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Paul Rigby
06-10-2010, 03:01 PM
Yes, that powerful, enduring enemy of free speech and diverse perspectives is at it again, this time in Afghanistan. Presumably if Press TV, like the ludicrous BBC Radio 4 news flagships, Today and the World Tonight, confined itself to the Chatham House view of the world, everything would be fine:

http://www.presstv.ir/detail.aspx?id=129705&sectionid=351020101


BBC sabotaging Press TV broadcasts

The British Broadcasting Corporation is showering Afghan cable networks with lucrative deals to cut broadcastings of Iran's English-language news channel, Press TV.

The Press TV bureau in Kabul was informed on Wednesday that "a number of BBC employees have recently contacted the cable networks' union in Herat to persuade them into breaking contract with Press TV and blocking all satellite transmission of its programs."

"The BBC reportedly offered to triple the union's pay once it agrees to strip Press TV of its broadcasting rights in Herat," the bureau added.

The move has drawn sharp criticism from media figures in Iran, who believe it is in line with US efforts to limit Press TV activities in Afghanistan, which is grappling with an all-out humanitarian crisis since the US-led invasion in 2001.

Last year, US military forces confiscated technical equipment of Press TV's Afghanistan bureau, only days before Iran's President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad made a visit to the country.

Local reports revealed that Press TV has started to emerge as a popular news source among the people and even journalists in Afghanistan.

According to the reports, Afghan officials and ordinary citizens have welcomed Press TV as an alternative, more credible news source, ever since it became available on cable in Kabul and various provinces.

Afghan President Hamid Karzai, meanwhile, recently told a private gathering that he tunes into Press TV's news reports as he finds them to be more reliable and enlightening than other English language news sources.

SBB/MSA

BBC is not a legitimate news source...
Thu, 10 Jun 2010 03:19:09 GMT
Its purpose is not to give news, but to brainwash people into accepting imperialism.

The BBC – enemy of freedom, suppressor of truth.

Peter Presland
06-10-2010, 06:59 PM
Press TV is unquestionably seen as a threat. Lots of puffed up outrage over its coverage to be found if you go looking around the Tory Blogsphere and elsewhere. Now it seems the Spooks may be orchestrating something a little more serious for the upstart 'terrorist supporting and coluding' channel:

This from Tonight's Channel 4 News: (http://www.channel4.com/news/articles/uk/iran+journalistaposs+ofcom+complaint+over+tv+confe ssion/3676242)

Maziar Bahari, arrested and tortured in Iran after last June's street protests, tells Channel 4 News he has referred Iran’s Press TV to Ofcom for sending a journalist to cover his interrogation.
http://www.channel4.com/news/media/images/Channel4/news/articles/10_maziar_k.jpg The journalist has accused the Iranian channel Press TV of colluding in his wrongful imprisonment (http://www.channel4.com/news/articles/uk/maziar+bahari+an+ordeal+of+terror+and+absurdity/3488307) after he was detained for filming protests during last year's presidential elections in Iran.

Freelance documentary maker Maziar Bahari has taken his case against Press TV (http://www.presstv.ir/) – which launched in Britain three years ago and broadcasts to nearly 10 million UK subscribers - to Ofcom, the broadcasting standards watchdog.

Mr Bahari, who now lives in Britain, accuses the channel of breaching Ofcom (http://www.ofcom.org.uk/) rules on privacy and fairness for recording his forced confession inside a Tehran prison.

Press TV, an English language channel funded by the Tehran government, describes itself as providing a "voice for the voiceless".

With glossy presenters and colourful sets, it is the model of an international 24-hour news channel. Broadcasting live from London, and Tehran, it features an array of local and international talent, including Yvonne Ridley (http://www.yvonneridley.org/), George Galloway (http://www.georgegalloway.com/) and Lauren Booth.

More on Maziar Bahari from Channel 4 News
- Maziar Bahari released from Iran prison (http://www.channel4.com/news/articles/uk/maziar+bahari+released+from+iran+prison/3377402)
- Maziar Bahari: an ordeal of terror and absurdity (http://www.channel4.com/news/articles/uk/maziar+bahari+an+ordeal+of+terror+and+absurdity/3488307)
- Iran arrests opposition protesters (http://www.channel4.com/news/articles/world/middle_east/aposiran+arrests+opposition+protestersapos/3475857)
- Ahmadinejad: Iran is solid and united (http://www.channel4.com/news/articles/politics/international_politics/ahmadinejad+aposiran+is+solid+and+unitedapos/3476542)
- Timeline: Iran's election protests (http://www.channel4.com/news/articles/politics/international_politics/timeline+iranaposs+election+protests/3348407)

When it launched in Britain, it promised to be independent, delivering different views and unbiased reports.
But in an interview with Channel 4 News, to be broadcast tonight, Mr Bahari explains that Press TV betrayed those promises by sending a journalist to cover his forced confession in Tehran's notorious Evin prison.
"I was somewhat surprised because I thought Press TV would at least pretend to have some credibility and wouldn't come and interview a prisoner in an interrogation room when I was under duress."

Mr Bahari says he was tortured and then forced to make his confession on television (http://www.channel4.com/news/articles/uk/maziar+bahari+an+ordeal+of+terror+and+absurdity/3488307), under threat of execution. He describes how he sat inside a room in the prison before three cameras, and responded to questions suggested by a government interrogator, who stood behind a red curtain. He says he kept his blindfold on his knee, in full view, so it should have been clear that he was under duress.

Press TV then broadcast the confession as though it was a legitimate interview, and Mr Bahari a willing guest. The presenter even suggested Mr Bahari might have participated in the protests.

The Iranian-Canadian journalist captured defining moments of the demonstrations - later broadcast on Channel 4 News, with whom he has worked for many years.

But he paid a high price, spending 118 days in detention, and was only released (http://www.channel4.com/news/articles/uk/maziar+bahari+released+from+iran+prison/3377402) after a vigorous international campaign. Last month he was convicted in absentia on five charges, including conspiring against the state and insulting the Supreme Leader. He was sentenced to 13 and a half years in prison, and 74 lashes.

A former current affairs presenter at Press TV, Shahab Mossavat, described the actions of the channel as appalling and tragic.

He left the network last year after his show was axed, but says there is increasing political pressure on the channel from Tehran, despite its aspirational beginnings.

"Iran wanted to engage, and set its own agenda for engagement, so in those ways I think Press TV was apposite," he told Channel 4 News.

"As time went on, that changed, and having played the game, the people at Press TV, and much higher than Press TV, realised they weren't winning. Then the tone changed and became much more shrill and much less palatable."

Press TV says it determines its own editorial policy and maintains complete independence from the government - suggesting Shahab Mossavat resigned after his employers couldn't meet his demands for a pay rise.

The broadcaster says it won't comment on Mr Bahari's allegations while Ofcom makes its deliberations.

The case is being closely watched by human rights activists. Index on Censorship (http://www.indexoncensorship.org/) campaigner Jo Glanville says any respectable journalist should refuse to work for the channel. "The way they behaved, by going into the prison in that way and essentially colluding with the torture and illegal detention of a journalist - that should finish their reputation once and for all in this country."
For the full report, see Channel 4 News tonight at 7pm

Paul Rigby
06-10-2010, 07:52 PM
The case is being closely watched by human rights activists. Index on Censorship (http://www.indexoncensorship.org/) campaigner Jo Glanville says any respectable journalist should refuse to work for the channel. "The way they behaved, by going into the prison in that way and essentially colluding with the torture and illegal detention of a journalist - that should finish their reputation once and for all in this country."
For the full report, see Channel 4 News tonight at 7pm

Great spot: can't wait for Index on Censorship to take up the case of Afghan viewers and their denial of choice. Fancy a piece of mischief? Should we file a request for them to look into this?

Peter Presland
06-11-2010, 06:44 AM
Great spot: can't wait for Index on Censorship to take up the case of Afghan viewers and their denial of choice. Fancy a piece of mischief? Should we file a request for them to look into this?
Not really a geat spot. I just happened to catch it on Channel 4 News and was fascinated by the mixture of credulity and demonising venom that characterised the whole piece. Jon Snow was the presenter and, whilst I hold no brief for him, he does occasionally make life very uncomfortable for those pushing official garbage - which made this hatchet job all the more fascinating.

This time, the Iranian government was clearly the designated axis of pure evil. It wasn't a government you see - pace the BBC - it was a 'Regime'. I feel uncomfortable appearing to defend a theocratic government and I have little doubt Mr Bahari was indeed made to feel very uncomfortable. It's the grossness of the double standards that really piss me off. Compare and contrast for example the BBC and C4 et al on their coverage of Operation Cast lead and the Gaza flotilla, not to mention our own governments collusion in torture, British troops behaving like sadistic torturing animals etc etc. Those seen as 'our' boys or 'on 'our side' or simply a designated ally, are given all the slack necessary to ensure that, if there is any blame going it is always assigned to 'the odd rotten apple' - always of junior rank naturally - or similar anodyne pap - and the rotten-to-the-core ship of state just sails on regardless.

Anyway - I had a quick look on the C4 web site and found that piece.

The latest from Media Lens is worth a look too (http://medialens.org/alerts/index.php). It contrasts the UK media handling of the Flotilla with the capture of those British sailors a while back by that wicked evil Iranian Regime.