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Magda Hassan
03-29-2010, 12:15 PM
Another interesting article by Michael Barker. Please link to the Swan's website to read the rest of the article:
http://swans.com/library/art16/barker45.html


(Swans - March 22, 2010) The Planned Parenthood Federation of America serves a critical role in contemporary society, not as a harbinger of charity and health, but instead as an integral humanitarian tool in capitalism's war against life. This blunt description runs counter to this group's liberal self-image as a trusted, informed, and passionate advocate for reproductive health worldwide, and most likely does not reflect the ideological proclivities of a large number of their well-meaning supporters. Nevertheless, last month, Planned Parenthood's national president, Cecile Richards, was rewarded for her outstanding commitment to the ruling class when she accepted a coveted position on the Ford Foundation's board of trustees -- a foundation that is well accepted as being one of the main financial engines for capitalist policy-planning networks. Cecile Richards' recruitment to the board of this philanthropic giant was entirely predictable considering the historical role that liberal foundations have fulfilled in creating and sustaining the population control establishment (http://peoplesgeography.com/links/the-eco-establishment/), an establishment within which Planned Parenthood holds a leading position. Thus, given the strong influence that Planned Parenthood exerts over popular thought on reproduction, this article will provide a brief history of this organization, thereby demonstrating why their activism has always served the interests of a small capitalist elite and not the best interests of the targets of their work -- the rest of the planet.
From the first day of its inception in October 1916, Planned Parenthood has been a capable ally in capitalism's Malthusian war against humans, especially those individuals drawn to the merits of socialism. Ironically, the organization's founder, Margaret Sanger, was not always so inclined and had previously "teamed up with labor radicals [like the International Workers of the World] and bohemians to organize strikes and pickets and pageants in the hope of achieving wholesale economic and social justice." In fact, "Margaret quite clearly adopted her feminist ideology, and much of the rhetoric she later claimed as her own, from Emma Goldman," the popular anarchist. However, like many other elitist reformers of her era who were eager for rapid change, she "soon jettisoned Socialism in favor of an alliance with progressives, confident that capitalism might reform itself voluntarily." (1) (http://swans.com/library/art16/barker45.html#1)