three Defendant agencies against DEA Special Agents, employees, and family members serving in foreign posts, and will likely be continued in the future.
Horn’s attorney, Brian Leighton, a former federal prosecutor, told Narco News that he is convinced that this CIA surveillance dragnet is still quite active.
“I believe the CIA is still spying on DEA overseas,” he says.
The purpose of this extensive surveillance of other federal agents, according to Leighton, is to assure that law enforcement's overseas missions remain subsurvient to CIA’s agenda.
“Rick [Horn] is seeking monetary damages in his case, but he also wants to expose this [the covert surveillance] so that someone in Congress wakes up and realizes that DEA can’t be treated like the red-headed stepchild when it comes to overseas missions,” Leighton says. “We can’t assign DEA overseas and expect them to do their jobs and then let the CIA and State Department prevent them from doing that job, unless it is related to some huge, legitimate issue where an exception is warranted.
“But in that case, it can’t be the CIA deciding [what the exception is] because the CIA thinks its lunch menu should be classified. So it has to be someone outside that agency making these decisions.”
Narco News did seek a response from CIA about whether it engages in surveillance of DEA agents overseas.
CIA spokesman George Little provided the following response:
Separate and apart from any specific instance, this kind of allegation is absurd. The CIA is a foreign intelligence organization.
Brown, Huddle and the CIA itself have denied any role in setting up surveillance on Horn while he was stationed in Burma, according to court pleadings.
However, in court pleadings in the Horn case, Leighton points out that Michael E. Grivsky, an investigator with the CIA’s Office of Inspector General, told Horn “that former Rangoon [CIA Chief of Station] Arthur Brown may very well have employed a local informant to initiate the illegal intercept [of Horn] and not gone through official channels or utilized conventional CIA resources.”
That may well be the case. But even so, it still opens up a can of worms for the CIA, one the agency undoubtedly would like to keep shielded from public view.
Because, if the surveillance of Horn, and the accompanying efforts to sabotage DEA’s mission in Burma, occurred as alleged by Horn, and that activity was not part of an official CIA operation, then it means Brown was acting as a rogue agent in conjunction with Huddle, his cohort at the State Department.
If that’s the case, and the CIA, Congress and the White House does not come to grips with that reality, but instead seeks to continue shielding such activity under national security, what is to prevent such rogue activities from being carried out by other CIA officials now and in the future, since there would seem to be no check in place to discourage such adventurism?
It would seem, in such a case, the very core of national security, and the ability of the president of the nation to assure its preservation, would be put at risk, left to the unchecked avarice of CIA and State Department bureaucrats seeking to protect their turf, political agendas and career aspirations.
On a wide enough scale, tolerance by our elected leaders of such mechanizations, for the sake of avoiding political embarrassment or blowback, would subject the democracy to the capricious agenda of a self-interested group of bureaucrats who are beyond the control of even the White House. Even more disconcerting is the possiblity that this alleged CIA sabotage mission is actually officially sanctioned from within the agency’s covert chambers, in which case we may already be well on our way to becoming subjects of a shadow government.
Stay tuned….

And

http://www.narconews.com/Issue34/article1063.html


DEA Agent’s Whistleblower Case Exposes the “War on Drugs” as a “War of Pretense”
Agent’s Sealed Legal Case Dismissed on National Security Grounds; Details Leaked to Narco News

By Bill Conroy
Special to The Narco News Bulletin
September 7, 2004

Former DEA agent Richard Horn has been fighting the U.S. government for the past 10 years trying to prove the CIA illegally spied on him as part of an effort to thwart his mission in the Southeast Asian country of Burma.

After being removed from his post in Burma, Horn filed litigation in federal court in Washington, D.C., in 1994 accusing top officials for the CIA and State Department in Burma of violating his Fourth Amendment rights.

After languishing in the federal court system for some 10 years, Horn’s case was dismissed in late July of this year after crucial evidence in the case was suppressed on national security grounds. Because the entire court record had been sealed by the judge, no one would have even known that Horn’s case was torpedoed, if it were not for the fact that an anonymous source leaked the judge’s ruling to Narco News.

Horn served in the early 1990s as the DEA country attaché to Burma – which ranks as one of the top opium poppy producing countries in the world.

As the highest-ranking in-country DEA representative in Burma (also known as Myanmar), Horn was charged with overseeing the agency’s mission in that country of eradicating the opium poppy, which is used to produce heroin.

From the start, Horn ran into problems with the top U.S. State Department official in Burma, Charge d’Affaires Franklin Huddle Jr., and the CIA chief of station in Burma at the time, Arthur M. Brown.

Horn’s attorney, Brian Leighton, describes what Horn was up against in Burma in a letter he sent in 1997 to U.S. Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala. In the letter, Leighton claims Huddle and Brown were bent on portraying the State Law and Order Restoration Council (SLORC) – the oppressive military junta ruling Burma – in the worst possible light.

However, Horn, according to the letter to Shelby, had made inroads in gaining the assistance of the SLORC in working toward opium poppy eradication in Burma. Horn’s success set in motion a series of overt and clandestine efforts on the part of Huddle and Brown to undermine DEA efforts in the region, Leighton alleges.

The reason, Leighton claimed in a recent phone interview, was that if Horn’s strategy proved successful, it would have undercut the State Department’s goal of vilifying the SLORC in the eyes of Congress and the public at large.

Sources within the intelligence community, however, tell Narco News that the CIA’s motivations in the region are likely far more complex, and that Horn simply found himself in the path of the Agency’s buzz saw.

In the end, Huddle managed to get Horn run out of Burma through the machinations of the State Department, Leighton contends, but only after Horn discovered that the CIA had planted eavesdropping equipment in his private quarters in Burma.

Horn’s attorney claims the bug was planted by Brown or one of his cronies as part of an effort to set up Horn and to undermine DEA’s mission in Burma. The eavesdropping, in the end, failed to produce any dirt that could be used against Horn, but it was a clear violation of his civil rights, according to Leighton.

Sources within DEA contend Horn’s claims against the CIA and State Department are on target, adding that the Department of Justice went as far as to claim that no U.S. citizen is protected from eavesdropping by its government when overseas.

“Horn’s whole story is true,” contends one DEA source. “They spied on his home, and the Department of Justice defended the CIA’s actions.”

Horn’s attorney, in his letter to Sen. Shelby, contends that the CIA’s net is far wider than Burma, and that the Agency regularly spies on DEA agents overseas:

… My client has learned that many DEA agents have been the subject of electronic eavesdropping by the State Department and our U.S. intelligence agencies.
… There are, no doubt, countless times when DEA’s operation plans have been foiled by “the listeners,” without DEA even knowing what happened.

What really happened in the Horn case, though, is not supposed to come out, if the government has its way. From the start, Horn’s litigation was sealed and critical evidence that could have supported his claims censored by the court.

Specifically, the evidence – two federal Inspector General (IG) reports that centered on Horn’s accusations – was determined by the court to be protected from disclosure based on something called state secrets privilege. The privilege, which was established as part of a 1953 Supreme Court ruling known as the Reynolds case, allows the government to deep-six information if it is deemed a threat to national security.

“Having determined that state secrets privilege bars disclosure of the IG Reports and certain attachments … the case cannot continue and must be dismissed,” wrote U.S. District Court Judge Royce Lamberth in his July 28, 2004, ruling in the Horn case. “As a result of the state secrets privilege, plaintiff cannot make out a … case, defendants cannot present facts necessary to their defense and the very subject matter at the heart of this case is protected from disclosure as a state secret.”

Leighton says he plans to appeal the judge’s ruling in the case.

Horn’s Charges

So what are these terrible state secrets that must be protected at all costs – even at the expense of Horn’s constitutional rights? Well, we may never know given how Horn’s case has been swept up into the world of cloak and dagger secrecy. Even in the sealed court ruling leaked to Narco News, all references to the alleged “state secrets” have been redacted.

However, it is clear that some of these state secrets are not really so secret. For example, in the sealed Lamberth ruling, among the material redacted is the name of the CIA chief of station in Burma who is one of the defendants in Horn’s lawsuit.

Horn’s attorney told Narco News that he would be subject to criminal prosecution for disclosing the name. However, the individual’s name, Arthur Brown, has been published numerous times in past media stories about the CIA’s operations in Burma and is referenced in the letter Leighton sent to Sen. Shelby. So it’s really not so secret after all, except when it comes to the peculiar rules of the U.S. Justice system.

Even though we cannot know for certain what the U.S. government deems to be “state secrets privilege” material in Horn’s case, we can assume that not everything is as it appears on the surface. An examination of Horn’s specific charges against Huddle and Brown offers additional insight as well.

For starters, Horn’s attorney claims Huddle and Brown used the resources of the State Department and CIA to sabotage a DEA plan to gain the government of Burma’s cooperation in conducting an opium yield study in the region. Leighton also claims that Huddle undermined Horn’s efforts to provide Burma’s prosecutors and police with U.S. assistance in implementing the country’s drug laws.

“In stark contrast,” Leighton points out in his letter to Shelby, “Mr. Huddle allowed the CIA to send Burmese military officers to Langley, Virginia, for training put on by the CIA.”

Horn also claims, according to assertions outlined in Judge Lamberth’s July 28 ruling in his case, that Brown compromised a DEA informant.

“… (Brown) turned over a copy of a DEA document that included the name of a confidential DEA informant to certain persons within the Burmese government without DEA permission,” the ruling states.

Leighton, in his 1997 letter to Sen. Shelby, describes the same event as follows:

DEA’s well-placed contact from the largest opium producing area in Burma provided DEA with a proposal to withdraw from opium production. The document was even signed by DEA’s informant. … If released, its contents would be highly inflammatory to the Central Government of Burma (GOB).
… Brown chose to deliver a signed copy of this document (which he surreptitiously obtained without Horn’s permission or knowledge) to a ranking figure of the Central Government of Burma knowing full well the outcome would be disastrous. It held the overall potential of causing the death of the informant, depreciating DEA’s credibility with the GOB and derailing the entire project – all at once.

… It seemed a near miracle that Brown’s plan failed. Horn and his agents still managed (after much work) to convince the Central Government of Burma not to arrest DEA’s informant and to give the crop substitution program a chance to succeed.

Huddle was finally able, through the clout of the State department, to get Horn run out of Burma in September of 1993, a little more than a year after Horn had arrived in Burma as the top DEA agent in the country. But about a month before his departure, Horn discovered that his home in Burma had been wired up by the CIA.

Leighton describes how Horn discovered the bug in his letter to Sen. Shelby:

Before leaving Burma, Horn happened to see a teletype which had quotes, ellipsis and summary of a private telephone conversation Horn had from the telephone in his living room. This cable clearly demonstrates that an electronic intercept had been planted – probably by Brown.
… As if that is not enough, Mr. Horn then learned about the technology used to conduct the intercept. … My client learned from a friend in the intelligence community (now retired) who served with him in Burma, how the intercept was likely accomplished and where the transmitter and receiver were likely located.

… Meanwhile, my client and I were threatened with prosecution if we told anyone details about this technology (designed specifically for use against other American diplomats) while at the same time, the government claimed it did not eavesdrop on my client.

In addition to the compromising of the DEA informant in Burma, the alleged illegal monitoring of Horn’s private residence is also referenced in Judge Lamberth’s sealed ruling. In fact, the ruling states that they were the subjects of the two Inspector General reports that have since been cloaked under state secrets privilege.

From Lamberth’s ruling:

(Horn’s) allegations regarding the handling of the DEA document was the subject of an Inspector General report that the court determined on Aug. 15, 2000, to be protected from disclosure by the state secrets privilege. (Horn) further argues that the purpose of the phone tap was to assist (Huddle) in obtaining information that would justify (Huddle) demanding (Horn’s) removal from Burma or otherwise justify expelling him directly. (Horn) alleges that (Huddle) sought (his) removal from Burma as retaliation for (Horn) sending reports to congressmen that conflicted with State Department reports prepared by (Huddle).
(Horn) supports his accusations of wire tapping with the contents of a cable sent by (Huddle) on or about Aug. 13, 1993, to his superiors in the State Department that contained allegedly verbatim quotations from the Aug. 12, 1993, phone conversation. The alleged phone tapping incident is the subject of a second Inspector General Report that the Court determined on Aug. 15, 2000, to be protected from disclosure by the state secrets privilege.

To understand the context of Horn’s incredible story, we have to explore the back story of Burma in the early 1990s. The SLORC is a brutal regime with a horrendous civil rights record that came into power through a military coup in 1988. That junta is now known as the State Peace and Development Council, or SPDC.

However, today, as was the case in the early 1990s, the ruling junta of Burma, because of financial and military limitations, does not control various regions of the country. This holds true in particular in the Golden Triangle region of the nation – an area that borders Laos, Thailand and China and is the source of much of the world’s opium poppy production.

The narco-trade in the Golden Triangle region is controlled by warlords who are able to field large armies that are funded with the proceeds of their illicit trade, according to sources in the intelligence community. In some cases, Burma’s military junta has struck bargains with these powerful factions, such as the United Wa State Army, which has had a ceasefire in effect with the government of Burma since 1989.

The relationship between the powerful warlords who control the lucrative narco-trade in Burma and the corrupt military junta that controls the government is very complex and layered. Sources in the intelligence community say that relationship is similar to two parasites, each sucking the blood out of the other, in a symbiotic union. As a result, drug money often finds its way into government coffers and personal accounts through agreements of convenience between corrupt government officials and the narco-traffickers.

The intelligence game in the region, then, according to sources, involves penetrating both worlds, and using information gained to manipulate the politics and forces in the region. As a result, the CIA would have assets planted inside both the government and the major trafficking organizations – with some of those assets likely working both sides of that fence. The CIA officials handling these human assets have built their careers on the information obtained from this spying game, and in some cases may have become corruptly involved in the system itself, according to sources in the intelligence community.

“If you want to cultivate assets in the drug trade to get information, then you have to let the drug trade continue, and that’s why you don’t want a noisy DEA agent getting in the way,” explains one source who does consulting work in the intelligence field. “The reason the opium economy will not stop is that the CIA does not see a value in stopping it when they want intelligence. … We don’t have a drug policy, we have a drug pretense.”

Former FBI agent Lok Lau says the Horn case is a perfect illustration of how there “is no coordination at all” between the intelligence community and other federal law enforcement agencies. Lau drew national attention last year after revealing he spied on China in the late 1980s and early 1990s for the Bureau.

Although Lau is prohibited from discussing the specifics of his spying mission due to national security concerns, his assignment did provide him with the expertise to brief CIA agents on the topics of “Chinese alien smuggling, Asian organized crime and Asian cultural issues in general,” according to government documents.

Like Horn, certain pleadings in an employment discrimination case Lau brought against the government were later stricken from the public record under the cloak of national security. Documents filed in Lau’s case show that he was successful in penetrating the Chinese diplomatic community as well as organized crime organizations that had strong links to the Chinese government.

A partially classified brief filed by the League of Untied Latin American Citizens in support of Lau’s legal claims offers a glimpse of the nature of Lau’s spying assignment:

“From a reading of the record, it is not difficult to discern that Lau was involved in espionage activities, kidnappings, trading in human slavery, illegal immigration, murder, torture, extortion, hostage-taking and any number of other criminal activities that involved crimes against humanity. Lau penetrated the Chinese Triads, the Tong, and other Chinese Organized Crime Organizations that trade in all of these things as a way of life … For six years Lau had to be on his guard and had to participate in whatever these hostile forces demanded of him.”
Lau explains that if the U.S. Government was really serious about eradicating the drug trade, “they would have done it. But they do not really want to.”

“Let’s say the DEA was successful in eradicating all drug trafficking,” Lau adds. “What would be left to prop up pro-U.S. regimes that rely on the drug trade? … The CIA can use the proceeds of the drug trade to pay for armies to support a friendly government.”

Lau also says a lot of careers in the intelligence community have been built around human assets who have been planted within the ranks of the narco-trafficking organizations. If you take down the drug trade, you take down the very assets that are helping to make careers – and at times, corrupt fortunes – within the intelligence community, Lau points out.

In fact, Lau alleges in his lawsuit against the FBI, which was dismissed in late 2003 and is currently on appeal, that on the eve of one of his overseas spying trips, he learned that one of the Bureau’s “highly placed assets had betrayed him.”

“I did not cancel my trip for it would confirm the asset’s allegation,” Lau contends in his court pleadings.

Lau says no effort was ever made by the FBI “to flush the asset out, because some (FBI) agent had made his career running that asset.”

“So they sold me out so that agent wouldn’t have to give him up,” Lau adds. “… Nothing ever happened to that informant….”

“War of Pretense”

Given that backdrop, it doesn’t take much of a leap of imagination to conclude that the intelligence community has a lot of motivation to keep a lid on the Horn case. Because the DEA agent actually wanted to do his job and take down the narco-trafficking trade in Burma, he was in fact likely threatening the opposing mission of the State Department and CIA in the region. Their mission was to maintain the status quo so that the information pipeline could continue to prop up careers and U.S. interests in the region – which had nothing to do with eradication of the opium market.

Clearly, the game as it is played is reprehensible in the eyes of most decent people, but it’s an old game that is not likely to end without a major reshuffling of the status quo. However, when that game starts to reach into this country’s courts and subverts the ultimate U.S. interest, the Constitution, it may be time to start drawing some lines.

The use of the state secrets privilege in the Horn case is the “government’s nuclear option when it comes to litigation,” explains Steven Aftergood, director of the Project on Government Secrecy at the Federation of American Scientists. “By claiming state security issues, the government can effectively shut down a lawsuit.

“It used to be a fairly rare procedure, but its use is on the rise in recent years, and based on perception at least, there is a question about the government’s good faith in citing the privilege.”

Mark Zaid, a Washington, D.C.-based attorney who has represented a number of high-profile government whistleblowers, says often the use of state secrets privilege “is an abuse, a way for the government to cover up wrongdoing or incompetence, and the judiciary goes along with it because they are intimidated.”

Zaid is the attorney representing former FBI translator Sibel Edmonds, who claims she was fired from the FBI for blowing the whistle on serious security and management dysfunction within the FBI’s translator program. Edmonds filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Department of Justice in 2002 claiming the government violated her civil rights.

However, this past July, a judge threw her case out of court after ruling evidence Edmonds needed to prove her claims was protected by state secrets privilege. As in the Horn and Lau cases, Edmonds was prevented from exposing alleged government corruption and mismanagement because of the national security trump card. Edmonds case is currently on appeal.

Zaid points out that the Horn case has particularly serious implications for open government, because not only was state secrets privilege invoked, but the case itself was sealed, which meant no one would even know that national security had been used to torpedo the case if the judge’s order had not been leaked to Narco News.

“The CIA will do what it needs to do to suit its interests,” Zaid says. “If that means taking steps against another agency employee, they will do it.

“… But there is a double tragedy in the use of the state secrets privilege (in the Horn case) in that because the case is sealed, no one would even know the government invoked the privilege. … The ridiculous thing is that (Horn’s) case is still under seal. There is very little classified information involved in the case (and what is there has already been redacted from the record).

“So why is this case being covered up by the government?” Zaid asks.

That is a question that goes to the heart of our Constitution, and whether the document still has any meaning. Ironically, Horn could not be reached for comment on this story because, according to sources, he fears the government will retaliate against him if he exercises his First Amendment right to discuss his case.

Phone calls to the CIA and State Department were never returned.

Their silence, like the pall that the national security trump card lays over the truth, only contributes to the “war of pretense” being waged against the civil rights of people around the globe.

One DEA source summed up the danger of the government’s continued expansion of that pretense as follows:

Illegal eavesdropping, the centerpiece of Horn’s civil case, is also a criminal offense. An analogy of the government’s position is this: If a CIA chief of station had stabbed Horn with a butcher knife in the American Embassy, he could not be prosecuted because the very existence, location and name of chiefs of station are considered classified and cannot be disclosed. Moreover, the chief of station would not be able to defend himself without using classified information. Therefore, the state secrets privilege kicks in and the case disappears. This theoretical “stretch” of the privilege is not unlike what was done in Horn’s civil action.
In practice, both cases could move forward, but only if fair treatment is accorded by the court.

It is apparent that the state secrets privilege has expanded and evolved in such a way that it effectively immunizes persons and agencies of crimes and other misconduct. It no longer just protects troop movements, satellite imagery, etc. It now seems to include everything the intelligence community does. The intelligence agencies are no longer held accountable for wrongdoing. They have the all-inclusive trump card.

… In the Horn case, the state secrets privilege has been used to immunize people and agencies from wrongdoing – a far cry from what the United States Constitution intended.

Tosh Plumlee
10-17-2009, 04:09 AM
Today Oct 16,2009.....eight of the weapons uncovered in a raid yesterday near Columbus New Mexico and Palomas MX had belong to the 101st Airborn Div in 1987.

one of these weapons was ID'ed as the automatic weapon that killed the mayor of Palomas, MX last week:

Previous post from last Spring:


04-15-2009, 02:23 PM
Tosh Plumlee
Member

"............

......That was not the only thing found at this place... that was only what they wanted released to the media.... there is more to this puppy than whats been released. Perhaps more details after Obama's trip to Mexico City.

"... confidental memo to JOC -J2.......

...........
I do not know how this could be checked out but... if you remember a sensitive source mentioned there were military weapons that were taken off the GAO books after the 101st and 82nd Airborne held maneuvers in Honduras back in the mid eighties. There was a GAO report on these lost weapons sometime around that time frame. There were Stinger missiles, grenade launchers, millions of rounds of various ammo, night vision goggles, helicopter parts, etc that went to Panama's Noriega and then into the Escobar, Ochoa cartel hands.

I think what was recently found in Mexico is a very small part of those missing weapons. I think we can get the numbers, although I have been told that the Mexican authorities have told ATF that the ID numbers have been filed off of that gun, but they have others which have been ID'ed......."..

Mexican Intell has also told the joint task force that they will be releasing information of another captured high profile drug Lord... the rumor is that it is "Guzman", and he will be turned over to American military at the border... we will perhaps see real soon...

I am going back to Coyote Hill today and will be out of cell phone range most of the day.... there is an Intel report that there is to be a "run" across the border going south from Columbus, I am told it is planned for today. I hope to get close up pictures and lic numbers and photos of the drivers, They are going to use another Ryder Truck reg in Arizona, I am told.

My sources have told me this information has been received from a Mexican military intelligence unit working out of Juarez, also I have received information from a sensitive source that the BP will not be in this area when the cross over is suppose to happen. (???)

If I can get more information on the other Ryder Truck which was found abandon near here yesterday or the day before, I will forward it to you... It might fit into something you have already uncovered... (we will see if this information from our sources checks out... so far there are three for four on Mexico Intel info)..... I still don't know what the motive is for feeding this info.... could be a set up to make the CIA look bad for having a UC team inside Mexico... anyway I am xxxx... however, Mexico just confirmed that they are working with a Navy SEAL team starting April 20, 09. (reference article I sent you last night) That would tie in with the US Ranger Team working Juarez and surrounding areas.... could be a joint assassination team down here tracking some of the cartel's gang members for all I know.

David Guyatt
10-17-2009, 08:04 AM
The 101st Airborne weapons "heist" would have been under the Reagan Administration then.

Should we as