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David Guyatt
01-05-2011, 10:02 AM
ttp://www.china-defense-mashup.com/chinas-j-20-stealth-fighter-in-taxi-tests.html (http://www.china-defense-mashup.com/chinas-j-20-stealth-fighter-in-taxi-tests.html)


2011-01-01 (China Military News cited from aviationweek.com and written by Bill Sweetman) --

http://www.china-defense-mashup.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/j-20-7.jpg
China’s first known stealth aircraft just emerged from a secret development program and was undergoing high-speed taxi tests late last week at Chengdu Aircraft Design Institute’s airfield. Said to be designated J-20, it is larger than most observers expected—pointing to long range and heavy weapon loads.

Its timing, Chengdu’s development record and official statements cast doubt on U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates’s 2009 prediction (in support of his decision to stop production of the Lockheed Martin F-22) that China would not have an operational stealth aircraft before 2020

he debut of the J-20 was announced in a November 2009 interview on Chinese TV by Gen. He Weirong, deputy commander of the People’s Liberation Army Air Force. The general said a “fourth-generation” fighter (Chinese terminology for a stealth fighter) would be flown in 2010-11 and be operational in 2017-19.

The J-20 is a single-seat, twin-engine aircraft, bigger and heavier than the Sukhoi T-50 and the F-22. Comparison with ground-service vehicles points to an overall length of 75 ft. and a wingspan of 45 ft. or more, which would suggest a takeoff weight in the 75,000-80,000-lb. class with no external load. That in turn implies a generous internal fuel capacity. The overall length is close to that of the 1960s General Dynamics F-111, which carries 34,000 lb. of fuel.

The J-20 has a canard delta layout (like Chengdu’s J-10) with two canted, all-moving vertical stabilizers (like the T-50) and smaller canted ventral fins. The stealth body shaping is similar to that of the F-22. The flat body sides are aligned with the canted tails, the wing-body junction is clean, and there is a sharp chine line around the forward fuselage. The cant angles are greater than they are on the Lockheed Martin F-35, and the frameless canopy is similar to that of the F-22.

David Guyatt
01-07-2011, 03:11 PM
It seems that feathers are being ruffled in Washington over this apparently unexpected development:

China stealth plane still 'years away', says Pentagon (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-12125566)
http://news.bbcimg.co.uk/media/images/50683000/jpg/_50683401_j20_1.jpg

The US is playing down pictures that appear to show a working prototype of a Chinese stealth aircraft, invisible to radar.

The images - first published on websites - show what looks like a stealth fighter on a taxi run.

Beijing has not commented on whether the pictures - published ahead of US Defence Secretary Robert Gates' visit later this week - are genuine.

The Pentagon says China is still years away from deploying a stealth aircraft.

In late 2009 the deputy head of China's air force, General He Weirong, said the country's stealth fighter would be ready sometime between 2017 and 2019, reports said.

But US director of naval intelligence Vice Admiral David Dorsett said that it would be "years" before China's new fighter would be operational.

"Developing a stealth capability with a prototype and then integrating that into a combat environment is going to take some time," he said.

Three modern wars in other parts of the world have hardened the resolve of China's top brass to catch up militarily”

Chen: Military modernisation gathers pace
The leaked photos of the prototype aircraft first appeared on military websites and blogs. They were said to have been taken at the Chengdu Aircraft Design Institute.

The images were then discussed in the Chinese state-run Global Times newspaper, in both its Chinese and English-language editions, although no comment was made on their authenticity.

Japan's Asahi Shimbun newspaper said China could begin test flights of the stealth jet as soon as this month, citing unidentified Chinese military sources.

Military build-up
The world's only operational stealth fighter is the Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor, but Russia is also known to be working on its own prototype.

BBC defence correspondent Nick Childs says the aircraft certainly bears a superficial resemblance to the latest US stealth designs - and that may spook some in Washington.

And it will add to the concerns of those who have been warning especially of the increasing reach and capabilities of China's air force and navy, he adds.

The US has been watching closely as China increases its military capacity - in particular, its development of a so-called "carrier killer" missile, a land-based system which could sink an aircraft carrier from up to 1,800 miles (2,900km) away.

US battle groups - including aircraft carriers - are stationed in the South China Sea.

And in August, the Pentagon reported that China had been expanding its nuclear arsenal and submarine force, as well as upgrading its land-based missiles.

Peter Lemkin
01-07-2011, 08:07 PM
It is really quite amazing how quickly China has come up 'to the mark' in the last few decades.....however it was done. At this rate, China will soon equal the USA and Russia in all fields, all technical levels and accomplishments.....

Sure glad I love Chinese food!

Magda Hassan
01-07-2011, 10:29 PM
1684
I wonder if they'll make it more stealthy than the US did? The Yugoslav army were able to get this one with old fashioned AA guns.

David Guyatt
01-11-2011, 11:44 AM
Ha! The lies politicians tell (see story below)




Not dissimilar in intent to the announcement made by the officer in charge of the US carrier fleet that has just docked in South Korea, when he said it was a "routine deployment".

Ha again!

http://uk.news.yahoo.com/22/20110111/tpl-uk-china-defence-fighter-81f3b62.html

[quote]China's Hu confirms stealth jet test-flight-Gates

Chinese President Hu Jintao confirmed the country had on Tuesday conducted its first test-flight of a stealth fighter jet, which could narrow the nation's military gap with the United States, U.S. Defence Secretary Robert Gates said after talks with Hu. Skip related content

Gates said Hu told him that the maiden test-flight of the advanced J-20 fighter jet prototype was not timed to coincide with Gates' visit and had been planned earlier.

"I asked President Hu about it directly, and he said that the test had absolutely nothing to do with my visit and had been a pre-planned test. And that's where we left it," Gates told reporters.

Beforehand, the test-flight of the fighter jet, which could potentially evade detection by foes, in the southwest Chinese city of Chengdu had been widely reported on Chinese Internet blogs and online news sites.

They showed pictures of a fighter plane in flight, and some offered what were cast as running accounts of the J-20 stealth jet fighter taking off after midday for a short flight from an airport in Chengdu.

The website of the Global Times, a popular Chinese newspaper owned by the People's Daily, the ruling Communist Party's main paper, featured a brief report headlined: "J-20 first flight successful."

It published a link to what it said were pictures of the flight.

The announcement of a successful test flight for the advanced fighter came while Gates was visiting Beijing, seeking to improve often tense military ties.

In recent days, Chinese Web sites and some popular newspapers, which can come under a heavy grip of censorship, have carried many reports and pictures claiming to show the stealth fighter being tested on the ground.

But the government had been silent about the fighter until Hu's remarks to Gates.

The latest pictures may heighten concern about China's military build-up, including possible deployment in 2011 of its first aircraft carrier and a new anti-ship ballistic missile seen as a threat to U.S. aircraft carriers.

Some analysts have said that the J-20 photos, if authentic, were a strong indicator that China was making faster-than-expected progress in developing a rival to Lockheed Martin's F-22 Raptor, the world's only operational stealth fighter designed to evade detection by radar.

But U.S. Vice Admiral David Dorsett, director of naval intelligence, has said deployment of the J-20 was years away.

(Reporting by Chris Buckley; Editing by Ken Wills)

David Guyatt
01-21-2011, 12:33 PM
All very well for the president to say with a smile, but try telling the Pentagon they're now equal with China.

Nope, don't think so.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1349251/China-military-threat-insists-president-urges-U-S-treat-equal.html
(http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1349251/China-military-threat-insists-president-urges-U-S-treat-equal.html)


China 'not a military threat', insists president as he urges U.S. to treat it as equal
By DAILY MAIL REPORTER
Last updated at 11:50 AM on 21st January 2011

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2011/01/21/article-1349251-0CD8DDF9000005DC-114_233x423.jpg
Collaboration: Chinese President Hu Jintao has insisted his country is not a military threat, despite aggressive moves in the west Pacific and a build up of forces
Chinese President Hu Jintao has denied his country is a military threat despite a rapid build up of its military forces.
Politicians gave the Chinese president an 'earful of complaints' during his visit to Capitol Hill over the country's policy on business and trade practices, human rights and aggressive military gestures.
President Barack Obama has also expressed similar concerns during the Chinese state visit to the U.S.
But Hu dismissed the concerns and urged the U.S. to treat China 'with respect and as equals'.
'China-U.S. relations will enjoy smooth and steady growth when the two countries handle well issues involving each other's major interests,' he said.
'Otherwise, our relations will suffer constant trouble or even tension.'
He told a the U.S.-China Business Council: 'We will remain committed to the path of peaceful development. We do not engage in an arms race, we are not a military threat to any country.
'China will never seek to dominate or pursue an expansionist policy.'
He added that the U.S. should continue to recognise China's sovereignty over Taiwan and Tibet.
The Chinese leader will today visit a Chinese centre at a high school and a Chinese auto parts producer.
House Speaker John Boehner said members 'raised our strong, ongoing concerns with reports of human rights violations in China, including the denial of religious freedom and the use of coercive abortion' - referring to China's one-child policy.
http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2011/01/21/article-1349251-0CD8C67E000005DC-423_468x286.jpg
Criticism: Outgoing Chicago mayor Richard Daley, left, talks with Mr Hu. Politicians have given a list of concerns over human rights and trade practices to the Chinese President
http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2011/01/21/article-1349251-0CD8CEB5000005DC-559_468x286.jpg
Opposition: Students protest against the Chinese government visit to the U.S. in downtown Chicago
Republican congresswoman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, said: 'Out of all the issues I raised, the only one which received a response from Mr Hu was my statement urging the end of China's forced abortion policy.
'I was astonished when he insisted that such a policy does not exist.'
Mr Hu has used the visit to call for closer cooperation between the global economic powers.
http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2011/01/21/article-1349251-0CBEA3F6000005DC-400_468x286.jpg
Muscle: Developments like the J-20 stealth fighter have led to concerns about China's military strength
In recent years, China has grown rapidly both economically and militarily.
The U.S. has expressed concerns over Beijing's increasingly aggressive stance in the western Pacific and the accountability of the People's Liberation Army to civilian leaders within the government.
During Defence Secretary Robert Gates' visit to China earlier this month, the decision to conduct a test flight of its first aircraft designed to evade radar - the J-20 stealth fighter - appeared to catch Hu and other Chinese leaders off guard.
Another area of concern is the development of anti-ship missiles which could make it harder for U.S. aircraft carriers to operate in the western Pacific.

Peter Lemkin
01-21-2011, 04:30 PM
Pretty fancy and not so little machine!....Amazing when compared with the images of people there in Mao-suits of three colors working the land by had and oxen in my youth. Well, surprise, surprise! I'd imagine it is a number of things. First, they have sent many of their best students to study abroad to come up to speed [had some in my classes at Yale] - but now they are back teaching and researching at home. Second, while so many 'Western' countries used the cheap labor there to have them build their electronic whatevers, they forgot that that also gave them the tools, machinery, infrastructure, training, etc. to build their own - of just take some off the assembly line for their own use. Third, China and France seem to be the leaders in Industrial espionage, with Russia third and the USA a paltry wanna be. [Though we were #1 stealing the Reich's technical secrets and smug ever since.] Fourth, they now have lots of money and money, while it can't buy you love [except in the Berlusconni sense] it can buy mucho technical items - or the experts and machinery to build them. So, China now doesn't have a large military [men, yes; arms no]; but they do seem to have some of the most up to date kinds...and as these are all mass produced....and they have the money.....watch out! I know the neocons are. While I think China is ready willing and able to protect its own territory and natural resources it deems essential, I don't yet sense any expansionist desires for physical Empire....but who know which way the wind blows. One thing is for sure. Japan isn't going to mess with China like it did pre WWII!!!!

David Guyatt
01-21-2011, 04:46 PM
I agree Pete, China is not ready to go international. Not yet. But they are, I think, planning to become a super-power.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Future_Chinese_aircraft_carrier

[Since 1985, China has acquired four retired aircraft carriers for study: the Australian HMAS Melbourne and the ex-Soviet carriers Minsk, Kiev and Varyag. Reports state that two 50,000-60,000 ton aircraft carriers are due to be finished by 2015.[1] Sukhoi Su-33s (navalized Flankers) are the aircraft most likely to be flown from these carriers.[4][/quote]

And

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aircraft_carrier#China


China

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0d/USNWC_Varyag02.jpg/220px-USNWC_Varyag02.jpg
Varyag under tow in Istanbul
China bought the unfinished Soviet aircraft carrier Varyag in 2001 from Ukraine, supposedly to turn it into a floating casino. Pictures taken while in port suggest this plan has been abandoned and show that work is being carried out to maintain its military function. There is no conclusive evidence as to what role it would play in the Chinese Navy.

In late December 2008 and early January 2009, there were multiple reports of China building two conventionally powered aircraft carriers displacing 50,000–60,000 tonnes, possibly to be launched in 2015. In December 2010 China's State Oceanic Administration announced that this vessel would be finished one year earlier, in 2014. A nuclear powered carrier is planned for launch around 2020.[9]
According to James Nolt, senior fellow at the World Policy Institute in New York, it might take China many years to develop the technology, training, and operational capability necessary for an effective carrier.[10]

Peter Lemkin
01-21-2011, 05:14 PM
I agree Pete, China is not ready to go international. Not yet. But they are, I think, planning to become a super-power.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Future_Chinese_aircraft_carrier

[Since 1985, China has acquired four retired aircraft carriers for study: the Australian HMAS Melbourne and the ex-Soviet carriers Minsk, Kiev and Varyag. Reports state that two 50,000-60,000 ton aircraft carriers are due to be finished by 2015.[1] Sukhoi Su-33s (navalized Flankers) are the aircraft most likely to be flown from these carriers.[4]

And

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aircraft_carrier#China


China

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0d/USNWC_Varyag02.jpg/220px-USNWC_Varyag02.jpg
Varyag under tow in Istanbul
China bought the unfinished Soviet aircraft carrier Varyag in 2001 from Ukraine, supposedly to turn it into a floating casino. Pictures taken while in port suggest this plan has been abandoned and show that work is being carried out to maintain its military function. There is no conclusive evidence as to what role it would play in the Chinese Navy.

In late December 2008 and early January 2009, there were multiple reports of China building two conventionally powered aircraft carriers displacing 50,000–60,000 tonnes, possibly to be launched in 2015. In December 2010 China's State Oceanic Administration announced that this vessel would be finished one year earlier, in 2014. A nuclear powered carrier is planned for launch around 2020.[9]
According to James Nolt, senior fellow at the World Policy Institute in New York, it might take China many years to develop the technology, training, and operational capability necessary for an effective carrier.[10][/QUOTE]

An aircraft carrier fleet would signal something a 'bit' different....but I think current thinking [as I see it from way, way outside] is that China can 'conquer' what others would need military force to accomplish, simply with economic clout....less messy, for sure.

If you don't like Chinese food...best to start getting used to it! :driving:

David Guyatt
01-21-2011, 05:42 PM
It's the single most popular food in the world.

Apart from Cheddar cheese, of course.