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Jan Klimkowski
01-22-2011, 08:03 PM
Via ZeroHedge. Difficult to say whether this is true:



Egypt Proactively Preparing For Tunisian-Style Rioting: Airport Intercepts 59 Outbound Gold Shipments Worth Tens Of Millions

Submitted by Tyler Durden on 01/22/2011 14:41 -0500


After a week ago we learned that the central bank of Tunisia had parted with 23% of its gold stash courtesy of now deposed president who fled the country with a 1.5 ton shipment of gold, it appears that Egypt is preparing for a comparable spike in revolutionary activity. Only unlike the now former Tunisian president whose gold sequestering actions were retroactive and thus, quite lucky to succeed, Egypt has taken proactive measures. According to Egypt News, the country's airport has intercepted 59 shipments of gold directed for the Netherlands "worth tens of millions." The gold, as well as an indeterminate amount of foreign currencies, was hidden in pillow cases: uh, cotton may not show up on X-Rays, but gold sure does. We eagerly await to learn how big the decline in the country's official holdings 75.6 tonnes of gold will be after this most recent episode confirming that gold is precisely money. And all this happening despite gold's complete and thorough inedibility.

From News Egypt, google translated from the Arabic:


Authority announced today the state of emergency to re-examine the expulsion of 59 gold and foreign currencies was on its way out of Egypt on the path of smuggling after the discovery of tearing some pillow cases before they are shipped to the Netherlands.

The workers were shipping on the plane heading to Amsterdam, the Netherlands were surprised to tear bags under the 59 parcels containing large quantities of gold and foreign currencies worth tens of millions were reported to officials.

Committee was formed headed by one official of the Egyptian banks have been re-examine the packages and parcels to make sure that shortages and supervise the shipment on the plane.

http://www.zerohedge.com/article/egypt-proactively-preparing-tunisian-style-rioting-airport-intercepts-59-outbound-gold-shipm

If this was Egypt's ruling elites shipping valuables out of the country prior to their own flight to a "safe haven", one would have expected the gold to have made it through customs and not been intercepted.

I'm not sure what this means.

Magda Hassan
01-23-2011, 12:51 AM
Agreed Jan. Not sure what this means either. Gold can disappear with out trace or interception through diplomatic cover. Which makes me think this is others lower down the food chain taking their gold or are they trying to take some one else's gold and hence the interception.

59 interceptions....Bet that doesn't happen every day at the airport.
Interesting and worth watching.

And there is that Dutch connection again.....

Keith Millea
01-26-2011, 12:36 AM
Published on Tuesday, January 25, 2011 by the Associated Press (http://www.thestar.com/news/world/article/927607--thousands-march-in-egyptian-capital-calling-for-president-s-ouster)

Thousands March in Egyptian Capital Calling for President’s Ouster

by Maggie Michael


CAIRO—Thousands of anti-government protesters, some hurling rocks and climbing atop an armoured police truck, clashed with riot police Tuesday in the centre of Cairo in a Tunisia-inspired demonstration to demand the end of Hosni Mubarak’s nearly 30 years in power.


http://www.commondreams.org/files/article_images/thousandsmarch_cairo.jpgAnti-government protesters demonstrate in downtown Cairo, Egypt Tuesday, Jan. 25, 2011. Hundreds of anti-government protesters marched in the Egyptian capital chanting against President Hosni Mubarak and calling for an end to poverty. (AP Photo/Mohammed Abu Zaid)

Police responded with blasts from a water cannon and set upon protesters with batons and acrid clouds of tear gas.
Tuesday’s demonstration, the largest Egypt has seen for years, began peacefully, with police showing unusual restraint in what appeared to be a concerted government effort not to provoke a Tunisia-like mass revolt.

As the crowds in downtown Cairo’s main Tahrir square continued to build, however, security personnel changed tactics and the protest turned violent.

Demonstrators attacked the police water canon truck, opening the driver’s door and ordering the man out of the vehicle. Some hurled rocks and dragged metal barricades. Officers beat back protesters with batons as they tried to break cordons to join the main downtown demonstrators.

To the north, in the Mediterranean port city of Alexandria, thousands of protesters also marched in what was dubbed a “Day of Rage” against Mubarak and calling for an end to the country’s grinding poverty.

The protests coincided with a national holiday honouring the country’s much-feared police. In another parallel with the Tunisia protests, the calls for rallies went out on Facebook and Twitter, with 90,000 saying they would attend.
The demonstrators in Cairo sang the national anthem and carried banners denouncing Mubarak and widespread fraud in the country’s elections. The organizers said the protests were a “day of revolution against torture, poverty, corruption and unemployment.”

Mothers carrying babies marched and chanted “Revolution until Victory!” while young men parked their cars on the main street and waved signs reading “OUT!” inspired by the Tunisian protestations of “DEGAGE!” this week. Men were seen spraying graffiti reading “Down with Hosni Mubarak.”
“We want to see change just like in Tunisia,” said Lamia Rayan, 24, one of the protesters.

© 2011 Associated Press

More at link below with video and updates.

http://www.commondreams.org/further/2011/01/25-5

Magda Hassan
01-26-2011, 12:49 AM
I've heard that 2 protesters and 1 police have died. The government there is also attempting to block Twitter.

David Guyatt
01-26-2011, 09:42 AM
Is this yet another "colour" revolution being perpetrated I wonder?

Peter Lemkin
01-26-2011, 10:14 AM
I've heard that 2 protesters and 1 police have died. The government there is also attempting to block Twitter.

The [at least] three deaths are confirmed and Twitter announced their site is not working today in Egypt.

[and while off-topic, it seems an apt time to remind those of us in the English-skreaking Countries]: when they declare Martial Law in our Nations, they'll shut down all types of electronic communications, as well...so be prepared with drums or carrier pigeons or......:noblesteed::panic:

Peter Lemkin
01-28-2011, 12:28 PM
From today's Guardian:

The Egyptian dissident Mohamed ElBaradei warned President Hosni Mubarak today that his regime is on its last legs, as tens of thousands of people prepared to take to the streets for a fourth day of anti-government protests.

The Nobel peace prize winner's comments to the Guardian represented his strongest intervention against the country's authoritarian government since he announced his intention to return to Egypt to join the protests. "I'm sending a message to the Guardian and to the world that Egypt is being isolated by a regime on its last legs," he said.

His words marked an escalation of the language he used on arrival in Cairo last night, when he merely urged the Mubarak government to "listen to the people" and not to use violence.

ElBaradei has been criticised by some Egyptians for the late return to his homeland, two days after the protests began – hundreds of people have already been arrested and exposed to the brutal tactics of the security services. But ElBaradei was keen to stress his solidarity with the protesters.

"There is of course a risk to my safety today, but it's a risk worth taking when you see your country in such a state you have to take risks," he said. "I will be with the people today."

In an apparent bid to scupper the protests, the Egyptian authorities have cut off almost all access to the internet from inside and outside the country. ElBaradei said the move was proof the government was in "a state of panic".

"Egypt today is in a pre-information age," he said. "The Egyptians are in solitary confinement – that's how unstable and uncomfortable the regime is. Being able to communicate is the first of our human rights and it's being taken away from us. I haven't seen this in any other country before."

He said the lack of communications could hamper organisation of the demonstrations, planned to begin after Friday prayers. "I don't know what my hopes are for today," he said. "It would be hard with the communications cut off but I think a lot of people will be turning out." Organisers of the marches – dubbed "the Friday of anger and freedom" – are defying a government ban on protests issued on Wednesday. They have been using social media to co-ordinate plans, and hope to rally even more than the tens of thousands who turned out on Tuesday in the biggest protests since 1977.

ElBaradei has already criticised the US secretary of state, Hillary Clinton, for describing the Egyptian government as stable and he stepped up his calls for the rest of the world to explicitly condemn Mubarak, who is a close ally of the US.

"The international community must understand we are being denied every human right day by day," he said. "Egypt today is one big prison. If the international community does not speak out it will have a lot of implications. We are fighting for universal values here. If the west is not going to speak out now, then when?"

Magda Hassan
01-28-2011, 12:39 PM
2 Policemen were arrested also for refusing to fire live ammunition at protesters. Hopefully more will also turn to the people.

Peter Lemkin
01-28-2011, 12:55 PM
2 Policemen were arrested also for refusing to fire live ammunition at protesters. Hopefully more will also turn to the people.

It will take some time, by word of mouth, as much of electronic communication is down, but my feeling is that when they hear that El Baradei was arrested, there will REALLY be some BIG demonstrations. He is a possible Presidential candidate and famous and respected outside of Egypt. It is only a matter of time now...but my bet is the USA will back the wrong side. While the police are important, the military is more problematic....as they get HUGE amounts of $$$ and training from their Uncle Sammy, who took over after the Nazi's helped after the War.

Peter Lemkin
01-28-2011, 01:02 PM
Mohamed Mustafa ElBaradei (Arabic: محمد مصطفى البرادعي‎, transliteration: Muḥammad Muṣṭafa al-Barādaʿī, Egyptian Arabic: [mæˈħæmːæd mosˈtˤɑfɑ (ʔe)lbæˈɾædʕi]; born June 17, 1942) was the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), an inter-governmental organisation under the auspices of the United Nations from December 1997 to November 2009. An Egyptian,[3] ElBaradei prefers the Latin writing of his name to be spelled ElBaradei rather than hyphenated (El-Baradei). ElBaradei and the IAEA were jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2005.Contents [hide]
1 Family
2 Early career
3 Public career as IAEA Director General
3.1 First term as director general
3.2 Second term as director general
3.3 Third and final term as director general
3.4 Comments on no fourth term
3.5 Role in addressing the nuclear program of Iran
3.5.1 Statements to the media
3.5.2 Reactions to Elbaradei's role in addressing the nuclear program of Iran
3.6 Multinational control of the nuclear fuel cycle
3.7 Technical Cooperation and cancer control
4 Possible presidential candidacy
5 Awards
5.1 2005 Nobel Peace Prize
5.2 Other awards and recognition
6 References
7 External links
7.1 Nomination of ElBaradei

[edit]
Family

ElBaradei was born and raised in Cairo, Egypt. He was one of five children of Mostafa ElBaradei, an attorney who headed the Egyptian Bar Association and often found himself at odds with the regime of Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser. ElBaradei's father was also a supporter of democratic rights in Egypt, supporting a free press and a legal system that was independent.[4] ElBaradei followed in his father's footsteps and earned his law degree at the University of Cairo in 1962.[5]

ElBaradei is married to Aida El-Kachef, an early childhood teacher. Their daughter, Laila, is a lawyer and lives in London.
[edit]
Early career

ElBaradei earned a Bachelor's degree in law from the University of Cairo in 1962, followed by a DEA degree in International Law at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva and a PhD in International Law at the New York University School of Law in 1974.

His diplomatic career began in 1964 in the Egyptian Ministry of External affairs, where he served in the Permanent Missions of Egypt to the United Nations in New York and in Geneva, in charge of political, legal, and arms control issues. From 1974 to 1978, he was a special assistant to the Egyptian Foreign Minister. In 1980, he became a senior fellow in charge of the International Law Program at the United Nations Institute for Training and Research. From 1981 to 1987, he was also an Adjunct Professor of International Law at New York University School of Law.

In 1984, ElBaradei became a senior staff member of the IAEA Secretariat, serving as the Agency's legal adviser (1984 to 1993) and Assistant Director General for External Relations (1993 to 1997).

ElBaradei is a current member of the International Law Association and the American Society of International Law.
[edit]
Public career as IAEA Director General

ElBaradei began serving as Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency on December 1, 1997, succeeding Hans Blix of Sweden.[6][7] He was re-elected for two more four-year terms in 2001 and 2005. His third and last term ended in November 2009. Elbaradei's tenure has been marked by high profile non-proliferation issues including the inspections in Iraq preceding the March 2003 invasion and tensions over the nuclear program of Iran.
[edit]
First term as director general

Meeting with Vladimir Putin in Moscow

After being appointed by the General Conference in 1997, Elbaradei said in his speech that: “for international organisations to enjoy the confidence and support of their members, they have to be responsive to their needs; show concrete achievements; conduct their activities in a cost-effective manner; and respect a process of equitable representation, transparency, and open dialogue.”[8]

Just a couple of months before Dr. Elbaradei took office, the Model Additional Protocol was adopted, creating a new environment for IAEA verification by giving it greater authority to look for undeclared nuclear activities. When in office, Elbaradei launched a programme to establish “integrated safeguards” combining the IAEA’s comprehensive safeguards agreements with the newly adopted Additional Protocol. In his statement to the General Conference in 1998, he called upon all states to conclude the Additional Protocol saying: “One of the main purposes of the strengthened safeguards system can be better achieved with global adherence. I would therefore urge all States with outstanding safeguards agreements to conclude them and I would also urge all States to accelerate their consideration of the Model Additional Protocol and enter into consultations with the Agency at the earliest possible opportunity. We should work together to ensure that by the year 2000 all States have concluded outstanding safeguards agreements and also the Additional Protocol”. Elbaradei repeated this call through his years as the Director General of the IAEA. In November 2009, 93 countries had Additional Protocols in force.[9]

Elbaradei’s first term ended in November 2001, just two months after the terrorist attacks of 9/11. These attacks made clear that more needed to be done to protect nuclear material and installations against theft or a terrorist attack. As a consequence, ElBaradei established a nuclear security programme to combat the risk of nuclear terrorism by assisting States in strengthening the physical protection of their nuclear and radioactive material and installations. The Nuclear Security Fund.[10]
[edit]
Second term as director general

One of the major issues during ElBaradei’s second term as the Director General of the IAEA was the Agency’s inspections in Iraq. ElBaradei disputed the US rationale for the 2003 invasion of Iraq from the time of the 2002 Iraq disarmament crisis, when he, along with Hans Blix, led a team of UN weapons inspectors in Iraq. ElBaradei told the UN Security Council in March 2003 that documents purporting to show that Iraq had tried to acquire uranium from Niger were not authentic.

ElBaradei described the U.S. invasion of Iraq as "a glaring example of how, in many cases, the use of force exacerbates the problem rather than solving it."[11] ElBaradei further said "we learned from Iraq that an inspection takes time, that we should be patient, that an inspection can, in fact, work,"[12] and that he had "been validated" in concluding that Saddam Hussein had not revived his nuclear weapons program.[13]

In a 2004 op-ed piece on the dangers of nuclear proliferation, in the New York Times (February 12, 2004), ElBaradei stated "We must abandon the unworkable notion that it is morally reprehensible for some countries to pursue weapons of mass destruction, yet morally acceptable for others to rely on them for security - and indeed to continue to refine their capacities and postulate plans for their use."[14] He went on to say "If the world does not change course, we risk self-destruction."
[edit]
Third and final term as director general

The United States initially voiced opposition to his election to a third four-year term in 2005.[15] In a May 2005 interview with the staff of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Lawrence Wilkerson, the chief of staff to former Secretary of State Colin Powell, charged former Undersecretary of State for Arms Control and International Security John Bolton with an underhanded campaign to unseat ElBaradei.[16] “Mr. Bolton overstepped his bounds in his moves and gyrations to try to keep [ElBaradei] from being reappointed as [IAEA] head,” Wilkerson said. The Washington Post reported in December 2004 that the Bush administration had intercepted dozens of ElBaradei’s phone calls with Iranian diplomats and was scrutinizing them for evidence they could use to force him out.[16] IAEA spokesman Mark Gwozdecky said the agency worked on "the assumption that one or more entities may be listening to our conversations". "It's not how we would prefer to work, but it is the reality. At the end of the day, we have nothing to hide," he said. Iran responded to the Washington Post reports by accusing the United States of violating international law in intercepting the communications.[17]

The United States was the only country to oppose ElBaradei's reappointment and eventually failed to win enough support from other countries to oust ElBaradei. On 9 June 2005, after a meeting between US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and ElBaradei, the United States dropped its objections. Among countries that supported Elbaradei was China, Russia, Germany and France. China praised his leadership and objectivity.[15] and supported him for doing "substantial fruitful work, which has maintained the agency's role and credit in international non-proliferation and promoted the development of peaceful use of nuclear energy. His work has been universally recognized in the international community. China appreciates Mr. El Baradei's work and supports his reelection as the agency's director-general."[18] France, Germany, and some developing countries, have made clear their support for ElBaradei as well.[16] Russia issued a strong statement in favor of re-electing him as soon as possible.

ElBaradei was unanimously re-appointed by the IAEA Board on 13 June 2005.[19]
[edit]
Comments on no fourth term

In 2008, ElBaradei said he would not be seeking a fourth term as director general.[20] ElBaradei said he was "not available for a further term" in office in an IAEA document.[21] In its first five rounds of voting, the IAEA Board of Governors split on a decision of who should next fill the role of Director General. ElBaradei said, "I just hope that the agency has a candidate acceptable to all...north, south, east, west because that is what is needed."[22] After several rounds of voting, on 3 July 2009, Mr. Yukiya Amano, Japanese Ambassador to the International Atomic Energy Agency, was elected as the next IAEA Director General.
[edit]
Role in addressing the nuclear program of Iran
Main article: Nuclear program of Iran

In his last speech to the IAEA Board of Governors in June 2009, ElBaradei stated that “the Agency has been able to continue to verify the non-diversion of declared nuclear material in Iran." He regretted, however, that "Iran has not implemented any of the measures called for by the Security Council and by the Agency's Board of Governors”. ElBaradei also said he was encouraged “by the new initiative of the United States to engage the Islamic Republic of Iran in direct dialogue, without preconditions and on the basis of mutual respect” and expressed hope “that Iran will respond to the US initiative with an equal gesture of goodwill and trust-building.” This gesture “could include implementing again the Agency's design information requirements and applying the provisions of the additional protocol.”

The International Atomic Energy Agency Board of Governors and UN Security Council have commended the ElBaradei for "professional and impartial efforts" to resolve all outstanding issues with Iran.[23][24] The Non-Aligned Movement has also reiterated "its full confidence in the impartiality and professionalism of the Secretariat of the IAEA."[25][26]
[edit]
Statements to the media

In an interview with CNN in May 2007, Dr ElBaradei gave one of his sternest warnings against using military action against Iran, a state signatory to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. Referring to "the extreme people who have extreme views" he said, "you do not want to give additional argument to some of the 'new crazies' who want to say let us go and bomb Iran."[27]

New York Times columnist Roger Cohen interviewed ElBaradei in April 2009. ElBaradei is quoted as saying, “Israel would be utterly crazy to attack Iran." He considers an attack on Iran's nuclear facilities would "turn the region into a ball of fire and put Iran on a crash course for nuclear weapons with the support of the whole Muslim world.”[28] ElBaradei believes the nuclear non-proliferation regime has "lost its legitimacy in the eyes of Arab public opinion because of the perceived double-standard" in relation to Israel's nuclear weapons program.[29]

In an interview with French newspaper Le Monde, ElBaradei said "I want to get people away from the idea that Iran will be a threat from tomorrow, and that we are faced right now with the issue of whether Iran should be bombed or allowed to have the bomb. We are not at all in that situation. Iraq is a glaring example of how, in many cases, the use of force exacerbates the problem rather than solving it."[11]

On October 4, 2009, the Xinhua News Agency reported that "At a joint press conference with Iran's Atomic Energy Organization chief Ali Akbar Salehi in Tehran, ElBaradei brought Israel under spotlight and said that the Tel Aviv regime has refused to allow inspections into its nuclear installations for 30 years, the report said.
'Israel is the number one threat to the Middle East given the nuclear arms it possesses,' ElBaradei was quoted as saying."[30]

In an interview published on July 12, 2010 in the German magazine Der Spiegel, ElBaradei said "I do not believe that the Iranians are actually producing nuclear weapons. [...] in general, the danger of a nuclear-armed Iran is overestimated, some even play it up intentionally.[31]
[edit]
Reactions to Elbaradei's role in addressing the nuclear program of Iran

Former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice has indirectly criticized ElBaradei for, in her perception, "muddying the message" to Iran and has also said "the IAEA is not in the business of diplomacy. The IAEA is a technical agency that has a board of governors of which the United States is a member." In response to Rice's comments, a senior official from the agency said "the IAEA is only doing now what the U.N. Security Council asked us to do."[32] ElBaradei notes that Rice said "from the U.S. perspective, I served with distinction",[33] and Rice has further said she appreciated his "stewardship of the nonproliferation regime".[34]

Former Prime Minister and current President of Israel Shimon Peres has said, "there are holes in the (IAEA) apparatus for deterring a culture of nuclear weapons, as in the case with Iran, but the agency certainly has done much in the prevention of nuclear weapons from reaching dangerous hands."[35] In a different reaction, former Israeli Deputy Prime Minister Shaul Mofaz has called for ElBaradei to be impeached.[36]

In September 2007, French Foreign Minister Bernard Kouchner, has warned the potential dangers of a nuclear Iran. He stated: "We have to prepare for the worst, and the worst is war."[37] In response to Kouchner, ElBaredei characterized talk of attacking Iran as "hype", and dismissed the notion of a possible attack on Iran. He referred to the war in Iraq, where "70,000 innocent civilians have lost their lives on the suspicion that a country has nuclear weapons."[38] He further added "I do not believe at this stage that we are facing a clear and present danger that requires we go beyond diplomacy."[39]

Iran points out that ElBaradei has highlighted the lack of evidence to prove Iran is after a nuclear bomb[40][41] and that ElBaradei says Iran is meeting its obligations to allow inspectors into its nuclear sites. Iran further says that the IAEA chief has consistently verified non-diversion in Iran's nuclear program and has said that his investigations show no military aspect in Iran's program.[42][43] According to the Tehran Times political desk, ElBaradei has reaffirmed in December 2008 that Iran's nuclear activities are "legal".[44][45]

Dr. Kaveh L Afrasiabi, author of After Khomeini: New Directions in Iran's Foreign Policy, said ElBaradei has been downplaying Iran's cooperation for some time, raising the ire of Tehran. Afrasiabi further says ElBaradei has given himself "the license to speculate on the timeline when Iran could convert its peaceful nuclear work into weaponization" which is irresponsible and inconsistent with his statements on other states.[46]

ElBaradei and Colin Powell

The Non-Aligned Movement has also reiterated "its full confidence in the impartiality and professionalism of the Secretariat of the IAEA." "NAM recognizes the IAEA as the sole competent authority for verification and expresses its full confidence in the professionalism and impartiality of the IAEA. In this regard, NAM strongly believes that all issues on safeguards and verification, including those of Iran, should be resolved only by the agency, within its framework, and be based on technical and legal grounds," the Non-Alignment movement said in another statement.[25][47]
[edit]
Multinational control of the nuclear fuel cycle

In an op-ed he wrote for The Economist in 2003, Mohamed Elbaradei outlined his idea for the future of the nuclear fuel cycle. His suggestion was to “limit the processing of weapon-usable material in civilian nuclear programmes, as well as the production of new material by agreeing to restrict these operations exclusively to facilities under multinational control.” Also, “nuclear-energy systems should be deployed that, by design, avoid the use of materials that may be applied directly to making nuclear weapons”. He concluded by saying that “considerable advantages would be gained from international co-operation in these stages of the nuclear fuel cycle. These initiatives would not simply add more non-proliferation controls, to limit access to weapon-usable nuclear material; they would also provide access to the benefits of nuclear technology for more people in more countries.”[48]

Non-nuclear weapon states have been reluctant to embrace these proposals because of a perception that the commercial or strategic interests of nuclear weapon states motivated the proposals, a perception that the proposals produce a dependency on a limited number of nuclear fuel suppliers, and a concern that the proposal restricts their unalienable right to nuclear energy for peaceful purposes.[49]
[edit]
Technical Cooperation and cancer control

Mohamed ElBaradei’s work does not only concentrate on nuclear verification. Another very important aspect is development through nuclear technology. In 2004, ElBaradei initiated a comprehensive global initiative to fight cancer known as the Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT). In one of his statements Elbaradei said: “A silent crisis in cancer treatment persists in developing countries and is intensifying every year. At least 50 to 60 per cent of cancer victims can benefit from radiotherapy, but most developing countries do not have enough radiotherapy machines or sufficient numbers of specialized doctors and other health professionals.” In the first year of operation, PACT undertook to build cancer treatment capacity in seven member states, using the IAEA's share of the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize award.[50]

In his speech to the 2008 General Conference, ElBaradei said that “development activities remain central to our work. Our resources have long been insufficient to keep pace with requests for support, and we have increasingly made use of partnerships with other organizations, regional collaborations and country to country support. I again emphasise that technical cooperation is not a bargaining chip, part of a political 'balance' between the development and safeguards activities of the Agency.”[51]
[edit]
Possible presidential candidacy
Main articles: Egyptian presidential election, 2011, National Association for Change, Mohamed ElBaradei presidential campaign, 2011, and People's campaign to support ElBaradei

ElBaradei's name has been circulated by opposition groups since 2009 as a possible candidate to succeed President Hosni Mubarak in Egypt's highest executive position.[52][53][54]

ElBaradei did not make any clear statements regarding his intentions to run for the office, however he has demanded that certain conditions have to be met to ensure fair elections accompanied by changes to the constitution that will allow more freedom for independent candidates before he would actually consider running for presidency. Several opposition groups and parties have endorsed him, considering him a neutral figure who could transition the country to greater democracy.

On 24 February 2010, ElBaradei met with several opposition leaders and notable intellectuals at his home in Cairo. The meeting was concluded with an announcement for the formation of a new non-party-political movement called "National Association for Change". The movement aims for general reforms in the political scene and mainly article 76 of the Egyptian constitution, which places restrictions on true free presidential elections, especially when it comes to independent candidates. The banned political group the Muslim Brotherhood were represented by one of their key figures who attended the meeting, however their stand in accepting a non-member of their group as a candidate is yet unclear. It is also unknown whether Amr Moussa, the head of the Arab League who met with ElBaradei a day earlier, will be part of the new movement.[55]

While speaking at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government on 27 April 2010, ElBaradei joked that he was "looking for a job" and is seeking to be an "agent of change and an advocate for democracy" within Egyptian politics. He also made clear that his wife is not very enthusiastic about any potential run.[56]

On January 27 2011, Mohamed ElBaradei returned to Egypt amid ongoing turmoil, with the biggest mass protests in 30 years. ElBaradei declared himself ready to lead a transitional government if that was the will of the nation, saying that: "If [people] want me to lead the transition, I will not let them down".[57] He was subsequently arrested.
[edit]
Awards

During his tenure as director general of the International Atomic Energy Agency, Dr. ElBaradei has been recognized with many awards for his efforts to ensure that nuclear energy is used for peaceful purposes.
[edit]
2005 Nobel Peace Prize

On October 7, 2005, ElBaradei and the IAEA itself were announced as joint recipients of the Nobel Peace Prize for their "efforts to prevent nuclear energy from being used for military purposes and to ensure that nuclear energy, for peaceful purposes, is used in the safest possible way". ElBaradei donated all his winnings to building orphanages in his home city of Cairo. The IAEA's winnings are being spent on training scientists from developing countries to use nuclear techniques in combating cancer and malnutrition. ElBaradei is the fourth ethnic Egyptian to receive the Nobel Prize, following Ahmed Zewail (1999 in Chemistry), Anwar Sadat (1978 in Peace) and Naguib Mahfouz (1988 in Literature).

In his Nobel Speech, ElBaradei said that the changing landscape of nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament may be defined by the emergence of an extensive black market in nuclear material and equipment, the proliferation of nuclear weapons and sensitive nuclear technology, and the stagnation in nuclear disarmament. To combat proliferation, ElBaradei has suggested keeping nuclear and radiological material out of the hands of extremist groups, tightening control over the operations for producing the nuclear material that could be used in weapons, and accelerating disarmament efforts.[58] Dr. ElBaradei also stated that only 1% of the money spent on developing new weapons would be enough to feed the entire world and that, if we hope to escape self-destruction, then nuclear weapons should have no place in our collective conscience, and no role in our security. Nobel Lecture.

United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan said he was delighted that the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize had been awarded to the UN nuclear watchdog and its head ElBaradei. "The secretary-general congratulates him and the entire staff of the agency, past and present, on their contributions to global peace," a spokesman for Annan said.[59]
[edit]
Other awards and recognition

ElBaradei in the 45th Munich Security Conference 2009

ElBaradei has received many awards for his work as director of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Some of these awards include:
The Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Award (2006)[60]
The James Park Morton Interfaith Award[61]
The Golden Plate award from the American Academy of Achievement[61]
The Jit Trainor award from Georgetown University for distinction in the conduct of diplomacy[62]
The Human Security award from the Muslim Public Affairs Council[63]
The Prix de la Fondation award from the Crans Montana Forum[64]
The El Athir award, Algeria's highest national distinction[65]
The Golden Dove of Peace prize from the President of Italy[66]
Honorary Patron of Trinity's University Philosophical Society (2006), following in the foot steps of previous Nobel Peace Prize Winners Desmond Tutu and John Hume[67]
Greatest Nile Collar, the highest Egyptian civilian decoration, awarded by the Government of Egypt[66]
Award for Distinguished Contribution to the Peaceful Worldwide Use of Nuclear Technology, awarded by The World Nuclear Association in September 2007[68]
The Mostar 2007 international peace award of the Mostar Center for Peace and Multiethnic Cooperation[69]
The 2008 "Peacebuilding Award" of the EastWest Institute[70][71]
The International Seville NODO Prize for Peace, Security and Inter-Cultural Dialogue[72]
The 2008 Indira Gandhi Prize for Peace, Disarmament and Development[73]
The 2009 Delta Prize for Global Understanding, sponsored by the University of Georgia and Delta Airlines[74]
The XIV International Grupo Compostela-Xunta de Galicia Prize

ElBaradei has also received honorary doctoral degrees from: the University of Dublin, Trinity College; New York University; the University of Maryland; the American University in Cairo; the Free Mediterranean University (LUM) in Bari, Italy; Soka University of Japan; Tsinghua University of Beijing; the Polytechnic University of Bucharest; the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid; Konkuk University in Seoul; the University of Florence; the University of Buenos Aires; the National University of Cuyo in Argentina; Amherst College and Cairo University.[75]
[edit]
References
^ "Outgoing IAEA Chief Leaves Complex Legacy". The New York Times. 2009-12-01. Retrieved 2009-12-01.[dead link]

ElBaradei, who describes himself as having a Muslim background, sometimes cites his favorite Christian prayer when speaking of his role on the world stage.
^ "MPAC Honors Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei, Director General of IAEA, for Bolstering Human Security". Muslim Public Affairs Council. 2006-10-31. Retrieved 2009-12-01.[dead link]
^ Encyclopedia Britannica
^ Notable Biographies: Mohamed ElBaradei
^ Academy of Achievement: Mohamed ElBaradei (Biography)
^ IAEA Board Reappoints Director General Mohamed ElBaradei
^ IAEA: IAEA Board Meeting on Director General Appointment
^ ElBaradei, Mohamed (1997-09-29). "Strengthened Safeguards System: Status of Additional Protocols". IAEA. Retrieved 2009-12-01.
^ "Strengthened Safeguards System: Status of Additional Protocols". IAEA. 2009-11-26. Retrieved 2009-12-01.
^ ElBaradei, Mohamed (2005-09-23). "Nuclear Security - Measures to Protect Against Nuclear Terrorism". IAEA. Retrieved 2009-12-01.
^ a b Boyle, Jon (October 22, 2007). "Iran seen to need 3-8 yrs to produce bomb". Reuters. Retrieved 2008-06-21.
^ CNN: Iraq war wasn't justified, U.N. weapons experts say
^ Washington Post: U.N. Nuclear Agency Chief Urges Iran to Suspend Activities
^ ElBaradei, Mohamed (2004-12-02). "Saving Ourselves from Self Destruction". IAEA. Retrieved 2008-06-21.
^ a b Voice of America: IAEA Postpones Decision on ElBaradei's Third Term
^ a b c Arms Control Today: ElBaradei Set to Win Third Term
^ BBC: ElBaradei 'has nothing to hide'
^ Foreign Ministry Spokesperson Liu Jianchao's Press Conference on 16 December 2004
^ "US agrees to back UN nuclear head". BBC News. 9 June 2005. Retrieved 2008-06-21.
^ International Herald Tribune: IAEA chief ElBaradei will not seek fourth term
^ Voice of America: IAEA Chief ElBaradei Will Not Seek Another Term
^ Reuters: 5-Vote impasse reopens race to head UN atom watchdog
^ International Atomic Energy Agency: Implementation of the NPT Safeguards Agreement in the Islamic Republic of Iran (2006-14)
^ International Atomic Energy Agency: UN Security Council: Resolution 1747 (2007)
^ a b XinhuaNet: Non-aligned nations voice support deal between IAEA, Iran
^ Singapore Ministry of Foreign Affairs: Report Of The IAEA Director-General to the Board of Governors GOV/2008/15
^ "Transcript of Interview with IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei". CNN Late Edition with Wolf Blitzer. 28 October 2007. Retrieved 2008-06-21.
^ http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/13/opinion/13iht-edcohen.html?ref=opinion Realpolitik for Iran
^ Reuters: Israel seen undermining disarmament ElBaradei
^ http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2009-10/04/content_12181647.htm
^ Der Spiegel: Interview with Mohamed ElBaradei, 12 July 2010. Accessed 15 July 2010.
^ Rice: ElBaradei "muddying the message" and Agency "not in the business of diplomacy"
^ Arms Control Association: "Tackling the Nuclear Dilemma: An Interview With IAEA Director-General Mohamed ElBaradei"
^ U.S. State Department: Remarks With International Atomic Energy Agency Director General Mohamed ElBaradei After Meeting
^ Jerusalem Post: IAEA, ElBaradei share Nobel Peace Prize
^ "Israel minister: Sack ElBaradei". BBC News. 8 November 2007. Retrieved 2008-06-21.
^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/6997935.stm France warning of war with Iran
^ IAEA boss warns against Iran attack UK Press Google, accessed September 22, 2007.
^ ElBaradei concerned over Iran row, BBC News, Sep. 17, 2007
^ PressTV: ElBaradei: Iran not after bomb
^ Atlantic Free Press: Threats of War Against Iran Continue to Escalate
^ PressTV: Soltaniyeh: Nothing new in ElBaradei's report
^ France24: ElBaradei: 'No evidence Iran is making nuclear weapons'
^ Tehran Times: ElBaradei says Iran’s nuclear program is legal: report
^ Mehr News: ElBaradei says Iran’s nuclear program is legal: report
^ Asia Times: IAEA 'mismanagement' raises Tehran's ire
^ South African Government: Notes following briefing by Deputy Minister Aziz Pahad on current international issues, Union Building, Pretoria - Iran
^ ElBaradei, Mohamed (2003-10-16). "Towards a Safer World". The Economist. Retrieved 2009-12-01.
^ American Society of International Law: The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons: Taking Stock after the May 2008 Preparatory Committee Meeting
^ "IAEA Nobel Peace Prize Cancer and Nutrition Fund". IAEA. May 2006. Retrieved 2009-12-01.
^ ElBaradei, Mohamed (2008-09-29). "IAEA At a Crossroads (Abridged Version)". IAEA. Retrieved 2009-12-01.
^ "Egyptian opposition wants ElBaradei to run for president". Tehran Times. October 8, 2009.
^ "El Baradei to run for president of Egypt?". Daily Times. October 7, 2009.
^ "Arab League chief refuses to rule out Egypt presidential bid". Earth Times. October 20, 2009.
^ ElBaradei to form 'national association for change'
^ http://www.iop.harvard.edu/Multimedia-Center/All-Videos/Nonproliferation-Arms-Control-Challenges-Opportunities2
^ http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2011/01/27/133275390/el-baradei-back-in-egypt-says-its-time-for-a-new-government
^ The Nobel Foundation: Mohamed ElBaradei, The Nobel Peace Prize 2005
^ Peoples Daily: Int'l community hails IAEA, ElBaradei's winning of Nobel Peace Prize
^ Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Award Laureates since 1982
^ a b Yale University: ElBaradei Will Speak at Yale
^ Carnegie Endowment for International Peace: ElBaradei Remarks at Georgetown University
^ MPAC: Dr. Mohamed Elbaradei to be Presented with MPAC's Human Security Award
^ Arrivée de Graça Machel au Comité d’attribution du Prix Mo Ibrahim
^ American Nuclear Society: 2008 American Nuclear Society National Student Conference
^ a b Amherst: Amherst College To Honor Atomic Agency Head, Princeton President and Five Others at Commencement May 25
^ University Philosophical Society: Honorary Patrons
^ World Nuclear University: Inaugural Ceremony of the World Nuclear University - Part Two
^ Center za mir: "Centar za mir - Mostar"
^ ZERO NUCLEAR'S FOUR STATESMEN, ELBARADEI TO BE HONORED
^ Richard Erdman and the EastWest Institute: Statesman of the Year Award
^ Entrega del IV Premio Sevilla-Nodo
^ Indian Express: ElBaradei chosen for Indira Gandhi Peace Prize
^ University of Georgia: 2009 Delta Prize Recipient
^ IAEA: Biography of Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei
[edit]
External links Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Mohamed ElBaradei
Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Mohamed ElBaradei
Wikinews has news related to:
Mohamed ElBaradei

Annotated Bibliography for Mohamed ElBaradei at the Alsos Digital Library for Nuclear Issues
Biography, news, statements, interviews, multimedia and awards at IAEA
Mohamed ElBaradei at the Internet Movie Database
Mohamed ElBaradei on Charlie Rose
Appearances on C-SPAN
Mohamed ElBaradei collected news and commentary at The New York Times
Works by or about Mohamed ElBaradei in libraries (WorldCat catalog)
Nobel Peace Prize Lecture, video and transcript
The 2005 Nobel Peace Prize, photoessay by Scott London
What Price, Peace?, Mohamed ElBaradei (LL.M '71, J.S.D. '74), NYU Law School, Autumn 2006
Paul C. Warnke Lecture on International Security: A World Free of Nuclear Weapons: Illusion or Possibility, Council on Foreign Relations, November 4, 2009
Posts about Mohamed ElBaradei at uFollow
Full transcript of BBC's interview with Dr ElBaradei - May 2007 CASMII
Washington intercepts ElBaradei phone calls for information to displace him, Washington Post, December 11, 2004
[edit]
Nomination of ElBaradei
ElBaradei: I will run for the presidential elections if it is free and fair
ElBaradei Campaign Starts with a banner (Working together so ElBaradei can be our President)
Wide reactions on ElBaradei's declaration of his candidacy for the presidency
A facebook group dedicated to Nominate Mohamed ElBaradei to the presidency of Egypt in 2011
ElBaradei set conditions to run for Egypt's presidential election
ElBaradei: I joined the opposition in rejecting the inheritance of the Egyptian Presidency, demanding reforms from Mubarak and a new constitution
Did ElBaradei become the youth candidate in the presidential election?
The Egyptian government Campaign against ElBaradei Following his announcement of his intention to run for president
Mufid Shehab (Minister of Legal Affairs): If ElBaradei Considering the presidency of Egypt he is mistaken
Dr. ElBaradei dialogue with Al-Arabiya
ElBaradei In a comprehensive interview with (Al-Shorouk) (1-3): I call on Mubarak to form a committee to draft a new constitution
ElBaradei In a comprehensive interview with (Al-Shorouk) (2-3): The Egyptian people deserve better life than the one they are living
ElBaradei In a comprehensive interview with (Al-Shorouk) (3-3): In Egypt, People are living below the level of the average human life
Wide reactions from ElBaradei's interview with (Al-Shorouk)
ElBaradei's interview with (Al-Shorouk) renew the debate over his personalty and his program
The debate over ElBaradei's interview with (Al-Shorouk) continues
(Al-Shorouk) Readers open hot files with ElBaradei
(Al-Shorouk) Readers open hot files with ElBaradei (2)
Dr. Said Sadiq (Professor of political sociology at the American University): ElBaradei is Modest and civilized .. And the opportunity of him winning is enhanced day after day
(Isaac) calls for a public reception to ElBaradei
(Health Minister) Hatem el-Gabali: ElBaradei is not fit to be president...Gamal is the fittest for the job if his father refuses to run for President
A seminar on sectarian tensions: ElBaradei gave a kiss of life
ElBaradei in Cairo on the first of February

David Guyatt
01-28-2011, 03:05 PM
Forgive this old Limey, but who's running this apparently well orchestrated campaign?

As I said earlier, is it another colour revolution?

What's Uncle's position in all this?

Just asking....

Peter Lemkin
01-28-2011, 06:08 PM
Forgive this old Limey, but who's running this apparently well orchestrated campaign?

As I said earlier, is it another colour revolution?

What's Uncle's position in all this?

Just asking....

My take is that PUBLICLY the USG is playing both sides...but PRIVATELY, Egypt is only second to Israel in military and intel support.....so.....

The color is the color of sand.......it is not named yet, but I vote for the 'Sand Revolution [having been in Cairo during a sandstorm...an amazing and life-changing event].....

It seems we will have to wait a few more days to know. My gut feeling [only based on what little info we get with communications downed by the Egyptian Govt. is that while the Egyptian Govt. and their surrogate, the USG are trying and no doubt to some extent controlling things and have agents provocateurs everywhere, that this is a legit, bottom-up revolution....sadly, as we both know so many that started that way, were co-opted by the forces of evil and repression not long after.....

FWIW

Jeffrey Orling
01-28-2011, 06:30 PM
Most dangerous weapon and most feared by the ruling elite:

The internet and "social media"

Control that and you can destroy an effective mass uprising of the people.

Smoke signals don't cut it these days.

Nor carrier pigeons.

Peter Lemkin
01-28-2011, 07:12 PM
Well, above I agree with J.O., mostly, for once. But when one has no internet, one must use the drum and word of mouth.....etc. Word will get around in Egypt the old-fashioned way.

However, the bigger question is when will the revolution in the streets being in the UK and USA?!?!?! Were that to happen similar wouldn't even be really needed in most countries that now need them....as we hold up those tyrannies and they would collapse the minute we did.

Magda Hassan
01-28-2011, 09:50 PM
Forgive this old Limey, but who's running this apparently well orchestrated campaign?

As I said earlier, is it another colour revolution?

What's Uncle's position in all this?

Just asking....
Not sure either David. The Muslim Brotherhood are likely to be big winners which does not fill me with joy. Uncles Sam looks like they are seeing where the wind will blow and no doubt have a couple of fans handy. They have not come out with unequivocal support for Mubarak but are urging the government to 'respect the human rights' of the people. A bit rich coming from the US who render their ghost prisoners the Egypt to be tortured. In any case the lack of social media connectivity due to the government cutting the internet has made no difference to the protesters who have defied the curfew and come out in even bigger numbers and found ways around that anyway. Many police stations and other security organisations have been burned, there were protesters outside the Hilton Hotel and stock exchange which has closed. No apparent 'leader'. Economics seems to be at the heart of this. Big rises in food prices and fuel prices as in Tunisia. Yemen and Jordan too are in this situation. The Arab gulf states are not. Libya not. But Saudi Arabia will be interesting to watch in the medium term due to high unemployment there. No doubt the elites in Egypt are busing looking for a suitable person to represent them and their best bet is Al Baredi due to him being untainted by the Mubarak party connections. But there are others too and the religious parties, Muslim Brotherhood, are a big contender too.

Mubarak is almost certainly gone. His son, and supposed successor, left the country a few days ago. There has been no communication from the government and their HQ have been torched by protesters. No emergency services went to protect it. On the other hand the military are all over the city but are not attacking the people but are guarding the embassies and museums.

Magda Hassan
01-28-2011, 10:40 PM
Mubarak was just on tv. He has sacked the cabinet and will appoint a new one tomorrow. Pretty poor speech. I doubt that this will satisfy any one in Egypt. Talked a lot about 'freedom' and 'stability' and 'chaos' and sounded like a threat if things continue. Talked about the aspirations of the Egyptian people and all that his government had done but this is clearly not enough or people would not be protesting and he doesn't explain how he has not been able to achieve the needs of the people in 30 years. If he hasn't done it by now it is not going to happen.:flypig:

Magda Hassan
01-29-2011, 04:47 AM
Making sense now of the appearance of the taking head Obama.

US secretly backed Egyptian protest leaders


By Nathan Diebenow (http://www.rawstory.com/rs/author/rawnathan/)
Friday, January 28th, 2011 -- 8:27 pm

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http://www.rawstory.com/images/new/egyptcopprotesterafp.jpgFor the last three years, the US government secretly provided aid to the leaders behind this week's social uprising in Egypt aimed to topple the government of President Hosni Mubarak, according to a leaked diplomatic cable.
One of the young Egyptian leaders who attended a summit for activists in New York with the help of the US embassy in Cairo was detained when he returned to Egypt, the memo released by Wikileaks said (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaandindianocean/egypt/8289698/Egypt-protests-secret-US-document-discloses-support-for-protesters.html).
The Daily Telegraph reported (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaandindianocean/egypt/8289686/Egypt-protests-Americas-secret-backing-for-rebel-leaders-behind-uprising.html) Friday that it and the secrets outlet were both hiding the identity of this young Egyptian leader. He was arrested in connection with this week's demonstrations.
The leaked document indicates that the US government was publicly supporting Mubarak's government while privately backing opposition groups.
A plan concocted by the dissident groups to oust Mubarak and install a democratic government prior to the September 2011 elections was relayed to the American Embassy in Cairo.

Margaret Scobey, the US Ambassador in Cairo, said in the memo to the US Secretary of State in Washington D.C. that she questioned the likelihood that such an action would happen.
Other cables revealed, however, the US diplomats had sought out the opposition groups, one of whose members attended a youth summit in Washington organized by the State Department.
This week's protests in Egypt were instigated by a group of young, educated Egyptians known as the "April 6 youth movement," which has a presence on the social network site Facebook.
The Scobey memo was labeled "April 6 activist on his US visit and regime change in Egypt."
The Egyptian government has blacked out the Internet (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/01/28/this-is-what-egypts-cutoff-from-the-net-looks-like_n_815335.html) and other telecommunications in a move to quell the protester's organization.
in a brief television appearance Friday, US President Barack Obama called on President Mubarak to restore telecommunications to the Egyptian people and on both sides to refrain from violence (http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/01/obama-called-egypts-government-refrain-violence/).
http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/01/secretly-backed-egyptian-protest-leaders/
S E C R E T SECTION 01 OF 02 CAIRO 002572 SIPDIS FOR NEA/ELA, R, S/P

AND H NSC FOR PASCUAL AND KUTCHA-HELBLING E.O. 12958: DECL:

12/30/2028 TAGS: PGOV, PHUM, KDEM, EG SUBJECT: APRIL 6 ACTIVIST ON HIS

U.S. VISIT AND REGIME CHANGE IN EGYPT REF: A. CAIRO 2462 B.

CAIRO 2454 C. CAIRO 2431 Classified By: ECPO A/Mincouns

Catherine Hill-Herndon for reason 1.4 (d ). 1. (C) Summary and
comment: On December 23, April 6 activist xxxxxxxxxxxx expressed
satisfaction with his participation in the December 3-5 \"Alliance of
Youth Movements Summit,\" and with his subsequent meetings with USG
officials, on Capitol Hill, and with think tanks. He described how
State Security (SSIS) detained him at the Cairo airport upon his
return and confiscated his notes for his summit presentation calling
for democratic change in Egypt, and his schedule for his Congressional
meetings. xxxxxxxxxxxx contended that the GOE will never undertake
significant reform, and therefore, Egyptians need to replace the
current regime with a parliamentary democracy. He alleged that
several opposition parties and movements have accepted an unwritten
plan for democratic transition by 2011; we are doubtful of this claim.
xxxxxxxxxxxx said that although SSIS recently released two April 6
activists, it also arrested three additional group members. We have
pressed the MFA for the release of these April 6 activists. April 6's
stated goal of replacing the current regime with a parliamentary
democracy prior to the 2011 presidential elections is highly
unrealistic, and is not supported by the mainstream opposition. End
summary and comment. ---------------------------- Satisfaction with
the Summit ---------------------------- 2. (C) xxxxxxxxxxxx expressed
satisfaction with the December 3-5 \"Alliance of Youth Movements
Summit\" in New York, noting that he was able to meet activists from
other countries and outline his movement's goals for democratic change
in Egypt. He told us that the other activists at the summit were very
supportive, and that some even offered to hold public demonstrations
in support of Egyptian democracy in their countries, with xxxxxxxxxxxx
as an invited guest. xxxxxxxxxxxx said he discussed with the other
activists how April 6 members could more effectively evade harassment
and surveillance from SSIS with technical upgrades, such as
consistently alternating computer \"simcards.\" However, xxxxxxxxxxxx
lamented to us that because most April 6 members do not own computers,
this tactic would be impossible to implement. xxxxxxxxxxxx was
appreciative of the successful efforts by the Department and the
summit organizers to protect his identity at the summit, and told us
that his name was never mentioned publicly. ------------------- A
Cold Welcome Home ------------------- 3. (S) xxxxxxxxxxxx told us
that SSIS detained and searched him at the Cairo Airport on December
18 upon his return from the U.S. According to xxxxxxxxxxxx, SSIS
found and confiscated two documents in his luggage: notes for his
presentation at the summit that described April 6's demands for
democratic transition in Egypt, and a schedule of his Capitol Hill
meetings. xxxxxxxxxxxx described how the SSIS officer told him that
State Security is compiling a file on him, and that the officer's
superiors instructed him to file a report on xxxxxxxxxxxx most recent
activities. --------------------------------------------- ----------
Washington Meetings and April 6 Ideas for Regime Change
--------------------------------------------- ---------- 4. (C)
xxxxxxxxxxxx described his Washington appointments as positive, saying
that on the Hill he met with xxxxxxxxxxxx, a variety of House staff
members, including from the offices of xxxxxxxxxxxx and xxxxxxxxxxxx),
and with two Senate staffers. xxxxxxxxxxxx also noted that he met
with several think tank members. xxxxxxxxxxxx said that xxxxxxxxxxxx's
office invited him to speak at a late January Congressional hearing on
House Resolution 1303 regarding religious and political freedom in
Egypt. xxxxxxxxxxxx told us he is interested in attending, but
conceded he is unsure whether he will have the funds to make the trip.
He indicated to us that he has not been focusing on his work as a
\"fixer\" for journalists, due to his preoccupation with his U.S.
trip. 5. (C) xxxxxxxxxxxx described how he tried to convince his
Washington interlocutors that the USG should pressure the GOE to
implement significant reforms by threatening to reveal CAIRO 00002572
002 OF 002 information about GOE officials' alleged \"illegal\"
off-shore bank accounts. He hoped that the U.S. and the international
community would freeze these bank accounts, like the accounts of
Zimbabwean President Mugabe's confidantes. xxxxxxxxxxxx said he wants
to convince the USG that Mubarak is worse than Mugabe and that the GOE
will never accept democratic reform. xxxxxxxxxxxx asserted that
Mubarak derives his legitimacy from U.S. support, and therefore
charged the U.S. with \"being responsible\" for Mubarak's \"crimes.\"
He accused NGOs working on political and economic reform of living in
a \"fantasy world,\" and not recognizing that Mubarak -- \"the head of
the snake\" -- must step aside to enable democracy to take root. 6.
(C) xxxxxxxxxxxx claimed that several opposition forces -- including
the Wafd, Nasserite, Karama and Tagammu parties, and the Muslim
Brotherhood, Kifaya, and Revolutionary Socialist movements -- have
agreed to support an unwritten plan for a transition to a
parliamentary democracy, involving a weakened presidency and an
empowered prime minister and parliament, before the scheduled 2011
presidential elections (ref C). According to xxxxxxxxxxxx, the
opposition is interested in receiving support from the army and the
police for a transitional government prior to the 2011 elections.
xxxxxxxxxxxx asserted that this plan is so sensitive it cannot be
written down. (Comment: We have no information to corroborate that
these parties and movements have agreed to the unrealistic plan
xxxxxxxxxxxx has outlined. Per ref C, xxxxxxxxxxxx previously told us
that this plan was publicly available on the internet. End comment.)
7. (C) xxxxxxxxxxxx said that the GOE has recently been cracking down
on the April 6 movement by arresting its members. xxxxxxxxxxxx noted
that although SSIS had released xxxxxxxxxxxx and xxxxxxxxxxxx \"in the
past few days,\" it had arrested three other members. (Note: On
December 14, we pressed the MFA for the release of xxxxxxxxxxxx and
xxxxxxxxxxxx, and on December 28 we asked the MFA for the GOE to
release the additional three activists. End note.) xxxxxxxxxxxx
conceded that April 6 has no feasible plans for future activities.
The group would like to call for another strike on April 6, 2009, but
realizes this would be \"impossible\" due to SSIS interference,
xxxxxxxxxxxx said. He lamented that the GOE has driven the group's
leadership underground, and that one of its leaders, xxxxxxxxxxxx, has
been in hiding for the past week. 8. (C) Comment: xxxxxxxxxxxx
offered no roadmap of concrete steps toward April 6's highly
unrealistic goal of replacing the current regime with a parliamentary
democracy prior to the 2011 presidential elections. Most opposition
parties and independent NGOs work toward achieving tangible,
incremental reform within the current political context, even if they
may be pessimistic about their chances of success. xxxxxxxxxxxx
wholesale rejection of such an approach places him outside this
mainstream of opposition politicians and activists.
SCOBEY02008-12-307386PGOV,PHUM,KDEM,EGAPRIL 6 ACTIVIST ON HIS U.S.
VISIT AND REGIME CHANGE IN EGYPT

Magda Hassan
01-29-2011, 06:35 AM
Egypt: Tor Use Skyrocketing as Users Route-Around Internet Blocks (http://www.readwriteweb.com/hack/2011/01/egypt-tor-use-skyrocketing-as.php)

By Klint Finley (http://www.readwriteweb.com/hack/author/klint-finley.php) / January 28, 2011 10:55 AM / 1 Comments (http://www.readwriteweb.com/hack/2011/01/egypt-tor-use-skyrocketing-as.php#disqus_thread)
Tweet (http://twitter.com/share)
Hacker News






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This post is part of our ReadWriteHack channel, which is a resource and guide for developers. The channel is sponsored by the Intel AppUp Developer Program (http://r1.fmpub.net/?r=http%3A%2F%2Faltfarm.mediaplex.com%2Fad%2Fck%2F 12124-114967-15250-4%3Fmpt%3D1296282670&k4=878&k5=%7Bbanner_id%7D). As you're exploring these resources, check out this helpful resource from our sponsors: AIR for AppUp: What You Need To Know (http://www.readwriteweb.com/hack/articles-and-blogs/air-for-appup---what-you-need/?utm_source=readwritehack&utm_medium=whitepapers_inpost&utm_campaign=whitepapers&utm_content=22394-AIR+for+AppUp+-+What+you+need+to+know)
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http://rww.readwriteweb.netdna-cdn.com/tahrir.jpg As we reported yesterday (http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/complete_internet_blackout_in_egypt.php), the Egyptian government appears to be locking down Intrernet access in Egypt. Access in or out of the country seems to be blocked. GigaOm (http://gigaom.com/2011/01/28/how-egypt-switched-off-the-internet/) provides some analysis on how this might work.
However, some Egyptian Internet users are still able to access the outside Internet. The Washington Post (http://www.readwriteweb.com/hack/2011/01/%3Cbr%20/%3Ehttp://voices.washingtonpost.com/blog-post/2011/01/egyptian_protests_in_egypt.html) lists some ways that Egyptians are still accessing the Internet. Meanwhile, use of Tor (http://www.torproject.org/), a free Internet anonymizer, is skyrocketing.

Here's a graph from the Tor Metrics Portal (http://metrics.torproject.org/):
http://rww.readwriteweb.netdna-cdn.com/hack/images/tor_egypt_0111.png
According to the Post:


Noor Data Networks, the provider used by the Egyptian Stock Excahnge, is unaffected by the Internet blackout.
Some are using dial-up access routed through other countries, though there are reports that some landlines are down.
Some are using virtual private networks.

It's being widely retweeted (http://twitter.com/#%21/patricelamothe/status/30996572158300160) that a French ISP called French Data Network (http://www.readwriteweb.com/hack/2011/01/anonymizing) is offering free dial-up to Egyptians: "Free dialup internet access for egypt : http://www.fdn.fr on +33172890150 login toto password toto #jan25 #egypt MASS RT PLZ"
Many people on Twitter are calling for people in other countries to setup Tor relays (http://www.torproject.org/docs/tor-doc-relay.html.en).
It's probably worth revisiting the failure of Haystack (http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2010/09/haystack/), an interesting but badly flawed attempt at anonymizing Internet traffic. Perhaps this will also rekindle interest in projects like Freenet (http://freenetproject.org/) and Netsukuku (http://netsukuku.freaknet.org/).
http://www.readwriteweb.com/hack/2011/01/egypt-tor-use-skyrocketing-as.php?utm_source=feedburner

Peter Lemkin
01-29-2011, 07:08 AM
Mubarak was just on tv. He has sacked the cabinet and will appoint a new one tomorrow. Pretty poor speech. I doubt that this will satisfy any one in Egypt. Talked a lot about 'freedom' and 'stability' and 'chaos' and sounded like a threat if things continue. Talked about the aspirations of the Egyptian people and all that his government had done but this is clearly not enough or people would not be protesting and he doesn't explain how he has not been able to achieve the needs of the people in 30 years. If he hasn't done it by now it is not going to happen.:flypig:

Horrible speech by any standard and no matter if one likes or hates Mubarak. He hung himself with that speech...though I'd be hard put to find a different version that could have saved him. I predict the whole thing will fall apart within a week and Mubarak is likely making his escape plans and escape 'funds' ready now....I think he sees the writing on the wall and will try one last move and then quit while the quiting is still good [his head still attached to the rest of him]. Sadly, I fear for what will happen after.

Nice find Magda - the cable. If the USA is behind this - or even if they are not - they may soon try to take advantage. They have many many assets there of their own and within Mubarak's secret police who do not wear uniforms and are everywhere. The key will be what the military does....but I fear a military government [of course they'll say it is 'just temporary' until things calm down]........I've seen this movie before and it didn't end well for the average person.

Israel also must be getting their rockets, bombers and nukes ready...I sense, if this spreads to other countries [likely] while it holds the POTENTIAL for democratic change....it also holds the potential for very horrible events in the region with the guidance of 'hidden hands'.

Peter Lemkin
01-29-2011, 08:47 AM
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/video/2011/jan/28/egypt-violent-protests-video?intcmp=239

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3xWiBCIxjIk&NR=1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NHIW9rGDlAA

Peter Lemkin
01-29-2011, 09:41 AM
Arab states: a quagmire of tyranny

Arabs are rebelling not just against decrepit autocrats but the foreign backers who kept them in power

Soumaya Ghannoushi
guardian.co.uk, Friday 28 January 2011 23.00 GMT
Article history

We are witnessing the breakdown of the Arab state after decades of failure and mounting crises. The Arab political establishment has never looked weaker than it does today. It is either dying a protracted silent death, corroded from within, or collapsing in thunderous explosions. Tunisia, which toppled its dictator through popular revolution two weeks ago, is by no means an exception. The symptoms are evident throughout the region, from the accelerating movement of protest in Egypt, Algeria and Jordan, or the increasing polarisation of Lebanon's sectarian politics, to the near-collapse of the state in Yemen and Sudan, and its complete disintegration in Somalia.

The postcolonial Arab state has always carried deficiency as part of its genetic make-up. It had emerged as a substitute for the complex network of local elites, tribal chieftains and religious groupings through which the imperial authorities had maintained their grip; and its mission was the regulation of the indigenous population. This system of indirect control over the region, which assumed its present shape in the aftermath of the first world war, specifically required a "state" that is capable of keeping the local populations under check and maintaining "stability" at home, but too weak to disrupt foreign influence or disturb the regional balance of powers.

The first generation of post-colonial Arab leaders, the likes of Egypt's Nasser and Tunisia's Bourguiba, had been able to soften the repressive nature of the Arab state by virtue of their personal charisma, and promises of progress. With their exit from the stage, and the entry of a new class of colourless autocrats and crude generals, the Arab state lost any cover of legitimacy, and became synonymous with violence and oppression.

Much of the turmoil plaguing the region today is traceable to its diseased political order. Its degeneration has wrought havoc on the social sphere too. It has led to weaker national identities, and to individuals reverting to their narrower sectarian affiliations, sparking conflicts between Sunnis and Shias, Arabs and Kurds, Copts and Muslims. The result has been a growth in extremism, self-insulation, and what the French Lebanese novelist Amin Maalouf calls "killer identities".

Beyond the Arab state's aura of physical might – embodied in its terrifying coercion apparatus – lurks a moral vulnerability and an abysmal dearth of popular allegiance. This paradox has been laid bare by protesters in Tunisia and is in the process of being exposed in Egypt today. These demonstrators are discovering the extreme frailty of the instruments of repression that have long crushed and suffocated them simultaneously, with the staggering power of their collective action on the street. The ousting of Tunisia's tyrant after no more than a month of perpetual protests has handed millions of Arabs the magical key out of the prison of fear behind whose walls they have been incarcerated for decades.

Events in Tunisia, Egypt and – to a lesser extent – Algeria are harbingers of a change long impeded and postponed. Were it not for the international will to maintain the worn out status quo, what happened in eastern Europe and the Soviet Union in the late 1980s could have occurred in the Arab region too. Its decrepit autocrats were allowed to stagger on, shedding their old skins and riding on the wave of rampant economic liberalism, which benefited the narrow interests of ruling families and their associates alone, and thrust the rest into a bottomless pit of poverty and marginalisation.

Arab rulers – aided by their foreign allies – have been able to steal over two decades of their societies' political life. Today they face the hour of truth: either radically transform the structure of authoritarian Arab rule, or depart for ever. The trouble is that an entity that has made coercion its raison d'etre and violence its sole means of survival has left itself no option but to sink deeper in the quagmire of tyranny. And the trouble for its sponsors, who have made its preservation the cornerstone of their "stability" strategy in the region, is that they have now tied their own hands, with no choice but to blindly stick with their "friends" to the last breath.

That is why those demonstrating on Arab streets today feel that they are not only rebelling against a band of corrupt local despots, but against their foreign backers too. And though we cannot predict the future, the likelihood is that just as Latin Americans had seen the fall of many Pinochets in the 1980s, Arabs will witness more Ben Alis before the close of this decade.

Bernice Moore
01-29-2011, 09:49 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/30/world/middleeast/30-egypt.html?partner=rss&emc=rss

Magda Hassan
01-29-2011, 09:57 AM
I've just heard the military have open fired on the renewed protests.

Peter Lemkin
01-29-2011, 10:26 AM
Yeah, it will get very bloody in the next days...but it is inevitable, IMO, Mubarak is finished....what will replace it is unknown. You can be sure the US Deep Political Cabal is busy trying to install their own [new replacement] one now. They always bet on the bad ass dictators....Shah, Mubarak, Pinochet.... and all the other despots from around the world. I can't think of one 'nice guy or gal' ruler they voluntarily backed. In fact, when they find a nice guy [like Allende, Aristide or Mussadeh] they either kill 'em or overthrow them.....often with UK or other Capitalist allies help.

Can't wait for when this kind of Revolution comes 'home'!!....ah, dream on......

Peter Lemkin
01-29-2011, 11:27 AM
Posted at 1:45 PM ET, 01/28/2011
What should the CIA do in Egypt?
By Jeff Stein [from a Mockingbird to your ears...or eyes!]

The ghost of the 1979 Iranian revolution is very much on the minds of veteran intelligence officials as Egypt explodes in street protests.

Most historians agree that the CIA was largely in the dark when anti-American students, radical Islamists and mullahs ignited street protests in Tehran because the U.S.-backed shah had forbidden the CIA to have contact with opposition groups.

The CIA can’t let that happen again in Egypt, intelligence veterans say -- and it probably isn't.

Former CIA director R. James Woolsey says agency officials' main mission in Egypt today is “to make sure that they are getting information from all factions where they don't already have relationships and that they are not making the same mistake they did under the shah -- talking only to regime-approved people.”

“Hopefully,” echoes Jeffrey White, a former chief of the Defense Intelligence Agency's Middle East intelligence division, “the CIA has contacts within the opposition or else is working to make them.”

There are “lots of important intelligence questions to be asked about their leadership, motivation, intentions, organization [and] external influences,” said White, a defense fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.

"The CIA's response should be to perform its usual missions of collecting information about, and providing assessments on, events in countries important to US interests, as is the case with both Egypt and Yemen," said Paul R. Pillar, who retired in 2005 as the CIA's national intelligence officer for the Near East and South Asia. "Anything beyond that in which the CIA might become involved would not be the 'CIA's response' but instead something done at the behest of policymakers."

“For now, we need to walk on both sides of street, stay close to the government and work the opposition hard for new sources and contacts,” added a senior former CIA operations official, speaking only on background because he conducts extensive business in the region.

“The priority is collection and analysis about what's going on,” said Richard K. Betts, a frequent consultant to U.S. intelligence agencies and director of the International Security Policy program at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs.

“Our capacity to shape events by more active measures, such as covert action to support moderate elements of the opposition, is probably minimal, and more likely to backfire than to control events,” added Betts, author of “Enemies of Intelligence: Knowledge and Power in American National Security.”

“Popular revolutions can hardly ever be contained or channeled effectively by foreign forces,” he said.

"The agency's work is pretty much over, as no part of the U.S. government can do much to influence the situation, unless [Secretary of State Hillary] Clinton makes things worse by continuing to speak as if we are supporting the demonstrators," said Michael Scheuer, a former head of the CIA’s Osama Bin Laden unit. "Ditto for Yemen."

Mark Lowenthal, the CIA’s assistant director for analysis and production from 2002 to 2005, agreed about the limits of covert action.

“I do not see any role per se for the [intelligence community] other than tracking what is going on and giving the policy makers enough intell to make proper choices,” he said.

“I would be hard put to think of a covert action. Now, you might want to put out discreet feelers to some folks in the opposition, just to get in touch, sound them out, find out their intentions, etc. But you have to be careful not to [anger] the powers that be.”

Lowenthal added, “But I would make this approach via diplomats, not intelligence [agents].

In any event, Lowenthal said, “overt is better than covert, if at all available.”

All emphasized that any new or major CIA initative in Egypt--or elsewhere in the region--would be undertaken at the direction of the White House.

"Rule No. 1: the Intelligence Community does not create or have policies," said Lowenthal. "It carries out activities to support policy makers. So, there can be no 'CIA response' to Egypt and Yemen."

A major fear among policymakers is that the Cairo protests could open the door for the country's largest opposition group, the Muslim Brotherhood, to take power.

Two years ago, Emile Nakhleh, the former head of the CIA’s political Islam strategic analysis program, said the United States should be reaching out to the Brotherhood in Egypt, as well as Hamas and Hezbollah, to “find common ground on daily issues, including issues of education, economics, commerce, health services, and community services.”

“To engage the Islamic world, the U.S. needs expertise—cultural, political, and languages, said Nakhleh, author of “A Necessary Engagement: Reinventing America's Relations with the Muslim World,” in an interview with Harpers blogger Ken Silverstein.

“The CIA was the first government agency that recognized this and systematically began to assign resources to acquire expertise on the Islamic World. This started before 9/11,” he also said. “The Agency’s directors in the Analytic section saw this challenge many years ago and proceeded to allocate resources to begin the process. But the bad news is that the CIA remains the only entity in the U.S. government that has cultivated this expertise.”

Nakhleh could not be reached for comment Friday.

"I would think that all of our officers across the Near East are spending a good amount of time on the streets trying to gauge the public mood and [assess] the chances of any more dominoes," said Scheuer, who has just authored a new biography of Osama Bin Laden.

"For myself, I hope that each [CIA chief of station] and/or the ambassador are writing commentaries for Washington to disabuse them of the idea that any of this unrest is going to lead to secular democracies in the region. We are either going to get either more ruthless dictatorships or--if they fall--a year or two of chaotic governments with patinas of democracy until the Islamists take over," Scheuer said.

Magda Hassan
01-29-2011, 12:53 PM
Mobile phones are back on.
50,000 protesters in the main square Tahiir Square defying military orders not to be there.
Fairly good coverage on Al Jazeera English live streaming if you can get it.
Mass public funerals being organized for the 100 dead.

Peter Lemkin
01-29-2011, 03:04 PM
I've been watching live on Al Jazeera. Very interesting and peaceful in the main squares....good vibes between people on street and military; however some person killed who tried to enter the Interior Ministry. Curfew started over an hour ago and no one is going home or observing it and no one is enforcing it.....

Jeffrey Orling
01-29-2011, 03:46 PM
The US as always is on the wrong side in these things. We have been propping up rightwing dictators and arming their repressive police forces which are now using our taxpayer funded weapons GIVEN to these right wing despots to oppress and kill the people in these countries.

The US will try to spin it and put in another puppet who will simply be the same with a new face and name and, if not from the get go, will morph into that in the very near future as more control measures are quietly passed to the new puppet regime.

As people become more and more desperate with "nothing left to lose" they will give their lives in a struggle for the lives of their children and loved ones. We're getting there and this is the only way to stop right wing thugs.

These thugs have realized the power of a peaceful charistic LEADER to marshall the forces of discontent into a mass movement and so they assassinate them ASAP, rewrite history and wait for the next one who they will take out if he or she is bold enough and egotistical enough to try to lead any sort of response to the oligarchs who dominate the world, the village, the city, the region... you name it.

I am very impressed with the Egyptians and by their courage.

Peter Lemkin
01-29-2011, 04:10 PM
The former spy chief is the new Vice-President [there has been NO vice-president before]. Another high-level miliary man was just appointed Prime Minister. It is an all Military, all Mubarak government...no change and I predict tomorrow will be the beginning of the end of the current regime! Obama/ Clinton/ USG backed the wrong horse...but don't they always. In fact they are the 'wrong horse' for America too!

What I fear is he US Military moving into Egypt and/or Israel. Either would spell Armageddon.

Peter Lemkin
01-29-2011, 04:24 PM
US reported 'routine' police brutality in Egypt, WikiLeaks cables show

Torture widely used against criminals, Islamist detainees, opposition activists and bloggers, embassy cables suggest

Luke Harding
guardian.co.uk, Friday 28 January 2011 15.23 GMT

Egyptian riot police in Cairo. The WikiLeaks cables paint a picture of an Egyptian police force out of control. Photograph: Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images

Police brutality in Egypt is "routine and pervasive" and the use of torture so widespread that the Egyptian government has stopped denying it exists, according to leaked cables released today by WikiLeaks.

The batch of US embassy cables paint a despairing portrait of a police force and security service in Egypt wholly out of control. They suggest torture is routinely used against ordinary criminals, Islamist detainees, opposition activists and bloggers.

"The police use brutal methods mostly against common criminals to extract confessions, but also against demonstrators, certain political prisoners and unfortunate bystanders. One human rights lawyer told us there is evidence of torture in Egypt dating back to the time of the pharoahs. NGO contacts estimate there are literally hundreds of torture incidents every day in Cairo police stations alone," one cable said.

Under Hosni Mubarak's presidency there had been "no serious effort to transform the police from an instrument of regime power into a public service institution", it said. The police's ubiquitous use of force had pervaded Egyptian culture to such an extent that one popular TV soap opera recently featured a police detective hero who beat up suspects to collect evidence.

Some middle-class Egyptians did not report thefts from their apartment blocks because they knew the police would immediately go and torture "all of the doormen", the cable added. It cited one source who said the police would use routinely electric shocks against suspected criminals, and would beat up human rights lawyers who enter police stations to defend their clients. Women detainees allegedly faced sexual abuse. Demoralised officers felt solving crimes justified brutal interrogation methods, with some believing that Islamic law also sanctioned torture, the cable said.

Another cable, from March 2009, said Egypt's bloggers were playing an "increasingly important role" in society and "in broadening the scope of acceptable political and social discourse". There had been a significant change over the past five years, it said, with bloggers able to discuss sensitive issues such as sexual harassment, sectarian tensions, the military and even abortion.

At the same time, a clampdown by the Egyptian government and other repressive measures meant bloggers were no longer a "cohesive activist movement". In 2009, an estimated 160,000 bloggers were active in Egypt, writing in Arabic and sometimes English. Most were 20-35 years old.

Bloggers now appear to be at the vanguard of this week's anti-Mubarak demonstrations, which led to the government switching off internet access. One woman had told the Americans, presciently, that the blogging community was bereft of "compelling and achievable political causes" but would play a crucial role "during the eventual succession".

The WikiLeaks cables also shed intriguing light on the US's staunch relationship with Egypt, its closest Arab ally. They show US diplomats concerned about the country's woeful human rights record and keen to promote an agenda of democratic reform and greater political pluralism. There appears to have been little progress on these goals.

Peter Lemkin
01-29-2011, 04:27 PM
2011-01-28 Cable: Egypt action against poet, bloggers, novelist and journalists
Submitted by GeorgieBC on Fri, 01/28/2011 - 22:28


US State cable 2009-07-28 09CAIRO1447 describes action taken by the Egyptian government against an amateur poet, bloggers, a novelist and journalists.

An amateur poet

A local government clerk arrested, convicted and jailed for writing unpublished poetry allegedly insulting to President Mubarak, illustrates how proactive security forces and courts can successfully move against a civilian defended by incompetent lawyers. In late June, the Arab Network for Human Rights Information (ANHRI) issued a statement that police arrested XXXXXXXXXXXXXX in April for defaming Mubarak in a poem, and a local court subsequently sentenced him to three years in prison. According to the statement, the court set bail at LE 100,000 (15,000 USD) pending appeal, and since XXXXXXXXXXXX could not afford that sum, he remained in jail. Skilled Cairo-based lawyers from ANHRI appealed the case, and a Minya appeals court acquitted XXXXXXXXXXX July 8; he was released July 20. XXXXXXXXXXXX might still be in jail if his original defense lawyers had not sought help.

XXXXXXXXXXXXX told us he was not aware of the case until June when lawyers from Minya contacted him to help with the appeal. XXXXXXXXXXXXX attributed the conviction in part to the poor skills of the defense lawyers. The case remained virtually unknown until the days leading up to the July 18 appeal verdict when the local and international press began reporting on it. Until mid-July, even our contacts specializing in freedom of expression were unaware of the case. Following XXXXXXXXXXXX's release from prison, XXXXXXXXX appeared on Egyptian satellite television and said XXXXXXXXXXXX would not write any more poetry critical of the government. XXXXXXXXXXX also criticized lawyers from Minya for not defending him aggressively out of fear of the GOE's response.

Bloggers

In a blogging environment often critical of the government, the GOE has selectively moved against certain bloggers. Most recently, the GOE arrested three young, Muslim Brotherhood (MB)-affiliated bloggers. XXXXXXXXXXXXX confirmed for us July 27 that State Security Investigative Services (SSIS) arrested bloggers XXXXXXXXXXXXX and XXXXXXXXXXXXXX at Cairo International Airport following their return from a conference in XXXXXXXXXXX. XXXXXXXXXXXX also confirmed that SSIS arrested a third blogger, XXXXXXXXXXXXXX, at his home on XXXXXXXXXXX, and that all three bloggers remained in detention. The MB website reported XXXXXXXXXXX that the GOE released XXXXXXXXXXXXX that day. The three bloggers have criticized trials of MB members in military courts and have voiced support for MB detainees. Our contacts have asserted that the GOE fears young, tech-savvy MB-affiliated bloggers because of their ability to generate mass support for the Brotherhood and organize rallies and other events via the internet. Contacts attributed the arrest and torture of young MB-blogger XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX in XXXXXXXXXXXX(refs D, E) to these factors. Police released XXXXXXXXXXXXX in XXXXXXXXXXXX (ref D).

Prominent blogger XXXXXXXXXXXX ran afoul of the GOE by publicly criticizing the regime in late June at a conference in XXXXXXXXXXXXX (ref B). XXXXXXXXXXXXXX, who was held at XXXXXXXXXXXX International Airport XXXXXXXXXX for 13 hours upon his return, told us XXXXXXXXXXXXX that police have still not returned his laptop. Hafez Abu Seada, Secretary-General of the Egyptian Organization for Human Rights which is representing XXXXXXXXXXXX, told us July 22 that the police have not responded to his organization's inquiries beyond saying that they are holding the laptop to search for "intellectual property violations." XXXXXXXXXXXXX had told us that NDP members attending the same conference in XXXXXXXXXXXXX reported his critical comments to the GOE.

The GOE is using the Emergency Law to reject court orders for the release of blogger XXXXXXXXXXXXXX whom SSIS has kept in jail since XXXXXXXXXXXXXX for allegedly insulting both Islam and Christianity (ref C). XXXXXXXXXXXXX's lawyer XXXXXXXXXXX told us that the Interior Ministry rejected a XXXXXXXXXXXXX court order to release XXXXXXXXXXXXX, and since SSIS made the arrest under the Emergency Law, neither the courts nor attorneys have any recourse. XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX commented that this is the fifth time the MOI has refused to follow court decisions ordering XXXXXXXXXXXXX's release.

A novelist and Journalists

The GOE and NDP operatives have stepped up their efforts to file lawsuits against political opponents. Human Rights attorney XXXXXXXXXXXXX told us in late June that he is defending the leading independent newspaper "Al-Masry Al-Youm" against more than 70 defamation suits, most of which have been filed by NDP loyalists. XXXXXXXXXXXXX is also defending XXXXXXXXXXXXX author of XXXXXXXXXXXXX against a government suit alleging that the work is profane. XXXXXXXXXXXXX said the MOI filed the profanity suit as a pretext to punish the author for the novel's criticism of the NDP and of MOI heavy-handed police tactics against demonstrators. The profanity suit focuses on one relatively explicit sex scene and the use of expletives. XXXXXXXXXXXXX said such content is common in books and magazines, and almost never incurs suits. The trial is currently adjourned until the fall.

EOHR Secretary-General Hafez Abu Seada told us in early July that he is defending XXXXXXXXXXXXX, a journalist from the weekly newspaper XXXXXXXXXXXXX whom he said the Interior Ministry has targeted for writing a series of articles critical of the minister and other senior MOI officials. Abu Seada said an Interior Ministry general confronted XXXXXXXXXXXXX on the street as a pretext for filing charges against him for allegedly "assaulting" an officer. The Arab Network for Human Rights Information issued a statement July 13 criticizing the police for breaking into XXXXXXXXXXXXX's home six times between July 10 and 11.

In mid-July, police arrested Yasser Barakat, editor-in-chief of the independent paper "Al-Moagaz," to implement a June 24 court decision convicting him of defaming independent MP and SSIS confidante Mustafa Bakry. In the first instance in recent memory of a journalist jailed for defamation, Barakat spent 5 days in jail before his July 11 release pending appeal, following lobbying by the Press Syndicate (ref A). Contacts have told us that SSIS was able to provide political cover to support Bakry in his long-running personal feud against Barakat.

Peter Lemkin
01-29-2011, 04:53 PM
Apparently, the former security and secret police now raiding the wealthy areas of Cairo for whatever they can steal at gunpoint.....as their days are numbered. Sadly, they are shooting those who they come across watching them and in the homes and shops they rob.

In Suez common criminals are breaking into stores and homes and taking what they want with the Military watching, doing nothing, despite the pleas of the People. The Police in all cities have been absent today!

Meanwhile, foreign tourists are all gathered at Cairo airport desperate to get out...with few to no flights available....

Items have been stolen and destroyed from the Egyptian Museum - the main repository of art and artifacts from Ancient Egypt!

Fire services and police are not responding anywhere in Egypt to fires, lootings, robberies, theft and threats on normal citizens lives....chaos now has taken hold and many think it is being perpetrated as much by the old secret police as normal criminals.

Tomorrow is the day of collapse, IMO.

Paul Rigby
01-29-2011, 08:22 PM
The US as always is on the wrong side in these things.

It isn't, Jeffrey: It's on both the major ones, and doubtless more than that, as ever. Just because the State Department is behind the curve doesn't mean other elements of the US establishment are similarly slow-moving:


The U.S. government has been supporting leading figures behind the violent protests in Egypt in a bid to promote regime change, it has been revealed.

A 2008 diplomatic cable leaked by the WikiLeaks site outlines how the U.S. State Department supported a pro-democracy activist and lobbied for the release of dissidents from custody.

The unnamed activist presented an 'unwritten plan for democratic transition in 2011' at a summit in New York and met with U.S. members of congress.

One aspect of the plan was for 'a transition to a parliamentary democracy before the scheduled 2011 presidential elections', the Jerusalem Post reported.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1351656/Egypt-protests-Egyptian-President-sacks-entire-cabinet.html

The CIA put Khomeini in power, just as it did Castro twenty years before. And that's leaving to one side for a moment all those splendid "colour" revolutions in Eastern Europe and the Russian "Near Abroad."

Peter Presland
01-29-2011, 08:50 PM
The US as always is on the wrong side in these things.

It isn't, Jeffrey: It's on both the major ones, and doubtless more than that, as ever. Just because the State Department is behind the curve doesn't mean other elements of the US establishment are similarly slow-moving:



Shades of Theodore Herzel's "We will lead every rebellion against us" eh?

It's amazing how naive the general public still are about these things. The US SIS's are undoubtedly in the thick of every significant faction involved - doing their level best to steer events.

I have little doubt the US laid plans for Mubarak's demise some time ago. He may have been a faithful ally in the overall US military domination of the region, but his lack of amenability to the de-regulation and wholesale privatisation of Egyptian industry and infrastructure has not endeared him to the WTO globalists one bit.

The public face of US diplomacy supports Mubarak - That says diddly squat about what the real agenda is. My guess is that Mubarak's days are numbered and US assets are already well positioned to have major influence on whoever/whatever replaces him.

Paul Rigby
01-29-2011, 08:58 PM
Shades of Theodore Herzel's "We will lead every rebellion against us" eh?

It's amazing how naive the general public still are about these things. The US SIS's are undoubtedly in the thick of every significant faction involved - doing their level best to steer events.

I have little doubt the US laid plans for Mubarak's demise some time ago. He may have been a faithful ally in the overall US military domination of the region, but his lack of amenability to the de-regulation and wholesale privatisation of Egyptian industry and infrastructure has not endeared him to the WTO globalists one bit.

The public face of US diplomacy supports Mubarak - That says diddly squat about what the real agenda is. My guess is that Mubarak's days are numbered and US assets are already well positioned to have major influence on whoever/whatever replaces him.

Couldn't agree more. The CIA and allies are now in the position to move off either foot: To usher in their creatures in the Moslem Brotherhood, or else install a classic neo-liberal privatization regime. Perhaps both, in reverse order.

A lot of Egyptian turkeys - most obviously in the Trade Unions, and on the Left in general - have just voted for Christmas.

Paul Rigby
01-29-2011, 09:08 PM
Follow the link to find more relevant links:


Saturday, January 29, 2011
US BACKS EGYPTIAN COUP

http://aangirfan.blogspot.com/2011/01/us-backs-egyptian-coup.html

1. The USA has secretly backed the rebel leaders behind the Egyptian uprising, according to the UK's leading newspaper, The Telegraph, on 29 January 2011.

"The American government secretly backed leading figures behind the Egyptian uprising who have been planning 'regime change' for the past three years, The Daily Telegraph has learned.

2. On 11 November 2010, Israel told its citizens to leave Egypt.

That was before the trouble erupted in Tunisia.

3. On 28th January 2011, Mubarak said the protests were part of a plot to destabilize Egypt.

4. Where has Egyptian army chief of staff General Sami Enan been during the riots?

He has been meeting U.S. defense officials in Washington. (Mubarak said the protests were part of a plot to destabilize Egypt.)

5. Egypt says the Muslim Brotherhood is plotting against it, - Israel News, Ynetnews

The Egyptian government sponsored daily al-Ahram reported on 29 January 2011 that the spy cell recently discovered in the country was in cahoots with the CIA's Muslim Brotherhood.

6. On June 2010 we learnt of the alleged Israeli Nile water plot.

Israel wants the waters of the Nile.

Keith Millea
01-30-2011, 01:02 AM
Anonymous (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZNbVL9EQKs&feature=player_embedded)




http://therealnews.com/t2/component/seyret/?task=videodirectlink&id=8960


:spy:

Peter Lemkin
01-30-2011, 03:30 AM
Where has Egyptian army chief of staff General Sami Enan been during the riots?

He has been meeting U.S. defense officials in Washington.

Even more significant than that he is in the USA, is that he arrived ONE DAY before the street demonstrations broke out....what a coincidence!?

Ed Jewett
01-30-2011, 05:15 AM
Additional coverage here: http://whatreallyhappened.com/

Ed Jewett
01-30-2011, 05:46 AM
See also http://willyloman.wordpress.com/

Ed Jewett
01-30-2011, 05:54 AM
Is this yet another "colour" revolution being perpetrated I wonder?



Is it possible that the forces which we have seen historically to have been involved in setting little fires of chaos have ignited a firestorm that didn't predict and can't control? The question is being asked if this isn't the great awakening that Zbignieuw Brzezinski predicted/feared?

Ed Jewett
01-30-2011, 06:05 AM
A different cup of tea: http://globalguerrillas.typepad.com/

Ed Jewett
01-30-2011, 06:17 AM
From http://www.ricefarmer.blogspot.com/ :

Saturday, January 29, 2011

News Links


-- Egypt --
Mad scene in Suez showed the depth of Egypt's anger (http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2011/01/28/107626/protesters-in-suez-egypt-storm.html)
What the United States has at stake in Egypt (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/41317259/ns/politics/)
Egypt protests: America's secret backing for rebel leaders behind uprising (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaandindianocean/egypt/8289686/Egypt-protests-Americas-secret-backing-for-rebel-leaders-behind-uprising.html)
Chaos, Looting Spread as Mubarak Names Key Deputies (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704653204576111443650347716.html)
Egyptian capital of Cairo engulfed in chaos (http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2011-01-29-egypt-unrest_N.htm?csp=34news&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+usatoday-NewsTopStories+%28News+-+Top+Stories%29)
Egypt's military in a quandary (http://english.aljazeera.net//news/middleeast/2011/01/2011129153021167916.html) (Al Jazeera analysis)
Army protecting Egypt protesters from police (video) (http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Backchannels/2011/0129/Army-protecting-Egypt-protesters-from-police-video?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+feeds/csm+%28Christian+Science+Monitor+%7C+All+Stories%2 9)
Yesterday we saw this story (http://www.iloubnan.info/politics/actualite/id/55180/titre/Egypt:-%22Alexandria-has-no-police-anymore%22-says-Human-Right-Watch-correspondant) about how police and protesters were fraternizing in Alexandria. Some among the police and military seem to be sympathetic to the protesters. -- RF
Egypt Stock Exchange, Banks to Close Sunday as Mubarak Protests Continue (http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-01-29/egypt-bourse-banks-to-close-january-30-as-anit-mubarak-protests-continue.html)
Mohamed ElBaradei: The Egyptian people have revolted (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-12316526)
Report: Egyptian president's son Gamal Mubarak arrives in London (http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-4020760,00.html)

Paul Rigby
01-30-2011, 07:59 AM
More news on the enormous humanitarian progress being so spontaneously achieved on the banks of the Nile:


The CIA's Role in Egypt's Regime Change? Who Is Omar Suleiman?

by Jane Mayer

http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=23004

One of the “new” names being mentioned as a possible alternative to President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt, Omar Suleiman, is actually not so new to anyone who has followed the American policy of renditions for terror suspects. After dissolving his cabinet yesterday, Mubarak appointed Suleiman vice-president, and according to many commentators he is poised to be a potential successor, and an alternative to Mubarak’s son and intended heir until now, Gamal Mubarak. Suleiman is a well-known quantity in Washington. Suave, sophisticated, and fluent in English, he has served for years as the main conduit between the United States and Mubarak. While he has a reputation for loyalty and effectiveness, he also carries some controversial baggage from the standpoint of those looking for a clean slate on human rights. As I described in my book “The Dark Side,” since 1993 Suleiman has headed the feared Egyptian general intelligence service. In that capacity, he was the C.I.A.’s point man in Egypt for renditions—the covert program in which the C.I.A. snatched terror suspects from around the world and returned them to Egypt and elsewhere for interrogation, often under brutal circumstances.

As laid out in greater detail by Stephen Grey, in his book “Ghost Plane,” beginning in the nineteen-nineties, Suleiman negotiated directly with top Agency officials. Every rendition was greenlighted at the highest levels of both the U.S. and Egyptian intelligence agencies. Edward S. Walker, Jr., a former U.S. Ambassador to Egypt, described Suleiman as “very bright, very realistic,” adding that he was cognizant that there was a downside to “some of the negative things that the Egyptians engaged in, of torture and so on. But he was not squeamish, by the way.”

Technically, U.S. law required the C.I.A. to seek “assurances” from Egypt that rendered suspects wouldn’t face torture. But under Suleiman’s reign at the intelligence service, such assurances were considered close to worthless. As Michael Scheuer, a former C.I.A. officer who helped set up the practice of rendition, later testified before Congress, even if such “assurances” were written in indelible ink, “they weren’t worth a bucket of warm spit.”

Read more http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/newsdesk/2011/01/who-is-omar-suleiman.html#ixzz1CVDpXPeg

Paul Rigby
01-30-2011, 09:41 AM
Far from clear to me that a straight substitution is the ultimate intent:


Egypt's Next Strongman

BY ISSANDR AMRANI

http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article27374.htm

January 29, 2011 "Foreign Policy" -- AUGUST 17, 2009 -- The prolonged fin de régime mood has unnerved many Egyptians, who worry that a Syrian-style inheritance-of-power scenario would usher in an era of instability. Many consider the prospect of such father-to-son nepotism humiliating for a country that has long claimed the mantle of Arab leadership. In this political environment -- in which democratic alternatives are locked out, but the population wants change -- Suleiman appears the only viable alternative to Gamal Mubarak. But who is this once-mysterious power player? And would he really mean a new era for Egypt?

Like the elder Mubarak, Suleiman rose to national prominence through the armed forces. The arc of his career followed the arc of Egypt's political history. He attended the Soviet Union's Frunze Military Academy in the 1960s -- as Mubarak did a few years earlier -- and became an infantryman. He then took part in the 1967 and 1973 Arab-Israeli wars, likely as a staff officer. When Cairo switched its strategic alliance from Moscow to Washington, he received training at the John F. Kennedy Special Warfare School and Center at Fort Bragg, N.C., in the 1980s. Suleiman continues to have privileged contacts with U.S. intelligence and military officials, with whom he has now been dealing for at least a quarter-century.

As the head of the Mukhabarat, Suleiman's political and military portfolio is vast. The GIS combines the intelligence-gathering elements of the CIA, the counterterrorism role of the FBI, the protection duties of the Secret Service, and the high-level diplomacy of the State Department. It also includes some functions unique to authoritarian regimes, such as monitoring Egypt's security apparatus for signs of internal coups. It is an elite institution, with a long reach inside government as well as abroad. It also crosses over the civilian and military worlds: Suleiman is one of a rare group of Egyptian officials who hold both a military rank (lieutenant general) and a civilian office (he is a cabinet minister, though he rarely attends meetings).

Traditionally, the identity of the head of the GIS is kept secret. But after 2001, when Suleiman began to take over key dossiers from the Foreign Ministry, his name and photograph began appearing in Al-Ahram, the staid government-owned daily. He even appeared on the top half of the front page, a space usually reserved for Mubarak. Since then, his high-profile assignments have garnered high-profile coverage. He has intervened in civil wars in Sudan, patched up the tiff between Saudi King Abdullah and Libyan leader Muammar el-Qaddafi over the latter's alleged attempt to assassinate the former, and put pressure on Syria to stop meddling in Lebanon and to dissociate itself from Iran.

Most importantly, Suleiman has mediated in the Israel-Palestine conflict, Egypt's most pressing national security priority. Since the June 2007 Hamas takeover of Gaza, Cairo has acted as an interlocutor and mediator between Hamas and Fatah. Although its attempts to reconcile the two groups have led to few clear victories -- in part, perhaps, because Egypt is clearly hostile to the Islamists -- its foreign policy has won the approval of the United States and the European Union.

David Guyatt
01-30-2011, 09:53 AM
I wonder how deeply involved in all this are the Muslim Brotherhood?

I don't know enough about the subject to know if the linked article (http://www.surrenderingislam.com/surrendering-islam/nazis) is valid or not.

Magda Hassan
01-30-2011, 10:20 AM
Don't know David. The MB are seen as fairly powerful by the (still) ruling party in Egypt and they have been banned by them. And there are historical links between them and MI6 http://markcurtis.wordpress.com/2010/12/18/britain-and-the-muslim-brotherhood-collaboration-during-the-1940s-and-1950s/

David Guyatt
01-30-2011, 10:29 AM
Thanks Maggie. They might be worth considering in all this.

Peter Lemkin
01-30-2011, 10:50 AM
...amazing what they don't teach in history classes and how uninformed most, even well educated persons are about the real events of/in history - and all that went on behind or in place of the fairytale lies of twisting of the truth/partial truths told, and believed by all too many throughout their lives.

Paul Rigby
01-30-2011, 11:27 AM
I wonder how deeply involved in all this are the Muslim Brotherhood?

I don't know enough about the subject to know if the linked article (http://www.surrenderingislam.com/surrendering-islam/nazis) is valid or not.

Fascinating!

Magda Hassan
01-30-2011, 11:45 AM
http://external.ak.fbcdn.net/safe_image.php?d=3804571eedb77c68a223a0502fcdb65c&w=90&h=90&url=http%3A%2F%2Fenglish.aljazeera.net%2Fmritems%2 Fimagecache%2F89%2F135%2Fmritems%2FImages%2F2011%2 F1%2F29%2F20111291112645734_20.jpg (http://english.aljazeera.net/news/middleeast/2011/01/201113085252994161.html)Egypt shuts down Al Jazeera bureau (http://english.aljazeera.net/news/middleeast/2011/01/201113085252994161.html)
english.aljazeera.netNetwork's licences cancelled and accreditation of staff in Cairo withdrawn by order of information minister.

David Guyatt
01-30-2011, 11:58 AM
There are deep politics, and at a more subterranean level, there are deep occult politics.

We know this to be the case because of the deeply political occult Catholic Martinist lodge - of the Papus, AMORC and Synarchy variety.

Not to mention the far older and very occult Order of Knights Templar that has waged bloody and pitiless war on behalf of the Church for many hundreds of years - and exists still, having been forced underground just over 700 years ago. But the current incumbent of St. Peter's throne, Benedict XVI, formally apologized (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2007/oct/11/religion.catholicism) to them in 2007 for their suppression and persecution.

And I suppose, therefore, it shouldn't surprise us that deep occult doctrines filter up into secret societies like SMOM and Opus Dei etc., and inform their world perspectives.

Magda Hassan
01-30-2011, 12:58 PM
Hundreds of judges have joined the protesters in Tahrir Square.
US says all US citizens to leave immediately.
Turkey have flow in military planes to take their citizens home.
Ministry of Interior evacuated under fire.

Magda Hassan
01-30-2011, 01:51 PM
38 Muslim Brotherhood members have been released. By whom? And why?

David Guyatt
01-30-2011, 01:56 PM
But timely...

Peter Lemkin
01-30-2011, 02:14 PM
USG tells all Americans to leave Egypt by tomorrow.....what do they know [or plan] that we don't know?! At the moment, jet fighters are flying at high speeds and very very low over tens of thousands of demonstrators in the main Cairo square and there are reports that the missing security police are surrounding the square...something is about to happen....stay tuned!

Paul Rigby
01-30-2011, 02:53 PM
The CIA contemplates its alternatives:


"For myself, I hope that each [CIA chief of station] and/or the ambassador are writing commentaries for Washington to disabuse them of the idea that any of this unrest is going to lead to secular democracies in the region. We are either going to get either more ruthless dictatorships or--if they fall--a year or two of chaotic governments with patinas of democracy until the Islamists take over," Scheuer said,"


Spytalk: What should the CIA do in Egypt? By Jeff Stein

Posted at 1:45 PM ET, 01/28/2011

http://voices.washingtonpost.com/spy-talk/2011/01/what_should_cia_do_in_egypt.html

David Guyatt
01-30-2011, 03:55 PM
Part 2 (http://www.surrenderingislam.com/surrendering-islam/exile-saudi-arabia)


Exile in Saudi Arabia

So when Nasser threatened to nationalise the Suez Canal, so important as a conduit for oil cargo to Europe and elsewhere, the Rothschilds employed their assassins from the Muslim Brotherhood against him. The Rothschilds had maintained an interest in the canal, ever since Baron Lionel de Rothschild financed his friend’s Bejamin Disraeli’s purchase of the canal for the British government in 1875.

When Brotherhood members fired shots at Nasser in 1954, the group was forcibly suppressed by the government, with thousands of members being imprisoned. Six of its leaders were tried and executed for treason and many others were imprisoned. Interrogations revealed that the Muslim Brotherhood functioned virtually as a German Intelligence unit. As well, as divulged by Copeland:

Nor was that all. Sound beatings of the Moslem Brotherhood organizers who had been arrested revealed that the organization had been thoroughly penetrated, at the top, by the British, American, French and Soviet intelligence services, any one of which could either make active use of it or blow it up, whichever best suited its purposes. Important lesson: fanaticism is no insurance against corruption; indeed, the two are highly compatible.117

The CIA also became concerned over Nasser’s leanings towards the Soviet Union. Great Britain and the United States had originally agreed to help finance the first stage of Nasser’s Aswan High Dam project. Although, in 1956, the U.S. secretary of state John Foster Dulles, cancelled the U.S. offer, and the next day Britain followed suit. Five days later, Nasser announced the nationalisation of the Suez Canal, promising that the tolls Egypt collected would in five years pay for the dam.

In response to Nasser’s nationalisation of the Canal, the United Kingdom and France, with the help of Israel, invaded the Sinai and much of Port Said, sending the Egyptian military into retreat. However, due to pressure from both the United States and the Soviet Union, the British and the French had to withdraw. Though Israel did achieve the cessation of Egyptian raids, Nasser was hailed as having achieved a victory for the Arab world.

Fleeing members of the Muslim Brotherhood were then shuttled to the CIA’s ally, Saudi Arabia. When John Loftus, a Justice Department official in the eighties, was permitted to peruse classified government documents, he discovered that the British Secret Service convinced American intelligence that the Arab Nazis of the Muslim Brotherhood would be indispensable as “freedom fighters” in preparation for the next major war, which was anticipated against the Soviet Union. Kim Philby, the Soviet agent who infiltrated the British Secret Service, and the son of “Abdullah” Philby, helped the US acquire these Arab Nazis, then being expelled from Egypt, who were afterwards sent to Saudi Arabia. There, according to Loftus, “they were given jobs as religion education instructors.”118

Thus, beginning in the 1960s, the Salafi became more formally allied to the Wahhabis, who became the principal patrons of the Brotherhood, which set up branches in most Arab states. With the CIA’s tacit approval, the Saudis provided funds for Brotherhood members who joined the anti-Nasser insurgency in Yemen in 1962.

“Like any other truly effective covert action, this one was strictly off the books,” wrote Robert Baer, a nineteen-year veteran of the CIA, in Sleeping with the Devil. “There was no CIA funding, no memorandum of notification to Congress. Not a penny came out of the Treasury to fund it. In other words, no record.” Describing the Brotherhood as a “silent ally” that provided a “cheap no-American casualties way” to do “our dirty work in Yemen, Afghanistan, and plenty of other places,” he explained, “All the White House had to do was give a wink and a nod to countries harboring the Muslim Brothers.” 119

In 1962, with CIA encouragement, the Saudis established an organisation called the Muslim World League. Underwritten initially by several donors, including Aramco, then a CIA collaborator, the League established a powerful international presence, with representatives in 120 countries. It was headed by then chief Mufti of Saudi Arabia, Mohammed ibn Ibrahim al-Sheikh, a lineal descendant of Mohammed ibn Abdul Wahhab, and the presidency remains vested in the Saudi Mufti to this day.
Included among its eight members were important representatives of the Salafi Muslim Brotherhood: Said Ramadan, son-in-law of Hasan al Banna (and whose own son Tariq Ramdan is now being groomed as a new reformist scholar for Muslims in the West), Maulana Abul Ala Maududi, leader of the Brotherhood offshoot Jamati Islami of Pakistan, and Maulana Abul Hasan Nadvi of India

Footnotes:

117 The Game of Nations, p. 184.
118 Loftus, John, “The Muslim Brotherhood, Nazis and Al-Qaeda”. Jewish Community News, October 4, 2004.
119 Lee, Martin A. “Not a prayer: then as now, American schemes to change Islam have been dangerous folly”. Harper’s Magazine, June 2004.

Peter Lemkin
01-30-2011, 04:50 PM
ElBaradei about [as I write this] to speak to the assembled crowds in the main square in Cairo......the denouement is near....

One of the stranger things I've heard - and apparently true - is the rump government that remains warns that the security police will be back throughout Cairo tomorrow with the EXCEPTION in Tehrir square....very odd, indeed and not going to please protester nor secret policeman....and only going to make for conflict of protesters on the way to protest.

Interesting that some of the citizen street 'watch' groups trying to stop looting found some of those with cars full of looted things were secret police. :lol: Ever was thus....usually they do it more surreptitiously.

Ah....have such mixed feelings...as I feel as in all the color and other revolutions it was HONEST disappointment to disgust of the People that was harnessed...but all too often it was orchestrated or co-opted by the secret services for TPTB in the USA and West. The Egyptians have long, long been in need of regime change and democracy, but not one run from outside again. Ah, I hope against hope this one will be allowed to develop as the Egyptians want and not as some other Nation[s] want.

Peter Lemkin
01-30-2011, 05:39 PM
The Protest Movement in Egypt: "Dictators" do not Dictate, They Obey Orders

by Michel Chossudovsky

Global Research, January 29, 2011

The Mubarak regime could collapse in the a face of a nationwide protest movement... What prospects for Egypt and the Arab World?

"Dictators" do not dictate, they obey orders. This is true in Egypt, Tunisia and Algeria.

Dictators are invariably political puppets. Dictators do not decide.

President Hosni Mubarak was a faithful servant of Western economic interests and so was Ben Ali.

The national government is the object of the protest movement.

The objective is to unseat the puppet rather than the puppet-master.

The slogans in Egypt are "Down with Mubarak, Down with the Regime". No anti-American posters have been reported... The overriding and destructive influence of the USA in Egypt and throughout the Middle East remains unheralded.

The foreign powers which operate behind the scenes are shielded from the protest movement.

No significant political change will occur unless the issue of foreign interference is meaningfully addressed by the protest movement.

The US embassy in Cairo is an important political entity, invariably overshadowing the national government. The Embassy is not a target of the protest movement.

In Egypt, a devastating IMF program was imposed in 1991 at the height of the Gulf War. It was negotiated in exchange for the annulment of Egypt's multibillion dollar military debt to the US as well as its participation in the war. The resulting deregulation of food prices, sweeping privatisation and massive austerity measures led to the impoverishment of the Egyptian population and the destabilization of its economy. The Mubarak government was praised as a model "IMF pupil".

The role of Ben Ali's government in Tunisia was to enforce the IMF's deadly economic medicine, which over a period of more than twenty years served to destabilize the national economy and impoverish the Tunisian population. Over the last 23 years, economic and social policy in Tunisia has been dictated by the Washington Consensus.

Both Hosni Mubarak and Ben Ali stayed in power because their governments obeyed and effectively enforced the diktats of the IMF.

From Pinochet and Videla to Baby Doc, Ben Ali and Mubarak, dictators have been installed by Washington. Historically in Latin America, dictators were instated through a series of US sponsored military coups. In todays World, they are installed through "free and fair elections" under the surveillance of the "international community".

Our message to the protest movement:

Actual decisions are taken in Washington DC, at the US State Department, at the Pentagon, at Langley, headquarters of the CIA. at H Street NW, the headquarters of the World Bank and the IMF.

The relationship of "the dictator" to foreign interests must be addressed. Unseat the political puppets but do not forget to target the "real dictators".

The protest movement should focus on the real seat of political authority; it should target the US embassy, the delegation of the European Union, the national missions of the IMF and the World Bank.

Meaningful political change can only be ensured if the neoliberal economic policy agenda is thrown out.

Regime Replacement

If the protest movement fails to address the role of foreign powers including pressures exerted by "investors", external creditors and international financial institutions, the objective of national sovereignty will not be achieved. In which case, what will occur is a narrow process of "regime replacement", which ensures political continuity.

"Dictators" are seated and unseated. When they are politically discredited and no longer serve the interests of their US sponsors, they are replaced by a new leader, often recruited from within the ranks of the political opposition.

In Tunisia, the Obama administration has already positioned itself. It intends to play a key role in the "democratization program" (i.e. the holding of so-called fair elections). It also intends to use the political crisis as a means to weaken the role of France and consolidate its position in North Africa:

"The United States, which was quick to size up the groundswell of protest on the streets of Tunisia, is trying to press its advantage to push for democratic reforms in the country and further afield.

The top-ranking US envoy for the Middle East, Jeffrey Feltman, was the first foreign official to arrive in the country after president Zine El Abidine Ben Ali was ousted on January 14 and swiftly called for reforms. He said on Tuesday only free and fair elections would strengthen and give credibility to the north African state's embattled leadership.

"I certainly expect that we'll be using the Tunisian example" in talks with other Arab governments, Assistant Secretary of State Feltman added.

He was dispatched to the north African country to offer US help in the turbulent transition of power, and met with Tunisian ministers and civil society figures.

Feltman travels to Paris on Wednesday to discuss the crisis with French leaders, boosting the impression that the US is leading international support for a new Tunisia, to the detriment of its former colonial power, France. ...

Western nations had long supported Tunisia's ousted leadership, seeing it as a bulwark against Islamic militants in the north Africa region.

In 2006, the then US defense secretary Donald Rumsfeld, speaking in Tunis, praised the country's evolution.

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton nimbly stepped in with a speech in Doha on January 13 warning Arab leaders to allow their citizens greater freedoms or risk extremists exploiting the situation.

"There is no doubt that the United States is trying to position itself very quickly on the good side,..." " AFP: US helping shape outcome of Tunisian uprising emphasis added

Will Washington be successful in instating a new puppet regime?

This very much depends on the ability of the protest movement to address the insidious role of the US in the country's internal affairs.

The overriding powers of empire are not mentioned. In a bitter irony, president Obama has expressed his support for the protest movement.

Many people within the protest movement are led to believe that president Obama is committed to democracy and human rights, and is supportive of the opposition's resolve to unseat a dictator, which was installed by the US in the first place.

Cooptation of Opposition Leaders

The cooptation of the leaders of major opposition parties and civil society organizations in anticipation of the collapse of an authoritarian puppet government is part of Washington's design, applied in different regions of the World.

The process of cooptation is implemented and financed by US based foundations including the National Endowment for Democracy (NED) and Freedom House (FH). Both FH and the NED have links to the US Congress. the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR), and the US business establishment. Both the NED and FH are known to have ties to the CIA.

The NED is actively involved in Tunisia, Egypt and Algeria. Freedom House supports several civil society organizations in Egypt.

"The NED was established by the Reagan administration after the CIA’s role in covertly funding efforts to overthrow foreign governments was brought to light, leading to the discrediting of the parties, movements, journals, books, newspapers and individuals that received CIA funding. ... As a bipartisan endowment, with participation from the two major parties, as well as the AFL-CIO and US Chamber of Commerce, the NED took over the financing of foreign overthrow movements, but overtly and under the rubric of “democracy promotion.” (Stephen Gowans, January « 2011 "What's left"

While the US has supported the Mubarak government for the last thirty years, US foundations with ties to the US State department and the Pentagon have actively supported the political opposition including the civil society movement. According to Freedom House: "Egyptian civil society is both vibrant and constrained. There are hundreds of non-governmental organizations devoted to expanding civil and political rights in the country, operating in a highly regulated environment." (Freedom House Press Releases).

In a bitter irony, Washington supports the Mubarak dictatorship, including its atrocities, while also backing and financing its detractors, through the activities of FH, the NED, among others.

Under the auspices of Freedom House, Egyptian dissidents and opponents of Hosni Mubarak were received in May 2008 by Condoleezza Rice at the State Department and the US Congress. They also met White House National Security Adviser Stephen Hadley, who was "the principal White House foreign policy adviser" during George W. Bush's second term.

Freedom House’s effort to empower a new generation of advocates has yielded tangible results and the New Generation program in Egypt has gained prominence both locally and internationally. Egyptian visiting fellows from all civil society groups received [May 2008] unprecedented attention and recognition, including meetings in Washington with US Secretary of State, the National Security Advisor, and prominent members of Congress. In the words of Condoleezza Rice, the fellows represent the "hope for the future of Egypt."

Freedom House, http://www.freedomhouse.org/template.cfm?page=66&program=84 (emphasis added).

Political Double Talk: Chatting with "Dictators", Mingling with "Dissidents"

The Egyptian pro-democracy delegation to the State Department was described by Condoleezza Rice as "The Hope for the Future of Egypt".

In May 2009, Hillary Clinton met a delegation of Egyptian dissidents, several of which had met Condoleezza Rice a year earlier. These high level meetings were held a week prior to Obama's visit to Egypt:


U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton praised the work of a group of Egyptian civil society activists she met with today and said it was in Egypt’s interest to move toward democracy and to exhibit more respect for human rights.

The 16 activists met with Clinton and Acting Assistant Secretary of State for Near Eastern Affairs Jeffrey Feltman in Washington at the end of a two-month fellowship organized by Freedom House’s New Generation program.

The fellows raised concern about what they perceived as the United States government distancing itself from Egyptian civil society and called on President Obama to meet with young independent civil society activists when he visits Cairo next week. They also urged the Obama administration to continue to provide political and financial support to Egyptian civil society and to help open the space for nongovernmental organizations which is tightly restricted under Egypt’s longstanding emergency law.

The fellows told Clinton that momentum was already building in Egypt for increased civil and human rights and that U.S. support at this time was urgently needed. They stressed that civil society represents a moderate and peaceful “third way” in Egypt, an alternative to authoritarian elements in the government and those that espouse theocratic rule. (Freedom House, May 2009)

During their fellowship, the activists spent a week in Washington receiving training in advocacy and getting an inside look at the way U.S. democracy works. After their training, the fellows were matched with civil society organizations throughout the country where they shared experiences with U.S. counterparts. The activists will wrap up their program ... by visiting U.S. government officials, members of Congress, media outlets and think tanks." (Freedom House, May 2009, emphasis added)

These opposition civil society groups --which are currently playing an important role in the protest movement-- are supported and funded by the US. They indelibly serve US interests.

The invitation of Egyptian dissidents to the State Department and the US Congress also purports to instil a feeling of commitment and allegiance to American democratic values. America is presented as a model of Freedom and Justice. Obama is upheld as a "Role Model".

Egyptian dissidents, Fellows of Freedom House in Washington DC (2008)

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks with "Egyptian activists promoting freedom and
democracy", prior to meetings at the State Department in Washington, DC, May 28, 2009.

Compare the two pictures 2008 delegation received by Condoleezza Rice versus 2009 delegation
meeting Hillary Clinton in May 2009.

Hillary Clinton and Hosni Mubarak in Sharm El Sheik, September 2010

Condoleezza Rice chats with Hosni Mubarak? " Hope for the Future of Egypt".

Condoleezza Rice addresses Freedom House. 4th from left

The Puppet Masters Support the Protest Movement against their own Puppets

The puppet masters support dissent against their own puppets?

Its called "political leveraging", "manufacturing dissent". Support the dictator as well as the opponents of the dictator as a means of controlling the political opposition.

These actions on the part of Freedom House and the National Endowment for Democracy, on behalf of the Bush and Obama administrations, ensure that the US funded civil society opposition will not direct their energies against the puppet masters behind the Mubarak regime, namely the US government.

These US funded civil society organizations act as a "Trojan Horse" which becomes embedded within the protest movement. They protect the interests of the puppet masters. They ensure that the grassroots protest movement will not address the broader issue of foreign interference in the affairs of sovereign states.

The Facebook Twitter Bloggers Supported and Financed by Washington

In relation to the protest movement in Egypt, several civil society groups funded by US based foundations have led the protest on Twitter and Facebook:

"Activists from Egypt's Kifaya (Enough) movement - a coalition of government opponents - and the 6th of April Youth Movement organized the protests on the Facebook and Twitter social networking websites. Western news reports said Twitter appeared to be blocked in Egypt later Tuesday." (See Voice of America, ,Egypt Rocked by Deadly Anti-Government Protests





Reads; Kifaya (Enough)

The Kifaya movement, which organized one of the first protests directed against the Mubarak regime in late 2004, is supported by the US based International Center for Non-Violent Conflict . Kifaya is a broad-based movement which has also taken a stance on Palestine and US interventionism in the region.

In turn, Freedom House has been involved in promoting and training the Middle East North Africa Facebook and Twitter blogs:

Freedom House fellows acquired skills in civic mobilization, leadership, and strategic planning, and benefit from networking opportunities through interaction with Washington-based donors, international organizations and the media. After returning to Egypt, the fellows received small grants to implement innovative initiatives such as advocating for political reform through Facebook and SMS messaging.

http://www.freedomhouse.org/template.cfm?page=66&program=84 (emphasis added)

From February 27 to March 13 [2010], Freedom House hosted 11 bloggers from the Middle East and North Africa [from different civil society organizations] for a two-week Advanced New Media Study Tour in Washington, D.C. The Study Tour provided the bloggers with training in digital security, digital video making, message development and digital mapping. While in D.C., the Fellows also participated in a Senate briefing, and met with high-level officials at USAID, State [Department] and Congress as well as international media including Al-Jazeera and the Washington Post.http://www.freedomhouse.org/template.cfm?page=115&program=84&item=87 emphasis added

One can easily apprehend the importance attached by the US administration to this bloggers' "training program", which is coupled with high level meetings at the US Senate, the Congress, the State Department, etc.

The role of the Facebook Twitter social media as an expression of dissent, must be carefully evaluated in the light of the links of several Egyptian civil society organizations to Freedom House (FH), the National Endowment for Democracy (NED) and the US State Department.

BBC News World (broadcast in the Middle East) quoting Egyptian internet messages has reported that "the US has been sending money to pro-democracy groups." (BBC News World, January 29, 2010). According to a report in The Daily Telegraph, quoting a secret US embassy document (Jan 29, 2011):


"The protests in Egypt are being driven by the April 6 youth movement, a group on Facebook that has attracted mainly young and educated members opposed to Mr Mubarak. The group has about 70,000 members and uses social networking sites to orchestrate protests and report on their activities.

The documents released by WikiLeaks reveal US Embassy officials [in Cairo] were in regular contact with the activist throughout 2008 and 2009, considering him one of their most reliable sources for information about human rights abuses." (emphasis added)

The Muslim Brotherhood

The Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt constitutes the largest segment of the opposition to president Mubarak. According to reports, The Muslim Brotherhood dominates the protest movement.

While there is a constitutional ban against religious political parties Brotherhood members elected to Egypt's parliament as "independents" constitute the largest parliamentary block.

The Brotherhood, however, does not constitute a direct threat to Washington's economic and strategic interests in the region. Western intelligence agencies have a longstanding history of collaboration with the Brotherhood. Britain's support of the Brotherhood instrumented through the British Secret Service dates back to the 1940s. Starting in the 1950s, according to former intelligence official William Baer, "The CIA [funnelled] support to the Muslim Brotherhood because of “the Brotherhood’s commendable capability to overthrow Nasser.”1954-1970: CIA and the Muslim Brotherhood Ally to Oppose Egyptian President Nasser, These covert links to the CIA were maintained in the post-Nasser era.

Concluding Remarks

The removal of Hosni Mubarak has, for several years, been on the drawing board of US foreign policy.

Regime replacement serves to ensure continuity, while providing the illusion that meaningful political change has occurred.

Washington's agenda for Egypt has been to "hijack the protest movement" and replace president Hosni Mubarak with a new compliant puppet head of state. Washington's objective is to sustain the interests of foreign powers, to uphold the neoliberal economic agenda which has served to impoverish the Egyptian population.

From Washington's standpoint, regime replacement no longer requires the installation of an authoritarian military regime as in the heyday of US imperialism, It can be implemented by co-opting political parties, including the Left, financing civil society groups, infiltrating the protest movement and manipulating national elections.

With reference to the protest movement in Egypt, President Obama stated in a January 28 video broadcast on Youtube: "The Government Should Not Resort to Violence". The more fundamental question is what is the source of that violence? Egypt is the largest recipient of US military aid after Israel. The Egyptian military is considered to be the power base of the Mubarak regime:

"The country’s army and police forces are geared to the teeth thanks to more than $1 billion in military aid a year from Washington. ... When the US officially describes Egypt as “an important ally” it is inadvertently referring to Mubarak’s role as a garrison outpost for US military operations and dirty war tactics in the Middle East and beyond. There is clear evidence from international human rights groups that countless “suspects” rendered by US forces in their various territories of (criminal) operations are secretly dumped in Egypt for “deep interrogation”. The country serves as a giant “Guantanamo” of the Middle East, conveniently obscured from US public interest and relieved of legal niceties over human rights." (Finian Cunningham, Egypt: US-Backed Repression is Insight for American Public, Global Research, January 28, 2010).

America is no "Role Model" of Democratization for the Middle East. US military presence imposed on Egypt and the Arab World for more than 20 years, coupled with "free market" reforms are the root cause of State violence.

America's intent is to use the protest movement to install a new regime.

The People's Movement should redirect its energies: Identify the relationship between America and "the dictator". Unseat America's political puppet but do not forget to target the "real dictators".

Shunt the process of regime change.

Dismantle the neoliberal reforms.

Close down US military bases in the Arab World.

Establish a truly sovereign government.

Magda Hassan
01-31-2011, 12:06 AM
Groton Guard detachment is heading to Egypt

Published 01/24/2011 12:00 AM
Updated 01/24/2011 04:59 AM



(http://www.addthis.com/bookmark.php?v=250)




Groton - Connecticut National Guard Detachment 2, Company I, 185th Aviation Regiment of Groton has mobilized and will deploy to the Sinai Peninsula, Egypt, to support the Multinational Force and Observers.

The unit left Connecticut Jan. 15 for Fort Benning, Ga., for further training and validation. The unit operates C-23C Sherpa aircraft and has deployed three times in the last seven years in support of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The unit will provide an on-demand aviation asset to the Multinational Force and Observers commander to support its mission of supervising the security provisions of the Egypt/ Israel Peace Treaty.

Chief Warrant Officer Four James Smith of Ivoryton commands the aviation unit.
http://www.theday.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=%2F20110124%2FNWS09%2F301249955%2F-1%2Fnws

Magda Hassan
01-31-2011, 03:48 AM
Egyptian Activists' Action Plan: Translated

Jan 27 2011, 7:40 PM ET By Alexis Madrigal (http://www.theatlantic.com/alexis-madrigal/) Comment (http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2011/01/egyptian-activists-action-plan-translated/70388/#disqus_thread)
Egyptian activists have been circulating a kind of primer to Friday's planned protest. We were sent the plan by two separate sources and have decided to publish excerpts here, with translations into English. Over Twitter, we connected with a translator, who translated the document with exceptional speed.

What follows are side-by-side translations of nine pages from the 26-page pamphlet. They were translated over the last hour and pasted up in Photoshop to give you an idea of what's in the protest plan. While the plan itself contains specifics about what protesters might do, these excerpts show how one might equip oneself for clashes with riot police. Egyptian security forces have repeatedly beaten protesters as the level of violent repression of demonstrations has ratcheted upwards (http://video.ap.org/?f=None&pid=oT7qj_wiVHTbYae3scwok4_irYjJ2R8Z). For more context on the pamphlet itself, the Guardian UK ran a summary (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jan/27/egypt-protest-leaflets-mass-action) of it earlier today.

As you'll read, the creators of the pamphlet explicitly asked that the pamphlet not be distributed on Twitter or Facebook, only through email or other contacts. We're publishing this piece of ephemera because we think it's a fascinating part of the historical record of what may end up becoming a very historic day for Egypt.

The pages included are 1, 2, 3, 4, 10, 12, 13, 22, and 26. You can click to (roughly) double the size of the images.

Update 8:21pm: People have asked why these particular pages were chosen. We had limited resources, so we knew we'd only be able to translate an excerpt. My guiding principles were to stay away from the small amount of tactical information in the pamphlet. Instead, we ran the more general pages. There is nothing in these pages that goes beyond standard advice and broad political statements. Broadly, we were trying to balance the historic nature of the document and protest with the safety of protesters. Publishing this excerpt was the compromise at which we arrived.

Update 8:48pm: Our translator requested that his name and Twitter handle be removed from the post. We complied.

Updated 8:57pm: Added context around why this information might be necessary for protesters.

Update 9:32am: A refinement of the document's translation has been made. Meanwhile, the Internet remains shut off in Egypt as protesters across the country clash with security forces wielding large amounts of tear gas and powerful water cannons. While the Internet remains shut off, @Jan25Voices (http://www.twitter.com/Jan25Voices/) is tweeting updates from phone calls with Egyptians. Al Jazeera English (http://english.aljazeera.net/watch_now/) is providing excellent coverage from the ground.
http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2011/01/egyptian-activists-action-plan-translated/70388/

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Bernice Moore
01-31-2011, 04:49 AM
http://www.presstv.ir/usdetail/162768.html

CIA POINT MAN TAPPED AS MUBAREK VP

Paul Rigby
01-31-2011, 06:12 AM
The pattern continues to emerge: The Nobel prize winner as CIA puppet


Who's Behind The Uprising In Egypt?

Rude Awakening!

By Soraya Sepahpour-Ulrich

http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article27383.htm

January 31, 2010 "Information Clearing House" -- Eyes fixed on Egypt, the consensus is that we are witnessing a global awakening. Mesmerized by the crowds, mainstream media reports, and 'pundits' analysis, we have abandoned our ability to think critically -- we fail to ask the right question: Why is the mainstream media in the U.S., the propaganda apparatus of the State and interest groups, condemning the Egyptian leader -- America and Israel's most subservient ally?

Clearly, we no longer suffer from short term memory in this country -- we suffer from a total loss of memory.

We tend to forget that well over a year ago, political actors in America and allied nations had full knowledge that Egypt's Hosni Mubarak was terminally ill. Certain that his reign was coming to a close, they devised a plan to compensate the inevitable loss of Mubarak's unconditional support. A plan was put into motion to assist orchestrate an uprising which would benefit their interests. The idea was to support the uprising so that an ally could be placed in Egypt without raising suspicion. Not only would America be seen as a benevolent force acting in good faith, contrary to its hypocritical policies, but perhaps more importantly for the decision makers, Israel's interests would be served - again - at the expense of the Arab world.

Who would be the wiser for it? It seems the public has fallen for the plan.

Media 'pundits' are eager to blame the timing of the protests in Egypt on economic hardships. Citing Egypt's jobless and inordinate poverty, they would have us believe that the American 'social media', Tweeter in particular, has prompted and aided the protests. They would have us believe that in spite of the fact that the Egyptians cry over the price of wheat, they have cell phones and access to social media. We are to accept that the poor, hungry, and jobless Egyptians are revolting against their lot by 'tweeting' in English.

Their access to modern technology aside, we are told to accept that the knowledge of English among 80 million Egyptians is so strong that they can 'tweet' -- fully comfortable with tweeter abbreviations and acronyms. Else, we are to believe that Egypt is busy 'tweeting' in Arabic even if Twitter does not lend itself to Arabic any more than it does to Persian.

When Iran's opposition leader, Mir-Hossein Mousavi compared the Egypt uprising to the 2009 post-election protests in Iran, he had a point. Both had an outside source. During the 2009 protests in Iran, 'tweets' were traced back to Israel (see link). The rumors and support for the "opposition" initiated in the West though Tehran Bureau -- partnered with the American PBS. A CNN desk was created to give the protests full coverage.

America has been attempting to undermine Iran's government for over 30 years. The media has helped to demonize the regime. Why would the media treat this obedient tyrant the same way? The mainstream media, as well as the 'left' are reporting on Egypt's protests round the clock. It is important to ask why.

For decades, the American government and allies have snuffed nationalist sentiments in the region in favor of dictators. Iran's Mossadegh, a fierce secular nationalist, who was democratically elected to be prime minister of Iran, was removed by a CIA-backed coup when he nationalized Iran’s oil and the oppressive Shah put in power. This political action led to the 1979 revolution. America lost a valuable puppet in the region.

Similarly, the nationalization of the Suez Canal by Egypt's patriotic Nasser led to his demise, paving the way for the eventual installation of a puppet regime - Mubarak.

But Mubarak is dying. Fearful of losing an important ally in Egypt's Mubarak, the political elite in America have undertaken a calculated risk: siding with the Egyptians to promote 'democracy' - hoping to help put in place one of their own. How likely is it that they will prevail in Egypt where they failed in Iran? Could it be that apprehensive about the future of Egypt, more importantly, its alliance with and subordination to Israel, the Noble Laureate option is being played?

Amongst the neoliberals, a new wave of thinking emerged which endorsed the idea of promoting 'democracy' ("liberal Imperialism") in order to evolve hegemonism to imperialism. Their thinking emphasized the 'character of the political leadership'. A wave of books centered on 'democratic transitions' that focused on the character of the leader with the right ideas appeared. They planned to emphasis new successful leaders such as Vaclav Havel, Nelson Mandela, Lech Walesa in order to promote their own in places of interest.

These neoliberals believed that "transition to 'democracy' required focusing on "political strategies" and introducing "indeterminancy" and "uncertainty" into the process of political change which they believed would be ground for cautious optimism that 'democracy' could catch on. Laureates were appointed: Shirin Ebadi, El Baradei, Obama, Liu Xiaobo...

Mr. ElBaradei, the Nobel Laureate and former chief of IAEA, applauded the violation of the NNPT with his acceptance speech as he praised the Bush-India nuclear deal - an NPT violation. Ally S. Korea's NPT violations were given a pass under his supervision, as well as that of Egypt's. In violation of the spirit of the NPT, he allowed the illegal referral of Iran to the UN Security Council. Mr. ElBaradei had proven himself worthy of American trust - he could be relied on and deserved a Nobel prize. He announced his readiness to run for president of Egypt.

Although not supported by protestors (no doubt placing him under house arrest will give him a boost), ElBaradei's return to Egypt enables the American politicians to speak from both sides of their mouths -- supporting the protestors' rights while supporting their ally. How could they go wrong? The thought process in this country (and elsewhere) has been guided and controlled by mainstream media and pundits, many of them neoconservatives. Curiously, the 24-7 media and its pundits have steered clear of ElBaradei and his arrest.

Sadly, the American political elite love Einstein's science but ignore his wisdom. When Einstein alerted FDR to the possibility of a nuclear weapon by the Germans, he was listened to and the way was paved for the Manhattan Project. America developed the heinous weapons of mass murder and dropped it on hundreds of thousands of Japanese citizen in the name of peace. Regrettably, as the Middle East and Africa react to America's decades of neocolonialist policies, Einstein's definition of insanity --"doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results" -- is more apt than ever.

America (and her allies) has practiced the same damning foreign policy for several decades, each time expecting a new result. This political insanity manifests itself as the decision makers interfere in sovereignty of other countries - believing that they can continue to fool all the people all the time. Their controlled chaos may get out of hand and following the painful 'pangs' of neocolonial rule, we may witness the birth of a new world order.

Soraya Sepahpour-Ulrich has a degree in Public Diplomacy from USC Annenberg for Communication and Journalism. She is an independent researcher and writer with a focus on U.S. foreign policy and the role of lobby groups in influencing US foreign policy.

Magda Hassan
01-31-2011, 06:17 AM
Quelle surprise! Yes, very middle class. The working class are still at work on the farms and scratching a living.

Magda Hassan
01-31-2011, 10:31 AM
Supposedly a co-opted movement. Don't know much about it.

David Guyatt
01-31-2011, 11:42 AM
(my bolding)




The unit will provide an on-demand aviation asset to the Multinational Force and Observers commander to support its mission of supervising the security provisions of the Egypt/ Israel Peace Treaty.


Ahem. What does this mean?

Magda Hassan
01-31-2011, 11:55 AM
I expect it is mostly to do with control of the Suez.

There is also the issue that there could not be any UN observation force to ensure the treaty due to the veto of the USSR (then) so Israel, Egypt and the US made their own security arrangements outside of the UN.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egypt%E2%80%93Israel_Peace_Treaty
and
http://www.mfa.gov.il/MFA/Peace%20Process/Guide%20to%20the%20Peace%20Process/Israel-Egypt%20Peace%20Treaty
In particular this
Article IV



In order to provide maximum security for both Parties on the basis of reciprocity, agreed security arrangements will be established including limited force zones in Egyptian and Israeli territory, and United Nations forces and observers, described in detail as to nature and timing in Annex I, and other security arrangements the Parties may agree upon.
The Parties agree to the stationing of United Nations personnel in areas described in Annex I. The Parties agree not to request withdrawal of the United Nations personnel and that these personnel will not be removed unless such removal is approved by the Security Council of the United Nations, with the affirmative vote of the five Permanent Members, unless the Parties otherwise agree.
A Joint Commission will be established to facilitate the implementation of the Treaty, as provided for in Annex I.
The security arrangements provided for in paragraphs 1 and 2 of this Article may at the request of either party be reviewed and amended by mutual agreement of the Parties.

David Guyatt
01-31-2011, 12:11 PM
Thanks Magda, that's it - the Suez etc.

PS, I have to say that BBC TV News is 24/7 this story. The "expert" view now is that there has to be a change of leadership, that Mubarak has to go. And the general tenor has changed too -- criticizing Mubarak's "sclerotic" style.

Ho, ho, ho.

Peter Lemkin
01-31-2011, 08:48 PM
AMY GOODMAN: The massive protests in Egypt have entered their seventh day as tens of thousands pack into Tahrir Square in Cairo. Protesters are vowing to stay in the streets until President Hosni Mubarak resigns. A general strike was called for today, and a "million man march" is being organized for Tuesday.

The Egyptian government continues to crack down on protesters and the media. Earlier today, six Al Jazeera journalists were arrested, their equipment seized. On Sunday, Egyptian authorities closed Al Jazeera’s offices in Egypt and removed the news station from the main TV satellite provider.

The internet has been completely shut off across most of Egypt. One of the only internet service providers still operating is the Noor Group, the company that manages the service for the Egyptian Stock Exchange and banks. Social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter have been completely shut down.

Well, Democracy Now! senior producer Sharif Abdel Kouddous is in Egypt, and we’ve developed a workaround to circumvent the Mubarak regime’s internet blackout. His round-the-clock tweets are being read around the world. Last night, CNN International highlighted one of them.

CNN INTERNATIONAL: Let’s go to a trends map here that we’re looking at to see the trending topics out of Cairo on Twitter. Now, still at the top here is Mubarak. But what’s interesting to note is how ElBaradei has come up in a popularity so much in the last few hours. That’s referring to Mohamed ElBaradei. Now, let’s see what some Twitter users there are saying about him.

"Baradei seen as non-corrupt, is respected. But he lived away too long, didn’t join earlier protests & this revolt was done w/o his help."

AMY GOODMAN: That was CNN International last night reading one of Sharif’s tweets. Sharif grew up in Mubarak’s Egypt. He was only three years old when the current regime came to power. He comes from a prominent Egyptian family with a long history in the arts, literature, film and politics.

Sharif, you landed in your home city of Cairo just a few days ago, but it was not the same country you grew up in. Describe your feelings and what you have found, but start at the airport.

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: Well, Amy, I’ve traveled to Egypt countless times from the United States after I moved there for college and then work, and when my plane from JFK touched down in Cairo International Airport on Saturday, the day after the massive protest where the protesters beat back the Interior Ministry, police and state security forces, I did land in a different country than the one I had known my entire life. Egypt has been reborn. This is not the Hosni Mubarak’s Egypt anymore. And no matter what happens next, it will never be again.

This is a unprecedented popular uprising, the likes of which myself and many others never thought they would see under President Mubarak. They are taking to the streets, men and women, rich and poor, all segments of society. They are defying the curfew for the past few days, packing into Tahrir Square. And their mood is celebratory, and it’s victorious. They are sure. They are sure that they will not leave until Mubarak does. And they are chanting in the streets every day.

They talk about what has taken place over the past week with such pride in what they have done. Tomorrow marks a week from the January 25th National Police Day, when the first protest began, and culminated on Friday. Friday was essentially a battle between the Interior Ministry and the people, and the people won. They talk about how they came up on the bridges leading to Tahrir, faced off with hundreds and hundreds of riot police from the Interior Ministry, from the state security forces, and were met with violence. They talk with how they walked with their hands up in the air, showing that they were coming peacefully, chanting, "Salmiya! Salmiya!" which means "Peacefully." And they were beat down. They were tear-gassed over and over again.

And I’m not talking about, you know, hardcore activists and protesters, which have been taking to the streets increasingly over the last few years; I’m talking about people who had been depoliticized over the last few years, people from the middle class, young, the Facebook generation. What one person told me, this is the revolution of the Facebook generation. They came out in droves, old and young, and they took the streets. And what one person told me was, when they would be beat down and tear-gassed, others would come in and rush the police, and then they would fall down, and others would come back after them. And they said, "We gave each other courage."

And as of 5:30 p.m., the police completely disappeared, reportedly on order, from the streets of Cairo. They were in full retreat, and they have disappeared. There is not a traffic policeman in Cairo. There’s not any police anywhere. They have come down to the streets today.

But since then, the military came in. And as many saw the images on the screens of how the military was greeted warmly on the streets of Cairo, you know, crowds were roaring with approval as tanks rolled in. And what’s important to understand is that, you know, over the past decades, three decades, the state, the security forces and the police have been brutalizing, have been torturing the Egyptian people, have been wrongly imprisoning them, have been corrupt. But the army has not done this. The army has not had an interaction with the civilian population since the 1973 war with Israel. And so, people trust the army. I’ve seen unbelievable scenes in Tahrir Square, where tanks have been just covered with people riding on the turret of the tank and all over the tanks, chanting. They pray on the tanks. They chant, "Al-gysh al-sha’ab yd wahda," which means "The army, the people are one hand." And I’ve seen soldiers carried on the shoulders of crowds through the crowds, chanting, holding flowers.

Now, it remains to be seen what will happen going forward. Yesterday in Tahrir, at 4:00, there’s been a 4:00 p.m. curfew yesterday. Today it’s actually 3:00 p.m. I’m talking to you, and the curfew is now in effect. I will be going to Tahrir after this interview. But people are in defiance of any kind of authority until Hosni Mubarak leaves. And yesterday we saw, in Tahrir, military jets, two fighter jets, and a helicopter continually swoop and do flyovers over Tahrir Square right at 4:00 p.m., when the curfew went into effect. And the jets kept getting louder and louder as they came lower. And whether it was an act of intimidation or not is unclear. But the crowds did not care. They waved and whistled and shouted to the planes as they passed overhead.

There really is an unbelievable feeling of community now, of people coming together. I’ve never seen Egypt this way. People are picking up trash in Tahrir Square. People are handing out food. People are helping each other. People are sleeping in the middle of Tahrir Square and setting up tents in the middle of the square. It is a scene that is very emotional. It’s something that no one thought could come together. It’s largely leaderless. I mean, no one—there’s no one organizing group. This is a popular uprising across all segments of society. Opposition groups have come now into the fold. They are—the Muslim Brotherhood is here, and other opposition groups. But people don’t want it coopted. And, you know, one of the things that I witnessed that was very moving was a lot of the Brotherhood started chanting, "Allah Akbar," and then—which means "God is great" in Arabic. And then the counter chant that was much louder, reverberating over them, was to "Muslim, Christian, we are all Egyptian." And that really symbolizes what’s happening here in Egypt today.

And, you know, Amy, I’ve seen some reports—I’ve had very little access to any kind of outside news. They really have shut down—the internet is completely shut down here. Cell phones do work now, and people are starting to be able to call each other. There is no texting; no SMS texting goes out. And they are very afraid of the internet, because Facebook was how they organized this uprising, to begin with. It was organized on Facebook. And there’s also mass SMS texting that is very common here in Egypt. And so, they’ve kept that shut down to try and cut off the communications from people. But people in Cairo do not care. They are going right now—I can see droves heading to Tahrir. And what’s significant, they go at the time of the curfew. They go when the curfew is there, and that’s when they start heading out.

And there’s been many reports of violence, of looting. And I just want to be very clear about this, that there was a significant amount of looting on Friday after the police completely disappeared from the scene. Certain places in Mohandessin in downtown Cairo were burned. Banks were burned. Some shops were looted. And, you know, there’s been reports of armed gangs coming around and robbing houses. Some of that did happen, yes, but what’s been amazing and what’s also kind of another phase of how this is Egypt coming together in this popular movement is that people have taken to the streets and formed these very efficient neighborhood watch committees. Where I live here in Zamalek, there’s groups of men, young and old, they stand, they form barricades. They are armed with metal pipes, some with bats. Some do have guns. And what they do is they check people coming in. They check their IDs. They’re very courteous. They allow people to go through if they believe you live in the neighborhood. They have really—they’re protecting their own. They’re protecting their homes. They are directing traffic. Well, the traffic cops are back in the streets of Cairo today, but before that, they were directing traffic. I’ve never seen Cairo traffic so smooth. One former diplomat I spoke with said, "It’s amazing. These 15-year-old kids are doing such a much better job than our traffic police."

That’s the story of what’s happening here. And people are so fed up with Mubarak, it’s hard to describe. They curse him. They want him to step down. And they will not leave the streets of Cairo, the streets of Egypt, until he does.

AMY GOODMAN: We’re talking to Sharif Abdel Kouddous on the ground in Cairo, who has figured out a workaround and is tweeting tweets, being seen around the world. You can go to our website at democracynow.org, so you can see what Sharif is reporting throughout the day, as well as his blogs each day of what is happening in Cairo.

I wanted to turn now, Sharif, to the Nobel Peace laureate, the former head of the IAEA, International Atomic Energy Agency, Mohamed ElBaradei, who came into Tahrir Square this weekend and spoke. Well, on Sunday, CNN’s Fareed Zakaria questioned ElBaradei about the Muslim Brotherhood.

FAREED ZAKARIA: One of the visions that haunts Americans is of the Iranian Revolution, where a dictator, pro-American dictator, was replaced by an even worse regime that was even more anti-American and more threatening to the region. People worry about the Muslim Brotherhood. Are you confident that a post-Mubarak Egypt will not give rise to some kind of Islamic fundamentalist force that will undermine the democracy of Egypt?

MOHAMED ELBARADEI: I am quite confident of that, Fareed. This is a myth that was sold by the Mubarak regime, that it’s either us, the ruthless dictators, or a Muslim al-Qaeda type. You know, the Muslim Brotherhood has nothing to do with the Iranian model, has nothing to do with extremism, as we have seen it in Afghanistan and other places. The Muslim Brotherhood is a religiously conservative group. They are a minority in Egypt. They are not a majority of the Egyptian people. But they have a lot of credibility because all the other liberal parties have been smothered for 30 years.

They are in favor of a secular state. They are in favor of working on the base of a constitution that have red lines, that every Egyptian have the same rights, same obligation. The state in no way will be a state based on religion. And I have been reaching out to them. We need to include them. They are part of the Egyptian society, as much as the Marxist party here. I think this myth that has been perpetuated and sold by the regime has no—has no iota of reality. As you know, Fareed, I’ve worked with Iranians. I have worked here. There is 100 percent difference between the two societies.

AMY GOODMAN: That was Mohamed ElBaradei speaking on CNN over the weekend. Sharif Abdel Kouddous, can you talk about the role of the Muslim Brotherhood?

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: Well, first of all, Amy, it’s not for Fareed Zakaria or anyone else to decide what groups or what people are palatable to the United States to lead Egypt. That is up for Egyptians for themselves to decide. And so, I reject the way he asked that question.

But as far as the Muslim Brotherhood is concerned, Mohamed ElBaradei did have some good points. They are a religious group. They are the largest opposition group here in Egypt, which doesn’t say much because of the clampdown on any kind of opposition and dissent. They have renounced violence decades ago. They fulfilled a lot of the services that the state abandoned. And so, a lot of people have gone to—do support them.

But again, they were not the ones that organized this uprising. They were not the ones that were in the streets. They were not the ones who fill Tahrir right now. Tahrir is being filled, and Cairo and Egypt is being, filled by people of all segments of society. In the future, will the Brotherhood play a part? I’m sure they’ll be a significant force; there is no question of that. And it is true, they are different from the Iranian regime. But again, whether the Muslim Brotherhood or anyone else fits the U.S. model of what democracy should be like—democracy is for people to choose for themselves.

And the Egyptian people want to choose for themselves. That’s all they’re asking. They’re very politically aware. They’re aware of the U.S. support for the Mubarak regime for the last 30 years. I’ve had protesters come up to me—people come up to me holding up tear gas canisters, fired tear gas canisters, showing me the "Made in U.S.A." sign, showing me how, you know, the weapons used against them were made in the U.S. They realize this. And all they ask for—you know, this isn’t a big anti-American rally. You don’t see burning of American flags or anything like that. All they ask for is to be left alone to be able to decide for themselves.

AMY GOODMAN: Sharif, I’d like to ask you to stay on the phone. We’re going to be joined by two guests in Washington and in New York, but I’d like you to join in at any point, as your observations are key on the ground in Cairo. Sharif Abdel Kouddous is a senior producer here at Democracy Now! He flew into Cairo over the weekend. You can follow his blogs, his tweets at democracynow.org. This is Democracy Now!, democracynow.org, The War and Peace Report. We’ll be back in a minute.

[break]

AMY GOODMAN: Sharif Abdel Kouddous, Democracy Now! senior producer, is on the ground in Cairo. Sharif, I wanted to continue to discuss how—your feelings as you flew into the country. You come from one of the most prominent families in Egypt, your grandfather one of the most famous writers, Ihsan Abdel Quddous. Your great-grandmother, Rosa al Youssef, a magazine she founded still exists today. And your uncle—you came into Tahrir Square, where you saw him being greeted by many. Describe the scene.

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: Well, Amy, my uncle is Mohamed Abdel Quddoos. He’s a leading opposition protester. He’s now head of the Freedom Committee at the Press Syndicate, and he has ties to the Muslim Brotherhood himself. And, Amy, he’s been protesting for years. There’s been a growing movement here in Egypt of protests, of people trying to voice their dissent. But they have been harshly clamped down on. And what we typically used to see was people like my uncle and other opposition voices speaking in Tahrir on the steps of the Press Syndicate, but they would be about a dozen and then surrounded by hundreds of police, and it would be quickly shut down. They would be arrested. They would be driven out into the middle of the desert and left there, without their wallet or phone, to find their way back, which is a common tactic by the police—completely shut down. And for years, my uncle was—his standard attire, he would leave the building wearing a suit, holding a megaphone and a flag of Egypt in his hand, and he would go into the streets.

And this was—I saw him yesterday in the square. He was there with his megaphone and flag and his suit all crumpled because he had spent the night in Tahrir. And I sat down next to him, and I said, "How are you feeling now?" And he was overwhelmed with emotion. He said, "This is a dream come true." And he pointed over to where the Press Syndicate is, and he said, "You remember when I used to stand on the steps of that Press Syndicate to protest? I would stand alone. Now look at everyone. They’re all here with me."

And he went on to say how this was not his uprising, it was not his revolt. He said this was done by young people. And he’s the one who called it "the revolution of the Facebook generation." He said there’s been—he said, "Tunis was the catalyst and the spark, but it’s been building for so many years." And he said there’s three similarities between Egypt and Tunis that he saw. He said this was organized through Facebook and was a leaderless movement—that’s one. He said the president will fall; of that, he is sure—that’s two. And three, he says the army supports the people and won’t harm them; of that, he is sure, too.

But it was a very moving scene being with him there. And the people in Tahrir, the people who came out to protest, who recognized him, his years of struggle alone—and as I was talking to him, dozens of people would come shake his hand, kiss him hello, take pictures with him. And they paying tribute to his years of struggle that have helped to bring about this mass uprising in the streets.

And just one last thing, Amy, before you move on. I know—

AMY GOODMAN: Just one point, Sharif, just one point—

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: Go ahead.

AMY GOODMAN: In the first few days of this uprising, he was one of the first arrested. Is that right?

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: Oh, yes. On Tuesday, the first day, on January 25th, he was on the steps of the Press Syndicate with other journalists. They were protesting. He was arrested by five plainclothes police officers. There was a picture of him being dragged away that was circulated widely on the internet and on Facebook. He was held for several hours at a police station. When they realized who he was, they let him go. He refused to leave until other students, 20 other students that were arrested with him, were let go. And so, he remained in the prison for about six more hours, until the students were let go, as well. He was also arrested again on Friday and driven out, in that same tactic, out into the desert. But he came back.

And one thing, Amy, I think there’s been this fear of the police force and of the interior state security forces for so long. Regardless of what happens, if they come back in the streets, if they come back into power, I don’t think the Egyptian people will ever fear them in the same way again, because they went to battle against them and they won. And I think they are the ones who will be afraid of the people now.

AMY GOODMAN: Sharif Abdel Kouddous, reporting from the ground in Cairo, Egypt.

Magda Hassan
02-01-2011, 01:01 AM
I am assuming that the Egyptian government and military have some sort of connection perhaps through the US :unclesam: (or Israeli ! :spy::shock:) system. They need to access the Swiss bank accounts after all. Oh, and communicate with each other.

Egypt's Net on Life Support

By Earl Zmijewski (http://www.renesys.com/blog/) on January 31, 2011 12:05 PM | 6 Comments (http://www.renesys.com/blog/2011/01/egypts-net-on-life-support.shtml#comments) | No TrackBacks (http://www.renesys.com/blog/2011/01/egypts-net-on-life-support.shtml#trackbacks)

As of approximately 20:46 UTC, four hours after this blog was first published, Noor started disappearing from the Internet. They are completely unavailable at present as shown below (http://www.renesys.com/blog/2011/01/egypts-net-on-life-support.shtml#latest)
As we observed last week (http://www.renesys.com/blog/2011/01/egypt-leaves-the-internet.shtml), Egypt took the unprecedented step of withdrawing from the Internet. The government didn't simply block Twitter and Facebook (an increasingly common tactic of regimes under fire), but rather they apparently ordered most major Egyptian providers to cease service via their international providers, effectively removing Egyptian IP space from the global Internet and cutting off essentially all access to the outside world via this medium. The only way out now would be via traditional phone calls, assuming they left that system up, or via satellite. We thought the Internet ban would be temporary, but much to our surprise, the situation has not changed. One of the few Egyptian providers reachable today, four days after the start of the crisis, is The Noor Group (http://www.noor.net/). In this blog, we'll take a quick look at them and some of the businesses they serve.

Follow the Money
Noor provides Internet service for a number of Egyptian and international concerns. To name just a few, we see I-score (http://www.i-score.com.eg/), the Egyptian Credit Bureau; and NTG (http://www.ntgegypt.com/), the National Technology Group providing IT processing to the aviation, banking and financial sectors. The American University in Cairo (http://www.aucegypt.edu/Pages/default.aspx) also gets Internet connectivity via Noor, as does the Egyptian Exchange (http://www.renesys.com/blog/2011/01/nilex.com.eg). As of this writing, these sites and many others hosted in Egypt are reachable, although access can be very slow.
http://www.renesys.com/blog/assets_c/2011/01/egexchange-thumb-600x155-198.png (http://www.renesys.com/blog/assets_c/2011/01/egexchange-198.shtml)
Perhaps surprisingly, the MCDR (http://www.thomasmurray.com/countries-depositories/Egypt_MCDR.html) (which handles the settlement of equities, corporate and government debt) cannot be reached at present, despite having Noor transit. But the situation is much too volatile to read anything into this.
The Noor Group

Internet routers listen to announcements of IP address blocks, known as prefixes, originating from Autonomous Systems (ASes). By acting on these announcements, Internet routing can function without any centeralized authority. ASes are typically associated with major businesses, Internet providers, or government agencies and are free to buy Internet transit from anyone they like and route their traffic in any way they choose. Unless, of course, as in Egypt's case, the government intrudes. In terms of ASes and prefixes, we can map out the Noor Group's connectivity, both to its customers and its providers, as it stands today. The following diagram gives some of the details.
http://www.renesys.com/blog/assets_c/2011/01/noor-thumb-600x498-201.png (http://www.renesys.com/blog/assets_c/2011/01/noor-201.shtml)
Things are not always as they seem
Remember that the Internet does not respect geography and so interpreting what you see can be very tricky. For example, you might think that the site for The Suzanne Mubarak Science Exploration Center (http://www.almasryalyoum.com/en/news/egypts-museums-xiii-suzanne-mubarak-science-exploration-center) would be hosted in Egypt. The associated IP address belongs to the prefix 213.247.0.0/20, which is registered at AfriNIC (http://whois.afrinic.net/cgi-bin/whois) to this center and with a physical Cairo street address. But in fact, from our vantage point, the web site is hosted in London. The site also has an online poll (http://www.almasryalyoum.com/en/poll/do-you-think-regimes-response-protesters-demands-are-satisfactory) that asks "Do you think the regime's response to the protesters' demands are satisfactory?"
What's next?
We'll continue to monitor Egypt's connectivity, and we'll report again when there is any substantive change. We really hope this situation does not continue and look forward to welcoming Egypt back to the 'net. Trying to ban the Internet in this century is a bit like trying to ban the wheel in centuries past. With each hour that passes, the uncertainty grows over the ultimate economic impact (http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/31/world/middleeast/31alexandria.html?_r=1&hp) on Egypt's people of this unprecedented Internet blackout.
Update: (21:00 UTC Monday)
As of approximately 20:46 UTC, Noor is no longer reachable from outside of Egypt.
http://www.renesys.com/blog/assets_c/2011/01/Noor_outages-thumb-600x450-206.png (http://www.renesys.com/blog/assets_c/2011/01/Noor_outages-206.shtml)



http://www.renesys.com/blog/2011/01/egypts-net-on-life-support.shtml

Pamela McElwain-Brown
02-01-2011, 02:39 AM
This is all very strange. When Hillary spoke on CNN yesterday she did not seem her usual animated self. Something is off. Is it simply that our govt has been caught off guard, or something more?

In addition to a social network connection to the situation in Egypt, it seems there is also a Wikileaks aspect, in that cables that Bradley Manning leaked to them discussed Egypt and were read there. Assange was on 60 Minutes last night, and while the interview was undoubtedly taped earlier, there was a sense that he believes the free press that he is demonstrating is capable of creating upheaval.

Now Egypt has gone dark in terms of the net and cel phones, with the anticipated march in a few hours. Pres. Carter has been brave enough to state that Mubarak needs to resign. Could that be next?

Jeffrey Orling
02-01-2011, 02:57 AM
He's a goner and the US has egg on its face per usual. They want another puppet in the worst way. Democracy and unfettered free market trans national capitalism mix like oil and water. When we talk "democracy" and "freedom" we mean freedom of markets for capitalists... and democracy means you get to serve on your buddy's board and vote him enormous compensation package.

Magda Hassan
02-01-2011, 03:11 AM
Yes, Jeffrey. There is precious little democracy in the US as it is. They're trying to line up the VP but I doubt he will be any more acceptable. The people want an Argentine solution, just as in Tunisia, they all must go.

Keith Millea
02-01-2011, 03:14 AM
This is all very strange. When Hillary spoke on CNN yesterday she did not seem her usual animated self. Something is off. Is it simply that our govt has been caught off guard, or something more?



I wouldn't be myself either if I had to stand before the world and talk bullshit.

Yes,Queen Hillary stands naked again. :shock: And it ain't pretty.....

Magda Hassan
02-01-2011, 03:23 AM
What’s Behind the Tumult in Egypt?

by Dr. K R Bolton

February 1, 2011




It seems that mobs of youth marching through the streets, fists clenched, chanting banal slogans and using “democracy” as a buzz-word, is sufficient to send Western liberaldom into spasms delight, despite it all by now being a very well-worn formula in the process of globalization. There seems to be a lack of explanation as to why those who feign opposition to globalization and American world hegemony get so enthused about phenomena that serve both of these.
http://www.foreignpolicyjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/tahrir-square-300x194.jpg (http://www.foreignpolicyjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/tahrir-square.jpg)Tahrir Square, Cairo (Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)

Overthrowing a regime because it is not “democratic” in the Western parliamentary sense seems a poor result when the outcome is yet another brick in the foundation of what is often called the “new world order.” It is somewhat akin to the universal ecstasy that took place when the evil Afrikaners were overthrown and a regime was established behind the façade of “human rights” and “democracy,” when the only real achievement has been to privatise and globalize the economy; as in Kosovo also, and a bunch of states of the former Soviet bloc that have undergone the same process of “color revolutions” that are taking place now in Tunisia, Egypt and elsewhere in the Arab world.
Perhaps something good will come of the unrest, and the new regimes will offer some sound Arabic ideals beyond Western-inspired clichés about “democracy,” of the type offered by Nasser’s “Arab socialism.” However, given the way such bourgeois revolutions have usually worked out elsewhere, there is not yet sufficient reason to be optimistic.
As I have tried to point out in my recent article on Tunisia for Foreign Policy Journal,[1] the present tumult over the Arab world is following precisely the same revolutionary formula as that which resulted in the dismantling of the Soviet bloc, and via “color revolutions” the installation of “open societies” (sic); that is to say, “open” to the ravages of global capitalism and subordination to US foreign policy, all in the cherished name of “democracy” – of course. Excuse me if I am not grateful to George Soros, NED, et al for dismantling the Soviet edifice in the name of “democracy.”
As for the situation unfolding in Egypt, a few salient features are already apparent. The Los Angeles Times has carried an illuminating interview with Ahmed Maher, the “leader of the youth movement that has shaken the Egyptian Government by rallying thousands of protesters into the streets this week.”
The first paragraph for the L. A. Times article is itself telling, as we are informed that there is a “youth movement,” which implies something more than a “spontaneous protest” (sic) in the way in which such “color revolutions” are always depicted.
Maher heads the April 6th Youth Movement. The L. A. Times states that (as with the other “color revolutions,”) techno-savvy youth are the ones playing the lead role, using gadgetry that is not so easy for regimes to control. These young Egyptians, states the Times, are not beholden to any particular religion or ideology. They are not part of the “traditional opposition voices.” This (and other “color revolutions”) has indeed been a revolt generated by what Maher calls “a generational gap in Egypt…. Young activists are fired up, and they have no allegiances to anything but change.” Maher states: “My inspiration comes from experiences, not personalities. I admire the Orange Revolution in Ukraine and the [Serbs] who overthrew Slobodan Milosevic.”[2]
April 6th Youth Movement
Maher’s organization, based on cyber networking, was founded on April 6, 2007 when a General Strike was called in support of mill workers in Mahalla.[3]
Several days ago Wikileaks exposed a document from the US Embassy in Cairo to Washington, which details the American support for the April 6 movement and other activists. The document was published by The Telegraph, as follows:
S E C R E T SECTION 01 OF 02 CAIRO 002572 SIPDIS FOR NEA/ELA, R, S/P
AND H NSC FOR PASCUAL AND KUTCHA-HELBLING E.O. 12958: DECL:
12/30/2028 TAGS: PGOV, PHUM, KDEM, EG SUBJECT: APRIL 6 ACTIVIST ON HIS
U.S. VISIT AND REGIME CHANGE IN EGYPT REF: A. CAIRO 2462 B.
CAIRO 2454 C. CAIRO 2431 Classified By: ECPO A/Mincouns
Catherine Hill-Herndon for reason 1.4 (d ). 1. (C) Summary and
comment: On December 23, April 6 activist xxxxxxxxxxxx expressed
satisfaction with his participation in the December 3-5 \”Alliance of
Youth Movements Summit,\” and with his subsequent meetings with USG
officials, on Capitol Hill, and with think tanks. He described how
State Security (SSIS) detained him at the Cairo airport upon his
return and confiscated his notes for his summit presentation calling
for democratic change in Egypt, and his schedule for his Congressional
meetings. xxxxxxxxxxxx contended that the GOE will never undertake
significant reform, and therefore, Egyptians need to replace the
current regime with a parliamentary democracy. He alleged that
several opposition parties and movements have accepted an unwritten
plan for democratic transition by 2011; we are doubtful of this claim.
xxxxxxxxxxxx said that although SSIS recently released two April 6
activists, it also arrested three additional group members. We have
pressed the MFA for the release of these April 6 activists. April 6′s
stated goal of replacing the current regime with a parliamentary
democracy prior to the 2011 presidential elections is highly
unrealistic, and is not supported by the mainstream opposition. End
summary and comment. —————————- Satisfaction with
the Summit —————————- 2. (C) xxxxxxxxxxxx expressed
satisfaction with the December 3-5 \”Alliance of Youth Movements
Summit\” in New York, noting that he was able to meet activists from
other countries and outline his movement’s goals for democratic change
in Egypt. He told us that the other activists at the summit were very
supportive, and that some even offered to hold public demonstrations
in support of Egyptian democracy in their countries, with xxxxxxxxxxxx
as an invited guest. xxxxxxxxxxxx said he discussed with the other
activists how April 6 members could more effectively evade harassment
and surveillance from SSIS with technical upgrades, such as
consistently alternating computer \”simcards.\” However, xxxxxxxxxxxx
lamented to us that because most April 6 members do not own computers,
this tactic would be impossible to implement. xxxxxxxxxxxx was
appreciative of the successful efforts by the Department and the
summit organizers to protect his identity at the summit, and told us
that his name was never mentioned publicly. ——————- A
Cold Welcome Home ——————- 3. (S) xxxxxxxxxxxx told us
that SSIS detained and searched him at the Cairo Airport on December
18 upon his return from the U.S. According to xxxxxxxxxxxx, SSIS
found and confiscated two documents in his luggage: notes for his
presentation at the summit that described April 6′s demands for
democratic transition in Egypt, and a schedule of his Capitol Hill
meetings. xxxxxxxxxxxx described how the SSIS officer told him that
State Security is compiling a file on him, and that the officer’s
superiors instructed him to file a report on xxxxxxxxxxxx most recent
activities. ——————————————— ———-
Washington Meetings and April 6 Ideas for Regime Change
——————————————— ———- 4. (C)
xxxxxxxxxxxx described his Washington appointments as positive, saying
that on the Hill he met with xxxxxxxxxxxx, a variety of House staff
members, including from the offices of xxxxxxxxxxxx and xxxxxxxxxxxx),
and with two Senate staffers. xxxxxxxxxxxx also noted that he met
with several think tank members. xxxxxxxxxxxx said that xxxxxxxxxxxx’s
office invited him to speak at a late January Congressional hearing on
House Resolution 1303 regarding religious and political freedom in
Egypt. xxxxxxxxxxxx told us he is interested in attending, but
conceded he is unsure whether he will have the funds to make the trip.
He indicated to us that he has not been focusing on his work as a
\”fixer\” for journalists, due to his preoccupation with his U.S.
trip. 5. (C) xxxxxxxxxxxx described how he tried to convince his
Washington interlocutors that the USG should pressure the GOE to
implement significant reforms by threatening to reveal CAIRO 00002572
002 OF 002 information about GOE officials’ alleged \”illegal\”
off-shore bank accounts. He hoped that the U.S. and the international
community would freeze these bank accounts, like the accounts of
Zimbabwean President Mugabe’s confidantes. xxxxxxxxxxxx said he wants
to convince the USG that Mubarak is worse than Mugabe and that the GOE
will never accept democratic reform. xxxxxxxxxxxx asserted that
Mubarak derives his legitimacy from U.S. support, and therefore
charged the U.S. with \”being responsible\” for Mubarak’s \”crimes.\”
He accused NGOs working on political and economic reform of living in
a \”fantasy world,\” and not recognizing that Mubarak — \”the head of
the snake\” — must step aside to enable democracy to take root. 6.
(C) xxxxxxxxxxxx claimed that several opposition forces — including
the Wafd, Nasserite, Karama and Tagammu parties, and the Muslim
Brotherhood, Kifaya, and Revolutionary Socialist movements — have
agreed to support an unwritten plan for a transition to a
parliamentary democracy, involving a weakened presidency and an
empowered prime minister and parliament, before the scheduled 2011
presidential elections (ref C). According to xxxxxxxxxxxx, the
opposition is interested in receiving support from the army and the
police for a transitional government prior to the 2011 elections.
xxxxxxxxxxxx asserted that this plan is so sensitive it cannot be
written down. (Comment: We have no information to corroborate that
these parties and movements have agreed to the unrealistic plan
xxxxxxxxxxxx has outlined. Per ref C, xxxxxxxxxxxx previously told us
that this plan was publicly available on the internet. End comment.)
7. (C) xxxxxxxxxxxx said that the GOE has recently been cracking down
on the April 6 movement by arresting its members. xxxxxxxxxxxx noted
that although SSIS had released xxxxxxxxxxxx and xxxxxxxxxxxx \”in the
past few days,\” it had arrested three other members. (Note: On
December 14, we pressed the MFA for the release of xxxxxxxxxxxx and
xxxxxxxxxxxx, and on December 28 we asked the MFA for the GOE to
release the additional three activists. End note.) xxxxxxxxxxxx
conceded that April 6 has no feasible plans for future activities.
The group would like to call for another strike on April 6, 2009, but
realizes this would be \”impossible\” due to SSIS interference,
xxxxxxxxxxxx said. He lamented that the GOE has driven the group’s
leadership underground, and that one of its leaders, xxxxxxxxxxxx, has
been in hiding for the past week. 8. (C) Comment: xxxxxxxxxxxx
offered no roadmap of concrete steps toward April 6′s highly
unrealistic goal of replacing the current regime with a parliamentary
democracy prior to the 2011 presidential elections. Most opposition
parties and independent NGOs work toward achieving tangible,
incremental reform within the current political context, even if they
may be pessimistic about their chances of success. xxxxxxxxxxxx
wholesale rejection of such an approach places him outside this
mainstream of opposition politicians and activists.
SCOBEY02008-12-307386PGOV,PHUM,KDEM,EGAPRIL 6 ACTIVIST ON HIS U.S.
VISIT AND REGIME CHANGE IN EGYPT [4]
Of course, this US backing for such revolutionary upheaval does not accord with America’s cultivated image as a defender of reactionary regimes. This is the image maintained by both mainstream and alternative media, one such example, stating that: “Egyptian officials know that because their country is an official ‘friend of the US’, Cairo’s undemocratic behavior always gets a pass in Washington….”[5]
However, the public image of the USA is far different from the reality, and the USA has embarked on a world revolutionary mission since the time of Woodrow Wilson. The US Establishment, far from being the epitome of conservatism, has been up to its neck in subversive activities throughout the world, which were often misidentified by conservative commentators as “Soviet” plots. The “color revolutions” are a continuation of a process that has been going on since Woodrow Wilson expounded his revolutionary manifesto for remaking the world in America’s image: The Fourteen Points.
US Secretary of State Clinton has been less than helpful to America’s supposedly great friend President Mubarak, whom the media tells us the “West” is propping up, when she stated:
We’re trying to promote an orderly transition and change that will respond to the legitimate grievances of the Egyptian people, which the protests are all about.
We are urging the Mubarak government, which is still in power, we are urging the military, which is a very respected institution in Egypt, to do what is necessary to facilitate that kind of orderly transition.[6]
This is a blatant call for Mubarak to go, and an openly stated declaration that the USA is aiming to secure “regime change” through revolution. Why should it be up to the Secretary of State of a corrupt, failed and bankrupt state to dictate what political course another state should take?
The Hand of Soros – Again
The above-cited UNFree Media ridicules allegations that George Soros, the currency speculator and patron of the world “color” revolution is a factor in the current turmoil, dismissing such claims as “conspiracy theory.” Yet the same article quickly goes on to state that a new monthly opposition magazine Wasla, which is widely distributed to strategic quarters such as the military and academia and has an electronic edition read throughout the Arab world:
[A]ims to link Arab bloggers with politicians and it was in fact launched at the initiative of a women’s group backed by Soros. Wasla — or “The Link” — is being touted as a first for the Arab world, with plans for articles by bloggers as a way of giving them a wider readership. It is published by the Arabic Network for Human Rights Information and financially supported by the Open Society Institute created by Soros, said ANHRI director Gamal Eid. “We want to challenge our audience, and open its eyes to the changes society is experiencing, particularly through youths and blogs in which they appear,” he said.[7]
It might be recalled that Soros’ Open Society Institute funded the primary opposition voice in Tunisia, Radio Kalima.[8]
The Soros network has been working extensively in Egypt. The Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights has the aura of a Soros front about it, and at the least works in tandem with the Open Society Justice Initiative,[9] and is an “OSI grantee.”[10]
In December 2010, the Open Society Institute advised:
The Open Society Foundations will consider projects from domestic and international NGOs or civil society groups active in Egypt. Coalitions of NGOs are also encouraged to apply. …[11]
National Endowment for Democracy
As one would expect, NED, the Congressionally-funded neo-Trotskyite Establishment Bolsheviks that work in tandem with Soros to ferment America’s version of “world revolution,” have been very active in Egypt, as they have in Tunisia.[12] NED’s 2009 report for grants to Egypt includes, but is not limited to:
American Center for International Labor Solidarity $318,75.
Andalus Institute for Tolerance and Anti-Violence Studies (AITAS)
$48,900. The description of the purposes for this grant again, as in Tunisia, points to NED’s activities in funding and training revolutionary cadres in precisely the techniques that are being used in the current strife:
To strengthen youth understanding of the Egyptian parliament and enhance regional activists’ use of new technologies as accountability tools. AITAS will conduct a series of workshops for 300 university students to raise their awareness of parliament’s functions and engage them in monitoring parliamentary committees. AITAS will also host 8 month-long internships for youth activists from the Middle East and North Africa to share its experiences using web-based technologies in monitoring efforts.
Arab Foundation for Supporting Civil Society (AFSCS)
$25,000. “…AFSCS will conduct four training workshops for a total of 100 journalists and representatives of civil society institutions on monitoring violations against civil society organizations, and extend its outreach on these efforts through a web site and newsletter focused on civil society issues.”
Arab Society for Human Rights (ASHR) $22,600. ASHR undertook a workshop for 80 journalists.
Bridge Center for Dialogue and Development (BTRD)
$25,000.
To promote youth expression and engagement in community issues through new media. BTRD will train youth between the ages of 16 and 26 in the use of new and traditional media tools to report on issues facing their communities. BRTD will also create a website for human rights videos and new media campaigns in Egypt. The website will host trainees’ completed projects and provide a blog-like forum for them to engage in an ongoing dialogue on their projects.
Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE) $187,569
To engage civil society organizations to participate in the democratic process by strengthening their capacity to advocate for free market legislative reform, and to build consensus on needed changes to the Egyptian legal environment to remove impediments to competition in a free market.
Again, the above is telling. NED’s global propagation of the virtues of “free market’ economics is more likely to indicate the real purpose behind these “color revolutions” than the touted slogans about democracy.
Egyptian Union of Liberal Youth (EULY) $33,300
To expand the use of new media among youth activists for the promotion of democratic ideas and values. EULY will train 60 youth activists to use filmmaking for the dissemination of democratic ideas and values. The Union will lead a total of four two-month long training workshops in Cairo to build the political knowledge and technical filmmaking skills of participating youth involved in NGOs. Each participating NGO will then produce and distribute a short film about its organization’s mission or about an issue for which they are advocating.
Ibn Khaldun Center for Development Studies (ICDS) $65,000 “To disseminate information on civil society and democratization in the Arab world and promote democratic ideas and values…”
Lawyers Union for Democratic and Legal Studies (LUDLS) $20,000 “To support freedom of association by strengthening young activists’ ability to express and organize themselves peacefully within the bounds of the law…”
Our Hands for Comprehensive Development $19,200 “To engage Minya youth in civic activism and encourage youth-led initiatives and volunteerism…”
Project on Middle East Democracy (POMED) $45,300 “To explore the feasibility of establishing a Cairo-based policy center to support Egyptian civic organizations’ and activists’ ability to advocate for policy reforms.”
Youth Forum$19,000
To expand and maintain a network of youth activists on Egyptian university campuses and to encourage the participation of university students in student union elections and civic activities on campus. Youth Forum will conduct a civic and political awareness training program for 150 university students in the Gharbeya, Suez, Minya, and Assiut governorates.[13]
Given the nature of the funding by NED, of its focus on “youth activists” and their training into cadres, and the use of new technologies, the portrayal of the Egyptian riots as “spontaneous” seems implausible. They have been, like others around world, well panned, for years in advance, waiting for a catalyst.
ElBaradei : Leader-in-Waiting
One of the common aspects of the “color revolutions ” in whatever part of the world they “spontaneously erupt” (sic), is that there always seems to be an internationally-respected figure waiting in the wings, ready to assume leadership; and it also seemingly always happens that by coincidence, this respectable leader has been associated with George Soros. Mohamed ElBaradei fits the role. ElBaradei, as is now widely recalled, achieved his eminence on the world stage as a Nobel Laureate and as Director General of the UN International Atomic Energy Agency.
In February 2010 ElBaradei helped form a non-party movement, the National Association for Change. ElBaradei is on the Executive Committee of the International Crisis Group, yet another globalist think tank promoting the “new world order” behind the facade of “peace and justice,” or of the “open society,” as Soros terms it. ICG was founded in 1994 by Mark Brown, former Vice President of the World Bank. Soros is a committee member, along with such luminaries of peace and goodwill as Samuel Berger, former US National Security Adviser; Wesley Clark, former NATO Commander, Europe; and sundry eminences from business, academe, politics and diplomacy of the type that generally comprise such organizations.[14]
“Senior advisers” of the ICG include the omnipresent Zbigniew Brzezinski, former US National Security Adviser, and founding director of David Rockefeller’s Trilateral Commission, an individual up to his neck in seemingly every globalist cause and think tank going, and a de facto foreign policy adviser for Pres. Obama; and Lord Robertson of Port Ellen, former Secretary General of NATO.[15] Financial backers of the ICG include the Ford Foundation and Open Society Institute.
The tumult in North Africa could conceivably backfire on the globalists terribly and create a quagmire of the Iraq variety. At the moment however, the indicators seem to be that the “spontaneous” regional tumult has been carefully planned and funded for a long time, and that the “revolutionary” potential of the bourgeois “youth activists” is about as phony as that of their 1960s American forebears in the “New Left,” who were created sand sponsored by the same types of plutocrat and for similar reasons.
Notes
[1] K R Bolton, “Tunisian Revolt: Another Soros/NED Jack-Up?,” Foreign Policy Journal, January 18, 2011, http//:www.foreignpolicyjournal.com/2011/01/18/Tunisian-revolt-another-sorosned-jack-up/all/1/
[2] “Young Egyptians Fight for Change. Twitter Generation Seeks its Freedom,” The Dominion Post, Wellington, New Zealand, January 29, 2011, A21.
[3] “Shahab 6 April Youth Movement,” http://shabab6april.wordpress.com/shabab-6-april-youth-movement-about-us-in-english/
[4] “Egypt Protests: Secret US Document Exposes Support for Protesters,” The Telegraph, London, January 28, 2011, http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaandindianocean/egypt/8289698/Egypt-protests-secret-US-document-discloses-support-for-protesters.html
[5] “Citizen bloggers ‘white-anting’ the Mubarak regime,” UNFree Media, unfreemedia.org, http://www.unfreemedia.com/mideast/2010/04/egypts-citizen-bloggers-white-anting-the-mubarak-regime.html
[6] “Egypt Crisis: Mubarak under pressure from West as lawlessness takes hold,” The Telegraph, London, January 30, 2011, http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaandindianocean/egypt/8291645/Egypt-crisis-Mubarak-under-pressure-from-West-as-lawlessness-takes-hold.html
[7] “Citizen bloggers ‘white-anting’ the Mubarak regime,” op. cit.
[8] K R Bolton, “Tunisian Revolt: Another Soros/NED Jack-Up?,” Foreign Policy Journal, op. cit.
[9] EIPR, http://www.eipr.org/
[10] “Challenges to Religious Freedom in Egypt,” OSI, August 13, 2009, http://www.soros.org/initiatives/mena/news/egyptreligion_20090813
[11] OSI, December 14, 2010, http://www.soros.org/initiatives/mena/news/egypt-legal-aid-20101214
[12] K R Bolton, “Tunisian Revolt,” op. cit.
[13] “Egypt,” National Endowment for Democracy, http://www.ned.org/where-we-work/middle-east-and-northern-africa/egypt
[14] “Crisis Group Board of Trustees,” http://www.crisisgroup.org/en/about/board.aspx
[15] “Crisis Group Senior Advisers,’ http://www.crisisgroup.org/en/about/board/crisis-group-senior-advisers.aspx
http://www.foreignpolicyjournal.com/2011/02/01/whats-behind-the-tumult-in-egypt/all/1/

Ed Jewett
02-01-2011, 03:27 AM
Monday, January 31, 2011

January 31 2011: The long forsaken sands of Egypt (http://theautomaticearth.blogspot.com/2011/01/january-31-2011-long-forsaken-sands-of.html)


Good coverage from http://theautomaticearth.blogspot.com/

####

Continued good coverage from the perspective of open source insurgency...

http://globalguerrillas.typepad.com/

####

See also http://aangirfan.blogspot.com/



Q & A ON EGYPT REVOLT (http://aangirfan.blogspot.com/2011/01/q-on-egypt-revolt.html)
EGYPT - THE NEW IRAQ? (http://aangirfan.blogspot.com/2011/01/egypt-new-iraq.html)
WHO CONTROLS THE EGYPTIAN MILITARY? HISTORY OF MAN... (http://aangirfan.blogspot.com/2011/01/who-controls-egyptian-military-history.html)
US BACKS EGYPTIAN COUP (http://aangirfan.blogspot.com/2011/01/us-backs-egyptian-coup.html)
WHAT THE USA REALLY THINKS ABOUT EGYPT (http://aangirfan.blogspot.com/2011/01/what-usa-really-thinks-about-egypt.html)
CIA, MOSSAD & SOROS VERSUS MUBARAK (http://aangirfan.blogspot.com/2011/01/cia-mossad-soros-versus-mubarak.html)

###

Sunday, January 30, 2011

The World is Watching - Egypt and Beyond (http://kennysideshow.blogspot.com/2011/01/world-is-watching-egypt-and-beyond.html)


http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_VyBhuhQW8YQ/TUWTzGGKHYI/AAAAAAAAAeA/uymUJO651ME/s400/dailymotion+aljazeera.jpg (http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_VyBhuhQW8YQ/TUWTzGGKHYI/AAAAAAAAAeA/uymUJO651ME/s1600/dailymotion+aljazeera.jpg)

For the last couple of days the Al Jazeera live stream (http://english.aljazeera.net/watch_now/) and Livestation (http://www.livestation.com/) have been overloaded with traffic and at least from my end virtually impossible to watch. I found this morning that the Dailymotion Al Jazerera (http://www.dailymotion.com/livestation#videoId=xg7hrs) feed is working fine so that may be an option if you're having problems.




I don't know the words to use but the Egyptian protests are exciting to put it mildly. The question remains will this be a revolution where the will of the masses prevail or end up as just a continuation of the U.S. and Israel's desire to divide the middle east and northern Africa into more easily manageable parts.

My feelings on this are best summed up from an anonymous comment at aangirfan (http://aangirfan.blogspot.com/):
"We should be skeptical. There might be two revolutions here. One merely a consolidation of power, and the second genuine. People around the world want to throw off their corrupt governments. I know I do. Our government no longer pretends to operate Constitutionally or uphold the law for all. Yet politics around the world keep providing these fake change moments - like our last election. It let's off just enough steam to appease, or confuse, the people so that no real change comes about."One important thing to remember is that no matter how the U.S. administration, the CIA and other intelligence services are working to influence the ultimate outcome in Egypt, they are not omnipotent. They have money and power and allies but they are only human. The outcome of their agenda is in doubt. The people can have the power if they can just learn how to use it and see through the lies they are being fed. It requires taking chances.

Hillary Clinton (http://abcnews.go.com/ThisWeek/week-transcript-crisis-egypt/story?id=12796399) seems to now be the mouthpiece of U.S. policy but has been speaking out of both sides of her mouth (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rBuMuzhvYeA). Democracy is an Orwellian term when it comes from her globalist zio puppet tongue. As much as she tries to hide it, she is worried that the house of glass is going to break.

Hats off to the real Egyptians. Americans may one day take this page in history and learn from it.


Also see: Twelfth Bough (http://twelfthbough.blogspot.com/) ... Les Visible (http://smokingmirrors.blogspot.com/2011/01/you-cant-be-there-if-youre-not-here.html) ... Facts Not Fairies (http://factsnotfairies.blogspot.com/) ... Greg Bacon (http://careandwashingofthebrain.blogspot.com/2011/01/america-want-to-see-real-democracy-in.html) ... American Everyman (http://willyloman.wordpress.com/) ... WRH (http://whatreallyhappened.com/) ... and others on the blog roll for viewpoints on what is happening. It is interesting times indeed.
Posted by kenny's sideshow at 2:00 PM (http://kennysideshow.blogspot.com/2011/01/world-is-watching-egypt-and-beyond.html) 11 comments (https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=3918678440524150306&postID=8553780748614836794&isPopup=true)

Magda Hassan
02-01-2011, 03:27 AM
This is all very strange. When Hillary spoke on CNN yesterday she did not seem her usual animated self. Something is off. Is it simply that our govt has been caught off guard, or something more?

I wouldn't be myself either if I had to stand before the world and talk bullshit.

Yes,Queen Hillary stands naked again. :shock: And it ain't pretty.....
https://deeppoliticsforum.com/forums/showthread.php?6254-Learn-State-Department-Speak.-One-easy-lesson.-What-she-really-means.-Whatch-and-Learn.

Ed Jewett
02-01-2011, 03:31 AM
US Ammunition tells its own story (http://www.opinion-maker.org/2011/01/us-ammunition-tells-its-own-story/)

Posted on 31. Jan, 2011 by Raja Mujtaba (http://www.opinion-maker.org/author/raja-mujtaba/) in Hot Topics (http://www.opinion-maker.org/category/hot-topics/)
[Translate]http://www.opinion-maker.org/wp-content/plugins/google-ajax-translation/transparent.gif
American ammunition is available in abundance if the targets are the Muslims and their lands; be it Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, Sudan, Yemen, Gaza, Tunisia and now Egypt.

By Yvonne Ridley
http://www.opinion-maker.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Hillary-clinton-on-phone-regarding-Egypt-300x238.jpg (http://www.opinion-maker.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Hillary-clinton-on-phone-regarding-Egypt.jpg)As people across Egypt continued resisting and rising against the brutal dictatorship of Hosni Mubarak it is quite clear they will not stop until he goes.
Quite clear to everyone, that is, apart from the US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton who is so out of touch with what is happening on the ground you have to wonder who on earth is advising her.
She appears to have no idea of the burning resentment and hatred held towards America among the ordinary men and women of Egypt. More than 100 have paid the blood price, so far, for standing up to the US backed tyrant Mubarak and two thousand others are injured.
It has been lost on no one that the empty shell casings from live ammunition and gas cannisters, which litter Tahrir Square and other streets across Egypt, were provided by the United States of America.
The “Made in the USA” empty shell casings tell their own story not just of the innocents they have killed, but of their origins and of America’s deadly legacy of unwelcome foreign interference in the region.
The Egyptian people have been fed propaganda for 30 years, their evening news on State TV is sanitized and censored and many have been afraid to speak out freely under the US backed dictatorship of Mubarak.
But do not for one minute think the Egyptian people are stupid – sadly the US has once again completely misread and underestimated an entire population.
These demonstrations are as much a protest against US meddling in their affairs as they are against the Mubarak regime.
Despite all of this Clinton showed not one ounce of compassion or humility when she made her latest blundering speech.
With the sensitivity of a bull in a china shop, she called for an orderly transition but only after heaping praise on the Mubarak government which has “made and kept peace with Israel avoiding violence, turmoil and death in the region.”
She told ABC News: "Democracy, human rights and economic reform are in the best interests of the Egyptian people." These are the same people her own government ignored as they continued to fund and back Mubarak with billions of US tax payers dollars over the decades.
The BBC's North America editor Mark Mardell says Clinton's comments are a sign that the Obama administration is edging towards accepting, if not openly endorsing, an end to Mubarak's rule. The truth is Mark, the Egyptian people do not want any more US interference – they do not want any more American weapons being used against them. America has no interest in the people of Egypt. Its only concern is for the man-made pariah state next door – Israel.
Clinton has been so out of step since this whole turmoil began to erupt. Both she and Obama remained completely silent for four whole weeks as scores of Tunisians died in that uprising and it was only when their man, Zine El Abedine Ben Ali took flight that they condemned his brutality.
When Egypt threatened to kick off Clinton said assuredly that the country was “stable.” That was a week ago and as she is beginning to learn, a week is a long time in politics. She says she wants democracy – but what sort of democracy Hillary? The sort that sees another tyrant take power? Or are you really going to let the people decide?
And by the way, the people are beginning to rise and resist right across the Maghreb, throughout the Middle East and Asia. US Foreign Policy has turned America in to the most hated country in the world and if Washington really told their own people the truth,. I know the millions upon millions of decent US citizens would be horrified by what is being done in their name.
But the truth is the American people are kept well away from the truth and are among the most least informed people in the world today.
Few Americans have any idea that this and the previous Bush administrations do not want democracy in the region. In fact they have collectively punished the people of Gaza for exercising their democratic right by voting for a Hamas-dominated government.
This has not been lost on the Egyptian people Hillary who, by the way, have a great love for Palestine, a place in their heart for Gaza and an even deeper hatred and mistrust for the brutal Zionist State, which really does threaten peace and stability in the region.
As I write this F16 fighter jets and attack helicopters, made in America, are flying overhead to try and intimidate the Egyptian people. Too late – there isn’t an army in the world that can beat this peoples’ army. Their fear has gone.
You ill-informed advisers won’t tell you this Hillary, but I hate to see an empowered female make such a prat of herself, so here’s a piece of advice. The time has come when you really must step back and take a vow of silence. Every time you open your mouth you are looking and sounding even more stupid than the female presenter on Egyptian State TV who assures us all is at peace with the world and the streets of Egypt are empty and calm.
Yvonne Ridley is the European President of the International Muslim Women’s Union who came to fame when she ventured intohttp://www.opinion-maker.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Yvonne-Ridley1-140x140.jpg (http://www.opinion-maker.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Yvonne-Ridley1.jpg) Afghanistan after 9/11 and was captured by Taliban. Later released and then she studied Islam and became a Muslim. She is an activist, present everywhere against tyranny, injustice and oppression.
She is a regular contributor to Opinion Maker (http://www.opinion-maker.org/).

Ed Jewett
02-01-2011, 03:44 AM
Israel urges world to curb criticism of Egypt's Mubarak

Jerusalem seeks to convince its allies that it is in the West's interest to maintain the stability of the Egyptian regime.

By Barak Ravid (http://www.haaretz.com/misc/writers/barak-ravid-1.325)

Israel called on the United States and a number of European countries over the weekend to curb their criticism of President Hosni Mubarak to preserve stability in the region.
Jerusalem seeks to convince its allies that it is in the West's interest to maintain the stability of the Egyptian regime. The diplomatic measures came after statements in Western capitals implying that the United States and European Union supported Mubarak's ouster.
http://www.haaretz.com/polopoly_fs/1.340315.1296441664%21/image/9022647.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_295/9022647.jpg Mubarak, left, and Suleiman, center, seen on Egyptian state TV.
Photo by: AP Israeli officials are keeping a low profile on the events in Egypt, with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu even ordering cabinet members to avoid commenting publicly on the issue.
Senior Israeli officials, however, said that on Saturday night the Foreign Ministry issued a directive to around a dozen key embassies in the United States, Canada, China, Russia and several European countries. The ambassadors were told to stress to their host countries the importance of Egypt's stability. In a special cable, they were told to get this word out as soon as possible.
EU foreign ministers are to discuss the situation in Egypt at a special session today in Brussels, after which they are expected to issue a statement echoing those issued in recent days by U.S. President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.
Obama called on Mubarak to take "concrete steps" toward democratic reforms and to refrain from violence against peaceful protesters, sentiments echoed in a statement Saturday night by the leaders of Britain, France and Germany.
"The Americans and the Europeans are being pulled along by public opinion and aren't considering their genuine interests," one senior Israeli official said. "Even if they are critical of Mubarak they have to make their friends feel that they're not alone. Jordan and Saudi Arabia see the reactions in the West, how everyone is abandoning Mubarak, and this will have very serious implications."
Netanyahu announced at Sunday's weekly cabinet meeting that the security cabinet will convene Monday to discuss the situation in Egypt.
"The peace between Israel and Egypt has lasted for more than three decades and our objective is to ensure that these relations will continue to exist," Netanyahu told his ministers. "We are closely monitoring events in Egypt and the region and are making efforts to preserve its security and stability."
The Foreign Ministry has called on Israelis currently in Egypt to consider returning home and for those planning to visit the country to reconsider. It is telling Israelis who have decided to remain in Egypt to obey government directives.

More on this topic

Assad: Syria in better position than Egypt since it has no ties with Israel (http://www.haaretz.com/news/international/assad-syria-in-better-position-than-egypt-since-it-has-no-ties-with-israel-1.340321)
Obama: Future Egypt gov't must respect the will of the people (http://www.haaretz.com/news/international/obama-future-egypt-gov-t-must-respect-the-will-of-the-people-1.340220)
Mubarak tells new PM to cut prices, blames rioting on Islamists (http://www.haaretz.com/news/international/mubarak-tells-new-pm-to-cut-prices-blames-rioting-on-islamists-1.340283)



http://www.haaretz.com/print-edition/news/israel-urges-world-to-curb-criticism-of-egypt-s-mubarak-1.340238

Ed Jewett
02-01-2011, 03:46 AM
US behind Egypt internet crackdown
Sat Jan 29, 2011 3:27PM



(http://www.facebook.com/share.php?u=http://www.presstv.ir/usdetail/162581.html)

http://previous.presstv.ir/photo/20110129/javadi20110129135241483.jpgPolice fire tear gas towards protesters in Suez, Egypt
U.S. companies are involved in providing technology that helps the Egyptian government to crack down on communications and monitor protestors on the Internet and mobile phones.

A U.S. company appears to have sold Egypt technology to monitor Internet and mobile phone traffic that is possibly being used by the ruling regime to crack down on communications as protests erupt throughout the country.

Boeing-owned, California-based company Narus sold Telecom Egypt, the state-run Internet service provider, "real-time traffic intelligence" equipment, more commonly known as Deep Packet Inspection (DPI) technology. Common Dreams

HIGHLIGHTS


The company is also known for creating "NarusInsight," a supercomputer system allegedly used by US' National Security Agency and other entities to perform mass surveillance and monitoring of public and corporate Internet communications in real time. Common Dreams

Telecom Egypt, the nation's dominant phone and Internet service provider, is a state-run enterprise, which made it easy on Friday morning for authorities to pull the plug and plunge much of the nation into digital darkness.

Narus provides Egypt Telecom with Deep Packet Inspection equipment (DPI), a content-filtering technology that allows network managers to inspect, track and target content from users of the Internet and mobile phones, as it passes through routers on the information superhighway.

"Anything that comes through (an Internet protocol network), we can record," Steve Bannerman, Narus' marketing vice president, once boasted to Wired about the service. "We can reconstruct all of their e-mails along with attachments, see what web pages they clicked on; we can reconstruct their (Voice Over Internet Protocol) calls.”

Earlier this week, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton urged Egypt's government "not to prevent peaceful protests or block communications, including on social media.” Huffington Post



FACTS & FIGURES


Narus, now owned by Boeing, was founded in 1997 by Israeli security experts to create and sell mass surveillance systems for governments and large corporate clients.

In addition to Narus, there are a number of companies, including many others in the United States, that produce and traffic in similar spying and control technology: Zeugma Systems (Canada), Camiant (USA), Procera Networks (USA), Allot (Israel), Ixia (USA), AdvancedIO (Canada) and Sandvine (Canada), among others.

When commercial network operators use DPI, the privacy of Internet users is compromised. But in government hands, the use of DPI can crush dissent and lead to human rights violations.

Virtually all internet access in Egypt is cut off as the government battles to contain the street protests that threaten to topple President Hosni Mubarak. Telegraph

HJ/KA/DB

http://www.presstv.ir/usdetail/162581.html

Ed Jewett
02-01-2011, 04:30 AM
From http://www.ricefarmer.blogspot.com/ on
Monday, January 31, 2011


-- Egypt --
Egyptian financial crisis looms (http://english.aljazeera.net/news/middleeast/2011/01/20111319341644600.html)
"Economists are warning that if Egypt's turmoil continues much longer, the country will not have enough currency reserves to avoid a long term financial crisis. Currency traders said on Monday that investors have transferred hundreds of millions of dollars out of the country since the start of the protests six days ago."
Lawlessness Could Hijack Egypt's Popular Uprising (http://www.npr.org/2011/01/31/133363676/lawlessness-could-hijack-egypts-popular-uprising?ft=1&f=1001)
'Mega protest' planned in Egypt (http://english.aljazeera.net//news/middleeast/2011/01/20111316148317175.html)
"Opposition movement calls for one "million people demonstration" on Tuesday in a bid to topple president Hosni Mubarak."
Egypt's army says it won't open fire on 'our great people' (http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2011/01/30/107733/why-has-egypts-army-not-confronted.html)
Did Egypt's Army Just Throw Mubarak Under The Bus? (http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2011/01/did-egypts-army-just-throw-mubarak-under-the-bus/)
Egypt protests: Did Jimmy Carter just throw Obama under the bus? (http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Foreign-Policy/2011/0131/Egypt-protests-Did-Jimmy-Carter-just-throw-Obama-under-the-bus?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+feeds/csm+%28Christian+Science+Monitor+%7C+All+Stories%2 9)
Mubarak said to be on brink of giving up (http://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-News/2011/01/31/Mubarak-said-to-be-on-brink-of-giving-up/UPI-92201296460800/)
Egypt businesses hit by instability (http://english.aljazeera.net//news/middleeast/2011/01/2011131143945965562.html)
"Food shortages reported and businesses remain shuttered as 16-hour curfew and protests continue."
Egypt Rapidly Running Out Of Food (http://www.zerohedge.com/article/egypt-rapidly-running-out-food)
Mobile Phone Service Restored in Egypt -- for Now (http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/218249/mobile_phone_service_restored_in_egypt_for_now.htm l)

Keith Millea
02-01-2011, 03:31 PM
Large protest planned for today.Watch live streaming here at Al Jezeera.

http://english.aljazeera.net/watch_now/

Ed Jewett
02-01-2011, 03:52 PM
From http://crowdsourced.tumblr.com/post/3036545138/urgent-message-from-activist-in-egypt-please-repost-if :

MESSAGE FROM ACTIVIST IN EGYPT. PLEASE REPOST IF YOU CAN! (http://crowdsourced.tumblr.com/post/3036545138/urgent-message-from-activist-in-egypt-please-repost-if)

thunderheist (http://thunderheist.tumblr.com/post/3025881379):

roxanneritchi (http://roxanneritchi.tumblr.com/post/3024930622)

[via (http://www.twitlonger.com/show/8fflmc)]
“To all the people of world”

Alicia Ali Marsden

To all the people of world

The people in Egypt are under governmental siege. Mubarak regime is banning Facebook, Twitter, and all other popular internet sites Now, the internet are completely blocked in Egypt. Tomorrow the government will block the 3 mobile phone network will be completely blocked.

And there is news that even the phone landlines will be cut tomorrow, to prevent any news agency from following what will happen.

Suez city is already under siege now. The government cut the water supply and electricity, people, including, children and elderly are suffering there now. The patients in hospitals cannot get urgent medical care. The injured protesters are lying in the streets and the riot police are preventing people from helping them. The families of the killed protesters cannot get the bodies of their sons to bury them. This picture is the same in north Saini (El-Sheikh zoyad city) and in western Egypt (Al-salom). The riot police is cracking down on protesters in Ismailia, Alexandria, Fayoum, Shbin Elkoum, and Cairo, the capital, in many neighborhoods across the city.

The government is preparing to crackdown on the protesters in all Egyptian cities. They are using tear gas bombs, rubber and plastic pullets, chemicals like dilutes mustard gas against protesters. Several protesters today have been killed when the armored vehicles of the riot police hit them. Officials in plain clothes carrying blades and knives used to intimidate protesters. Thugs deployed by the Egyptian Ministry of Interior are roaming the streets of Cairo, setting fire on car-wheels as means of black propaganda to demonize protesters and justify police beatings and state torture

All this has been taken place over the past three days during the peaceful demonstrations in Cairo and other cities. Now, with the suspicious silence of the local media and the lack of coverage from the international media, Mubarak and his gang are blocking all the channels that can tell the world about what is happening.

People who call for their freedom need your support and help. Will you give them a hand?

The activists are flooding the net (youtube and other sites) with thousands of pictures and videos showing the riot police firing on armless people. The police started to use ammunition against protesters. 15-year old girl has been injured and another 25 year old man has been shot in the mouth. While nothing of these has appeared in the media, there is more to happen tomorrow. Will you keep silent? Will you keep your mouth shut while seeing all these cruelty and inhumane actions?

We don’t ask for much, just broadcast what is happening
[To reblog without Tumblr cutting the text off, select “reblog as text” at the top of the reblog page.]
(via youcanchangethisatanytimeanyway (http://youcanchangethisatanytimeanyway.tumblr.com/post/3035998723))
Source : twitlonger.com (http://www.twitlonger.com/show/8fflmc)
17 hours ago (http://crowdsourced.tumblr.com/post/3036545138/urgent-message-from-activist-in-egypt-please-repost-if#) | 9,839 notes (http://crowdsourced.tumblr.com/post/3036545138/urgent-message-from-activist-in-egypt-please-repost-if) | Reblog (http://tmv.proto.jp/reblog.php?post_url=http://crowdsourced.tumblr.com/post/3036545138/urgent-message-from-activist-in-egypt-please-repost-if;) |

Keith Millea
02-01-2011, 04:35 PM
The government is preparing to crackdown on the protesters in all Egyptian cities. They are using tear gas bombs, rubber and plastic pullets, chemicals like dilutes mustard gas against protesters. Several protesters today have been killed when the armored vehicles of the riot police hit them.

There is video footage of this happening during a bridge battle.

PRETTY DISGUSTING!!!!



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBtYLBQPRGQ

Ed Jewett
02-01-2011, 05:27 PM
A Mr. Fish cartoon of Hosni Mubarak getting advice from Obama... click to enlarge

1896

Ed Jewett
02-01-2011, 05:31 PM
Another cartoon entitled Dictator Dominos by Mike Luckovitch ... click to enlarge

http://www.truthdig.com/images/eartothegrounduploads/lk020111dBP-500.jpg

1897

Peter Lemkin
02-01-2011, 05:32 PM
Coming to a country near you sooner than you think!

Ed Jewett
02-01-2011, 05:41 PM
Kissinger on Egypt unrest – “This is only the first scene of the first act of a drama that is to be played out” (http://www.prisonplanet.com/kissinger-on-egypt-unrest-this-is-only-the-first-scene-of-the-first-act-of-a-drama-that-is-to-be-played-out.html)





(http://www.youtube.com/user/TheAlexJonesChannel)
(http://xml.nfowars.net/Alex.rss)
(http://prisonplanet.tv/)
(http://twitter.com/realalexjones)
(http://www.facebook.com/AlexanderEmerickJones)
(http://www.infowarsshop.com/)


Prisonplanet.com
Feb 1, 2011
Speaking on Bloomberg News, Bilderberg puppet master Kissinger warns that the uprising is a temporary state of affairs, “only the first Scene of the first act of a drama that is to be played out.”


Video embedded at link...

Ed Jewett
02-01-2011, 05:50 PM
Bolton: If Mubarak falls in Egypt, Israel should bomb Iran


By Eric W. Dolan (http://www.rawstory.com/rs/author/raweric/)
Tuesday, February 1st, 2011 -- 11:24 am

Former US Ambassador to the United Nations John Bolton said the ouster of embattled Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak would speed the timetable for an attack on Iran's nuclear facilities.
"Do you think that the Israelis are going to have to strike — they are going to have to take action?" Fox News Republican opinion host Sean Hannity asked the former ambassador on his radio program Monday.
"As you pointed out, ElBaradei ran cover for the Iranians for all those years that he was with the IAEA. And, I just don’t think the Israelis have much longer to wait… they're going to have to act in fairly short order."
"I think that's right," Bolton responded. "I don't think there’s much time to act. And I think the fall of a Egyptian government committed to the peace agreement will almost certainly speed that timetable up."
Bolton chided the protests in Egypt (http://thinkprogress.org/2011/01/29/no-caring-democracy-bolton/) last week, saying that "the real alternative is not Jefferson democracy versus the Mubarak regime, but that it’s the Muslim Brotherhood versus the Mubarak regime, and that has enormous implications for the US, for Israel, and our other friends in the region."

The former ambassador was appointed to his position by President George W. Bush in 2005 after facing heavy resistance from Democrats. He resigned from his position in December 2006 after failing to be confirmed by the Senate.
Bolton, a neoconservative, has a long history of promoting military strikes on Iran.
In August 2010, he warned that Israel only had eight days (http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2010/08/israel-8-days-hit-iran-nuclear-site-bolton/) to launch an attack against Iran's nuclear facilities to prevent the nation from acquiring a functioning atomic plant.
"Once that uranium, once those fuel rods are very close to the reactor, certainly once they're in the reactor, attacking it means a release of radiation, no question about it," he told Fox Business Network.
"So if Israel is going to do anything against Bushehr it has to move in the next eight days."
He also predicted in June 2008 that Israel would attack Iran's nuclear sites before the next US president (http://rawstory.com/news/2008/Bolton_Israel_will_attack_Iran_before_0623.html) was sworn in.
"An Obama victory would rule out military action by the Israelis because they would fear the consequences given the approach Obama has taken to foreign policy," Bolton said. "With McCain they might still be looking at a delay. Given that time is on Iran's side, I think the argument for military action is sooner rather than later absent some other development."
Iran's Russian-built Bushehr nuclear plant has already been hit with a computer worm that damaged the facilities' centrifuges. The malicious code, known as "Stuxnet," is suspected to be a joint American and Israeli effort (http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/16/world/middleeast/16stuxnet.html).
A recent Russian intelligence assessment warned that "Stuxnet" could cause a "Chernobyl-like disaster" (http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/01/stuxnet-worm-chernobyllike-disaster-iran-intel-assessment-warns/) should the site be switched on.
Iran continues to maintain its nuclear program is for the peaceful generation of energy, not weapons.


http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/02/bolton-israel-bomb-iran-mubarak-falls/

Ed Jewett
02-01-2011, 06:32 PM
Rights NGO claims that Israeli planes carrying crowd dispersal weapons have arrived in Egypt


Monday, 31 January 2011 14:20

http://www.middleeastmonitor.org.uk/templates/salaamhosting/images/emailButton.png (http://www.middleeastmonitor.org.uk/component/mailto/?tmpl=component&link=aHR0cDovL3d3dy5taWRkbGVlYXN0bW9uaXRvci5vcmcud WsvbmV3cy9taWRkbGUtZWFzdC8yMDAxLXJpZ2h0cy1uZ28tY2x haW1zLXRoYXQtaXNyYWVsaS1wbGFuZXMtY2FycnlpbmctY3Jvd 2QtZGlzcGVyc2FsLXdlYXBvbnMtaGF2ZS1hcnJpdmVkLWluLWV neXB0)
http://www.middleeastmonitor.org.uk/templates/salaamhosting/images/printButton.png (http://www.middleeastmonitor.org.uk/news/middle-east/2001-rights-ngo-claims-that-israeli-planes-carrying-crowd-dispersal-weapons-have-arrived-in-egypt?tmpl=component&print=1&layout=default&page=)


http://www.middleeastmonitor.org.uk/images/article_images/news/middle-east/israeli-cargo-plane.jpgThree Israeli planes landed at Cairo's Mina International Airport on Saturday carrying hazardous equipment for use in dispersing and suppressing large crowds.

The International Network for Rights and Development has claimed that Israeli logistical support has been sent to Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak to help his regime confront demonstrations demanding that he steps down as head of state. According to reports by the non-governmental organisation, three Israeli planes landed at Cairo's Mina International Airport on Saturday carrying hazardous equipment for use in dispersing and suppressing large crowds. In the statement circulated by the International Network, it was disclosed that Egyptian security forces received the complete cargoes on three Israeli planes which were, it is claimed, carrying an abundant supply of internationally proscribed gas to disperse unwanted crowds. If the reports are accurate, this suggests that the Egyptian regime is preparing for the worse in defence of its position, despite the country sinking into chaos.
On Sunday 30 January, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu addressed Israeli government ministers in a public statement saying: "Our efforts aim at the continued maintenance of stability and security in the region… and I remind you that peace between the Israeli establishment and Egypt has endured for over three decades… we currently strive to guarantee the continuity of these relations." Netanyahu added, "We are following the events unfolding in Egypt and the region with vigilance… and it is incumbent at this time that we show responsibility, self-restraint and maximum consideration for the situation… in the hope that the peaceful relations between the Israeli establishment and Egypt continue…"
The Israeli prime minister urged Israeli government ministers to refrain from making any additional statements to the media.


http://www.middleeastmonitor.org.uk/news/middle-east/2001-rights-ngo-claims-that-israeli-planes-carrying-crowd-dispersal-weapons-have-arrived-in-egypt

Peter Lemkin
02-01-2011, 06:47 PM
Rights NGO claims that Israeli planes carrying crowd dispersal weapons have arrived in Egypt


Monday, 31 January 2011 14:20

http://www.middleeastmonitor.org.uk/templates/salaamhosting/images/emailButton.png (http://www.middleeastmonitor.org.uk/component/mailto/?tmpl=component&link=aHR0cDovL3d3dy5taWRkbGVlYXN0bW9uaXRvci5vcmcud WsvbmV3cy9taWRkbGUtZWFzdC8yMDAxLXJpZ2h0cy1uZ28tY2x haW1zLXRoYXQtaXNyYWVsaS1wbGFuZXMtY2FycnlpbmctY3Jvd 2QtZGlzcGVyc2FsLXdlYXBvbnMtaGF2ZS1hcnJpdmVkLWluLWV neXB0)
http://www.middleeastmonitor.org.uk/templates/salaamhosting/images/printButton.png (http://www.middleeastmonitor.org.uk/news/middle-east/2001-rights-ngo-claims-that-israeli-planes-carrying-crowd-dispersal-weapons-have-arrived-in-egypt?tmpl=component&print=1&layout=default&page=)


http://www.middleeastmonitor.org.uk/images/article_images/news/middle-east/israeli-cargo-plane.jpgThree Israeli planes landed at Cairo's Mina International Airport on Saturday carrying hazardous equipment for use in dispersing and suppressing large crowds.

The International Network for Rights and Development has claimed that Israeli logistical support has been sent to Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak to help his regime confront demonstrations demanding that he steps down as head of state. According to reports by the non-governmental organisation, three Israeli planes landed at Cairo's Mina International Airport on Saturday carrying hazardous equipment for use in dispersing and suppressing large crowds. In the statement circulated by the International Network, it was disclosed that Egyptian security forces received the complete cargoes on three Israeli planes which were, it is claimed, carrying an abundant supply of internationally proscribed gas to disperse unwanted crowds. If the reports are accurate, this suggests that the Egyptian regime is preparing for the worse in defence of its position, despite the country sinking into chaos.
On Sunday 30 January, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu addressed Israeli government ministers in a public statement saying: "Our efforts aim at the continued maintenance of stability and security in the region… and I remind you that peace between the Israeli establishment and Egypt has endured for over three decades… we currently strive to guarantee the continuity of these relations." Netanyahu added, "We are following the events unfolding in Egypt and the region with vigilance… and it is incumbent at this time that we show responsibility, self-restraint and maximum consideration for the situation… in the hope that the peaceful relations between the Israeli establishment and Egypt continue…"
The Israeli prime minister urged Israeli government ministers to refrain from making any additional statements to the media.


http://www.middleeastmonitor.org.uk/news/middle-east/2001-rights-ngo-claims-that-israeli-planes-carrying-crowd-dispersal-weapons-have-arrived-in-egypt

The political dynamic is such that if they use them Mubarak will be gone within 48 hours. I'd also add that the use of them further imperils Israel, which should have 'collapsed' from its own ill deed long ago...and I say this as a Jew. Peaceful co-existence with the Arabs and others who live in that area or get the f out! Look what was done to us in the Holocaust! Sadly [I can't tell you how is sears my heart] to see those who are the children and relatives of this horror to perpetrate it on yet another group, using invented excuses as to how it is 'different'...it is the ssame. It has a name - GENOCIDE.

Ed Jewett
02-01-2011, 06:52 PM
Tuesday, February 1, 2011

Washington Post Confirms that Egyptian Looters Were Agents Provocateur (http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2011/02/washington-post-confirms-that-egyptian.html)



The Washington Post writes (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/02/01/AR2011020100903.html) today:

Human Rights Watch confirmed several cases of undercover police loyal to Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's regime committing acts of violence and looting in an attempt to stoke fear of instability as demonstrations grew stronger Tuesday against the autocratic leader.
Peter Bouckaert, the emergency director at Human Rights Watch, said hospitals confirmed that they received several wounded looters shot by the army carrying police identification cards. They also found several cases of looters and vandals in Cairo and Alexandria with police identification cards. He added that it was "unexplainable" that thousands of prisoners escaped from prisons over the weekend.
"Mubarak's mantra to his own people was that he was the guarantor of the nation's stability. It would make sense that he would want to send the message that without him, there is no safety," Bouckaert said.
This only confirms what we already knew (http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2011/01/is-egyptian-government-using-agents.html) about Mubarak's use of agents provocateur to carry out false flag disruptions.
Thank you, President Mubarak ... for educating the world about the concepts of agents provocateur and false flags disruptions.

Ed Jewett
02-01-2011, 07:01 PM
The political dynamic is such that if they use them [Israeli-shipped crowd-dispersal weapons] Mubarak will be gone within 48 hours. I'd also add that the use of them further imperils Israel, which should have 'collapsed' from its own ill deed long ago...and I say this as a Jew. Peaceful co-existence with the Arabs and others who live in that area or get the f out! Look what was done to us in the Holocaust! Sadly [I can't tell you how is sears my heart] to see those who are the children and relatives of this horror to perpetrate it on yet another group, using invented excuses as to how it is 'different'...it is the ssame. It has a name - GENOCIDE.


I wish only that there were more like you, Peter. You have some ownership of that word genocide and I know you don't toss it out lightly.

As-Salāmu `Alaykum
Shalom aleichem
שלום עליכם להיות לך

Ed Jewett
02-01-2011, 07:25 PM
Raising Egypt From the Dead

http://electricpolitics.com/media/photos/napoleonrevolution.jpgWell, the demonstrations/riots have spread. Regime change? Not so much. At least not yet. And maybe not at all, for quite a while. Not in Egypt — nor in Morocco, nor Jordan, nor Syria, nor Algeria, nor Yemen. Heck, I like magical thinking as much as the next person, but when I see leaderless (http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/01/world/middleeast/01square.html?hp) mobs composed of a thousand and one different political agendas, I don't see democracy.
Another thing I don't see is any willingness on the part of the Egyptian military to turn over control to the street. In the best case scenario the generals might try to work out some kind of power-sharing arrangement among four sets of players: themselves, the Muslim Brotherhood, a collection of some of the larger secular groups, and Egypt's economic elite. The worst case scenario I could imagine is that the generals send Mubarak packing merely to replace him with younger, more energetic officers. Regime decapitation instead of regime change. But the Egyptian government just collapsing, like in Tunisia? No, it ain't happening.

Regime continuity in one form or other has seemed and continues to seem the most likely outcome. The alternative, as I keep saying, is to organize an authentic democratic movement that represents a large majority of people, then force change through carefully planned non-violent action. But that ain't happening, either.
To think that just because lots of people are poor and oppressed you can start a Twitter revolution is to profoundly misunderstand the nature of social change. And as a heuristic exercise it's probably worth asking, after experiencing the current unrest how sympathetic will the Egyptian military be to civilian democracy building exercises tomorrow? How much more difficult might they make the achievement of real reform and how much longer, then, might they retain power?
Without the hard work of political organizing Egypt most likely will continue on its downward spiral. Eventually, indeed, the state must collapse. The result, however, won't be democracy, but anarchy.


Posted by George Kenney on February 1, 2011 5:04 AM




http://www.electricpolitics.com/2011/02/raising_egypt_from_the_dead.html#more
Comments


You're right that the hard work of political organizing lies ahead, but a certain amount of chaos is inevitable. I doubt the embattled farmers on that rude bridge had worked out a plan for a bicameral legislature to protect slavery yet.
What I find incredibly stupid is the US government acting behind the scenes to promote some combination of Mubarak holdovers and the armed forces to insure that we end up with a government that serves US/Israeli interests. The fear-mongering in the media about the Muslim Brotherhood is clearly designed to get us ready to save Egyptian "stability".
I fail to understand why, given our obvious failed strategy in the Middle East (http://www.newshoggers.com/blog/2011/02/why-washington-clings-to-a-failed-middle-east-strategy.html?), we can't simply sit by and let nature take its course. The UN might be able to help organize an election if the US and its allies stay well out of the picture, but what can be gained by US meddling at this point?
[One of the most difficult things to do when in government is to do nothing. g.]

Posted by: Charles D (http://democracylover.blogspot.com/) http://www.electricpolitics.com/mt-static/images/comment/typekey_logo.png (http://democracylover.blogspot.com/) | February 1, 2011 9:33 AM (http://www.electricpolitics.com/#comment-6742)


There was a moment when Mubarak didn't have to go. Then there was a moment when nothing could have enabled him to stay. Both moments passed.
It may be that his plan is to do nothing, just keep going on in the daily routine as though nothing is happening. Pictures of the new cabinet meeting, all in business uniforms, about to start the daily routine, not ordering the army to kill the protesters, collecting the garbage. Maybe Mubarak has been advised that if he does nothing — (a nothing that is a doing) the protesters will get exhausted and the fire will just trail off, slowly die for lack of fuel. The thinking: If he doesn't respond, there can be no reaction to his non-response. It's a bad, snaky thought, but it's got me very worried. I thought yesterday (Monday) would be the day Mubarak left. And also the day ElBaradei made another move, instead of lapsing again into silence. I still think that with everything still shaking, one man — it could still be ElBaradei — could push it over the top, get rid of Mubarak and break Egypt free into newness and deliverance from bondage.

Posted by: judyjablow123.wordpress.com (http://www.bluepolarblog.wordpress.com/) http://www.electricpolitics.com/mt-static/images/comment/openid_logo.png (http://www.bluepolarblog.wordpress.com/) | February 1, 2011 11:34 AM (http://www.electricpolitics.com/#comment-6743)

Ed Jewett
02-01-2011, 07:42 PM
U.S. dispatches former Egypt envoy to Cairo

By the CNN Wire Staff
February 1, 2011 9:47 a.m. EST

http://i.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2011/WORLD/africa/02/01/egypt.protests.wisner/t1larg.frank.wisner.gi.jpg
A U.S. State Department official said Frank Wisner "knows some of the key players within the Egyptian government."

STORY HIGHLIGHTS


Frank Wisner is a former U.S. ambassador to Egypt
He is meeting with Egyptian officials
Clinton regards the situation as "complex, very difficult"



Washington (CNN) -- The Obama administration has sent a former U.S. ambassador to Egypt to meet with officials there, a government official said Tuesday.
National Security Council spokesman Tommy Vietor said the United States asked Frank Wisner to go to Cairo.
"As someone with deep experience in the region, he is meeting with Egyptian officials and providing his assessment," Vietor said.
When asked Monday whether Wisner was a formal envoy, State Department spokesman P.J. Crowley noted that "he's a private citizen" but "a retired diplomat."
http://i.cdn.turner.com/cnn/.element/img/3.0/mosaic/bttn_close.gif
http://www.cnn.com/video/bestoftv/2011/02/01/piers.morgan.dan.rather.cnn.640x360.jpg

http://www.cnn.com/video/bestoftv/2011/02/01/piers.morgan.dan.rather.cnn.640x360.jpgDan Rather: What we can do for Egypt
http://i.cdn.turner.com/cnn/.element/img/3.0/mosaic/bttn_close.gif
http://www.cnn.com/video/bestoftv/2011/01/31/exp.ac.streetsofcairo.cnn.640x360.jpg

http://www.cnn.com/video/bestoftv/2011/01/31/exp.ac.streetsofcairo.cnn.640x360.jpgEgypt braces for 'march of millions'
http://i.cdn.turner.com/cnn/.element/img/3.0/mosaic/bttn_close.gif
http://www.cnn.com/video/bestoftv/2011/01/31/piers.erian.egypt.protests.cnn.640x360.jpg

http://www.cnn.com/video/bestoftv/2011/01/31/piers.erian.egypt.protests.cnn.640x360.jpgEgypt protests threaten global economy
http://i.cdn.turner.com/cnn/.element/img/3.0/mosaic/bttn_close.gif
http://www.cnn.com/video/bestoftv/2011/01/31/exp.ps.mubarak.chaos.criminals.cnn.640x360.jpg

http://www.cnn.com/video/bestoftv/2011/01/31/exp.ps.mubarak.chaos.criminals.cnn.640x360.jpgScho lar: Mubarak behind chaos
RELATED TOPICS


Egypt (http://topics.cnn.com/topics/Egypt)
U.S. Department of State (http://topics.cnn.com/topics/U_S_Department_of_State)



Wisner "knows some of the key players within the Egyptian government," Crowley said, and officials thought it was "useful" for the former ambassador to interact with people within Egyptian society.
Crowley said Wisner arrived in Cairo Monday.
"We'll look forward to hearing his perspective," he told reporters at the daily briefing.
"This is an opportunity both for Ambassador Wisner, who has a history with some of these key figures, you know, to meet with them and reinforce what the president has said, what the secretary (Clinton) has said, at the same time has the opportunity to gain a perspective on what they're thinking and what their ideas are in terms of ... the process that we've clearly called for."
U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton outlined the administration's stance in separate interviews Sunday with five television networks, saying the "complex, very difficult" situation in Egypt requires careful progress toward a peaceful transition to democracy rather than any sudden or violent change that could undermine the aspirations of the protesters.
"There's no easy answer," Clinton said on CNN's "State of the Union." "And, clearly, increasing chaos or even violence in the streets, prison breaks, which we've had reports about -- that is not the way to go.
"We want to see this peaceful uprising on the part of the Egyptian people to demand their rights to be responded to in a very clear, unambiguous way by the government, and then a process of national dialogue that will lead to the changes that the Egyptian people seek and that they deserve," she said.
On Monday, White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs said Egypt's government should engage in "meaningful negotiations with a broad section of civil society, including opposition groups," and hold "free and fair elections" in September.
The transition called for by Clinton "means change, and what we've advocated from the very beginning is that the way Egypt looks and operates must change," Gibbs told reporters.
At the same time, he said it is not the place of the United States to support or oppose the possible ouster of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak.


http://www.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/africa/02/01/egypt.protests.wisner/

Keith Millea
02-01-2011, 07:56 PM
Mubarak to speak shortly....announce solutions :gossip:

Ed Jewett
02-01-2011, 08:00 PM
As an aside, perhaps a side project, someone could correlate the historical research on Frank http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Wisner Wisner and Frank G. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_G._Wisner Wisner, the OSS, the CIA, the Gehlen organization, Operation Mockingbird, coups and revolutions in various countries (Guatemala, Hungary, Iran), Iraq, AIG (and its role in 9/11 and the recent bailouts), and Enron.

Ed Jewett
02-01-2011, 08:02 PM
A Million Egyptians at Tehrir Square – Protest Leaders Have Scrubbed Plans to March To Palace Due to Rumors of Violence on Routes (http://willyloman.wordpress.com/2011/02/01/hundreds-of-thousands-at-tehrir-square-rumors-spread-by-state-tv-about-stolen-army-uniforms/)

Posted on February 1, 2011 by willyloman
UPDATE : Obama sends F. Wisner to Cairo – former VP AIG, Board Mem. Enron, S. Envoy to Mafia gov. of Kosovo, linked to PSA (globalist think tank) (http://www.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/africa/02/01/egypt.protests.wisner/)
UPDATE : U.S. State Department ordered all non-emergency persons and citizens to leave Egypt.
UPDATE : Truckload of people with guns stopped on the way to the square.
UPDATE : Alan Dershowitz on ElBaradei and the Nazi-linked Muslim Brotherhood – Huffington Post (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/alan-dershowitz/the-egyptian-revolution-m_b_816308.html)

“No one can confidently predict the (revolution’s) outcome… There are models for good outcomes, bad outcomes, as well as for in-between results. The paradigmatic horrible outcome was, of course, the structural democratic election of 1932 in Germany which brought to office Adolf Hitler…
… (Elbaradei) is supported by the Muslim Brotherhood, and, in turn, he has said nice things about the Brotherhood.
… The Muslim Brotherhood is a violent, radical group with roots in Nazism and an uncompromising commitment to end the cold peace with Israel and replace it with a hot war of destruction…. ElBaradei is their perfect stalking horse.”
UPDATE : King of Jordan dismisses entire cabinet due to protests there – Washington Post (http://voices.washingtonpost.com/blog-post/2011/02/egypt_protests_major_protests.html#JORDAN-DISMISSED)

Jordan King dismisses government (2:53 p.m. EET | 7:53 a.m. EST)
After protests in Jordan, inspired by the unrest in the region, Jordan’s King Abdullah dismissed the government and appointed Marouf Bakhit to replace the prime minister Samir Rifai, Reuters reports.
UPDATE: Israel is “shocked” by Obama’s “betrayal” of Mubarak (http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/01/31/us-egypt-israel-usa-idUSTRE70U53720110131)
UPDATE: 1:30 pm local time – Al Jazeera just reported that the Egyptian Army has arrested “saboteurs and thugs infiltrating the demonstrations“
http://willyloman.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/update-10.jpg?w=468&h=279 (http://willyloman.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/update-10.jpg)
ElBaradei appeared via video to the protesters in the square urging them not to march to the palace for fear of how violence has been used against similar protests in the past.
UPDATE: The IMF is offering money to Egypt (http://www.rte.ie/news/2011/0201/egypt-business.html?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter)… looking to take advantage of yet another crisis, those IMF loansharks are looking to get the globalist leaders in Egypt to take out a loan, which will mean that the IMF can set their standard “reform” conditions on the money and lock in the people of that country to more debt servitude.
UPDATE: 1:00 pm local time – rumors that Mubarak will step down tonight leaving CIA/state department linked Vice President Omar Suleiman to take power.
UPDATE: 12:30 pm local time. Sharif Kouddous, blogger in Tehrir Square, says that the protest leaders have decided to remain in Tehrir Square rather than marching to the presidential palace.
CONFIRMED by another reporter on Al Jazeera – Looks like they have decided to scrub the march for fear of violence on the route.
Reporter said that they worried about state sponsored false flag attacks…

They might have discovered that something was indeed planned.

Army is searching people going into the square so they can verify there are no weapons. They seem to be surrounding those demonstrators, almost protecting them.
People are streaming into Tehrir Square.

There are reports from Egypt State TV, a rumor really, that stores have been broken into… and ARMY UNIFORMS have been stolen. Is this the government spin doctors creating a pretext just in case someone films something that will happen later?
Watch al Jazeera live (http://english.aljazeera.net/watch_now/)
Hundreds of thousands have already shown up at Tehrir Square.
http://willyloman.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/update-8.jpg?w=468&h=241 (http://willyloman.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/update-8.jpg)
http://willyloman.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/update-7.jpg?w=468&h=278 (http://willyloman.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/update-7.jpg)

Ed Jewett
02-01-2011, 08:21 PM
The Torture Career of Egypt's New Vice President: Omar Suleiman and the Rendition to Torture Program







(http://www.opednews.com/populum/tellafriend/tellafriend.php?page=http://www.opednews.com/articles/The-Torture-Career-of-Egyp-by-Stephen-Soldz-110129-181.html)


(http://www.opednews.com/author/author80.html)

By Stephen Soldz


http://www.opednews.com/articles/The-Torture-Career-of-Egyp-by-Stephen-Soldz-110129-181.html

Peter Lemkin
02-01-2011, 08:23 PM
...a brief aside [I can detail further soon], but are most here aware that MANY very high level Nazi scientists, engineers and SS officers went to Egypt at the end of WWII, with the silent 'permission' of the USA......and here is a long story mostly unknown!......

Ed Jewett
02-01-2011, 08:33 PM
Tuesday, February 01, 2011

EGYPT - LOOK AT THE PATTERN (http://aangirfan.blogspot.com/2011/02/egypt-look-at-pattern.html)


http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3080/3521908160_7152fddf44.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/16146765@N08/3521908160/)
Egypt by dvlazar (http://www.blogger.com/photos/16146765@N08/)

Is any 'Moslem' country safe from the CIA-Mossad-NATO?

1. Look at the pattern.

Palestine has been wrecked.

Iraq and Afghanistan have been wrecked.

Pakistan and Egypt are being wrecked.

"Will Malaysia become like Egypt and Tunisia?

"This is a question which many Malaysians are asking in the wake of people power and street demonstrations which have rocked several Muslim countries." (Malaysia, Tunisia, Egypt (http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&source=news&cd=15&ved=0CE4QqQIwBDgK&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.todayonline.com%2FCommentary% 2FEDC110201-0000172%2FMalaysias-far-from-being-Tunisia-or-Egypt&ei=47lHTZyyNpKwhAf059HoBA&usg=AFQjCNFfevxYvwwZxbYVOyeLoj0OWJsjmw&sig2=7E-yD0_HpDDj_sAgnKLQMA))

And the Egypt protests could spread to Saudi Arabia and other such countries (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jan/31/egypt-protests-spread-other-countries)

"The Saudis control the world's largest known reserves of oil..."

According to Zbigniew Brzezinski: "Egypt is seething. And if it erupts it is not only going to destabilize the country... it will affect Saudi Arabia, because the masses there are also seething underneath the surface." (Zbigniew Brzezinski Discusses Egypt Protests - Newsweek (http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=2&ved=0CDAQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.newsweek.com%2F2011%2F01%2F30 %2Fegypt-is-seething.html&ei=qMVHTZyrEZyAhAfS74ikBQ&usg=AFQjCNEr7uYGMfzcysD8NIGVJsGb2tL-LA&sig2=VwjEv64AWUuLZLCOX7bOFA))


http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2263/2068547589_d0b7b7c6c7.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/verymodest/2068547589/)
Cairo by Modest and Jill (http://www.blogger.com/photos/verymodest/)

2. Look at what is happening to Egypt's economy.

"Investors, on whom the economy depends, are ... quick to retreat and, according to assessment by Credit Suisse, are not likely to return, at least until the crisis ends...

"It warns, foreign and private investment risks collapsing even if Mubarak manages to cling on to power.

"Tourism, which along with remittances from Egyptians living abroad is the biggest source of foreign currency, looks most vulnerable of all. (Egypt in crisis: Business collapse piles pressure on Mubarak) (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jan/31/egypt-mubarak)

And Tunisia.

Moody's Investor Service has downgraded Tunisia's sovereign rating to negative, citing political instability caused by the toppling of the government. (Tunisia Slams Ratings Downgrade (http://www.google.co.uk/url?url=http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703833204576114412507581464.html%3 Fmod%3Dgooglenews_wsj&rct=j&sa=X&ei=XL5HTdqEF46ChQfNtvCXBQ&ved=0CCsQ-AsoADAAOBQ&q=tunisia&usg=AFQjCNFzuX6e_Z3e9wJuBjK8vpTvaUBCQQ))


http://farm1.static.flickr.com/99/291472664_2d850a135b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/hazy_jenius/291472664/)
Egypt by hazy jenius (http://www.blogger.com/photos/hazy_jenius/)

3. Look at how Egypt may become the new Pakistan.

Richard Norton-Taylor, in the Guardian 31 January 2011, reports that Egypt could become a greater threat than Pakistan, according to analysts (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jan/31/egypt-greater-threat-than-pakistan)

"Egypt has the potential to take Pakistan's place as the country posing the greatest threat to Britain's security, intelligence analysts said today..."

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3102/2674091199_05daa45583.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/brooklyn_museum/2674091199/)
Old Egypt - Brooklyn Museum (http://www.blogger.com/photos/brooklyn_museum/)

4. Look at the biggest 'Moslem' country in the world.

Indonesia's first president was Sukarno and his policy of 'non-alignment' did not suit the CIA and its friends.

The CIA and MI6 undermined the Indonesian economy.

MI6 trained Islamists in Sumatra, in order to weaken Sukarno.

The CIA bombed churches in Indonesia, and blamed this on Islamists.

(aangirfan: USA SEEKS CONTROL OF INDONESIA? (http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=5&sqi=2&ved=0CDIQFjAE&url=http%3A%2F%2Faangirfan.blogspot.com%2F2009%2F0 7%2Fusa-seeks-control-of-indonesia.html&ei=PcpHTfOsH6KAhAe9hsnOCQ&usg=AFQjCNHuge-LXf-rrEgktJbO6sBT8uK7Ow&sig2=Qe6yrWhLPG8en7Lf14-4hA) / aangirfan: THE USA IN INDONESIA (http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=1&sqi=2&ved=0CBoQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Faangirfan.blogspot.com%2F2009%2F1 1%2Fusa-in-indonesia.html&ei=g8pHTf2eCMKnhAfUx5SZBQ&usg=AFQjCNEzpB3W5TZqGGlXPQz4h_vBwj_dJQ&sig2=S_qR34gQykhVGxILlxg0sw) /
aangirfan: SUHARTO (http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=4&sqi=2&ved=0CDAQFjAD&url=http%3A%2F%2Faangirfan.blogspot.com%2F2008%2F0 1%2Fsuharto.html&ei=g8pHTf2eCMKnhAfUx5SZBQ&usg=AFQjCNFdCS7dKmJCklpr7EksBgA1CEpUHw&sig2=haQG3aH4bhrPNIvaiZV9LQ))

The CIA used its assets in the Indonesian military to topple Sukarno.

General Suharto, a CIA asset, was put into power as president.

The CIA gave the Indonesian military lists of people who were to be killed.

Up to one million people were slaughtered.

The Pentagon trained the key generals and the spooks.

When Suharto and Indonesia were beginning to become too powerful, and Suharto was not giving enough contracts to US firms, the CIA took action.

The Indonesian economy was undermined.

Soldiers, dressed up as students, organised riots.

The CIA used its assets in the Indonesian military to topple Suharto.

Indonesia then endured several years of deep poverty and chaos.

And who now rules Indonesia?

The current president is a former general, trained in the USA.

~~




Posted by Anon at 9:21 AM (http://aangirfan.blogspot.com/2011/02/egypt-look-at-pattern.html)




[And don't forget to correlate that with Obama's early background , family roots, education, and
post-collegiate employment placement. ]

Keith Millea
02-01-2011, 09:44 PM
Mubarak proclaims "He will die on Egyptian soil."

The people chant "Di Di Mau."

Peter Lemkin
02-01-2011, 10:01 PM
What role, if any, did Mubarak have in the assassination of his predecessor Saddat? I admit, I've not researched this....if anyone has any clues, now would be a good time to speak. I know the official line is he had none...and that may well be so.....just curious.

Jan Klimkowski
02-01-2011, 10:19 PM
What role, if any, did Mubarak have in the assassination of his predecessor Saddat? I admit, I've not researched this....if anyone has any clues, now would be a good time to speak. I know the official line is he had none...and that may well be so.....just curious.

See here, for a thread on that assassination (https://deeppoliticsforum.com/forums/showthread.php?6268-Assassination-of-Anwar-Sadat-October-6-1981).

Ed Jewett
02-02-2011, 01:05 AM
Tweets Mapped...
http://www.mibazaar.com/egypt.html

David Guyatt
02-02-2011, 09:45 AM
...a brief aside [I can detail further soon], but are most here aware that MANY very high level Nazi scientists, engineers and SS officers went to Egypt at the end of WWII, with the silent 'permission' of the USA......and here is a long story mostly unknown!......

Anxiously awaiting your brief aside Pete... :poke:

Peter Lemkin
02-02-2011, 01:00 PM
Men on horseback with whips and weapons, backed by secret police and 'pro-government supporters in battles. Some stabbed. Some killed. Many injured. Army watching and doing nothing!....

Peter Lemkin
02-02-2011, 01:32 PM
Many injured. They have shown that many of the 'pro-Mubarrak' 'supporters' are plain-clothes police and police thugs, with official IDs in their wallets! CNN reporter injured. Total war scene now!

Peter Lemkin
02-02-2011, 01:59 PM
Chaos increasing. Hundreds injured. Journalists and especially camerapersons being attacked by mobs coming from all directions on side-streets toward anti-government protesters with rocks, sticks, knives, etc. Watch it live on Al Jazeera, English

Peter Lemkin
02-02-2011, 02:04 PM
Pro-Mabarrak forces have hijacked at least three armored personnel carriers that have machine guns and are heading toward the crowds!....and firing! Watch live here http://english.aljazeera.net/watch_now/

TOTAL CHAOS. Army only protecting the Egyptian museum, otherwise doing nothing!

Peter Lemkin
02-02-2011, 02:20 PM
All escape routes of the thousands of anti-government protestors are blocked. They are surrounded by armed thugs...I expect the worse. They include thousands of woman and children. Now buildings are being put on fire....the chaos is increasing!

Peter Lemkin
02-02-2011, 03:21 PM
Thousands injured, lying on road being treated by other demonstrators...no ambulances....no intervention by Army who are right there!....total scenes of chaos increasing and night will soon fall....I predict hundreds to be murdered.

Peter Lemkin
02-02-2011, 03:31 PM
security forces and police in plain-clothes thugs now on rooftops surrounding square throwing stones, chairs and satellite dishes down on peaceful anti-Mubarrack demonstrators. Army says it 'has no orders, so will do nothing'. This will be a night of the long knives for Peace in Cairo...I fear!

Peter Lemkin
02-02-2011, 03:40 PM
Building across from the Egyptian Museum on fire and some indication fire is starting IN the Egyptian Museum = home of Trillions of dollars [really priceless] antiquities! No authorities are intervening...only the secret security police acting to attack the demonstrators in plain clothes!

Peter Lemkin
02-02-2011, 04:44 PM
Clashes have broken out between pro- and anti-government demonstrators in the Egyptian capital Cairo.

Protesters from both sides threw stones at each other in Tahrir Square, the epicentre of ongoing opposition demonstrations against President Hosni Mubarak for the past nine days.

Al Jazeera correspondents, reporting from the scene, said that more than 500 people had been injured in Wednesday's clashes that are continuing to rage.

Earlier, witnesses said the military allowed thousands of pro-Mubarak supporters, armed with sticks and knives, to enter the square. Opposition groups said Mubarak had sent in thugs to suppress anti-government protests.

One of our correspondents said the army seemed to be standing by and facilitating the clashes. Latest reports suggest that the centre of the square is still in control of the protesters, despite the pro-Mubarak supporters gaining ground.

'Absolute mayhem'

Witnesses also said that pro-Mubarak supporters were dragging away protesters they had managed to grab and handing them over to security forces.

Salma Eltarzi, an anti-government protester, told Al Jazeera there were hundreds of wounded people.

"There are no ambulances in sight, and all we are using is Dettol," she said. "We are all so scared."

Aisha Hussein, a nurse, said dozens of people were being treated at a makeshift clinic in a mosque near the square.

She described a scene of "absolute mayhem", as protesters first began to flood into the clinic.
Al Jazeera's special coverage on Egypt


"People are coming in with multiple wounds. All kinds of contusions. We had one guy who needed stitches in two places on his face. Some have broken bones."

Meanwhile, another Al Jazeera correspondent said men on horseback and camels had ploughed into the crowds, as army personnel stood by.

At least six riders were dragged from their beasts, beaten with sticks by the protesters and taken away with blood streaming down their faces.

One of them was dragged away unconscious, with large blood stains on the ground at the site of the clash.

The worst of the fighting was just outside the world famous Egyptian Museum, which was targeted by looters last week.

Al Jazeera's correspondent added that several a group of pro-government protesters took over army vehicles. They also took control of a nearby building and used the rooftop to throw concrete blocks, stones, and other objects.

Soldiers surrounding the square took cover from flying stones, and the windows of at least one army truck were broken. Some troops stood on tanks and appealed for calm but did not otherwise intervene.

Many of the pro-Mubarak supporters raised slogans like "Thirty Years of Stability, Nine Days of Anarchy".

Al Jazeera's online producer in Cairo said rocks were continously being thrown from both sides. He said that though the army had put up barricades around the square, they let the pro-Mubarak supporters through.

"The people on horses are pro-Mubarak supporters, they are a very angry crowd looking for anyone working for Al Jazeera and for Americans. They are trying to get on the other side of the army tanks to get to the anti-Mubarak supporters. More and more pro-Mubarak supporters are coming in."

Violence

Al Jazeera's Jane Dutton, also in Cairo, said that security guards have also been seen amongst the pro-Mubarak supporters, and it may be a precursor to the feared riot police arriving on the scene.

Dutton added that a journalist with the Al-Arabiya channel was stabbed during the clashes.

Fighting took place around army tanks deployed around the square, with stones bouncing off the armoured vehicles. Soldiers did not intervene.

Several groups were involved in fist fights, and some were using clubs. The opposition also said many among the pro-Mubarak crowd were policemen in plain clothes.
"But we will not leave ... Everybody stay put"

Khalil, anti-government protester


"Members of security forces dressed in plain clothes and a number of thugs have stormed Tahrir Square," three opposition groups said in a statement.

Mohamed ElBaradei, a prominent opposition figure, accused Mubarak of resorting to scare tactics. Opposition groups have reportedly also seized police identification cards amongst the pro-Mubarak demonstrators.

"I'm extremely concerned, I mean this is yet another symptom, or another indication, of a criminal regime using criminal acts," ElBaradei said.

"My fear is that it will turn into a bloodbath," he added, calling the pro-Mubarak supporters a "bunch of thugs".

But according to state television, the minister of interior denied that plain clothes police had joined pro-Mubarak demonstrations.

Elbaradei has also urged the army to intervene.

"I ask the army to intervene to protect Egyptian lives," he told Al Jazeera, adding he said it should intervene "today" and not remain neutral.

Hassiba Hadj Sahraoui, deputy director for Amnesty International's Middle East and North Africa Programme, told Al Jazeera that the clashes look to be orchestrated.

"It is not the first time the Mubarak government has provoked clashes to quell protests, but if it truly is orchestrated, this is a cynical and bloody approach," she said.

"The army look to be not intervening at all, and the question remains as to whether they have been ordered not to step in."

The army has told state television that citizens should arrest those who have stolen military clothing, and to hand them over.

Determined protesters

Despite the clashes, anti-government protesters seeking Mubarak's immediate resignation said they would not give up until Mubarak steps down.
Pro-Mubarak supporters came riding on camels and horses [Al Jazeera/online producer]


Khalil, in his 60s and holding a stick, blamed Mubarak supporters and undercover security for the clashes.

"But we will not leave," he told Reuters. "Everybody stay put."

Mohammed el-Belgaty, a member of the Muslim Brotherhood, told Al Jazeera the "peaceful demonstrations in Tahrir Square have been turned into chaos".

"The speech delivered by President Mubarak was very provocative as he used very sentimental words.

"Since morning, hundreds of these paid thugs started to demonstrate pretending to be supporting the President. Now they came to charge inside Tahrir Square armed with batons, sticks and some knives.

"Mubarak is asking the people to choose between him or chaos."

Ahead of Wednesday's clashes, supporters of the president staged a number of rallies around Cairo, saying Mubarak represented stability amid growing insecurity, and calling those who want his departure "traitors."

"Yes to Mubarak, to protect stability," read one banner in a crowd of 500 gathered near state television headquarters, about 1km from Tahrir Square.

A witness said organisers were paying people $17, to take part in the pro-Mubarak rally, a claim that could not be confirmed.

Other pro-Mubarak demonstrations occurred in the Mohandeseen district, as well as near Ramses Square.

Peter Lemkin
02-02-2011, 05:18 PM
1600 injured, and now it is night......

Magda Hassan
02-02-2011, 05:35 PM
Protesters in Alexandria shot at from cars.

Peter Lemkin
02-02-2011, 06:15 PM
Pro-Mubarrak police, secret police and police thugs have plans tonight to 'take over' the main square in Cairo...what that means for the peaceful protesters who have been there for the last week seems very dire, dire indeed...if not deadly.....

Peter Lemkin
02-02-2011, 08:07 PM
one killed, 600 seriously injured...and the night is young......

Ed Jewett
02-03-2011, 02:26 AM
Machine guns fired into Cairo's Tahrir Square (http://www.jpost.com/MiddleEast/Article.aspx?id=206429) --600 reported injured, one killed in clashes; Pro-Mubarak rioters hurl Molotov Cocktails, rocks at opposition from surrounding buildings; protesters target Egyptian Museum. 02 Feb 2011 Machine gunfire was heard on Wednesday night, shortly after Egyptian state television ordered all demonstrators to evacuate Cairo's Tahrir (Liberation) Square. Al Jazeera reported that anti-government protesters remained in the square, chanting "Leave! Leave!" at Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, as ambulances were stationed in the area.



Deputy Omar Suleiman known for his brutality and CIA links (http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/world/deputy-omar-suleiman-known-for-his-brutality-and-cia-links/story-e6frg6so-1225998362607) 02 Feb 2011 The man named by President Hosni Mubarak as his first ever deputy, spy chief Omar Suleiman, reportedly orchestrated the brutal interrogation [torture] of terror suspects abducted by the CIA in its secret "extraordinary rendition" program. For US intelligence officials, Mr Suleiman was "the CIA's point man in Egypt for rendition - the covert program in which the CIA snatched terror suspects from around the world and returned them to Egypt and elsewhere for interrogation, often under brutal circumstances", according to Jane Mayer in a profile for The New Yorker.


February 2, 2011 by legitgov

Keith Millea
02-03-2011, 02:27 AM
Bullets are flying NOW!Live feed at:

http://english.aljazeera.net/watch_now/

Magda Hassan
02-03-2011, 03:21 AM
http://liberalconspiracy.org/images/design/nav_home.gif (http://liberalconspiracy.org/) http://liberalconspiracy.org/images/design/nav_westminster.gif (http://liberalconspiracy.org/westminster) http://liberalconspiracy.org/images/design/nav_unions.gif http://liberalconspiracy.org/images/design/nav_media.gif (http://liberalconspiracy.org/media) http://liberalconspiracy.org/images/design/nav_activism.gif (http://liberalconspiracy.org/activism/)
Pro-Mubarak text messages from Egypt; who sent them? (http://liberalconspiracy.org/2011/02/03/unsolicited-pro-mubarak-text-messages-from-egypt/)


by Sunny Hundal
February 3, 2011 at 1:14 am

People on Twitter have been sending these text messages (http://www.flickr.com/photos/59098813@N06/with/5411904816/) around (uploaded by @SheriefFarouk (http://twitter.com/SheriefFarouk))
He tells me that all his friends (over 20) got the text messages from across Cairo (masr el gedida), Nasr city, Rehab city , maadi, Alexandria and Tanta. So it seems a wide geographical area was covered.
Their content is very interesting and they were sent around yesterday to whip up support for the Mubarak regime.
There are allegations all over Twitter that they were sent to all Vodafone customers in Egypt, unsolicited. I’m currently trying to confirm this.
Updates at the end
—-
http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5297/5411905728_c896f8f4d0.jpg
Translation: Youth of Egypt, beware rumors and listen to the sound of reason – Egypt is above all so preserve it.
.
http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4141/5411904816_7b70736783.jpg
Translation: The Armed Forces asks Egypt’s honest and loyal men to confront the traitors and criminals and protect our people and honor and our precious Egypt.
.
http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5255/5411903120_63e45e0ae6.jpg
Translation:
First text: To every mother-father-sister-brother, to every honest citizen preserve this country as the nation is forever.
Second text: The Armed Forces cares for your safety and well being and will not resort to using force against this great nation.
.
http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5013/5411291245_747e38a0d6.jpg
Translation: The Armed Forces asks Egypt’s honest and loyal men to confront the traitors and criminals and protect our people and honor and our precious Egypt.
——
Pictures via @glinner (http://twitter.com/glinner) (via @BodyInTheThames (http://twitter.com/BodyInTheThames)). Thanks also to @El_Amster (http://twitter.com/El_Amster) and @inkelectric (http://twitter.com/inkelectric) and @salmaeldaly (http://twitter.com/salmaeldaly) and @monaeltahawy (http://twitter.com/monaeltahawy).
——
1. The translation have been verified.
2. It has also been verified that they are genuine text messages and not spoofs.
3. But it’s not yet been verified beyond doubt whether they were sent to Vodafone customers unsolicited.
——
Update: One tweeter from Cairo (http://twitter.com/#%21/NevineZaki/status/32971479754735616) tells me they were definitely sent to all Vodafone customers, including herself. We still need official confirmation from Vodafone.
Update 2: A Facebook group has been set up (http://on.fb.me/gfWdFa) for Egyptians to upload pictures of their text messages. If you got these messages or other ones, upload yours there and say how you got them!
Update 3: Vodafone Egypt is 45% owned by Telecom Egypt (http://bit.ly/fCeCGD). [hat-tip R_McCormack (http://twitter.com/R_McCormack)]
——
Note: This page is being cached (to stop the site from going down) so your comments etc will appear after a delay.
http://liberalconspiracy.org/2011/02/03/unsolicited-pro-mubarak-text-messages-from-egypt/

Peter Lemkin
02-03-2011, 11:58 AM
Minimum of 7 dead [seems low], thousands injured. Journalists with any camera or any ID are being stopped from getting into demonstration area. Army is now placing barriers, in unclear move. Some discussion of senior Military wanted to use Army to stop protesters, but medium and low level commanders refused. As an alternative, they had the police and secret police dress as 'civilians' and attack the demonstrators. Demo after tomorrow's prayers should be interesting and likely the deciding day.....but who can tell.

Peter Lemkin
02-03-2011, 08:15 PM
JUAN GONZALEZ: The Egyptian government has launched a violent crackdown on the massive uprising seeking the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak. After over a week of unprecedented and peaceful rallies that brought millions into the streets, pro-democracy demonstrators were viciously attacked Wednesday and earlier today in Cairo’s Tahrir Square.

Aided by positions overlooking the crowd and the apparent consent of the military, pro-Mubarak supporters unleashed a barrage of automatic gunfire and Molotov cocktails. Protesters responded with homemade bombs, sticks and rocks. At least seven people were killed and over 800 were wounded before dawn broke. The vast majority of the victims appeared to be on the pro-democracy side. There are widespread reports that many pro-Mubarak supporters were either plainclothes police officers or others paid by the regime.

AMY GOODMAN: Shortly after the first gunfire erupted, Democracy Now! producer Aaron Maté reached Egyptian activist Mona Seif in Tahrir square.

MONA EL SEIF: They have rifles. They are shooting live ammunition at us. We’ve already—we’ve had a lot of wounded. I don’t know how many. The ambulance keeps on coming and carrying wounded people and speeding away with them. We have had so far four confirmed deaths. One of them was with a shot right through the head. And it just—it is still going on. And the army is there, and they are not moving, and nobody’s moving. And we keep on sending other of our people to the forefront to try and protect us, and we keep on losing some of them. And that’s how it is.

AARON MATÉ: And what is the military doing?

MONA EL SEIF: The military is not doing anything. On the side, where the main clashes are, where we lost already four people and lots of wounded, there are more than six army trucks, and they are not doing anything. And right now there is—it seems that there is another clash on another of the entrances to Tahrir Square, but I cannot confirm it, like people are running towards it, but I don’t know yet if there is something.

AARON MATÉ: Now, it’s almost 6:00 in the morning there, and it’s obviously very dangerous. Why are you still there?

MONA EL SEIF: Because we cannot leave. We came here peacefully demanding for Mubarak to leave. We were so numerous yesterday. This is not our demand alone. This is the demand of the majority of Egyptians all over the country. We were here peacefully. Yesterday was such a festive day. If you saw the place, you would think it was a park. We had children playing and people chanting and dancing and singing. And now, all of a sudden, it’s this war zone, just because they leashed at us those thugs, with their weapons and their knives and their cocktail Molotovs thrown at us from rooftops. We are here because we’ve lost a lot of people for a certain demand and a certain cause, and we owe it to them to stick it and stay here.

AARON MATÉ: Now, the corporate media here has described what’s happening today as clashes between two sides. What do think of that description?

MONA EL SEIF: It isn’t. It isn’t. If it was clashes between two sides, then you would assume that the two sides had opposing causes and they were equal. It isn’t. Most of the—we have caught a lot of the thugs they have released at us. We have searched them. Most of them were one of two things. Either they had police IDs on them—and we have taken photos of this, and we’ve already sent it out to Twitter and Facebook; you can look for it, the hashtag is jan25—or they were unemployed people that were promised either jobs or money. And we’ve already—we have a testimony of one of them on videotape. We are just waiting for a chance to have internet to show the world what this government is capable of. We know this. We know this since every demo we went to. They always plant thugs and pretend—let them pretend to be civilians, so they can start the violence. I just never saw this amount of violence, this publicly displayed, and nobody stopping it.

AMY GOODMAN: Egyptian activist Mona Seif, speaking after the pro-Mubarak forces opened fire on Tahrir Square. Democracy Now! producer Aaron Maté also reached another activist there, Selma Tarzi.

SELMA AL-TARZI: The Mubarak thugs were shooting at us with the machine guns. The army shot back at them. Two of them were killed. One of us was killed. And the army was chased them and took their machine guns away. However, more are coming. And we are so tired. People are so tired. We’ve been fighting for the past 12 hours. And we’re just protesters; we’re civilians. We’re protesters. We’re not—we’re improvising fighting tactics. All we have is stones and sticks. And we’re tired. This is not what we’re here to do. This is not—this is not how—this is a crime of war. They’re killing us.

AARON MATÉ: Tell us what you’re seeing right now.

SELMA AL-TARZI: I’m seeing doctors running left and right, ambulances driving left and right, people carrying wounded people, trying to take them to the place that we set up and made an improvised doctor tent. On the other side, people are sitting on the pavement so exhausted and so tired. And that is us. Some people are trying to lift the morale or encourage people to go and fight. But people are tired. People are tired.

And channels like the BBC are claiming that it’s a Muslim Brother movement and that all the people in the square are Muslim Brothers. We are not Muslim Brothers. I’m not the Muslim Brothers. I couldn’t care less for the Muslim Brothers. They’re everything I work against and I believe against. However, in this fight, we are working together side by side. And there are people from all sorts of ideologies here. It’s a people’s movement.

AARON MATÉ: Who are these forces that have been shooting at you?

SELMA AL-TARZI: These are thugs. These are thugs that are trying to attack the square from all the entrances. Our people are trying to secure the entrances of the square. But these are the Mubarak thugs, and not only Mubarak. And it has to be very clear to everyone that when we say that we want Mubarak out, we mean his whole government, his whole regime, including Habib El Adly, including Omar Suleiman, the chief of intelligence, including the parliament, including the parliament heads that are hiring these thugs to kill us, basically.

There has been live shooting all day. I was helping with the wounded. And I have, myself, seen to a couple of cases of gunshots in their legs, because they’re below. They’re shooting their legs below. They’re not showing the guns. At the beginning, they weren’t. Now that they’re using machine guns, apparently they’re being obvious about it, but at the beginning they were shooting below the—they were shooting the legs. They weren’t showing their weapons. And we did not know where the shot is coming from.

JUAN GONZALEZ: That was Selma Tarzi, speaking from Tahrir Square in the midst of pro-government forces opening fire on the pro-democracy demonstrators.
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AMY GOODMAN: And we just got this message, as messages are coming into us right and left. This is a message from our guest yesterday on Democracy Now!, Noha Radwan. She’s a professor at UC Davis, University of California, Davis, Egyptian American. She’s been in Tahrir Square for days now, part of the protests. We had her on the show. She was in a studio with Sharif, who joined us yesterday from the studio. By the way, they won’t be able to join us from studio today, because the studio is shut down as a result of security concerns. But Noha Radwan was attacked. She said, "I wanted your show to know that as I left the studio to go back to Tahrir, I got attacked by the mob and beaten half to death by the Mubarak thugs, who were happy to snatch my necklaces off my neck and to rip my shirt open. I am now fine, but the big thug must go. Wish us the best. Our Internet comes and goes." Again, that was Professor Noha Radwan after she left the studio yesterday.
We are going right now to Sharif Abdel Kouddous, our senior producer, Democracy Now! senior producer, on the ground. He was supposed to be in the studio in Cairo. That studio has been shut down.

Sharif, describe the whole scene in Tahrir Square right now.

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: Amy, I’m talking to you—I’m standing on a rooftop near the 6 of October Bridge, just a few hundred yards from where the studio is. It’s impossible to get across. I’m standing basically on the frontlines of the battle between the pro-democracy uprising and the Mubarak regime. There is a lot of rock throwing that is happening back and forth. There are army tanks that are stationed on the bridge. And there’s the crackle of gunfire, and it’s unclear who is firing.

The people in Tahrir that I met throughout the day today were very proud of the fact that they held the square, that they—despite this brutal assault that they came under, that they managed to hold Tahrir. You know, "Tahrir" means "liberation." And what the people say now is that they’re going to stay in Liberation Square until liberation.

And I’m speaking to you right now—the pro-democracy forces seem to have pushed back and keep on pushing back the Mubarak thugs. We were here earlier, and the border was further near Tahrir. And now they seem to be pushing back the Mubarak forces.

Right now, it’s unclear what is going to happen in the evening. Tomorrow, Friday, is going to be a decisive day. Of course, Friday is the day for Muslim prayer, and they expect hundreds of thousands to come to Tahrir. And they want the ouster of the Mubarak regime, and they demand nothing less.

We were walking around Tahrir yesterday. They held the square, but they suffered terribly. There are people—many, many hundreds wounded. I’ve seen broken legs and arms. I’ve seen many people bandaged. They’ve shown me bullets that were fired. There’s a man right now trying to give me bread. We went to a makeshift hospital, where people have been—the doctors have been up for more than 48 hours, tending to the wounded. The numbers of the dead vary, but there’s somewhere between five and 10 people, they say, were shot in the head, people hit by rocks, who died. They said they weren’t allowed to leave the square yesterday and that they were trapped inside.

Another thing is that the army—people are very angry at the army, because they say they were complicit in all of this. You know, in my earlier reports, I said that the Egyptian army—people were convinced that the army wouldn’t harm them. But what they didn’t imagine was that they would just stand by and allow these pro-Mubarak thugs to come in hordes, on horseback and camel, to attack them with rocks and Molotov cocktails and to lay siege to Tahrir to try and make them leave.

But the people here are defiant, and they refuse to leave. And there’s more coming into Tahrir, as I speak. But right now, I’m on the very edge of it, and the battle continues to rage. I can see more Mubarak forces continuing to gather at the foot of one of the bridges. It’s unclear what will happen next. There are rocks absolutely everywhere on the ground, rocks that were thrown from both sides, mostly from the baltaguia, from the thugs. The people in Tahrir point to the square that they were so proud of, that they had cleaned up the garbage and tended to it so well, and now there is trash, there are rocks everywhere, because they had to defend themselves. They say they are forced to throw back, that they don’t want, but they were forced to throw back to defend themselves. And they appear to be holding their ground.

JUAN GONZALEZ: Sharif, you mentioned the role of the military. We did get some reports that when the pro-Mubarak forces started shooting machine guns, that the army did intervene and tried to confiscate those. Are you getting any sense that there’s an increase in the military presence, or does this represent basically conflicting orders that are coming in to the military about what to do in this situation?

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: Well, Juan, they certainly did let in the pro-Mubarak thugs to come in on horseback and camel, which people are very shocked at. You know, they say, "What are we living in? Barbarian times?" I have heard the same reports, that when machine gun fire started, that the army did come in and pushed back Mubarak’s forces. So, it appears that at a certain point they intervened, but people don’t understand why they let it come to that point. Many were wounded here, hundreds were wounded, and some were killed. And they want the army to do more to protect Tahrir. Tahrir has become the epicenter in all of Egypt for this struggle for democracy.

AMY GOODMAN: Sharif, we’re going to break, and we’re going to come right back. We’re speaking to Democracy Now! senior producer Sharif Abdel Kouddous, who is in Tahrir Square. We also finally got Noha Radwan on the line, who was with Sharif yesterday in the studio, who was beaten badly when she left the studio after her interview with Democracy Now!. This is Democracy Now! We’re covering the uprising in Egypt, live on the ground. Stay with us.

[break]

AMY GOODMAN: We’re live on the ground in Cairo in Tahrir Square with our senior producer, Democracy Now!'s Sharif Abdel Kouddous. We're also joined by Noha Radwan, assistant professor of comparative literature at the University of California, Davis, who is currently taking part in the protests in Tahrir Square. She joined us yesterday with Sharif in studio.

Noha, describe what happened when you left the studio.

NOHA RADWAN: Hi, Amy. What happened is I left the studio with Sharif and your cameraperson Jacquie, and they were stopped at the Ramsis Hilton and had to stay inside the hotel. I actually moved towards the square. And as I approached, I could see the thugs, the Mubarak mob, but I totally underestimated what they’re capable of doing.

They asked me why I was trying to get into the square. I said I had friends and relatives who are injured, and I’m just checking on them. But then the big question came: "Are you pro-Mubarak or anti-Mubarak?" And I didn’t want to answer the question. I just left the person who was asking the question and tried to get in.

Two, three meters later, somebody caught on to the fact that I was trying to get in anyway, and then they yelled to the mob, "She’s with them! She’s with them! Get her!" And I found two big guys who came and held onto my arms and took me out, and they kind of handed me on to a mob that started beating me and pulling my hair. They ripped my shirt off. They ripped a gold necklace. If you see the recording from yesterday, you’ll see that I was wearing a very close-to-the-neck kind of big necklace. So, in ripping this, they actually injured the neck. And through all the beating, I had to get a couple of stitches to the head yesterday.

I’m fine now, and I actually really wanted to give this report as a minor, you know, firsthand testimony to what is happening. What has happened to others is a lot more. We have seen people get hit by the stones thrown in by the mobs, and they have lost their eyes. There are people with concussions. I was taken in an ambulance much, much later to a hospital, where I had to spend most of the night, because there was no way of getting out. The mob is really singling us out.

The worst part of it is that the Egyptian media has been broadcasting nonstop that we are infiltrators, that we are foreign-paid, that most of the people in Tahrir are not actually real Egyptians, they are, you know, paid by foreigners outside. There have been reports about a Belgian who was caught and turned out to be a spy, Israelis who were caught in the demonstration, and so on and so forth.

AMY GOODMAN: Speaking of being caught, Sharif, the reports of the number of pro-Mubarak forces that have been captured by anti-Mubarak forces, the protesters in the square, The Guardian has something like 120 IDs of police. What do you know about this? And as you were reporting, Juan, the busloads of these pro-Mubarak forces being shipped—shipping them in.

JUAN GONZALEZ: Yeah, the New York Times, Sharif, is reporting that they were bused in systematically throughout the day, apparently, obviously by the government. Who else would pay for all those buses?

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: That’s right. I mean, there’s no question who these people were who attacked last night. I have seen, myself, at least four police IDs. People say they grabbed—as you know, on the ground, it’s difficult to get numbers. I get between dozens and hundreds of them. And they say that 90 percent of them had some sort of ID that linked them to the police or state and Central Security forces. They say many of them are baltaguias, just these kind of—these thugs that the Mubarak regime has used for many years.

And let me just say also that I watched as they arrested a policeman in uniform today, two policemen in uniform. And in stark contrast to the way that they beat the members of the popular uprising here, like Noha Radwan and others, they arrested this man very peacefully. You know, they had just held him stiffly and put him into an army tank. And so, the difference is very clear.

And let me just add, I was devastated to hear that Professor Radwan came under attack. We left the hotel maybe 20 minutes after her. We tried to re-enter Tahrir Square. These mobs are very intimidating. They’re very hostile. They’re men, mostly, that range from about 20 to 45 years old. They wear sweaters and thick leather jackets. And they were basically holding a mini riot at every entrance into Tahrir, preventing anyone from going in. We tried to force our way in, Hany, Jacquie and I. We held each other and tried to go through. But we were on the verge of being beaten ourselves, and we backed off and then had to go home, and we were unable to go inside. It was a very dark day in this struggle, but the people are very proud here in Tahrir that they held their ground under this brutal assault. And to this day they remain defiant. And it remains to be seen what will happen tomorrow, but I think it will be a decisive day in this struggle.

JUAN GONZALEZ: And Noha Radwan, I’d like to ask you about what I asked Sharif, the role of the military, because obviously many of the protesters at first felt that the military was on their side. Your assessment now, after what happened in the past 24 hours?

NOHA RADWAN: Can I answer that question?

JUAN GONZALEZ: Yes.

NOHA RADWAN: I was actually saved by the military. I was going to practically die on the street, had it not been for the fact that some very low-ranking army officer—and I cannot give any more details than that—actually asked his soldiers to pick me up and put me inside the tank, and where I stayed until it got dark. And then they called an ambulance for me to get out in the ambulance and go straight to a hospital. The mob outside were really calling for my head, as a traitor, an American-paid Baradei supporter.

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: Amy, I had just ducked into a stairwell to talk to you. I’m back on the roof right now. There’s some kind of fire bombs thrown back and forth. You can hear—I don’t know if you can hear them exploding in the background. There’s smoke coming. They are coming in the air, and there’s just tons of—Jesus, tons of rocks on the ground. It’s unclear where they are coming from, but they seem to be coming largely from the pro-Mubarak forces.

AMY GOODMAN: Sharif, where are you in relation—in Tahrir Square, what area are you looking on it from? And be very careful. Don’t be on the phone if you’re in any danger.

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: Amy, I’m on a rooftop. I’m on a rooftop that is near the museum, that is overlooking near the Hilton hotel and where we were staying, near the studio. And I can see—it’s right on the 6 of October Bridge. Clashes are breaking out right on the 6 of October Bridge. There’s a lot of rock throwing. People are advancing forward now. This is really the frontline of the struggle between the pro-democracy movement and the Mubarak regime. And it remains to be seen what will happen next, but right now the battle is raging.

AMY GOODMAN: Sharif, we have unconfirmed reports, but tweeted by various journalists on Twitter, that Shahira Amin resigned from Nile TV, citing her inability to lie any longer. Nile TV is state TV. The significance? And describe what you’re seeing now. Just tell us what’s happening.

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: Amy, I don’t know about her resignation. I know a lot of people have come up to me, and any time we kind of were filming, they say, "Make sure you film the reality of this." They’re very aware of the propaganda of the state TV. And the state TV is filming Tahrir Square, just filming these empty spaces, to try and show that there’s hardly anyone there, when in fact there are tens of thousands there, that they do not show the brutal assault that they came under. And so, they know the state TV and the bias that it has. If someone resigned—and I’ve heard of other resignations, not sure if it’s from Nile TV.

But right now, again, I’m standing on this roof, and basically what it is is, from the main square, there’s a big street that runs next to the museum. And the people have created three lines of barricades, with burnt-up trucks to form barriers. They’ve also torn corrugated iron from a construction site, and they’re using that to barricade themselves, as well, and use it as shields under the shower of rocks that keep flying over. And so, they have fortified themselves here after the assault yesterday, and they’re ready to defend Tahrir Square, Liberation Square, they say, until liberation.

JUAN GONZALEZ: Sharif, I know it’s difficult with the events you’re seeing right now unfold before you, but I’d like to ask you a little bit in terms of—have you seen any evidence of involvement of the Egyptian labor movement in any of these protests? I’m not talking about the official labor organizations that the government basically sponsors. But there has been, over the last few years, a very strong labor—independent labor movement in Egypt. And one report that I saw recently said that there have been over 3,000 actions by Egyptian workers since 2004, involving more than two million people. One historian called it the largest social movement in the Arab world, and it’s gone largely unreported. Do you have any sense of whether the masses of Egyptian workers, in one way or another, are poised maybe to act on Friday or in the coming days in any kind of organized form?

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: Well, Juan, I would say that the labor movement has been extremely important in this struggle. I think this popular uprising really started to gain strength a few years ago during the strike in Mahalla, which is the site of the biggest textile factory in the Middle East. I think it’s something like 30,000 to 40,000 workers. They held a strike, and they were brutally cracked down upon by the Mubarak regime. And after that, the uprising—many believe that’s when it started. Demonstrations started in bigger, bigger and bigger numbers. And, you know, what is—this uprising that started a week ago was really led by the youth movement, and one of the youth movements that helped organize it on Facebook calls itself the April 6 Youth Movement. That is the date of that strike. And so, the labor movement is very important to this. It’s hard to say how many of them are here in Tahrir, but, you know, many of them—many of the people here are the youth. And so—but labor, indeed, has been very important in this uprising.
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AMY GOODMAN: We’re live on the ground in Cairo in Tahrir Square with our senior producer, Democracy Now!'s Sharif Abdel Kouddous. We're also joined by Noha Radwan, assistant professor of comparative literature at the University of California, Davis, who is currently taking part in the protests in Tahrir Square. She joined us yesterday with Sharif in studio.

Noha, describe what happened when you left the studio.

NOHA RADWAN: Hi, Amy. What happened is I left the studio with Sharif and your cameraperson Jacquie, and they were stopped at the Ramsis Hilton and had to stay inside the hotel. I actually moved towards the square. And as I approached, I could see the thugs, the Mubarak mob, but I totally underestimated what they’re capable of doing.

They asked me why I was trying to get into the square. I said I had friends and relatives who are injured, and I’m just checking on them. But then the big question came: "Are you pro-Mubarak or anti-Mubarak?" And I didn’t want to answer the question. I just left the person who was asking the question and tried to get in.

Two, three meters later, somebody caught on to the fact that I was trying to get in anyway, and then they yelled to the mob, "She’s with them! She’s with them! Get her!" And I found two big guys who came and held onto my arms and took me out, and they kind of handed me on to a mob that started beating me and pulling my hair. They ripped my shirt off. They ripped a gold necklace. If you see the recording from yesterday, you’ll see that I was wearing a very close-to-the-neck kind of big necklace. So, in ripping this, they actually injured the neck. And through all the beating, I had to get a couple of stitches to the head yesterday.

I’m fine now, and I actually really wanted to give this report as a minor, you know, firsthand testimony to what is happening. What has happened to others is a lot more. We have seen people get hit by the stones thrown in by the mobs, and they have lost their eyes. There are people with concussions. I was taken in an ambulance much, much later to a hospital, where I had to spend most of the night, because there was no way of getting out. The mob is really singling us out.

The worst part of it is that the Egyptian media has been broadcasting nonstop that we are infiltrators, that we are foreign-paid, that most of the people in Tahrir are not actually real Egyptians, they are, you know, paid by foreigners outside. There have been reports about a Belgian who was caught and turned out to be a spy, Israelis who were caught in the demonstration, and so on and so forth.

AMY GOODMAN: Speaking of being caught, Sharif, the reports of the number of pro-Mubarak forces that have been captured by anti-Mubarak forces, the protesters in the square, The Guardian has something like 120 IDs of police. What do you know about this? And as you were reporting, Juan, the busloads of these pro-Mubarak forces being shipped—shipping them in.

JUAN GONZALEZ: Yeah, the New York Times, Sharif, is reporting that they were bused in systematically throughout the day, apparently, obviously by the government. Who else would pay for all those buses?

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: That’s right. I mean, there’s no question who these people were who attacked last night. I have seen, myself, at least four police IDs. People say they grabbed—as you know, on the ground, it’s difficult to get numbers. I get between dozens and hundreds of them. And they say that 90 percent of them had some sort of ID that linked them to the police or state and Central Security forces. They say many of them are baltaguias, just these kind of—these thugs that the Mubarak regime has used for many years.

And let me just say also that I watched as they arrested a policeman in uniform today, two policemen in uniform. And in stark contrast to the way that they beat the members of the popular uprising here, like Noha Radwan and others, they arrested this man very peacefully. You know, they had just held him stiffly and put him into an army tank. And so, the difference is very clear.

And let me just add, I was devastated to hear that Professor Radwan came under attack. We left the hotel maybe 20 minutes after her. We tried to re-enter Tahrir Square. These mobs are very intimidating. They’re very hostile. They’re men, mostly, that range from about 20 to 45 years old. They wear sweaters and thick leather jackets. And they were basically holding a mini riot at every entrance into Tahrir, preventing anyone from going in. We tried to force our way in, Hany, Jacquie and I. We held each other and tried to go through. But we were on the verge of being beaten ourselves, and we backed off and then had to go home, and we were unable to go inside. It was a very dark day in this struggle, but the people are very proud here in Tahrir that they held their ground under this brutal assault. And to this day they remain defiant. And it remains to be seen what will happen tomorrow, but I think it will be a decisive day in this struggle.

JUAN GONZALEZ: And Noha Radwan, I’d like to ask you about what I asked Sharif, the role of the military, because obviously many of the protesters at first felt that the military was on their side. Your assessment now, after what happened in the past 24 hours?

NOHA RADWAN: Can I answer that question?

JUAN GONZALEZ: Yes.

NOHA RADWAN: I was actually saved by the military. I was going to practically die on the street, had it not been for the fact that some very low-ranking army officer—and I cannot give any more details than that—actually asked his soldiers to pick me up and put me inside the tank, and where I stayed until it got dark. And then they called an ambulance for me to get out in the ambulance and go straight to a hospital. The mob outside were really calling for my head, as a traitor, an American-paid Baradei supporter.
----------------------------------------------------
AMY GOODMAN: We’re also joined, Sharif, by Hossam Bahgat, a human rights activist in Egypt. He’s the founder of Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights.

Hossam, you’re on the line with us now from Cairo. Can you tell us where you are and what you learned has happened with human rights organizations there?

HOSSAM BAHGAT: I’m in downtown Cairo, and I’m trying to gain access into Tahrir Square, but it seems that I keep being turned away from military checkpoints that are only allowing medical staff and medicines and ambulances to enter the square today. I’m just past the south of the square, and I saw a line of 15 or 16 ambulances that are parked outside of the square.

But more disturbingly, we just received news from our colleagues at the Hisham Mubarak Law Center, which had been acting as the main legal aid human rights organization in Egypt and also the headquarter of a coalition of human rights organizations working under the name of the Front to Defend Egypt Protesters, their offices in downtown Cairo have just been raided by the military police, who have asked everyone to lie on the floor face down and to remove the SIM cards from their phones. And their offices are now being searched by the military police. We have information that people inside the offices were not only the legal officers and the staff of the center, but also a representative from Amnesty International in London and a representative from Human Rights Watch were also inside and are currently being questioned. We can’t have access to the building, because there is mob of pro-Mubarak agents that are gathered outside and are not letting anyone in or out of the building, and are chanting slogans accusing human rights defenders of being agents and traitors and spies. And we can’t call anyone, because they’ve all switched their phones off. And when we call the land line of the center, it is a representative of the police that picks up the phone.

That happens in the immediate aftermath of a series of steps that have been taken to target foreign journalists, and many of whom were ordered to evacuate Tahrir Square or were attacked and had their equipment confiscated on the streets. And that has escalated now, because we are getting consistent reports that all foreigners are being stopped on the streets, sometimes by the army personnel and at other times by ordinary citizens on the street in an apparent response to the persistent anti-foreigners message that they’ve been hearing for two days on TV, on the state television, saying that there are foreign agents and foreign forces standing behind the remaining protesters in Tahrir Square.

AMY GOODMAN: I want to just correct something. We are speaking with Hossam el-Hamalawy, who is an Egyptian journalist and blogger, who is in—

HOSSAM BAHGAT: No, I’m sorry. This is Hossam Bahgat. You were correct the first time.

AMY GOODMAN: Ah, sorry, sorry, sorry. Hossam Bahgat. OK, the latest news that we have, CPJ talking about cutting off access, a serious, as you were describing, crackdown. Also, the prime minister has said that they will stop the violence, supposedly, the Egyptian prime minister, which of course indicates a level of control.

HOSSAM BAHGAT: Yes, I heard the prime minister’s interview with Al Hayat TV this morning, in which he apologized for the—what he called was a mistake last night, in terms of allowing the pro-Mubarak agents to access Tahrir Square. He said that he demanded an explanation from—I guess from his own government or his own party for this, about, I mean, who made this decision to let the pro-Mubarak agents assault the pro-democracy protesters in the square.

But what is causing the biggest alarm today is that there seems to be a series of attempts by the army itself, for the first time, of going after foreign journalists and going after human rights organizations, both Egyptian and foreign. And with the lack of access to Tahrir Square, we fear that the worst is about to happen and that there is something that the army does not want anyone from the outside world to witness.

JUAN GONZALEZ: Yes, Hossam Bahgat, precisely that point I wanted to raise to you. It’s clear now that the Mubarak government has decided that rather than for him to leave office now, that they are going to basically crack down on the center of the protest. And we’re looking at the potential of another Tiananmen here, not another Philippines victory of the people as against Marcos. So, my question to you: what do you see that people in other parts of the world need to do now, especially those of us here in the United States? Do you think the U.S. government should now move to remove all military aid from the Egyptian military—because, after all, the military depends, to a large extent, on the financial support of the United States—as a means of pressuring it to change its stance of the last few days?

HOSSAM BAHGAT: The most negative development that we are witnessing, starting yesterday, was that the army has given up on, you now, its position of at least apparent neutrality. Yesterday, they made the statement by an army spokesperson inviting all the protesters, the pro-democracy protesters, to go home. And then, within minutes, they removed their barricades and allowed their pro-Mubarak thugs to assault us with stones and Molotov cocktails and, later and early this morning, with live fire. And they disappeared; they were nowhere to be seen. They did not even stay to arm their own—to guard their own tanks, which they left behind.

Now, today, now that it is actually the military personnel that are stopping foreign journalists on the street, confiscating their equipment, going through their notebooks, but also now raiding the offices of a human rights organization and at least temporarily so far detaining the staff and searching their offices, it is clear now that the army has decided to pick a side. And unfortunately, it is not the side of the Egyptian people but the side of the government. We fear now that the army is about to do something that it does not want the rest of the world to see. And the whole world will bear responsibility for what is about to happen, because I think that a blood bath is still avoidable. We need to do everything in our disposal to prevent a massacre from taking place.

AMY GOODMAN: Hossam Bahgat, what do you think the United States can do?

HOSSAM BAHGAT: The United States bears the most responsibility because of the ties that they have with the Egyptian army, but also because of the constant contacts, that have been made public over the past few days, that were made between U.S. Army officials and Egyptian military officials, not to mention of course the fact that the Egyptian army remains almost exclusively funded by the United States. The U.S. can prevent this from taking place and should prevent it.

AMY GOODMAN: We’re going to go to break and then come back. We’re speaking with Hossam Bahgat, a human rights activist in Egypt, founder of the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights. We also are joined by Sharif Abdel Kouddous, on the ground at Tahrir Square, who is senior producer at Democracy Now! This is Democracy Now!, democracynow.org, The War and Peace Report. Back in a second.

Ed Jewett
02-04-2011, 01:21 AM
Vodafone Colluded with Egyptian Regime’s Information Warfare PSYOP (http://cryptogon.com/?p=20348)

February 3rd, 2011 Via: AP (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110203/ap_on_hi_te/eu_egypt_cell_phones):
Egyptian authorities forced Vodafone to broadcast pro-government text messages during the protests that have rocked the country, the U.K.-based mobile company said Thursday.
Micro-blogging site Twitter has been buzzing with screen grabs from Vodafone’s Egyptian customers showing text messages sent over the course of the demonstrations against Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak’s 30-year-old regime.
A text message received Sunday by an Associated Press reporter in Egypt appealed to the country’s “honest and loyal men to confront the traitors and criminals and protect our people and honor.” Another urged Egyptians to attend a pro-Mubarak rally in Cairo on Wednesday. The first was marked as coming from “Vodafone.” The other was signed: “Egypt Lovers.”
In a statement, Vodafone Group PLC said that the messages had been drafted by Egyptian authorities and that it had no power to change them.
“Vodafone Group has protested to the authorities that the current situation regarding these messages is unacceptable,” the statement said. “We have made clear that all messages should be transparent and clearly attributable to the originator.”
The company also said its competitors — including Egypt’s Mobinil and the United Arab Emirates’ Etisalat — were doing the same. Etisalat, known formally as Emirates Telecommunications Corp., declined comment.
Vodafone said the texts had been sent “since the start of the protests,” which kicked off more than a week ago. Vodafone did not immediately return an e-mail asking why the company waited nearly 10 days to complain publicly. Its statement was released only after repeated inquiries by the AP.
The company declined to reveal how many such messages it had sent, or whether it was still pumping them out.
Vodafone has already come under fire for its role in the Internet blackout that cut Egypt off from the online world for several days. The company said the order to pull the plug on its Egyptian customers could not be ignored as it was legal under local law.
Related: Digital Darkness: U.S., U.K. Companies Help Egyptian Regime Shut Down Telecommunications and Identify Dissidents (http://cryptogon.com/?p=20318)
Posted in COINTELPRO (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=36), Dictatorship (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=22), Infrastructure (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=21), Perception Management (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=7), Resistance (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=34), Technology (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=12), War (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=28)

Magda Hassan
02-04-2011, 04:29 AM
May explain Vodafone's colaboration as well as the use of Vodafone to spam people to suppport Mubarak.


Egypt's Mubarak Likely to Retain Vast Wealth


Mubarak Family May Have as Much as $70 Billion Stashed Away, Experts Estimate


http://a.abcnews.com/images/Site/byline_abcnews.gif
37 comments
By SUSANNA KIM

Feb. 2, 2011
President Hosni Mubarak's power may have visibly crumbled before the world on Jan. 25 when protesters took to the streets of Cairo (http://abcnews.go.com/International/egypt-clashes-tahrir-square-turns-battleground-hosni-mubarak/story?id=12820071), but his personal wealth will likely be intact when he leaves office as pledged at the end of the year, or sooner if the crowds have their way.
Experts say the wealth of the Mubarak family was built largely from military contracts during his days as an air force officer. He eventually diversified his investments through his family when he became president in 1981. The family's net worth ranges from $40 billion to $70 billion, by some estimates.
Amaney Jamal, a political science professor at Princeton, said those estimates are comparable with the vast wealth of leaders in other Gulf countries.
"The business ventures from his military and government service accumulated to his personal wealth," said Jamal. "There was a lot of corruption in this regime and stifling of public resources for personal gain."
Jamal said that Mubarak's assets are most likely in banks outside of Egypt, possibly in the United Kingdom and Switzerland.
"This is the pattern of other Middle Eastern dictators so their wealth will not be taken during a transition (http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory?id=12819511), she said. "These leaders plan on this."
Mubarak, his wife and two sons were able to also accumulate wealth through a number of business partnerships with foreigners, said Christopher Davidson, professor of Middle East Politics at Durham University in England. He said Egyptian law requires that foreigners give a local business partner a 51 percent stake in most ventures.
Aladdin Elaasar, author of "The Last Pharaoh: Mubarak and the Uncertain Future of Egypt in the Obama Age," said the Mubaraks own several residences in Egypt, some inherited from previous presidents and the monarchy, and others he has built.
"He had a very lavish lifestyle with many homes around the country," said Elaasar, who estimates the family's wealth is between $50 billion to $70 billion.
Gross national income is $2,070 per family in Egypt, according to the World Bank. About 20 percent of the population lives below the poverty line, according to a 2010 report by the CIA.
"Gamal and Alaa are partners in the biggest trade and industrial companies in Egypt, practically paying nothing," Elaasar wrote in his book of Mubarak's two sons. Elaasar said the sons have shares in Chili's restaurants, Hyundai and Scoda auto dealerships, Vodafone, and several luxury hotel and residential properties.
The Mubarak family owns properties in London, Paris, Madrid, Dubai, Washington, D.C., New York and Frankfurt, according to a report from IHS Global Insight.
Davidson said the family's net worth, however -- $17 billion for Mubarak, $10 billion for his second son, Gamal, and $40 billion for the family -- are really just estimates.
"Of course, by definition, bank accounts in Switzerland are a secret so we cannot get a full picture," said Davidson.
Robert Springborg, a professor at the Naval Postgraduate School and a Middle East scholar, said while the family is very wealthy, they have not been extremely overt with their wealth.
"One of the sons has a nice apartment in Cairo but nothing hugely lavish," said Springborg. "There are many other people in Egypt who live a more lavish lifestyle than them."
Whatever Mubarak's wealth is, Jamal said it is certain that whenever the president actually leaves office, there will be an investigation into his assets.
"There's not much of a cover-up," she said. "The people have already outed him as a corrupt leader."

http://abcnews.go.com/Business/egypt-mubarak-family-accumulated-wealth-days-military/story?id=12821073&page=2

Peter Lemkin
02-04-2011, 06:20 AM
70 Billion! No wonder he is 'ready' to resign sometime soon....he needs a few hundred years to spend that all!

David Guyatt
02-04-2011, 09:15 AM
THis is, obviously, why greedy, viscous people always end up in power the world over.

Political power is a constantly paying multi-armed bandit machine.

Peter Lemkin
02-04-2011, 09:50 AM
THis is, obviously, why greedy, viscous people always end up in power the world over.

Political power is a constantly paying multi-armed bandit machine.

I'd be hard put spending one billion - even if I spent most of it on charity. 70 Billion!...and those are likely 'liquid' assets....imagine the land and homes and other hidden assets....we're talking 'real' money! Hey Hosni, can you spare a mil?

Being an American stooge surrogate Dictator certainly does have its financial perks!....from Noreiga, to the Shah, to Pinochet, to Mubarrak, to Duvalier, to Marcos, and on and on...it is a license to steal. [and a get out of jail free card for crimes - even mass murder - unless you outlive your usefullness.......or doublecross the godfathers in DC, NY and London.]

David Guyatt
02-04-2011, 10:30 AM
THis is, obviously, why greedy, viscous people always end up in power the world over.

Political power is a constantly paying multi-armed bandit machine.

I'd be hard put spending one billion - even if I spent most of it on charity. 70 Billion!...and those are likely 'liquid' assets....

Keeping up with the Joneses remains a critical social requirement...

David Guyatt
02-04-2011, 10:36 AM
Translation of above caption:

Egypt crisis: US "We're shitting ourselves - we need to get rid of this guy pronto (before other states in the mid-east copy them) and get a 'safe pair of hands' in situ immediately."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaandindianocean/egypt/8302727/Egypt-crisis-US-negotiates-Mubarak-exit-strategy.html


Egypt crisis: US 'negotiates Mubarak exit strategy'

The US is negotiating with Egyptian officials for Hosni Mubarak, the president, to resign now and hand power to an interim government, according to reports.

By Philip Sherwell, New York 8:27AM GMT 04 Feb 2011
The proposal from the Obama administration would see the new government led by Mr Mubarak's newly-appointed deputy Omar Suleiman and would be backed by the Egyptian military, the New York Times has claimed.
Under the plans, the interim government reportedly would be encouraged to invite opposition leaders from a raft of groups, including the Muslim Brotherhood, to enter talks about reforming Egypt's electoral system ahead of presidential elections in September.
The disclosure of the plan, one of several options under discussion between Washington and high-level Egyptian officials, is clearly intended to increase the pressure on Mr Mubarak to step aside. It is also unclear whether Mr Suleiman or the Egyptian military would abandon the country's president.
After struggling initially to keep pace with developments on the ground in Egypt, the administration of President Barack Obama is now firming up a "Mubarak-must-go-now posture" in private conversations with Egyptian officials, according to US media reports.
But for all parties, events in Cairo on Friday, when anti-Mubarak demonstrators have called for a "day of departure" march on the presidential palace, are likely to prove crucial.

Magda Hassan
02-04-2011, 10:54 AM
Hackers Shut Down Government Sites

By RAVI SOMAIYA

Published: February 2, 2011

The online group Anonymous said Wednesday that it had paralyzed the Egyptian government’s Web sites in support of the antigovernment protests.





Anonymous, a loosely defined group of hackers from all over the world, gathered about 500 supporters in online forums and used software tools to bring down the sites of the Ministry of Information and President Hosni Mubarak (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/m/hosni_mubarak/index.html?inline=nyt-per)’s National Democratic Party, said Gregg Housh, a member of the group who disavows any illegal activity himself. The sites were unavailable Wednesday afternoon. The attacks, Mr. Housh said, are part of a wider campaign that Anonymous has mounted in support of the antigovernment protests that have roiled the Arab world. Last month, the group shut down the Web sites of the Tunisian government and stock exchange in support of the uprising that forced the country’s dictator, Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/b/zine_elabidine_ben_ali/index.html?inline=nyt-per), to flee.
Mr. Housh said that the group had used its technical knowledge to help protesters in Egypt defy a government shutdown of the Internet that began last week. “We want freedom,” he said of the group’s motivation. “It’s as simple as that. We’re sick of oppressive governments encroaching on people.”
Anonymous also mounted strikes late last year, characterized by some of its supporters as a “cyberwar,” against companies like MasterCard, Visa and PayPal that had refused to process donations to the antisecrecy group WikiLeaks (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/w/wikileaks/index.html?inline=nyt-org).
The F.B.I. (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/f/federal_bureau_of_investigation/index.html?inline=nyt-org) said last week that it had executed 40 search warrants “throughout the United States” in connection with that campaign. The strikes by Anonymous, known as “distributed denial of service” attacks, could lead to criminal charges that carry 10-year prison sentences, the F.B.I. said. Arrests have been made and equipment seized in Britain, the Netherlands, Sweden, Germany and France, according to British and American officials. They declined to provide further details.
Barrett Brown, who is helping to organize a legal defense for those who might be prosecuted, said further raids were expected.
Mr. Housh said “these arrests aren’t going to have any effect.”
Just hours after the raids, he said, about 600 people, including many who had been arrested and then released, were back online and coordinating efforts in Egypt.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/03/world/middleeast/03hackers.html?_r=1

Peter Lemkin
02-04-2011, 01:00 PM
Hackers Shut Down Government Sites

By RAVI SOMAIYA

Published: February 2, 2011

The online group Anonymous said Wednesday that it had paralyzed the Egyptian government’s Web sites in support of the antigovernment protests.





Anonymous, a loosely defined group of hackers from all over the world, gathered about 500 supporters in online forums and used software tools to bring down the sites of the Ministry of Information and President Hosni Mubarak (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/m/hosni_mubarak/index.html?inline=nyt-per)’s National Democratic Party, said Gregg Housh, a member of the group who disavows any illegal activity himself. The sites were unavailable Wednesday afternoon. The attacks, Mr. Housh said, are part of a wider campaign that Anonymous has mounted in support of the antigovernment protests that have roiled the Arab world. Last month, the group shut down the Web sites of the Tunisian government and stock exchange in support of the uprising that forced the country’s dictator, Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/b/zine_elabidine_ben_ali/index.html?inline=nyt-per), to flee.
Mr. Housh said that the group had used its technical knowledge to help protesters in Egypt defy a government shutdown of the Internet that began last week. “We want freedom,” he said of the group’s motivation. “It’s as simple as that. We’re sick of oppressive governments encroaching on people.”
Anonymous also mounted strikes late last year, characterized by some of its supporters as a “cyberwar,” against companies like MasterCard, Visa and PayPal that had refused to process donations to the antisecrecy group WikiLeaks (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/w/wikileaks/index.html?inline=nyt-org).
The F.B.I. (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/f/federal_bureau_of_investigation/index.html?inline=nyt-org) said last week that it had executed 40 search warrants “throughout the United States” in connection with that campaign. The strikes by Anonymous, known as “distributed denial of service” attacks, could lead to criminal charges that carry 10-year prison sentences, the F.B.I. said. Arrests have been made and equipment seized in Britain, the Netherlands, Sweden, Germany and France, according to British and American officials. They declined to provide further details.
Barrett Brown, who is helping to organize a legal defense for those who might be prosecuted, said further raids were expected.
Mr. Housh said “these arrests aren’t going to have any effect.”
Just hours after the raids, he said, about 600 people, including many who had been arrested and then released, were back online and coordinating efforts in Egypt.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/03/world/middleeast/03hackers.html?_r=1

Poetic, if so. I'm watching Al Jazeera and the Liberty Square is packed....shoulder to shoulder with people...but they also showed Egyptian State TV...which showed a shot of the roof of the Egyptian Museum with NO ONE beyond....as if the square were empty!

Peter Lemkin
02-04-2011, 01:01 PM
Hackers Shut Down Government Sites

By RAVI SOMAIYA

Published: February 2, 2011

The online group Anonymous said Wednesday that it had paralyzed the Egyptian government’s Web sites in support of the antigovernment protests.





Anonymous, a loosely defined group of hackers from all over the world, gathered about 500 supporters in online forums and used software tools to bring down the sites of the Ministry of Information and President Hosni Mubarak (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/m/hosni_mubarak/index.html?inline=nyt-per)’s National Democratic Party, said Gregg Housh, a member of the group who disavows any illegal activity himself. The sites were unavailable Wednesday afternoon. The attacks, Mr. Housh said, are part of a wider campaign that Anonymous has mounted in support of the antigovernment protests that have roiled the Arab world. Last month, the group shut down the Web sites of the Tunisian government and stock exchange in support of the uprising that forced the country’s dictator, Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/b/zine_elabidine_ben_ali/index.html?inline=nyt-per), to flee.
Mr. Housh said that the group had used its technical knowledge to help protesters in Egypt defy a government shutdown of the Internet that began last week. “We want freedom,” he said of the group’s motivation. “It’s as simple as that. We’re sick of oppressive governments encroaching on people.”
Anonymous also mounted strikes late last year, characterized by some of its supporters as a “cyberwar,” against companies like MasterCard, Visa and PayPal that had refused to process donations to the antisecrecy group WikiLeaks (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/w/wikileaks/index.html?inline=nyt-org).
The F.B.I. (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/f/federal_bureau_of_investigation/index.html?inline=nyt-org) said last week that it had executed 40 search warrants “throughout the United States” in connection with that campaign. The strikes by Anonymous, known as “distributed denial of service” attacks, could lead to criminal charges that carry 10-year prison sentences, the F.B.I. said. Arrests have been made and equipment seized in Britain, the Netherlands, Sweden, Germany and France, according to British and American officials. They declined to provide further details.
Barrett Brown, who is helping to organize a legal defense for those who might be prosecuted, said further raids were expected.
Mr. Housh said “these arrests aren’t going to have any effect.”
Just hours after the raids, he said, about 600 people, including many who had been arrested and then released, were back online and coordinating efforts in Egypt.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/03/world/middleeast/03hackers.html?_r=1

Poetic, if so. I'm watching Al Jazeera and the Liberation Square is packed....shoulder to shoulder with people...but they also showed Egyptian State TV...which showed a shot of the roof of the Egyptian Museum with NO ONE beyond....as if the square were empty!

Magda Hassan
02-04-2011, 01:19 PM
I've lost the link but will try to find it. The Deputy Director of the Egyptian State TV quit saying it was a propaganda machine iirc.
Edit: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfXimfZ6LcU
(CNN) Former Nile TV reporter Shahira Amin quits her job, claiming she was pressured to air only pro-Mubarak rallies.

Peter Lemkin
02-04-2011, 02:06 PM
I've lost the link but will try to find it. The Deputy Director of the Egyptian State TV quit saying it was a propaganda machine iirc.
Edit: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfXimfZ6LcU
(CNN) Former Nile TV reporter Shahira Amin quits her job, claiming she was pressured to air only pro-Mubarak rallies.

A nice moment in history....and a sign that the whole edifice is about to collapse...can't we bring the same collapse to the big ''western'" nations...it would do more good for the world.....although almost no nation could use at least a small revolution and 'house-cleaning' ;)

Peter Lemkin
02-04-2011, 03:16 PM
I'm watching what is happening in Cairo/Egypt on Al Jazerra, and while I'm not so naive as to believe he USA and others of that ''ilk'' are attempting to quickly replace one puppet with another...I feel a certain jealousy....Egypt [which I spent a lot of time in as I love and am a student of Ancient Egypt...and in that pursuit met the modern day Egyptians] had a revolution, and I didn't EVEN get a T-shirt...and my own country [IMO, the most in need of a real revolution or quick evolution] hasn't changed one itsy little bit........

Charles Drago
02-04-2011, 03:35 PM
If Egypt had its own Teabaggers, would they be pro- or anti-Mubarak demonstrators?

David Guyatt
02-04-2011, 03:37 PM
"Teabagging"? :pointlaugh:

Charlie, are we talking about the same thing, I wonder?

Peter Lemkin
02-04-2011, 03:39 PM
If Egypt had its own Teabaggers, would they be pro- or anti-Mubarak demonstrators?

Pro-Mubarrak..too easy...more difficult quiz, please....:joystick:

Charles Drago
02-04-2011, 03:49 PM
Is there a more important distinction for patriots to grasp than that between one's country and its government?

Peter Lemkin
02-04-2011, 04:02 PM
Is there a more important distinction for patriots to grasp than that between one's country and its government?

Charles, I was bred [by my very ''odd' parents (by usual standards)] to not ever consider myself as an ''American'', but rather as a citizen of the Planet Earth]....that said, we Planet Earth Patriots don't give a flying shit about country or government. Yes, there ARE governments and there ARE countries, but these are very artificial constructs from the past and now from the Oligarchy of the Planet in order to control and contain. It is IMO we either all survive and advance; or we all perish and fail. I personally do NOT believe in big government or big countries [in physical size or political power]. Small is beautiful and the sooner we get back to something approaching a unified Planetary tribalism, the better.

Charles Drago
02-04-2011, 04:08 PM
It's best that you learn this from me.

We're in the same tribe.

And our parents may have been related.

Peter Lemkin
02-04-2011, 04:10 PM
It's best that you learn this from me.

We're in the same tribe.

And our parents may have been related.

Hey, Brother!...or at least First cousin!

Charles Drago
02-04-2011, 04:22 PM
Hey Blood! What it is?

Half Jewish, half Italian.

We hijack our own trucks.

Peter Lemkin
02-04-2011, 04:25 PM
Hey Blood! What it is?

Half Jewish, half Italian.

We hijack our own trucks.

R-E-V-O-L-U-T-I-O-N.....I think would be the only course of action........

Peter Lemkin
02-04-2011, 05:13 PM
A plainclothes policeman (l) moves to attack a foreign journalist as others beat a protester during demonstrations in Cairo. Photograph: Goran Tomasevic/Reuters

The soldier appeared helpful at first, offering to walk us through to Cairo's Tahrir Square as we attempted to cover the latest protests on what had been dubbed Mubarak's "day of departure". But it was not the square that we were being led to but the ministry of the interior.

The next soldier, outside the ministry's main door was not so friendly. He ordered us to kneel facing a wall with our hands behind our heads, an order that was quickly countermanded by another soldier.

The soldiers were disciplined but firm, demanding to know who we were, querying a passport stamp for the Rafah border crossing into Gaza; others for Tunisia and Afghanistan. Soon there were more of us sitting with our backs against a wall: a freelance journalist from New Zealand, another Briton, a Dane and an Italian, and three students.

Next came two officers in plain clothes, less friendly than the enlisted troops.

"Israeli?" asked one of the plain clothes men. No, British, we replied. Our phones were taken despite our best efforts to hide them. The Dane's bag was searched, as well as those belonging to the three students, who were French.

The man who ordered us to kneel was sat by an armoured personnel carrier. With a flourish he took out five or six sets of handcuffs and racked them on a bar behind a metal shield.

My colleague Jack Shenker's packet of Strepsils attracted sudden suspicion. A soldier took them from my hand, demanding to know what they are.

State television has been reporting that foreigners were directing the protests in Tahrir Square; that they have been handing out drugs to those occupying it and that the foreign press was telling lies. That is the background to our detention in a city fast descending into anarchy and mutual suspicion. It was also clear that the army had been given orders to harass us.

What happened to this reporter and his colleague is far from unique.

In the last few days, in what appears to be a co-ordinated campaign, journalists have been arrested, beaten, threatened, even stabbed. Cameras have been taken and broken, crews set upon, rooms and offices raided.

Outside the interior ministry, the mood relaxed somewhat. Some of the young soldiers spoke English. We talked about football and the Hollywood star Russell Crowe. They gave us crisps and cigarettes, allowing us to stand one at a time to stretch.

One of the soldiers warned us about the senior man in plain clothes, telling us that he's "mad" and that we were unlucky to walk into the wrong checkpoint.

"I'll make a deal with you," Ahmad, the "mad" officer said, after an hour and a half: "I'll let you go but I'm afraid for you." He repeated this several times. "You come near the square again things won't be so good next time. Do you understand? Go far away from here."

A soldier walked us to the edge of their cordon and waved us out. It was then that our problems really began.

Hailing a taxi, we were stopped immediately by an armed group. Two men jumped into the car. One took our passports while the other cradled a large machete. Behind us two men jumped up onto the bumper. Within minutes we were taken to another group of soldiers who released us after once again checking our documents.

We tried again to head back to the hotel, but in the midst of a contested revolution this was no mean feat. The city reeked of paranoia and violence.

Every hundred yards or so someone from the groups along the road - men with knives and scaffold poles - put their body in front of the car to stop us and demanded to see our passports.

Another soldier prevented us reaching the hotel and sent us in another direction. We could see the building where we were staying close to Tahrir Square but suddenly we found ourselves among a crowd of Mubarak supporters.

There was a tank 100m distant, but we were where the heaviest clashes of the day before took place, beneath a series of overlapping underpasses leading to the 6 October bridge. It remains perhaps the most dangerous spot in the city for foreign journalists.

We reversed quickly, in the knowledge that these were the same groups who had been beating up reporters, and found ourselves immediately surrounded by a new crowd.

The same barked questions were fired our way. By now we had decided to try an escape the city centre and head to another hotel in Zamalek, on the river's other side.

More men got into our car. They said they were leading us to the hotel but in Arabic we understood them to be saying they would take us to the army once again, this time to the defence ministry.

We were questioned once more, this time by soldiers at the state-run TV station, getting more scared and frustrated in the knowledge that we were within a couple of hundred metres of our destination and relative safety. We were not there yet. Between us and the hotel, on the main roads lay pro-Mubarak crowds.

An Egyptian journalist, being held along with his luggage, asked for an escort to the hotel. He was visibly as alarmed as we both felt. We asked the senior officer on the scene three times but he shrugged his shoulders and refused us. Instead a group of the neighbouring vigilantes walked us back down tiny, dirty back alleys guarded by young men with swords and knives and clubs, who upon seeing us accompanied by their neighbours smiled and welcomed us.

We finally felt secure for the first time in several hours.

Peter Lemkin
02-04-2011, 08:15 PM
Egypt: 1) Deputy Omar Suleiman Known for His Brutality and CIA Links, 2) Suleiman Biography
3rd February 2011 [Mr. Nice-Guy, English-Speaker, American 'Friend'', Handpicked by US to succeed Mubarak]

AFP | February 2, 2011

THE man named by President Hosni Mubarak as his first ever deputy, spy chief Omar Suleiman, reportedly orchestrated the brutal interrogation of terror suspects abducted by the CIA in its secret “extraordinary rendition” program.

Mr Suleiman has carried out sensitive truce negotiations with Israel and the Palestinians as well as talks among rival Palestinian factions, winning the praise of American diplomats. For US intelligence officials, he has been a trusted partner willing to pursue Islamist militants without hesitation, targeting homegrown radical groups Gamaa Islamiya and Jihad after they carried out a string of attacks on foreigners.

He was also “the CIA’s point man in Egypt for rendition – the covert program in which the CIA snatched terror suspects from around the world and returned them to Egypt and elsewhere for interrogation, often under brutal circumstances”, according to Jane Mayer in a profile for The New Yorker. “Technically, US law required the CIA to seek ‘assurances’ from Egypt that rendered suspects wouldn’t face torture,” Mayer writes. “But under Suleiman’s reign at the intelligence service, such assurances were considered close to worthless.”

Mayer is the author of The Dark Side: The Inside Story of How the War on Terror Turned Into a War on American Ideals.

A product of the US-Egyptian relationship, Mr Suleiman underwent training in the 1980s at the John F. Kennedy Special Warfare School and Centre at Fort Bragg in North Carolina.

After taking over as spy director, Mr Suleiman oversaw an agreement with the US in 1995 that allowed for suspected militants to be secretly transferred to Egypt for questioning, according to the book Ghost Plane by journalist Stephen Grey. In the run-up to the US invasion of Iraq in 2003, the CIA relied on Mr Suleiman to accept the transfer of a detainee known as Ibn Sheikh al-Libi, who US officials hoped could prove a link between Iraq’s Saddam Hussein and al-Qa’ida.

The suspect was bound and blindfolded and flown to Cairo, where he was locked in a cage for hours and beaten, according to The One Percent Doctrine by Ron Suskind, until he told his interrogators that the Iraqi regime was moving to provide terrorist group al-Qa’ida with biological and chemical weapons.

When then US secretary of state Colin Powell made the case for war before the UN, he referred to details of Libi’s confession.

The detainee eventually recanted his account.

AFP

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/world/deputy-omar-suleiman-known-for-his-brutality-and-cia-links/story-e6frg6so-1225998362607

Biography

Omar Suleiman (Wikipedia) – Arabic: عمر سليمان‎; born July 2, 1936 - is an Egyptian politician and military figure who was appointed Vice President of Egypt on January 29, 2011. Previously, he was Minister without Portfolio and Director of the Egyptian General Intelligence Directorate (EGID), the national intelligence agency, from 1993 to 2011. In his role as Director of EGID, the British Daily Telegraph dubbed him as “one of the world’s most powerful spy chiefs”. Foreign Policy magazine ranked him the Middle East’s most powerful intelligence chief, ahead of Mossad chief Meir Dagan.[3][4]
Contents

1 Early life and education
2 Egyptian intelligence career
2.1 CIA rendition program
3 Political role and accession to the vice presidency
4 References
5 Further reading
6 External links

Early life and education

Suleiman was born in Qena in Southern Egypt. He left Qena for Cairo in 1954, at the age of nineteen, to enroll in Egypt’s prestigious Military Academy. He received additional military training in the former Soviet Union at Moscow’s Frunze Military Academy. He is known to have participated both the Six-Day and Yom Kippur Wars.[2] In the mid-1980′s he later earned additional degrees: a bachelors and a master degree in Political Science from Ain Shams and Cairo Universities. Suleiman was transferred to military intelligence and, fluent in English,[5] he began what was to be a long relationship between Egypt and the United States.
Egyptian intelligence career

Suleiman became the director of military intelligence in 1991. In 1993, he became the chief of the Egyptian General Intelligence Service (EGIS). In 1995, it is said that he insisted that President Mubarak ride in an armored car during a visit to Ethiopia. A would-be assassin fired on the vehicle, but Mubarak escaped without injury due to the added precautions.[6] His name has become known only in recent years, breaking the tradition of keeping the name of the Egyptian head of Intelligence a secret known only to top government officials. It was released in the media around 2000.

Suleiman has acquired a more public profile while trying to broker a deal between the different armed Palestinian groups vying for power in Gaza as the top presidential envoy from President Hosni Mubarak as well as brokering deals or truces between the Palestinians and Israel. His perceived role in negotiations between Palestinian groups gave him the image of an effective behind-the-scenes figure in the Egyptian government as well as identifying him as potentially useful to foreign governments such those of the Arab countries, Israel, the Palestinians and the United States.
CIA rendition program

Suleiman has been implicated as directly involved in the controversial CIA “rendition” program.[5][7] Journalist Stephen Grey in his work, “Ghost Plane”, states that after taking over as intelligence director, Suleiman oversaw an agreement with the US in 1995 that allowed for suspected militants to be secretly transferred to Egypt for questioning.[8] Although Suleiman’s Egyptian Intelligence was required to provide “assurances” that prisoners handed over through this program would not be subjected to torture, at least one CIA officer has testified that such assurances from them were unofficially regarded as worthless as “a bucket of warm spit”.[5]

He has been accused of complicity in torture of Al-Qaeda suspects in Egypt.[9] Particularly, the case of Ibn al-Shaykh al-Libi who was captured and handed over to Suleiman. The information al-Libi gave under torture was cited by US officials in the run-up to the 2003 invasion of Iraq as evidence of a connection between Saddam Hussein and al-Qaeda. Al-Libi later recanted his confession.[8]
Political role and accession to the vice presidency

Suleiman is seen as a very close and trusted ally of President Mubarak, sharing many of his views on key issues such as Iran, Egyptian relations with Israel and the United States, and treatment of the Muslim Brotherhood.[6] Although he was a military man who by law is not a member of Mubarak’s National Democratic Party, he preferred suits to military uniforms and is seen as a major link between Egyptian political and military elites.[6] Due to his role in the regional political scene and the lack of an alternative candidate acceptable to Hosni Mubarak, some have speculated that Suleiman will succeed Mubarak as President. In particular, he is seen as the choice of the Egyptian military establishment.[6] On January 29, 2011, he was named Vice President of Egypt during the civil unrest,[10] ending a vacancy in the position that lasted almost 30 years.
References
^ Black, Ian (January 30, 2011). “Egypt protests – as they happened”. guardian.co.uk. http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jan/29/egypt-protests-government-live-blog#block-51.
^ a b c “Profile: Omar Suleiman” aljazeera.com April 30, 2008. Retrieved January 30, 2011.
^ “The List: The Middle East’s Most Powerful Spooks”. Foreign Policy. 2009-07-20. http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2009/07/20/the_list_the_middle_easts_most_powerful_spies. Retrieved 2011-01-29.
^ Blair, David (2009-02-24). “The fixer in the shadows who may emerge as Egypt’s leader”. Telegraph. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/personal-view/4800970/The-fixer-in-the-shadows-who-may-emerge-as-Egypts-leader.html. Retrieved 2011-01-29.
^ a b c Mayer, Jane. “Who is Omar Suleiman?” www.newyorker.com Retrieved January 30, 2011.
^ a b c d Slackman, Michael. “Choice Likely to Please the Military, Not the Crowds” New York Times January 30, 2011. A10.
^ Stein, Jeff (January 30, 2011). “The CIA’s complicated relationship with Egypt”. The Washington Post. http://voices.washingtonpost.com/spy-talk/2011/01/the_cias_complicated_relations.html. Retrieved January 31, 2011.
^ a b France-Presse, Agence (January 31st, 2011). “Mubarak’s new deputy linked to CIA rendition program”. The Raw Story. http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/01/mubarak-deputy-cia-rendition/?hl=en. Retrieved January 31st, 2011.
^ Soldz, Stephen. “The Torture Career of Egypt’s New Vice President: Omar Suleiman and the Rendition to Torture Program”. Dissident Voice. http://dissidentvoice.org/2011/01/the-torture-career-of-egypts-new-vice-president-omar-suleiman-and-the-rendition-to-torture-program/. Retrieved January 31st, 2011.
^ “Egypt’s Mubarak picks vice-president for first time”. Reuters. 29 January 2011. http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/01/29/egypt-vice-president-idUSLDE70S0F120110129. Retrieved 29 January 2011.
Further reading
Shpiro, Shlomo (2004). “Intelligence Services and Political Transformation in the Middle East”. International Journal of Intelligence and CounterIntelligence 17 (4): 575–600. doi:10.1080/08850600490496407.
Sirrs, Owen L. (2010). A History of the Egyptian Intelligence Service: A History of the Mukhabarat, 1910-2009. New York: Routledge. ISBN 9780415569200.
External links
We Want Omar Soliman unofficial supporter blog
Pharaohs-in-Waiting, Mary Anne Weaver, The Atlantic, October 2003
The ongoing Omar vs. Gamal Debate, Josh Stacher, The Arabist, February 10, 2005
Israel pinning hopes for Hamas deal in Gaza on Egypt intel chief, Yossi Melman, Ha’aretz, 20 January 2009
Egyptian intelligence chief’s Washington agenda, Laura Rozen, Foreign Policy, March 21, 2009
The list: The Middle East’s Most Powerful Spooks, Patrick Devenny, Foreign Policy, July 20, 2009
Egypt’s Next Strongman, Issandr Amrani, August 17, 2009
Egypt’s Succession Crisis: Omar Suleiman and El Baredei Hold Keys to the Presidency, Ikhwanweb.com, April 2, 2010
New Yorker: “Who is Omar Suleiman?” January 29, 2011
Omar Suleiman: Egypt’s vice-presidential spook Channel 4 News, 2 February 2011

Ed Jewett
02-05-2011, 02:04 AM
The CIA, an American Pinay Circle & the Muslim Brotherhood

4th February 2011
http://s7.addthis.com/static/btn/lg-share-en.gif
” … The CIA funded the Muslim Brotherhood in 1977, and trained Mujahadin to support Hekmatyar of the Brotherhood in Afghanistan. The Muslim Brothers have served the CIA operationally for some 40 years, an arrangement rubber-stamped by Allen Dulles, Frank Wisner and Kermit Roosevelt. Airline hijacker Mohammed Atta was ID’d as a Muslim Brother in the Wall Street Journal and New York Times shortly after the jet attacks on the World Trade Center. So were Khalid Shaik Mohammed [accused killer of Daniel Pearl], and Ramzi Yousef, reportedly guided to a sacrificial pyre in the sky by Aman Zawahiri, Al Qeada’s second-in-command – also a co-conspirator, while operating under the aegis of the CIA, in the murder of Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and the 1993 WTC bomb plot. … “




The CIA, an American Pinay Circle & the Muslim Brotherhood

By Alex Constantine
(Excerpt from Psychic Dictatorship in the USA II (http://www.antifascistencyclopedia.com/allposts/announcing-psychic-dictatorship-in-the-usa-ii-by-ac-available-in-searchable-e-book-form))




An American Pinay Circle

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_mg7D3kYysfw/SxhtpiZXHBI/AAAAAAAAO5g/nqYy45rv00Y/s200/burning_sky.jpg (http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_mg7D3kYysfw/SxhtpiZXHBI/AAAAAAAAO5g/nqYy45rv00Y/s1600-h/burning_sky.jpg)

“… The sky burns,
A copper roof over the shriveled corn.
Children and camels gasp in the noonday heat.
Enemies sweat in their steel, cry out at night,
And wake up trembling, wet with fright.
We squat and stare
Across the nervous barbs,
tied by our common dreads…”
– Aubrey Hodes, “Hating”
Adnan Khashoggi’s mercenary army of global corporate criminals lives in Mafia mansions, basks in the political limelight, enjoys privileges of royalty in tyrannical desert dystopias, sips vodka in the shadow of gleaming Moscow spires. They are kings, Pentagon officials, priests, S&L thieves, assassins, prostitutes, nazis, Big Oil executives, metals merchants, New Age cultists, drug barons, boiler-room con artists, mobsters, dictators by the horde. And terrorists, of course.
Khashoggi is a Turkoman, the son of a doctor who tended to Abdul al-Aziz Ibn Saud. The Khashoggi brothers were classmates of the future King Hussein and several sons of the bin Ladens.1 His career as an international “connector” began in the 1950s, while still an undergraduate at Chico State College. His purchase of fifty Kenworth trucks for resale to Saudi Arabia’s bin Laden Group demonstrated his business savvy, and provided him the capital to launch his career as world-class death merchant.
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_mg7D3kYysfw/SxiY4NuTR6I/AAAAAAAAO5w/ty_TbkYIRic/s320/50499830.jpg (http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_mg7D3kYysfw/SxiY4NuTR6I/AAAAAAAAO5w/ty_TbkYIRic/s1600-h/50499830.jpg)Edwin Pauley
In the early 1960s, he could be found languishing in the sun or plotting world domination at Edwin Pauley’s Coconut Island estate in Hawaii. Pauley, then Democratic Party chairman, operated an oil company called Zapata with the son of Prescott Bush, the Nazi collaborator.2
Houston attorney Linda Minor sidelines as an investigator into banking and political malfeasance. She discovered that Pauley was a slimy operator years before his alliance with Bush.
“He was a spy within the White House,” Minor says, “acting as a funnel for campaign funds to FDR, while at the same time gathering and transmitting information about oil policy and captured Nazi and Japanese assets back to his California business associates.”
Pauley’s political significance stems from his participation in Gulf of Mexico oil explorations in the 1950′s when, with an oil concession from Mexico, he threw in with Howard Hughes and George H.W. Bush.
“Pauley taught Bush how to launder money through corporate subsidiaries to be used for payoffs and the financing of political campaigns,” Minor notes. “Both Pauley and Bush used this system to finance Richard Nixon’s presidential campaigns.”
The laundering scheme unraveled after the 1972 election, when a check drawn at a Mexican bank – the subsidiary of a Houston corporation controlled by associates of Bush the elder – surfaced in the Miami bank account of a Watergate plumber.3
Saudi shiekhs and domestic oil barons struck up alliances. Shiekh Kamal Adham and a circle of cohorts founded Arabian Shield Development Co. in Texas. (since re-named the Arabian American Development Company).
Sheikh Mohammad Salem Bin Mahfouz at National Commercial Bank was an Arabian Shield investor.4 “During the 1980′s,” reports Martin J. Rivers of the Center for Research on Globalization, “Sheikh Mahfouz’s syndicate performed major CIA-inspired banking operations for such former CIA assets as Osama bin Laden … Saddam Hussein, Manuel Noriega and other drug dealing generals. George W. Bush, for his part, had important business relationships … with a total of nine prominent individuals central to Mahfouz’s financial empire.”5
The early 1970s also brought Saudis recruited by the CIA to train at American military bases, including Prince Bandar bin Sultan.6
After September 11, 2001, Bandar drew the attention of the press when it was discovered that two of the terrorists involved were found to have received financing from the Prince’s wife. Bandar trained at Ellington AFB near Houston.7
In the early 1970s, the prince fell in with James A. Baker’s social circle, struck up an alliance with Joanne Herring, who was instrumental in luring Texas Democrat Charlie Wilson to support Gul Hekmatyar of the Muslim Brotherhood chaptger in Afghanstan by the late ’70s.
The Big Oil-CIA-Saudi alliance was consummated with the establishment of the Safari Club of elite cut-throats, founded with covert Agency support on Sept. 1, 1976. George Herbert Walker Bush was then director of the Agency,. Nelson Rockefeller was vice president under Ford.
The Safari Club was a CIA cut-out: This clutch of intelligence agents, politicians and businessmen from three countries (Saudi Arabia, Egypt, and Iran) was founded with the express purpose of engaging in covert operations in Africa and the Middle East without leaving a CIA footprint.
Chicago Tribune book reviewer Padam Ahlawa neatly summarized the tensions that gave rise to the Safari Club: “The origins of world terrorism go back to the cold war era. Moscow’s monumental blunder in invading Afghanistan in 1979 set off a sequence of intrigue-laden events in Afghanistan…. High-profile military operations were out. Carter wanted a covert CIA operation like the one it had carried out in Laos, with no US personnel directly involved. The Agency, it was decided, would co-opt specialized American military personnel with the support of the Pakistan military to train an army of Muslim zealots.”
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_mg7D3kYysfw/SxiZosYTjSI/AAAAAAAAO54/5wz5VJHn8aY/s320/anwar-sadat_kennerly_.jpg (http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_mg7D3kYysfw/SxiZosYTjSI/AAAAAAAAO54/5wz5VJHn8aY/s1600-h/anwar-sadat_kennerly_.jpg)Anwar Sadat entered into an agreement to assist in the training and equipping of recruits for the coming Anti-Communist jihad. “Russian weapons were flown to Afghanistan. Encouraging fundamentalism to grow in Egypt had its fallout when these Mujahadins turned hostile to Sadat for signing the peace treaty with Israel. It led to Sadat’s assassination and terrorist acts of killing 58 tourists. Zia ul Haq of Pakistan made the best of this opportunity, created the ISI to train Pakistanis and Afghans. By doing this, Pakistan’s economic and social instability increased and terrorist acts in Sindh grew.”8
The Safari Club’s cover was blown when the Ayatollah Khomeini allowed an Egyptian reporter to peek into the archives of the exiled Shah of Iran – a Club member.9 The CIA/Safari Club left footprints in the destabilization campaign at Mengistu in Ethiopia, the unrest in Costa Rica, and there were treadmarks all over Iran-Contra, not to mention the funding of UNITA in Angola and the Afghan “freedom fighters,’ including bin-Laden.10
http://www.antifascistencyclopedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Egypt-Muslim-Brotherhood1.jpg (http://www.antifascistencyclopedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Egypt-Muslim-Brotherhood1.jpg)The CIA funded the Muslim Brotherhood in 1977, and trained Mujahadin to support Gulbuddin Hekmatyar of the Brotherhood in Afghanistan. The Muslim Brothers have served the CIA operationally for some 40 years, an arrangement rubber-stamped by Allen Dulles, Frank Wisner and Kermit Roosevelt.
Airline hijacker Mohammed Atta was ID’d as a Muslim Brother in the Wall Street Journal and New York Times shortly after the jet attacks on the World Trade Center. So were Khalid Shaik Mohammed and Ramzi Yousef, reportedly guided to a sacrificial pyre in the sky by Aman Zawahiri, Al Qeada’s second-in-command – also a co-conspirator, while operating under the aegis of the CIA, in the murder of Egyptian President Anwar Sadat, and the 1993 WTC bomb plot.

NOTES
1) Roland Jacquard, In the Name of Osama Bin Laden, Duke University Press, 2002, http://print.google.com/print/doc?isbn=0822329913

2) Bruce Campbell Adamson, letter to Congressman Sam Farr, September 15, 2001, http://www.mail-archive.com/ctrl@listserv.aol.com/msg96515.htm
33) Linda Minor, “Follow the Yellow Brick Road: From Harvard to Enron,” http://www.newsmakingnews.com/lm4,30,02,harvardtoenronpt4.htm
4) LB, e-mail exchange with author, October 2, 2004.
5) Martin J. Rivers, “A Wolf in Sheikh’s Clothing: Bush Business Deals with Nine Partners of bin Laden’s Banker,” geocities.com, March 15, 2004, www.globalresearch.ca/articles/MAR403A.html (http://www.globalresearch.ca/articles/MAR403A.html).
6) Anonymous, “Bandar bin Sultan, a CIA Agent,” House of Saud web site, http://www.geocities.com/saudhouse_p/irancont.htm.
7) LB.
http://www.antifascistencyclopedia.com/wp-includes/images/smilies/icon_cool.gif Padam Ahlawat, “Journalists’ account of terrorism,” Chicago Tribune, May 5, 2002 – review of Unholy Wars. Afghanistan, America and International Terrorism, by John K. Cooley, Penguin.
9) Imad-ad-Dean Ahmad, review of Unholy Wars, Journal of Islam and Muslim-Christian Relations, Minaret of Freedom Institute, http://www.minaret.org/cooley.htm.
10) Dr Samir Rihan, “Arms or democracy, but not both,” http://www.globalcomplexity.org/Arms%20or%20Democracy.htm
11) Debbie Schlussel, “Bush’s Favorite Terrorist Buddy,” WorldNetDaily, October 1, 2001.

Peter Lemkin
02-05-2011, 02:53 AM
The CIA, an American Pinay Circle & the Muslim Brotherhood

4th February 2011
http://s7.addthis.com/static/btn/lg-share-en.gif
” … The CIA funded the Muslim Brotherhood in 1977, and trained Mujahadin to support Hekmatyar of the Brotherhood in Afghanistan. The Muslim Brothers have served the CIA operationally for some 40 years, an arrangement rubber-stamped by Allen Dulles, Frank Wisner and Kermit Roosevelt. Airline hijacker Mohammed Atta was ID’d as a Muslim Brother in the Wall Street Journal and New York Times shortly after the jet attacks on the World Trade Center. So were Khalid Shaik Mohammed [accused killer of Daniel Pearl], and Ramzi Yousef, reportedly guided to a sacrificial pyre in the sky by Aman Zawahiri, Al Qeada’s second-in-command – also a co-conspirator, while operating under the aegis of the CIA, in the murder of Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and the 1993 WTC bomb plot. … “




The CIA, an American Pinay Circle & the Muslim Brotherhood

By Alex Constantine
(Excerpt from Psychic Dictatorship in the USA II (http://www.antifascistencyclopedia.com/allposts/announcing-psychic-dictatorship-in-the-usa-ii-by-ac-available-in-searchable-e-book-form))




An American Pinay Circle

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_mg7D3kYysfw/SxhtpiZXHBI/AAAAAAAAO5g/nqYy45rv00Y/s200/burning_sky.jpg (http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_mg7D3kYysfw/SxhtpiZXHBI/AAAAAAAAO5g/nqYy45rv00Y/s1600-h/burning_sky.jpg)

“… The sky burns,
A copper roof over the shriveled corn.
Children and camels gasp in the noonday heat.
Enemies sweat in their steel, cry out at night,
And wake up trembling, wet with fright.
We squat and stare
Across the nervous barbs,
tied by our common dreads…”
– Aubrey Hodes, “Hating”
Adnan Khashoggi’s mercenary army of global corporate criminals lives in Mafia mansions, basks in the political limelight, enjoys privileges of royalty in tyrannical desert dystopias, sips vodka in the shadow of gleaming Moscow spires. They are kings, Pentagon officials, priests, S&L thieves, assassins, prostitutes, nazis, Big Oil executives, metals merchants, New Age cultists, drug barons, boiler-room con artists, mobsters, dictators by the horde. And terrorists, of course.
Khashoggi is a Turkoman, the son of a doctor who tended to Abdul al-Aziz Ibn Saud. The Khashoggi brothers were classmates of the future King Hussein and several sons of the bin Ladens.1 His career as an international “connector” began in the 1950s, while still an undergraduate at Chico State College. His purchase of fifty Kenworth trucks for resale to Saudi Arabia’s bin Laden Group demonstrated his business savvy, and provided him the capital to launch his career as world-class death merchant.
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_mg7D3kYysfw/SxiY4NuTR6I/AAAAAAAAO5w/ty_TbkYIRic/s320/50499830.jpg (http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_mg7D3kYysfw/SxiY4NuTR6I/AAAAAAAAO5w/ty_TbkYIRic/s1600-h/50499830.jpg)Edwin Pauley
In the early 1960s, he could be found languishing in the sun or plotting world domination at Edwin Pauley’s Coconut Island estate in Hawaii. Pauley, then Democratic Party chairman, operated an oil company called Zapata with the son of Prescott Bush, the Nazi collaborator.2
Houston attorney Linda Minor sidelines as an investigator into banking and political malfeasance. She discovered that Pauley was a slimy operator years before his alliance with Bush.
“He was a spy within the White House,” Minor says, “acting as a funnel for campaign funds to FDR, while at the same time gathering and transmitting information about oil policy and captured Nazi and Japanese assets back to his California business associates.”
Pauley’s political significance stems from his participation in Gulf of Mexico oil explorations in the 1950′s when, with an oil concession from Mexico, he threw in with Howard Hughes and George H.W. Bush.
“Pauley taught Bush how to launder money through corporate subsidiaries to be used for payoffs and the financing of political campaigns,” Minor notes. “Both Pauley and Bush used this system to finance Richard Nixon’s presidential campaigns.”
The laundering scheme unraveled after the 1972 election, when a check drawn at a Mexican bank – the subsidiary of a Houston corporation controlled by associates of Bush the elder – surfaced in the Miami bank account of a Watergate plumber.3
Saudi shiekhs and domestic oil barons struck up alliances. Shiekh Kamal Adham and a circle of cohorts founded Arabian Shield Development Co. in Texas. (since re-named the Arabian American Development Company).
Sheikh Mohammad Salem Bin Mahfouz at National Commercial Bank was an Arabian Shield investor.4 “During the 1980′s,” reports Martin J. Rivers of the Center for Research on Globalization, “Sheikh Mahfouz’s syndicate performed major CIA-inspired banking operations for such former CIA assets as Osama bin Laden … Saddam Hussein, Manuel Noriega and other drug dealing generals. George W. Bush, for his part, had important business relationships … with a total of nine prominent individuals central to Mahfouz’s financial empire.”5
The early 1970s also brought Saudis recruited by the CIA to train at American military bases, including Prince Bandar bin Sultan.6
After September 11, 2001, Bandar drew the attention of the press when it was discovered that two of the terrorists involved were found to have received financing from the Prince’s wife. Bandar trained at Ellington AFB near Houston.7
In the early 1970s, the prince fell in with James A. Baker’s social circle, struck up an alliance with Joanne Herring, who was instrumental in luring Texas Democrat Charlie Wilson to support Gul Hekmatyar of the Muslim Brotherhood chaptger in Afghanstan by the late ’70s.
The Big Oil-CIA-Saudi alliance was consummated with the establishment of the Safari Club of elite cut-throats, founded with covert Agency support on Sept. 1, 1976. George Herbert Walker Bush was then director of the Agency,. Nelson Rockefeller was vice president under Ford.
The Safari Club was a CIA cut-out: This clutch of intelligence agents, politicians and businessmen from three countries (Saudi Arabia, Egypt, and Iran) was founded with the express purpose of engaging in covert operations in Africa and the Middle East without leaving a CIA footprint.
Chicago Tribune book reviewer Padam Ahlawa neatly summarized the tensions that gave rise to the Safari Club: “The origins of world terrorism go back to the cold war era. Moscow’s monumental blunder in invading Afghanistan in 1979 set off a sequence of intrigue-laden events in Afghanistan…. High-profile military operations were out. Carter wanted a covert CIA operation like the one it had carried out in Laos, with no US personnel directly involved. The Agency, it was decided, would co-opt specialized American military personnel with the support of the Pakistan military to train an army of Muslim zealots.”
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_mg7D3kYysfw/SxiZosYTjSI/AAAAAAAAO54/5wz5VJHn8aY/s320/anwar-sadat_kennerly_.jpg (http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_mg7D3kYysfw/SxiZosYTjSI/AAAAAAAAO54/5wz5VJHn8aY/s1600-h/anwar-sadat_kennerly_.jpg)Anwar Sadat entered into an agreement to assist in the training and equipping of recruits for the coming Anti-Communist jihad. “Russian weapons were flown to Afghanistan. Encouraging fundamentalism to grow in Egypt had its fallout when these Mujahadins turned hostile to Sadat for signing the peace treaty with Israel. It led to Sadat’s assassination and terrorist acts of killing 58 tourists. Zia ul Haq of Pakistan made the best of this opportunity, created the ISI to train Pakistanis and Afghans. By doing this, Pakistan’s economic and social instability increased and terrorist acts in Sindh grew.”8
The Safari Club’s cover was blown when the Ayatollah Khomeini allowed an Egyptian reporter to peek into the archives of the exiled Shah of Iran – a Club member.9 The CIA/Safari Club left footprints in the destabilization campaign at Mengistu in Ethiopia, the unrest in Costa Rica, and there were treadmarks all over Iran-Contra, not to mention the funding of UNITA in Angola and the Afghan “freedom fighters,’ including bin-Laden.10
http://www.antifascistencyclopedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Egypt-Muslim-Brotherhood1.jpg (http://www.antifascistencyclopedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Egypt-Muslim-Brotherhood1.jpg)The CIA funded the Muslim Brotherhood in 1977, and trained Mujahadin to support Gulbuddin Hekmatyar of the Brotherhood in Afghanistan. The Muslim Brothers have served the CIA operationally for some 40 years, an arrangement rubber-stamped by Allen Dulles, Frank Wisner and Kermit Roosevelt.
Airline hijacker Mohammed Atta was ID’d as a Muslim Brother in the Wall Street Journal and New York Times shortly after the jet attacks on the World Trade Center. So were Khalid Shaik Mohammed and Ramzi Yousef, reportedly guided to a sacrificial pyre in the sky by Aman Zawahiri, Al Qeada’s second-in-command – also a co-conspirator, while operating under the aegis of the CIA, in the murder of Egyptian President Anwar Sadat, and the 1993 WTC bomb plot.

NOTES
1) Roland Jacquard, In the Name of Osama Bin Laden, Duke University Press, 2002, http://print.google.com/print/doc?isbn=0822329913

2) Bruce Campbell Adamson, letter to Congressman Sam Farr, September 15, 2001, http://www.mail-archive.com/ctrl@listserv.aol.com/msg96515.htm
33) Linda Minor, “Follow the Yellow Brick Road: From Harvard to Enron,” http://www.newsmakingnews.com/lm4,30,02,harvardtoenronpt4.htm
4) LB, e-mail exchange with author, October 2, 2004.
5) Martin J. Rivers, “A Wolf in Sheikh’s Clothing: Bush Business Deals with Nine Partners of bin Laden’s Banker,” geocities.com, March 15, 2004, www.globalresearch.ca/articles/MAR403A.html (http://www.globalresearch.ca/articles/MAR403A.html).
6) Anonymous, “Bandar bin Sultan, a CIA Agent,” House of Saud web site, http://www.geocities.com/saudhouse_p/irancont.htm.
7) LB.
http://www.antifascistencyclopedia.com/wp-includes/images/smilies/icon_cool.gif Padam Ahlawat, “Journalists’ account of terrorism,” Chicago Tribune, May 5, 2002 – review of Unholy Wars. Afghanistan, America and International Terrorism, by John K. Cooley, Penguin.
9) Imad-ad-Dean Ahmad, review of Unholy Wars, Journal of Islam and Muslim-Christian Relations, Minaret of Freedom Institute, http://www.minaret.org/cooley.htm.
10) Dr Samir Rihan, “Arms or democracy, but not both,” http://www.globalcomplexity.org/Arms%20or%20Democracy.htm
11) Debbie Schlussel, “Bush’s Favorite Terrorist Buddy,” WorldNetDaily, October 1, 2001.

:spy: Well that is an interesting find!!!! Amazing how things fit together sometimes in the slimy world of our would-be 'Masters'. We seem to be in the habit of creating, funding and/or secretly supporting our 'enemies' presented to the Sheeple to keep 'em scared shitless of the bogeymen we created just for their amazement and 'amusement'. It would be funny, if it wasn't so tragic in lives and liberty. :spy:

Magda Hassan
02-05-2011, 04:30 AM
2010 Press Conference on Egypt

From SourceWatch

Jump to: navigation (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=2010_Press_Conference_on_Egypt#col umn-one), search (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=2010_Press_Conference_on_Egypt#sea rchInput)
On September 1st, at the National Press Club, "a press conference was held to discuss the Mubarak government’s prominent role in the upcoming negotiations between Israel and the Palestinian Authority. Hosted by The Coalition of Egyptian Organizations (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Coalition_of_Egyptian_Organization s&action=edit&redlink=1) and the Egyptian Association for Change-USA (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Egyptian_Association_for_Change-USA) and moderated by Tarek Khalil (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Tarek_Khalil&action=edit&redlink=1), the event featured a panel of Egyptian activists.
"The first to speak was Sheikh Ahmed Subhy Mansour (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Ahmed_Subhy_Mansour), a Muslim scholar and human rights activist. Mansour is the founder of the Muslim Quranists (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Muslim_Quranists&action=edit&redlink=1), a group which has suffered arrests and torture under the Mubarak government...
"Next to speak was Ibrahim Hussein (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Ibrahim_Hussein), an Egyptian born American citizen who served as Secretary General for the President’s Council, an initiative to promote trade and economic development between the U.S. and Egypt...
"Omar Afifi (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Omar_Afifi), a former Egyptian police officer, lawyer, and President of Hukuk El Nas (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Hukuk_El_Nas), a human rights organization, made his statement in Arabic. (Translation was provided) “If Mubarak claims he is achieving ’stability’, well, it is a fake stability. Mubarak has not ruled for even one day without an emergency law…” The statement goes on to ask the United States to “honor its own principles and values…” by ceasing unconditional support for the Mubarak government and not extending support to Gamal Mubarak, the President’s son and likely presidential candidate. “It will be utterly fraudulent if Mr. Mubarak Junior wins the presidency under the guise of ‘competitive presidential election’…how can it be competitive if the candidate’s dad controls everything in the country?” Afifi concludes by reminding the Obama Administration that “…supporting a regime like Mubarak’s will feed feelings of antagonism on the part of the Egyptian people towards America.”
"Next to speak was Dina Darwish (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Dina_Darwish&action=edit&redlink=1), a member of the Executive Board of the Egyptian Association for Change-USA (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Egyptian_Association_for_Change-USA)...
"Maria Dayton (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Maria_Dayton) is the founder of Voices for a Democratic Egypt (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Voices_for_a_Democratic_Egypt&action=edit&redlink=1)..
"Sam Gerges (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Sam_Gerges&action=edit&redlink=1), a PhD student and former Senior Programs Coordinator for the Cairo Institute for Human Rights Studies (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Cairo_Institute_for_Human_Rights_S tudies), provided background on the current political situation in Egypt...
"At this point in the event, Khalil announced that Egyptian democracy advocate Saad Eddin Ibrahim (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Saad_Eddin_Ibrahim), who had been hoping to attend the event, had been unable to make it due to his travel schedule.”[1] (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=2010_Press_Conference_on_Egypt#cit e_note-0)

Resources and articles


Related Sourcewatch


References



↑ (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=2010_Press_Conference_on_Egypt#cit e_ref-0) POMED Notes: Press Conference “Without a Stable and Democratic Egypt, the Future of a Two State Solution is in Jeopardy” (http://pomed.org/blog/2010/09/pomed-notes-press-conference-without-a-stable-and-democratic-egypt-the-future-of-a-two-state-solution-is-in-jeopardy.html/), , accessed February 3, 2011.

Retrieved from "http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=2010_Press_Conference_on_Egypt"
Categories (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Special:Categories): United States (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Category:United_States) | Egypt (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Category:Egypt)

Magda Hassan
02-05-2011, 04:38 AM
It will be interesting to see if any of the same names above come up with the Egypt youth announcement of a formation of 25-person negotiating body.


Members of the coalition of youth movements, which triggered the 25 April popular uprising and have since provided field leadership to the occupation of Tahrir Sq have agreed on mandating a 25-person committee of public and political figures to negotiate on behalf of the pro-democracy protesters, lawyer Ziad El-Eleimy, a leading member of one of the youth movements and a close associate of Mohamed El-Baradei, revealed to Ahram Online. According to El-Eleimy, the 25-person committee is to include an assemblage of Egyptian luminaries, among whom the former director of the International Atomic Energy Agency and Nobel laureate, El-Baradei, himself. Another Egyptian Nobel laureate on the committee is Ahmed
Zewail, a professor of chemistry and physics at the famed California Institute of Technology (Caltec), who also sits on US President Barak Obama’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. Over the past few years, Zewail has been increasingly vocal in criticizing the Egyptian regime for its lack of democracy. Arab League Secretary General Amr Moussa, who retains wide popularity among Egyptian and Arab publics is also expected to be a member of the committee.
Not surprisingly, these three public figures have been among the names suggested as possible candidates for the presidency, once President Mubarak steps down.
The full list of members is to be announced tomorrow Saturday, said El-Eleimy, but preferred not to disclose as yet how that announcement is to be made.
He did stress, however, that the committee is to include five representatives of the youth movements.
As to when, and under which terms, the committee would enter into negotiations, El-Eleimy indicated that this would depend either on President Mubarak stepping down, or the announcement of a credible commitment to his stepping down within a specified, and short, period of time.http://english.ahram.org.eg/News/5005.aspx

Peter Lemkin
02-05-2011, 07:41 AM
A pipeline that runs through Egypt's North Sinai and supplies 1/3 of gas to Israel has had one of the monitor stations blown up, Egypt state TV reported moments ago! Army has shut pipeline down.

More provocation to keep Mubarak without Mubarak?

Peter Lemkin
02-05-2011, 10:11 AM
A pipeline that runs through Egypt's North Sinai and supplies 1/3 of gas to Israel has had one of the monitor stations blown up, Egypt state TV reported moments ago! Army has shut pipeline down.

More provocation to keep Mubarak without Mubarak?

Well the story has changed in the first hour....not the part of the pipeline that goes to Israel, but the part that goes to Jordan.....or so they now say.....bet it changes again....

Peter Lemkin
02-05-2011, 10:32 AM
"Dictators" do not Dictate, They Obey Orders

by Michel Chossudovsky


Global Research, January 29, 2011
http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=22993
The Mubarak regime could collapse in the a face of a nationwide protest movement... What prospects for Egypt and the Arab World?

"Dictators" do not dictate, they obey orders. This is true in Egypt, Tunisia and Algeria.

Dictators are invariably political puppets. Dictators do not decide.

President Hosni Mubarak was a faithful servant of Western economic interests and so was Ben Ali.

The national government is the object of the protest movement.

The objective is to unseat the puppet rather than the puppet-master.

The slogans in Egypt are "Down with Mubarak, Down with the Regime". No anti-American posters have been reported... The overriding and destructive influence of the USA in Egypt and throughout the Middle East remains unheralded.

The foreign powers which operate behind the scenes are shielded from the protest movement.

No significant political change will occur unless the issue of foreign interference is meaningfully addressed by the protest movement.

The US embassy in Cairo is an important political entity, invariably overshadowing the national government. The Embassy is not a target of the protest movement.




In Egypt, a devastating IMF program was imposed in 1991 at the height of the Gulf War. It was negotiated in exchange for the annulment of Egypt's multibillion dollar military debt to the US as well as its participation in the war. The resulting deregulation of food prices, sweeping privatisation and massive austerity measures led to the impoverishment of the Egyptian population and the destabilization of its economy. The Mubarak government was praised as a model "IMF pupil".

The role of Ben Ali's government in Tunisia was to enforce the IMF's deadly economic medicine, which over a period of more than twenty years served to destabilize the national economy and impoverish the Tunisian population. Over the last 23 years, economic and social policy in Tunisia has been dictated by the Washington Consensus.

Both Hosni Mubarak and Ben Ali stayed in power because their governments obeyed and effectively enforced the diktats of the IMF.

From Pinochet and Videla to Baby Doc, Ben Ali and Mubarak, dictators have been installed by Washington. Historically in Latin America, dictators were instated through a series of US sponsored military coups. In todays World, they are installed through "free and fair elections" under the surveillance of the "international community".

Our message to the protest movement:

Actual decisions are taken in Washington DC, at the US State Department, at the Pentagon, at Langley, headquarters of the CIA. at H Street NW, the headquarters of the World Bank and the IMF.

The relationship of "the dictator" to foreign interests must be addressed. Unseat the political puppets but do not forget to target the "real dictators".

The protest movement should focus on the real seat of political authority; it should target (in a peaceful, orderly and nonviolent fashion) the US embassy, the delegation of the European Union, the national missions of the IMF and the World Bank.

Meaningful political change can only be ensured if the neoliberal economic policy agenda is thrown out.

Regime Replacement

If the protest movement fails to address the role of foreign powers including pressures exerted by "investors", external creditors and international financial institutions, the objective of national sovereignty will not be achieved. In which case, what will occur is a narrow process of "regime replacement", which ensures political continuity.

"Dictators" are seated and unseated. When they are politically discredited and no longer serve the interests of their US sponsors, they are replaced by a new leader, often recruited from within the ranks of the political opposition.

In Tunisia, the Obama administration has already positioned itself. It intends to play a key role in the "democratization program" (i.e. the holding of so-called fair elections). It also intends to use the political crisis as a means to weaken the role of France and consolidate its position in North Africa:

"The United States, which was quick to size up the groundswell of protest on the streets of Tunisia, is trying to press its advantage to push for democratic reforms in the country and further afield.

The top-ranking US envoy for the Middle East, Jeffrey Feltman, was the first foreign official to arrive in the country after president Zine El Abidine Ben Ali was ousted on January 14 and swiftly called for reforms. He said on Tuesday only free and fair elections would strengthen and give credibility to the north African state's embattled leadership.

"I certainly expect that we'll be using the Tunisian example" in talks with other Arab governments, Assistant Secretary of State Feltman added.

He was dispatched to the north African country to offer US help in the turbulent transition of power, and met with Tunisian ministers and civil society figures.

Feltman travels to Paris on Wednesday to discuss the crisis with French leaders, boosting the impression that the US is leading international support for a new Tunisia, to the detriment of its former colonial power, France. ...

Western nations had long supported Tunisia's ousted leadership, seeing it as a bulwark against Islamic militants in the north Africa region.

In 2006, the then US defense secretary Donald Rumsfeld, speaking in Tunis, praised the country's evolution.

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton nimbly stepped in with a speech in Doha on January 13 warning Arab leaders to allow their citizens greater freedoms or risk extremists exploiting the situation.

"There is no doubt that the United States is trying to position itself very quickly on the good side,..." " AFP: US helping shape outcome of Tunisian uprising emphasis added

Will Washington be successful in instating a new puppet regime?

This very much depends on the ability of the protest movement to address the insidious role of the US in the country's internal affairs.

The overriding powers of empire are not mentioned. In a bitter irony, president Obama has expressed his support for the protest movement.

Many people within the protest movement are led to believe that president Obama is committed to democracy and human rights, and is supportive of the opposition's resolve to unseat a dictator, which was installed by the US in the first place.

Cooptation of Opposition Leaders

The cooptation of the leaders of major opposition parties and civil society organizations in anticipation of the collapse of an authoritarian puppet government is part of Washington's design, applied in different regions of the World.

The process of cooptation is implemented and financed by US based foundations including the National Endowment for Democracy (NED) and Freedom House (FH). Both FH and the NED have links to the US Congress. the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR), and the US business establishment. Both the NED and FH are known to have ties to the CIA.

The NED is actively involved in Tunisia, Egypt and Algeria. Freedom House supports several civil society organizations in Egypt.

"The NED was established by the Reagan administration after the CIA’s role in covertly funding efforts to overthrow foreign governments was brought to light, leading to the discrediting of the parties, movements, journals, books, newspapers and individuals that received CIA funding. ... As a bipartisan endowment, with participation from the two major parties, as well as the AFL-CIO and US Chamber of Commerce, the NED took over the financing of foreign overthrow movements, but overtly and under the rubric of “democracy promotion.” (Stephen Gowans, January « 2011 "What's left"

While the US has supported the Mubarak government for the last thirty years, US foundations with ties to the US State department and the Pentagon have actively supported the political opposition including the civil society movement. According to Freedom House: "Egyptian civil society is both vibrant and constrained. There are hundreds of non-governmental organizations devoted to expanding civil and political rights in the country, operating in a highly regulated environment." (Freedom House Press Releases).

In a bitter irony, Washington supports the Mubarak dictatorship, including its atrocities, while also backing and financing its detractors, through the activities of FH, the NED, among others.

Under the auspices of Freedom House, Egyptian dissidents and opponents of Hosni Mubarak were received in May 2008 by Condoleezza Rice at the State Department and the US Congress. They also met White House National Security Adviser Stephen Hadley, who was "the principal White House foreign policy adviser" during George W. Bush's second term.

Freedom House’s effort to empower a new generation of advocates has yielded tangible results and the New Generation program in Egypt has gained prominence both locally and internationally. Egyptian visiting fellows from all civil society groups received [May 2008] unprecedented attention and recognition, including meetings in Washington with US Secretary of State, the National Security Advisor, and prominent members of Congress. In the words of Condoleezza Rice, the fellows represent the "hope for the future of Egypt."

Freedom House, http://www.freedomhouse.org/template.cfm?page=66&program=84 (emphasis added).

Political Double Talk: Chatting with "Dictators", Mingling with "Dissidents"

The Egyptian pro-democracy delegation to the State Department was described by Condoleezza Rice as "The Hope for the Future of Egypt".

In May 2009, Hillary Clinton met a delegation of Egyptian dissidents, several of which had met Condoleezza Rice a year earlier. These high level meetings were held a week prior to Obama's visit to Egypt:


U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton praised the work of a group of Egyptian civil society activists she met with today and said it was in Egypt’s interest to move toward democracy and to exhibit more respect for human rights.

The 16 activists met with Clinton and Acting Assistant Secretary of State for Near Eastern Affairs Jeffrey Feltman in Washington at the end of a two-month fellowship organized by Freedom House’s New Generation program.

The fellows raised concern about what they perceived as the United States government distancing itself from Egyptian civil society and called on President Obama to meet with young independent civil society activists when he visits Cairo next week. They also urged the Obama administration to continue to provide political and financial support to Egyptian civil society and to help open the space for nongovernmental organizations which is tightly restricted under Egypt’s longstanding emergency law.

The fellows told Clinton that momentum was already building in Egypt for increased civil and human rights and that U.S. support at this time was urgently needed. They stressed that civil society represents a moderate and peaceful “third way” in Egypt, an alternative to authoritarian elements in the government and those that espouse theocratic rule. (Freedom House, May 2009)

During their fellowship, the activists spent a week in Washington receiving training in advocacy and getting an inside look at the way U.S. democracy works. After their training, the fellows were matched with civil society organizations throughout the country where they shared experiences with U.S. counterparts. The activists will wrap up their program ... by visiting U.S. government officials, members of Congress, media outlets and think tanks." (Freedom House, May 2009, emphasis added)

These opposition civil society groups --which are currently playing an important role in the protest movement-- are supported and funded by the US. They indelibly serve US interests.

The invitation of Egyptian dissidents to the State Department and the US Congress also purports to instil a feeling of commitment and allegiance to American democratic values. America is presented as a model of Freedom and Justice. Obama is upheld as a "Role Model".








`






Egyptian dissidents, Fellows of Freedom House in Washington DC (2008)



US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks with "Egyptian activists promoting freedom and
democracy", prior to meetings at the State Department in Washington, DC, May 28, 2009.

Compare the two pictures 2008 delegation received by Condoleezza Rice versus 2009 delegation
meeting Hillary Clinton in May 2009.





Hillary Clinton and Hosni Mubarak in Sharm El Sheik, September 2010





Condoleezza Rice chats with Hosni Mubarak? " Hope for the Future of Egypt".



Condoleezza Rice addresses Freedom House. 4th from left






The Puppet Masters Support the Protest Movement against their own Puppets

The puppet masters support dissent against their own puppets?

Its called "political leveraging", "manufacturing dissent". Support the dictator as well as the opponents of the dictator as a means of controlling the political opposition.

These actions on the part of Freedom House and the National Endowment for Democracy, on behalf of the Bush and Obama administrations, ensure that the US funded civil society opposition will not direct their energies against the puppet masters behind the Mubarak regime, namely the US government.

These US funded civil society organizations act as a "Trojan Horse" which becomes embedded within the protest movement. They protect the interests of the puppet masters. They ensure that the grassroots protest movement will not address the broader issue of foreign interference in the affairs of sovereign states.

The Facebook Twitter Bloggers Supported and Financed by Washington

In relation to the protest movement in Egypt, several civil society groups funded by US based foundations have led the protest on Twitter and Facebook:

"Activists from Egypt's Kifaya (Enough) movement - a coalition of government opponents - and the 6th of April Youth Movement organized the protests on the Facebook and Twitter social networking websites. Western news reports said Twitter appeared to be blocked in Egypt later Tuesday." (See Voice of America, ,Egypt Rocked by Deadly Anti-Government Protests



Reads; Kifaya (Enough)

The Kifaya movement, which organized one of the first protests directed against the Mubarak regime in late 2004, is supported by the US based International Center for Non-Violent Conflict. Kifaya is a broad-based movement which has also taken a stance on Palestine and US interventionism in the region.

In turn, Freedom House has been involved in promoting and training the Middle East North Africa Facebook and Twitter blogs:

Freedom House fellows acquired skills in civic mobilization, leadership, and strategic planning, and benefit from networking opportunities through interaction with Washington-based donors, international organizations and the media. After returning to Egypt, the fellows received small grants to implement innovative initiatives such as advocating for political reform through Facebook and SMS messaging.

http://www.freedomhouse.org/template.cfm?page=66&program=84 (emphasis added)

From February 27 to March 13 [2010], Freedom House hosted 11 bloggers from the Middle East and North Africa [from different civil society organizations] for a two-week Advanced New Media Study Tour in Washington, D.C. The Study Tour provided the bloggers with training in digital security, digital video making, message development and digital mapping. While in D.C., the Fellows also participated in a Senate briefing, and met with high-level officials at USAID, State [Department] and Congress as well as international media including Al-Jazeera and the Washington Post.http://www.freedomhouse.org/template.cfm?page=115&program=84&item=87 emphasis added

One can easily apprehend the importance attached by the US administration to this bloggers' "training program", which is coupled with high level meetings at the US Senate, the Congress, the State Department, etc.

The role of the Facebook Twitter social media as an expression of dissent, must be carefully evaluated: the civil society bloggers are supported by Freedom House (FH), the National Endowment for Democracy (NED) and the US State Department.

BBC News World (broadcast in the Middle East) quoting Egyptian internet messages has reported that "the US has been sending money to pro-democracy groups." (BBC News World, January 29, 2010). The April 6 Youth Movement is supported covertly by Washington. According to a report in The Daily Telegraph, quoting a secret US embassy document (Jan 29, 2011):


"The protests in Egypt are being driven by the April 6 youth movement, a group on Facebook that has attracted mainly young and educated members opposed to Mr Mubarak. The group has about 70,000 members and uses social networking sites to orchestrate protests and report on their activities.

The documents released by WikiLeaks reveal US Embassy officials [in Cairo] were in regular contact with the activist throughout 2008 and 2009, considering him one of their most reliable sources for information about human rights abuses." (emphasis added)

The Muslim Brotherhood

The Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt constitutes the largest segment of the opposition to president Mubarak. According to reports, The Muslim Brotherhood dominates the protest movement.

While there is a constitutional ban against religious political parties Brotherhood members elected to Egypt's parliament as "independents" constitute the largest parliamentary block.

The Brotherhood, however, does not constitute a direct threat to Washington's economic and strategic interests in the region. Western intelligence agencies have a longstanding history of collaboration with the Brotherhood. Britain's support of the Brotherhood instrumented through the British Secret Service dates back to the 1940s. Starting in the 1950s, according to former intelligence official William Baer, "The CIA [funnelled] support to the Muslim Brotherhood because of “the Brotherhood’s commendable capability to overthrow Nasser.”1954-1970: CIA and the Muslim Brotherhood Ally to Oppose Egyptian President Nasser, These covert links to the CIA were maintained in the post-Nasser era.

Concluding Remarks

The removal of Hosni Mubarak has, for several years, been on the drawing board of US foreign policy.

Regime replacement serves to ensure continuity, while providing the illusion that meaningful political change has occurred.

Washington's agenda for Egypt has been to "hijack the protest movement" and replace president Hosni Mubarak with a new compliant puppet head of state. Washington's objective is to sustain the interests of foreign powers, to uphold the neoliberal economic agenda which has served to impoverish the Egyptian population.

From Washington's standpoint, regime replacement no longer requires the installation of an authoritarian military regime as in the heyday of US imperialism, It can be implemented by co-opting political parties, including the Left, financing civil society groups, infiltrating the protest movement and manipulating national elections.

With reference to the protest movement in Egypt, President Obama stated in a January 28 video broadcast on Youtube: "The Government Should Not Resort to Violence". The more fundamental question is what is the source of that violence? Egypt is the largest recipient of US military aid after Israel. The Egyptian military is considered to be the power base of the Mubarak regime:

"The country’s army and police forces are geared to the teeth thanks to more than $1 billion in military aid a year from Washington. ... When the US officially describes Egypt as “an important ally” it is inadvertently referring to Mubarak’s role as a garrison outpost for US military operations and dirty war tactics in the Middle East and beyond. There is clear evidence from international human rights groups that countless “suspects” rendered by US forces in their various territories of (criminal) operations are secretly dumped in Egypt for “deep interrogation”. The country serves as a giant “Guantanamo” of the Middle East, conveniently obscured from US public interest and relieved of legal niceties over human rights." (Finian Cunningham, Egypt: US-Backed Repression is Insight for American Public, Global Research, January 28, 2010).

America is no "Role Model" of Democratization for the Middle East. US military presence imposed on Egypt and the Arab World for more than 20 years, coupled with "free market" reforms are the root cause of State violence.

America's intent is to use the protest movement to install a new regime.

The People's Movement should redirect its energies: Identify the relationship between America and "the dictator". Unseat America's political puppet but do not forget to target the "real dictators".

Shunt the process of regime change.

Dismantle the neoliberal reforms.

Close down US military bases in the Arab World.

Establish a truly sovereign government.

Peter Lemkin
02-05-2011, 10:51 AM
A pipeline that runs through Egypt's North Sinai and supplies 1/3 of gas to Israel has had one of the monitor stations blown up, Egypt state TV reported moments ago! Army has shut pipeline down.

More provocation to keep Mubarak without Mubarak?

Well the story has changed in the first hour....not the part of the pipeline that goes to Israel, but the part that goes to Jordan.....or so they now say.....bet it changes again....

I was right....now they say they don't know which parts of the pipeline were affected.....I guess whichever is most politically expedient. :wavey:

David Guyatt
02-05-2011, 11:36 AM
Is this the pipeline?

http://www.meed.com/sectors/economy/egypt/israel-gas-pipeline-goes-ahead/322787.article


Egypt/Israel gas pipeline goes ahead
2 September 2005, 16:00 GMT

The Egyptian/Israeli consortium East Mediterranean Gas (EMG) and Israel Electric Corporation (IEC) signeda commercial agreement on 8 August for the supply of gas from Egypt to Israel. A subsea pipeline from El-Arish in Egypt to Ashkelon in southern Israel will transport 7,000 million cubic metres a year of gas. The construction of the pipeline is expected to take 24 months. Cairo and Tel Aviv on 30 June signed a memorandum of understanding for the project (MEED ...

I can't imagine there is more than one? And if so why all the shilly-shallying?

Peter Lemkin
02-05-2011, 12:16 PM
Is this the pipeline?

http://www.meed.com/sectors/economy/egypt/israel-gas-pipeline-goes-ahead/322787.article


Egypt/Israel gas pipeline goes ahead
2 September 2005, 16:00 GMT

The Egyptian/Israeli consortium East Mediterranean Gas (EMG) and Israel Electric Corporation (IEC) signeda commercial agreement on 8 August for the supply of gas from Egypt to Israel. A subsea pipeline from El-Arish in Egypt to Ashkelon in southern Israel will transport 7,000 million cubic metres a year of gas. The construction of the pipeline is expected to take 24 months. Cairo and Tel Aviv on 30 June signed a memorandum of understanding for the project (MEED ...

I can't imagine there is more than one? And if so why all the shilly-shallying?

Hey, shilly-shallying is the main game!!!! All I can tell you is it is just underwater along the coast of Gaza and come onshore for the pumping, monitoring stations spaced every few Km. It was one of these stations that apparently was bombed and set on fire. The reports were [Al Jazerra quoting Egyptian authorities] that the pipeline splits and went to several countries. Jordan has confirmed no gas coming to them now. Israel has said nothing.......its deeeeeep.

David Guyatt
02-05-2011, 03:22 PM
Allo, allo, allo, what's all this then?

http://edition.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/africa/02/05/egypt.vice.president/


German official retracts assassination report
By the CNN Wire Staff
February 5, 2011 -- Updated 1438 GMT (2238 HKT)

Munich, Germany (CNN) -- The German diplomat who said there was an assassination attempt against Egypt's new vice president has retracted his comments.
"I was led to believe that we had a confirmed report but in fact we didn't," Wolfgang Ischinger told CNN, adding the information he received was based on an unsubstantiated source.
Ischinger, the host of the Munich Security Conference, told a plenary session of the meeting that there was an assassination attempt against Omar Suleiman and several people were killed.
At the time, he didn't provide any more detail about the incident.
The vice president, appointed last week amid widespread cries for President Hosni Mubarak's ouster, has been working to initiate a government transition.
U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, who is attending the conference, said it's important to support the Suleiman-led transition process.
Suleiman had been an intelligence chief and a powerful behind-the-scenes player for a long time, and his appointment was seen widely as an attempt by Mubarak to restore order.

Hosting a "security conference" but used an "unsubstantiated source" -- I don't think so...

David Guyatt
02-05-2011, 03:27 PM
Translated from western pol speak the below simply means slow the election down to give us time to fix it - for "freedom and democracy".

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/02/05/us-egypt-europe-idUSTRE71416L20110205


Europe to Egypt: After Mubarak, don't rush election

(Reuters) - European powers Germany and Britain urged Egypt on Saturday to change leaders rapidly but take its time holding elections, saying traditions of tolerance and fairness had to be built to make democracy work.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel, British Prime Minister David Cameron and European Council President Herman van Rompuy reiterated demands for a rapid "transition" -- a phrase that has become a diplomatic codeword for the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak after 30 years of military-backed autocracy.

But they said caution would be needed in the aftermath.

"I don't believe that we solve the world's problems by flicking a switch and holding an election ... Egypt is a classic case in point," Cameron told a security conference in Munich.

"I think a very quick election at the start of a process of democratization would be wrong," Merkel told the same meeting, citing her own experiences as an East German pro-democracy activist at the time of the 1989 collapse of the Berlin Wall.

"If there is an election first, new structures (of political dialogue and decision-making) don't have a chance to develop."

Mubarak, who has pledged to step down in September, said on Thursday he believed Egypt would descend into chaos if he were to give in to almost two weeks of demands by an unprecedented popular revolt that he quit immediately.

He has fashioned himself as the crucial rampart against Islamist militancy in Egypt and the indispensable player in maintaining a peace treaty Egypt signed with Israel in 1979.

WORRY ABOUT ISLAMIST RISE

Political analysts say European caution about free elections in Egypt will be seen by many in the Middle East as evidence of Western anxiety about the possibility that Islamists could come to power in the Arab world's most populous country.

Critics of Western diplomacy in the region says this anxiety reflects a double standard, namely that the West compromises on its democratic ideals when the outcome would be unfavorable.

Egypt's largest opposition movement, the Muslim Brotherhood, is tolerated by the authorities despite being officially banned. The Brotherhood says that, if given the freedom to choose, most of Egypt's 80 million population would choose a form of Islamic law, although it is publicly committed to political pluralism.

Cameron said that a transition to a new leadership and political reform in Egypt is essential, because delay would produce an unstable country that the West would not welcome.

But he said building democracy in Britain itself had taken hundreds of years of inculcating traditions of tolerance, showing the growth of democracy was a process, not an event.

"Yes, the transition has to start now to demonstrate to people inside (Egypt) that their aspirations are being understood. But if we think it's about the act of holding an election, we are wrong," he said.

"I think there's a naivety that existed among politicians in the past that somehow if you introduce democracy like that you solve a country's problems," said Cameron. "I don't believe that for one second. But what I do believe is that we should build a partnership for an open society."

Jan Klimkowski
02-05-2011, 04:38 PM
"I think there's a naivety that existed among politicians in the past that somehow if you introduce democracy like that you solve a country's problems," said Cameron. "I don't believe that for one second. But what I do believe is that we should build a partnership for an open society."

Ever since British PM Cameron and Chancellor Osborne returned from the Davos summit, they've been relentlessly ON MESSAGE. A very neocon, War On Terror Lives, message.

Cameron has just delivered a speech with the following themes:


David Cameron tells Muslim Britain: stop tolerating extremists

PM says those who don't hold 'British' values will be shunned by government

Patrick Wintour The Guardian, Saturday 5 February 2011

David Cameron will today signal a sea-change in the government fight against home-grown terrorism, saying the state must confront, and not consort with, the non-violent Muslim groups that are ambiguous about British values such as equality between sexes, democracy and integration.

To belong in Britain is to believe in these values, he will say. Claiming the previous government had been the victim of fear and muddled thinking by backing a state-sponsored form of multiculturalism, the prime minister will state that his government "will no longer fund or share platforms with organisations that, while non-violent, are certainly in some cases part of the problem".

In a major speech to a security conference in Munich, he will demand: "We need a lot less of the passive tolerance of recent years and much more active, muscular liberalism."

He will say that "some organisations that seek to present themselves as a gateway to the Muslim community are showered with public money while doing little to combat extremism. This is like turning to a rightwing fascist party to fight a violent white supremacist movement."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2011/feb/05/david-cameron-muslim-extremism

Peter Lemkin
02-05-2011, 04:50 PM
He probably misspoke or was misquoted. I don't think he meant shunned; more likely gunned. Being 'shunned' by the government is hardly such a penalty...but being gunned by them.....well.....that's a different matter entirely.

Keith Millea
02-05-2011, 09:52 PM
This is an extremely good video compilation.......Check it out.





http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-HGfFyqJMrk&feature=player_embedded

Magda Hassan
02-06-2011, 05:28 AM
I've lost the link but will try to find it. The Deputy Director of the Egyptian State TV quit saying it was a propaganda machine iirc.
Edit: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfXimfZ6LcU
(CNN) Former Nile TV reporter Shahira Amin quits her job, claiming she was pressured to air only pro-Mubarak rallies.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qh-5oRtjHkM Al Jazeera interview with Shahira Amin

Peter Lemkin
02-06-2011, 05:48 AM
I've lost the link but will try to find it. The Deputy Director of the Egyptian State TV quit saying it was a propaganda machine iirc.
Edit: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfXimfZ6LcU
(CNN) Former Nile TV reporter Shahira Amin quits her job, claiming she was pressured to air only pro-Mubarak rallies.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qh-5oRtjHkM Al Jazeera interview with Shahira Amin



Well, good for her. Yes, I heard the same - and a short interview with her - brave while the Regime is still in power! However, it is not surprising that 'State' TV only wants State OK TV.....why it is even so in the 'ol USA....they only make it seem like there is debate in the USA....watch the news about the war or documentaries on 911 or JFK, it is all Corporate approved [i.e. State Approved].

Ed Jewett
02-06-2011, 06:09 AM
Frank Wisner, Son of Nazi-Recruiting CIA Official, Sent to Prod Mubarak

5th February 2011
http://s7.addthis.com/static/btn/lg-share-en.gif
Also see: “The CIA, an American Pinay Circle & the Muslim Brotherhood” (http://www.antifascistencyclopedia.com/allposts/the-cia-the-muslim-brotherhood)


http://www.antifascistencyclopedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/frank-wisner-opc-cia.jpg (http://www.antifascistencyclopedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/frank-wisner-opc-cia.jpg)Frank Wisner, Sr.
” … Here in Washington, news that Mr. Obama had tapped Mr. Wisner revived memories for some of an even more colorful Frank Wisner (http://www.antifascistencyclopedia.com/wp-admin/edit.php): Mr. Wisner’s father, a freewheeling if mentally unstable cold-war-era spy who helped found the modern C.I.A. and ran its clandestine service. The elder Mr. Wisner’s clandestine exploits were said to have included masterminding an anticommunist coup in Guatemala in 1954. He suffered a mental breakdown after the Soviets crushed the Hungarian revolution in 1956 and never quite recovered; in 1965, he committed suicide. … “

Frank Wisner, the Diplomat Sent to Prod Mubarak


By SHERYL GAY STOLBERG
New York Times | February 2, 2011
http://www.antifascistencyclopedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/4617frankwisnerjr1.jpg (http://www.antifascistencyclopedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/4617frankwisnerjr1.jpg)Frank Wisner, Jr.
WASHINGTON — Once a month or so, a coterie of aging diplomats convenes at the elegant Metropolitan Club of New York. Over lunch in a glass-enclosed restaurant overlooking Central Park, they engage in verbal thrust and parry over the foreign policy issues of the day.
The man who sits at the head of the table is Frank G. Wisner, a bald, barrel-chested, martini-drinking (he gave up cigars, friends say) 72-year-old retired ambassador and businessman. Like his lunch mates, he is of a distinct class in Washington: a corps of foreign policy realists who came of age in an era when American power reigned supreme, and who have the heft and experience to troubleshoot the crises of the moment.
When the United States and Iran headed into a stalemate on nuclear issues during the administration of George W. Bush — who had branded Iran part of the “axis of evil” — Mr. Wisner was among several well-connected former officials pursuing a “track two” process of back-channel communications to find a way out. (The effort fizzled.)
When Mr. Bush was contemplating war in Iraq, Mr. Wisner joined with Edward P. Djerejian, another fellow former ambassador, to publicly warn against it. Yet when Mr. Bush needed help bringing Kosovo to independence, his State Department deployed Mr. Wisner as chief negotiator there. (He was successful.)
“He’s one of the supreme American diplomats of the last 30 to 40 years,” said R. Nicholas Burns, who oversaw the Kosovo talks as under secretary of state.
This week, Mr. Wisner, whose stints around the globe have included four ambassadorships, one of them to Egypt, was briefly President Obama’s man in Cairo, charged with prodding an old friend, President Hosni Mubarak, to make his exit. How much effect he had was unclear. On Wednesday, as Mr. Mubarak resisted Mr. Obama’s demand for an immediate peaceful transition and each side dug in its heels, Mr. Wisner left the country.
“He wasn’t sent there to flatter him and hold his hand,” said Leslie H. Gelb, the longtime diplomat and journalist who co-founded the lunch club with Mr. Wisner. “He was sent there because he has a very close relationship with Mubarak, and because that’s the kind of person who can best deliver some hard messages.”
An imposing presence with a resonant voice whose last posting was as ambassador to India, Mr. Wisner has spent the years since his retirement in 1997 operating at the nexus of diplomacy and business. For more than a decade, he was vice chairman of the insurance giant A.I.G.; he left in 2009, just as the company was getting bailed out by American taxpayers, and joined the lobbying firm Patton Boggs.
He is well known in foreign policy circles, but not beyond them. Unlike the late Richard C. Holbrooke (http://www.antifascistencyclopedia.com/allposts/obit-grotesque-genocidal-stinkbug-richard-holbrooke) — the Obama administration envoy to Pakistan and Afghanistan, who was one of Mr. Wisner’s best friends — he does not crave the limelight. But he is respected enough that his name is being bandied about as a possible Holbrooke replacement, a job friends say he would be unlikely to take.
“He’s not a flashy fellow in the sense that Dick was,” said Morton I. Abramowitz, another longtime diplomat who knows Mr. Wisner well. “But he’s very solid, he studies the issues, he’s a very serious guy who works very quietly, very effectively and knows how to deal with people.”
Mr. Gelb put it this way: “Dick saw being a public figure as part of the power he needed to do what he wanted. Frank was much more of an inside man.”
But as did Mr. Holbrooke, Mr. Wisner relished the frisson of the diplomat’s life. He has been married twice to upper-crust French women; Mr. Wisner’s current wife, from whom he is separated, was once married to Pal Sarkozy, the father of President Nicolas Sarkozy of France.
He is accustomed to being dropped into chaotic situations. During the administration of the first President Bush, Mr. Wisner was sent to the Philippines to help stabilize the administration of President Corazon Aquino. She had survived several coup attempts by rogue elements of the Philippine military, and Mr. Wisner’s office in the United States Embassy was part of the old American governor-general’s suite.
Cigar in hand, he loved to take visitors out on the giant veranda overlooking the bay and describe the sweep of American interactions with the Philippines, back to the days of the Spanish-American War.
Here in Washington, news that Mr. Obama had tapped Mr. Wisner revived memories for some of an even more colorful Frank Wisner: Mr. Wisner’s father, a freewheeling if mentally unstable cold-war-era spy who helped found the modern C.I.A. and ran its clandestine service. The elder Mr. Wisner’s clandestine exploits were said to have included masterminding an anticommunist coup in Guatemala in 1954. He suffered a mental breakdown after the Soviets crushed the Hungarian revolution in 1956 and never quite recovered; in 1965, he committed suicide.
His son chose a more conventional path, the Foreign Service. He graduated from Princeton University in 1961, learned Arabic and pursued a career that took him from Algeria to Vietnam at the height of the war there, to Zambia, Egypt, the Philippines and India, with tours every so often back in Washington.
“I told Frank, ‘The title of ambassador does not suffice for you, Frank. We need to call you Pasha,’ ” said Mr. Djerejian, using the honorary title. “He reveled in the role of being an ambassador. He loved the substance and the trappings of the role, and was very enthusiastic about representing the United States abroad.”
At the monthly lunch meetings, Mr. Wisner plays the role of enforcer when the discussion gets too rowdy. The high-powered attendees include J. Stapleton Roy, an East Asia specialist and three-time ambassador, and Mr. Holbrooke before his death.
Mr. Gelb says they met for a time at an Albanian restaurant, which everyone liked, until Mr. Wisner insisted they move to the Metropolitan Club. Mr. Gelb decided it was a waste of time to negotiate.
“A Zambian minister once told me it was always easier to agree with Frank than to let the meeting go on for four days,” he said. “He has that kind of persistence.”
Mark Landler and David E. Sanger contributed reporting.
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/03/world/middleeast/03wisner.html?_r=1&partner=rss&emc=rss&pagewanted=print



http://www.antifascistencyclopedia.com/allposts/frank-wisner-son-of-nazi-recruiting-cia-official-sent-to-prod-mubarak

Paul Rigby
02-06-2011, 12:03 PM
can't we bring the same collapse to the big ''western'" nations...it would do more good for the...

...denizens of Wall Street:


Egypt's Social Crisis: Financial Bonanza for Wall Street Investors and Speculators: Hidden Agenda behind Mubarak's Decision Not to Resign?

by Michel Chossudovsky

Global Research, February 6, 2011

http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=23099

Mubarak's decision not to resign was taken in close consultation with Washington. The US administration including US intelligence had carefully identified the possible scenarios. If Washington had instructed Mubarak to step down, he would have obeyed forthright.

His decision not to resign indelibly serves US interests. It creates a situation of social chaos and political inertia, which in turn generates a vacuum in decision making at the government level.

The continued social crisis has also resulted in a massive outflow of money capital. More concretely, what this signifies is that Egypt's official foreign exchange reserves are being confiscated by major financial institutions.

The ransacking of the country's money wealth is an integral part of the macroeconomic agenda. The newly formed government on instructions from Washington has not taken concrete steps to curtail the massive outward flow of money capital. A prolonged social crisis means that large amounts of money will be appropriated.

According to official sources, Egypt's Central Bank had (prior to the protest movement) 36 billion dollars in foreign exchange reserves as well as an additional $21 billion of deposits with international banking institutions which are said to to constitute its so-called "unofficial reserves." (Reuters, 30 January, 2011).

Egypt's external debt, which has increased by more than fifty percent in the last five years is of the order 34.1 billion (2009). What this means is that these Central Bank reserves are de facto based on borrowed money.

In early 2010, there was a large influx of hot money deposits into Egyptian government debt instruments.

Foreign exchange flows into the country and is exchanged for Egyptian pounds (EgP), which are then used by institutional investors and speculators to purchase high yielding government bonds and treasury bills (denominated in Egyptian pounds) with short term interest rates of the order 10 percent.

The interest rate on long term government bonds shot up to 7.2 percent at the outset of the protest movement. (Egypt Banks to Open Amid Concern Deposit-Run May Weaken Pound, Lift Yields - Bloomberg, January 2, 2011)

At the onset of the crisis, international investors owned about $25bn of Egyptian T-bills and bonds, almost a fifth of the total T-bill market and about 40 per cent of the domestic bond market. Foreign investors also accounted for about 17 per cent of the stock market’s turnover, and held about $5bn-$6bn of Egyptian shares. (Ibid)

Under its agreement with the IMF, Egypt is not allowed to implement foreign exchange controls. These hot money deposits are now leaving the country in anticipation of a devaluation of the Egyptian pound. In the days preceding Mubarak's speech, capital flight was running at several hundred million dollars a day.

In a bitter irony, Egypt deposits 21 billion with the commercial banks as "unofficial reserves" on the one hand, while the commercial banks acquire $25bn worth of EgP debt, with a yield of the order of 10 percent. What this suggests is that Egypt is financing its own indebtedness.

The protest movement started on a bank holiday. While the closure of the Cairo stock market and domestic banking system had put a temporary lid on the outflow of money capital, large amounts of capital flight instrumented by major financial institutions had already occurred in the days leading up to the protest movement.

Egypt's banking system reopened on February 5, leading to a renewed process of capital flight resulting in the depletion of central bank reserves and a corresponding increase in Egypt's foreign debt.

A devaluation of at least 20 percent is contemplated. According to UBS' emerging markets currency division, "the pound could “easily” drop by a further 50 per cent or so to E£9 per US dollar". FT.com / Currencies - Banks weigh risk of capital flight, February 1, 2010)

A devaluation of more than ten percent would wreck social havock: Domestic prices of food are dollarized. If there is a devaluation of the Egyptian pound, this would inevitably trigger a renewed increase in the prices of essential food staples, leading to a further process of impoverishment.

A scenario of currency devaluation, rising external debt coupled with a renewed package of IMF sponsored austerity measures would inevitably lead to an accentuation of the social crisis and a new wave of protests.

The newly appointed Finance Minister Samir Radwan is firmly committed to the Washington consensus, which has served to impoverish the Egyptian people. In a contraditory statement on February 3, Radwan confirmed that "the government won’t reduce subsidies even if global prices of food and commodities rise. Public spending will be used as a tool to “achieve social justice,” he told a news conference in Cairo." (Bloomberg, February 5, 2011)

Radwan is abiding by IMF-World Bank guidelines: no restrictions will be placed on capital flight. The Central Bank will ensure the conversion of hot money deposits into hard currency by major financial institutions. The coffers of the central will be ransacked.

With capital flight, domestic debt is transformed into foreign debt, putting the country into the stranglehold of foreign creditors:

Radwan said Egypt will honor its debt obligations and urged foreign investors to have confidence in the country. “All the bond obligations, everything will be honored on time,” Radwan said in a Feb. 4 telephone interview from Cairo. “We are not defaulting on any obligations.” (Bloomberg, February 5, 2011)

In a bitter irony, Mubarak's decision to remain as head of State with Washington's approval has served the interests of institutional investors, currency traders and speculators.

The latter group is, of course, the primary source of Obama campaign money.

David Guyatt
02-06-2011, 01:22 PM
Hence the strategy of delay.

Jan Klimkowski
02-06-2011, 01:50 PM
See also the material here (https://deeppoliticsforum.com/forums/showthread.php?5778-Operation-Tunisia/page2), from posts #20 onwards in particular, about international finanicial looting of Tunisia during and after the fall of her government.

Paul Rigby
02-06-2011, 06:09 PM
Stand by for an increase in the CIA's budget. After all, the spooks have to be "punished" for failing to anticipate the very events they are directing:


Washington’s new myth: “intelligence failure” in Egypt: Regime change has been planned for years

by Larry Chin

Global Research, February 6, 2011

http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=23101

The Obama administration and prominent members of Congress have begun pushing the idea that an intelligence failure prevented the US government from predicting massive civil unrest in Egypt and the Arab world.

This new “debate” over the gathering of intelligence fills the mainstream media with red herrings, obscuring the fact (leaked by WikiLeaks and the Daily Telegraph) that the US government has secretly backed leading figures behind Arab opposition for at least three years. Strong evidence suggests that an Egyptian regime change has been planned for years. Leading opposition groups, civil society organizations and dissidents---including the Muslim Brotherhood---have been co-opted by front groups backed by the CIA, the Pentagon and the State Department, and wooed in earnest by members of both the Bush/Cheney and Obama administrations. The US government and its allies already have enduring ties to key figures on all sides of the Arab revolts, with the goal of controlling the process and preserving Anglo-American geostrategy.

It is true that the Arab revolutions are real, and their depth and scope, and the speed at which they have ignited have unprecedented and extensive power does lie in the hands of mobilized peoples (if genuine and untainted dissidents grasp the specifics of the larger dynamic). It is also true that not all of the various political players were “in the loop”. But the idea of a general US “intelligence failure” is ludicrous, given years of ongoing US manipulation and intelligence penetration.

What the Obama administration, Washington politicos and the US corporate media wish to create is the same deception as the one resulting from 9/11. That false flag operation was also not an “intelligence failure” but an intelligence “success” resulting from many years of preparation, and unmatched CIA power and penetration worldwide. Now, as then, there is an extensive history (that eliminates the “lack of foreknowledge” argument), specific warnings.

Even if the “intelligence failure” idea, and the myth that both the CIA and Obama administration as a whole have been completely blind, are accepted at face value, what would an “informed” Obama administration have done about Egypt? The same thing it has already done: use whatever means necessary to protect vital US oil and military interests.

The “failure” debate is a new tempest in a familiar old teapot: official scapegoats and cover-your-ass games, and new propaganda excuses to further justify even more covert operations and “improvements”.

Paul Rigby
02-06-2011, 06:50 PM
Much shrewd stuff from Tarpley, as ever:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IVYTSFTdYMM

David Guyatt
02-06-2011, 08:28 PM
In other words a "coloured revolution".

Sorry to say I told you so, but I told you so.

Yours in Black and White,

Ibrahim Itold Youso

Paul Rigby
02-06-2011, 08:44 PM
In other words a "coloured revolution".

Sorry to say I told you so, but I told you so.

Yours in Black and White,

Ibrahim Itold Youso

The first five members are:

Mustapha Reich (Coptic Christians against the Bomb*)

Benjamin Netanyahoo (Israelo-Egyptian Electronic Peace Foundation, Twitter League of Friends)

Acenath the bra-burner (Feminists for Freedom)

Sebak the Strangler (aka Tum the Torturer)

Geb Soroshut (Cairo Open Society)



*But not, curiously, the Israeli ones

Peter Lemkin
02-07-2011, 08:09 PM
Frank Wisner, Son of Nazi-Recruiting CIA Official, Sent to Prod Mubarak
5th February 2011



Also see: “The CIA, an American Pinay Circle & the Muslim Brotherhood”

Frank Wisner, Sr.
” … Here in Washington, news that Mr. Obama had tapped Mr. Wisner revived memories for some of an even more colorful Frank Wisner: Mr. Wisner’s father, a freewheeling if mentally unstable cold-war-era spy who helped found the modern C.I.A. and ran its clandestine service. The elder Mr. Wisner’s clandestine exploits were said to have included masterminding an anticommunist coup in Guatemala in 1954. He suffered a mental breakdown after the Soviets crushed the Hungarian revolution in 1956 and never quite recovered; in 1965, he committed suicide. … “
Frank Wisner, the Diplomat Sent to Prod Mubarak

By SHERYL GAY STOLBERG
New York Times | February 2, 2011

Frank Wisner, Jr.

WASHINGTON — Once a month or so, a coterie of aging diplomats convenes at the elegant Metropolitan Club of New York. Over lunch in a glass-enclosed restaurant overlooking Central Park, they engage in verbal thrust and parry over the foreign policy issues of the day.

The man who sits at the head of the table is Frank G. Wisner, a bald, barrel-chested, martini-drinking (he gave up cigars, friends say) 72-year-old retired ambassador and businessman. Like his lunch mates, he is of a distinct class in Washington: a corps of foreign policy realists who came of age in an era when American power reigned supreme, and who have the heft and experience to troubleshoot the crises of the moment.

When the United States and Iran headed into a stalemate on nuclear issues during the administration of George W. Bush — who had branded Iran part of the “axis of evil” — Mr. Wisner was among several well-connected former officials pursuing a “track two” process of back-channel communications to find a way out. (The effort fizzled.)

When Mr. Bush was contemplating war in Iraq, Mr. Wisner joined with Edward P. Djerejian, another fellow former ambassador, to publicly warn against it. Yet when Mr. Bush needed help bringing Kosovo to independence, his State Department deployed Mr. Wisner as chief negotiator there. (He was successful.)

“He’s one of the supreme American diplomats of the last 30 to 40 years,” said R. Nicholas Burns, who oversaw the Kosovo talks as under secretary of state.

This week, Mr. Wisner, whose stints around the globe have included four ambassadorships, one of them to Egypt, was briefly President Obama’s man in Cairo, charged with prodding an old friend, President Hosni Mubarak, to make his exit. How much effect he had was unclear. On Wednesday, as Mr. Mubarak resisted Mr. Obama’s demand for an immediate peaceful transition and each side dug in its heels, Mr. Wisner left the country.

“He wasn’t sent there to flatter him and hold his hand,” said Leslie H. Gelb, the longtime diplomat and journalist who co-founded the lunch club with Mr. Wisner. “He was sent there because he has a very close relationship with Mubarak, and because that’s the kind of person who can best deliver some hard messages.”

An imposing presence with a resonant voice whose last posting was as ambassador to India, Mr. Wisner has spent the years since his retirement in 1997 operating at the nexus of diplomacy and business. For more than a decade, he was vice chairman of the insurance giant A.I.G.; he left in 2009, just as the company was getting bailed out by American taxpayers, and joined the lobbying firm Patton Boggs.

He is well known in foreign policy circles, but not beyond them. Unlike the late Richard C. Holbrooke — the Obama administration envoy to Pakistan and Afghanistan, who was one of Mr. Wisner’s best friends — he does not crave the limelight. But he is respected enough that his name is being bandied about as a possible Holbrooke replacement, a job friends say he would be unlikely to take.

“He’s not a flashy fellow in the sense that Dick was,” said Morton I. Abramowitz, another longtime diplomat who knows Mr. Wisner well. “But he’s very solid, he studies the issues, he’s a very serious guy who works very quietly, very effectively and knows how to deal with people.”

Mr. Gelb put it this way: “Dick saw being a public figure as part of the power he needed to do what he wanted. Frank was much more of an inside man.”

But as did Mr. Holbrooke, Mr. Wisner relished the frisson of the diplomat’s life. He has been married twice to upper-crust French women; Mr. Wisner’s current wife, from whom he is separated, was once married to Pal Sarkozy, the father of President Nicolas Sarkozy of France.

He is accustomed to being dropped into chaotic situations. During the administration of the first President Bush, Mr. Wisner was sent to the Philippines to help stabilize the administration of President Corazon Aquino. She had survived several coup attempts by rogue elements of the Philippine military, and Mr. Wisner’s office in the United States Embassy was part of the old American governor-general’s suite.

Cigar in hand, he loved to take visitors out on the giant veranda overlooking the bay and describe the sweep of American interactions with the Philippines, back to the days of the Spanish-American War.

Here in Washington, news that Mr. Obama had tapped Mr. Wisner revived memories for some of an even more colorful Frank Wisner: Mr. Wisner’s father, a freewheeling if mentally unstable cold-war-era spy who helped found the modern C.I.A. and ran its clandestine service. The elder Mr. Wisner’s clandestine exploits were said to have included masterminding an anticommunist coup in Guatemala in 1954. He suffered a mental breakdown after the Soviets crushed the Hungarian revolution in 1956 and never quite recovered; in 1965, he committed suicide.

His son chose a more conventional path, the Foreign Service. He graduated from Princeton University in 1961, learned Arabic and pursued a career that took him from Algeria to Vietnam at the height of the war there, to Zambia, Egypt, the Philippines and India, with tours every so often back in Washington.

“I told Frank, ‘The title of ambassador does not suffice for you, Frank. We need to call you Pasha,’ ” said Mr. Djerejian, using the honorary title. “He reveled in the role of being an ambassador. He loved the substance and the trappings of the role, and was very enthusiastic about representing the United States abroad.”

At the monthly lunch meetings, Mr. Wisner plays the role of enforcer when the discussion gets too rowdy. The high-powered attendees include J. Stapleton Roy, an East Asia specialist and three-time ambassador, and Mr. Holbrooke before his death.

Mr. Gelb says they met for a time at an Albanian restaurant, which everyone liked, until Mr. Wisner insisted they move to the Metropolitan Club. Mr. Gelb decided it was a waste of time to negotiate.

“A Zambian minister once told me it was always easier to agree with Frank than to let the meeting go on for four days,” he said. “He has that kind of persistence.”

Mark Landler and David E. Sanger contributed reporting.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/03/world/middleeast/03wisner.html?_r=1&partner=rss&emc=rss&pagewanted=print
================================================== ====
The CIA, an American Pinay Circle & the Muslim Brotherhood
4th February 2011


” … The CIA funded the Muslim Brotherhood in 1977, and trained Mujahadin to support Hekmatyar of the Brotherhood in Afghanistan. The Muslim Brothers have served the CIA operationally for some 40 years, an arrangement rubber-stamped by Allen Dulles, Frank Wisner and Kermit Roosevelt. Airline hijacker Mohammed Atta was ID’d as a Muslim Brother in the Wall Street Journal and New York Times shortly after the jet attacks on the World Trade Center. So were Khalid Shaik Mohammed, and Ramzi Yousef, reportedly guided to a sacrificial pyre in the sky by Aman Zawahiri, Al Qeada’s second-in-command – also a co-conspirator, while operating under the aegis of the CIA, in the murder of Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and the 1993 WTC bomb plot. … “



The CIA, an American Pinay Circle & the Muslim Brotherhood

By Alex Constantine
(Excerpt from Psychic Dictatorship in the USA II)


An American Pinay Circle


“… The sky burns,
A copper roof over the shriveled corn.
Children and camels gasp in the noonday heat.
Enemies sweat in their steel, cry out at night,
And wake up trembling, wet with fright.
We squat and stare
Across the nervous barbs,
tied by our common dreads…”
– Aubrey Hodes, “Hating”

Adnan Khashoggi’s mercenary army of global corporate criminals lives in Mafia mansions, basks in the political limelight, enjoys privileges of royalty in tyrannical desert dystopias, sips vodka in the shadow of gleaming Moscow spires. They are kings, Pentagon officials, priests, S&L thieves, assassins, prostitutes, nazis, Big Oil executives, metals merchants, New Age cultists, drug barons, boiler-room con artists, mobsters, dictators by the horde. And terrorists, of course.

Khashoggi is a Turkoman, the son of a doctor who tended to Abdul al-Aziz Ibn Saud. The Khashoggi brothers were classmates of the future King Hussein and several sons of the bin Ladens.1 His career as an international “connector” began in the 1950s, while still an undergraduate at Chico State College. His purchase of fifty Kenworth trucks for resale to Saudi Arabia’s bin Laden Group demonstrated his business savvy, and provided him the capital to launch his career as world-class death merchant.

Edwin Pauley

In the early 1960s, he could be found languishing in the sun or plotting world domination at Edwin Pauley’s Coconut Island estate in Hawaii. Pauley, then Democratic Party chairman, operated an oil company called Zapata with the son of Prescott Bush, the Nazi collaborator.2

Houston attorney Linda Minor sidelines as an investigator into banking and political malfeasance. She discovered that Pauley was a slimy operator years before his alliance with Bush.

“He was a spy within the White House,” Minor says, “acting as a funnel for campaign funds to FDR, while at the same time gathering and transmitting information about oil policy and captured Nazi and Japanese assets back to his California business associates.”

Pauley’s political significance stems from his participation in Gulf of Mexico oil explorations in the 1950′s when, with an oil concession from Mexico, he threw in with Howard Hughes and George H.W. Bush.

“Pauley taught Bush how to launder money through corporate subsidiaries to be used for payoffs and the financing of political campaigns,” Minor notes. “Both Pauley and Bush used this system to finance Richard Nixon’s presidential campaigns.”

The laundering scheme unraveled after the 1972 election, when a check drawn at a Mexican bank – the subsidiary of a Houston corporation controlled by associates of Bush the elder – surfaced in the Miami bank account of a Watergate plumber.3

Saudi shiekhs and domestic oil barons struck up alliances. Shiekh Kamal Adham and a circle of cohorts founded Arabian Shield Development Co. in Texas. (since re-named the Arabian American Development Company).

Sheikh Mohammad Salem Bin Mahfouz at National Commercial Bank was an Arabian Shield investor.4 “During the 1980′s,” reports Martin J. Rivers of the Center for Research on Globalization, “Sheikh Mahfouz’s syndicate performed major CIA-inspired banking operations for such former CIA assets as Osama bin Laden … Saddam Hussein, Manuel Noriega and other drug dealing generals. George W. Bush, for his part, had important business relationships … with a total of nine prominent individuals central to Mahfouz’s financial empire.”5

The early 1970s also brought Saudis recruited by the CIA to train at American military bases, including Prince Bandar bin Sultan.6

After September 11, 2001, Bandar drew the attention of the press when it was discovered that two of the terrorists involved were found to have received financing from the Prince’s wife. Bandar trained at Ellington AFB near Houston.7

In the early 1970s, the prince fell in with James A. Baker’s social circle, struck up an alliance with Joanne Herring, who was instrumental in luring Texas Democrat Charlie Wilson to support Gul Hekmatyar of the Muslim Brotherhood chaptger in Afghanstan by the late ’70s.

The Big Oil-CIA-Saudi alliance was consummated with the establishment of the Safari Club of elite cut-throats, founded with covert Agency support on Sept. 1, 1976. George Herbert Walker Bush was then director of the Agency,. Nelson Rockefeller was vice president under Ford.

The Safari Club was a CIA cut-out: This clutch of intelligence agents, politicians and businessmen from three countries (Saudi Arabia, Egypt, and Iran) was founded with the express purpose of engaging in covert operations in Africa and the Middle East without leaving a CIA footprint.

Chicago Tribune book reviewer Padam Ahlawa neatly summarized the tensions that gave rise to the Safari Club: “The origins of world terrorism go back to the cold war era. Moscow’s monumental blunder in invading Afghanistan in 1979 set off a sequence of intrigue-laden events in Afghanistan…. High-profile military operations were out. Carter wanted a covert CIA operation like the one it had carried out in Laos, with no US personnel directly involved. The Agency, it was decided, would co-opt specialized American military personnel with the support of the Pakistan military to train an army of Muslim zealots.”

Anwar Sadat entered into an agreement to assist in the training and equipping of recruits for the coming Anti-Communist jihad. “Russian weapons were flown to Afghanistan. Encouraging fundamentalism to grow in Egypt had its fallout when these Mujahadins turned hostile to Sadat for signing the peace treaty with Israel. It led to Sadat’s assassination and terrorist acts of killing 58 tourists. Zia ul Haq of Pakistan made the best of this opportunity, created the ISI to train Pakistanis and Afghans. By doing this, Pakistan’s economic and social instability increased and terrorist acts in Sindh grew.”8

The Safari Club’s cover was blown when the Ayatollah Khomeini allowed an Egyptian reporter to peek into the archives of the exiled Shah of Iran – a Club member.9 The CIA/Safari Club left footprints in the destabilization campaign at Mengistu in Ethiopia, the unrest in Costa Rica, and there were treadmarks all over Iran-Contra, not to mention the funding of UNITA in Angola and the Afghan “freedom fighters,’ including bin-Laden.10

The CIA funded the Muslim Brotherhood in 1977, and trained Mujahadin to support Gulbuddin Hekmatyar of the Brotherhood in Afghanistan. The Muslim Brothers have served the CIA operationally for some 40 years, an arrangement rubber-stamped by Allen Dulles, Frank Wisner and Kermit Roosevelt.

Airline hijacker Mohammed Atta was ID’d as a Muslim Brother in the Wall Street Journal and New York Times shortly after the jet attacks on the World Trade Center. So were Khalid Shaik Mohammed and Ramzi Yousef, reportedly guided to a sacrificial pyre in the sky by Aman Zawahiri, Al Qeada’s second-in-command – also a co-conspirator, while operating under the aegis of the CIA, in the murder of Egyptian President Anwar Sadat, and the 1993 WTC bomb plot.

NOTES

1) Roland Jacquard, In the Name of Osama Bin Laden, Duke University Press, 2002, http://print.google.com/print/doc?isbn=0822329913

2) Bruce Campbell Adamson, letter to Congressman Sam Farr, September 15, 2001, http://www.mail-archive.com/ctrl@listserv.aol.com/msg96515.htm

33) Linda Minor, “Follow the Yellow Brick Road: From Harvard to Enron,” http://www.newsmakingnews.com/lm4,30,02,harvardtoenronpt4.htm

4) LB, e-mail exchange with author, October 2, 2004.

5) Martin J. Rivers, “A Wolf in Sheikh’s Clothing: Bush Business Deals with Nine Partners of bin Laden’s Banker,” geocities.com, March 15, 2004, www.globalresearch.ca/articles/MAR403A.html.

6) Anonymous, “Bandar bin Sultan, a CIA Agent,” House of Saud web site, http://www.geocities.com/saudhouse_p/irancont.htm.

7) LB.

Padam Ahlawat, “Journalists’ account of terrorism,” Chicago Tribune, May 5, 2002 – review of Unholy Wars. Afghanistan, America and International Terrorism, by John K. Cooley, Penguin.

9) Imad-ad-Dean Ahmad, review of Unholy Wars, Journal of Islam and Muslim-Christian Relations, Minaret of Freedom Institute, http://www.minaret.org/cooley.htm.

10) Dr Samir Rihan, “Arms or democracy, but not both,” http://www.globalcomplexity.org/Arms%20or%20Democracy.htm

11) Debbie Schlussel, “Bush’s Favorite Terrorist Buddy,” WorldNetDaily, October 1, 2001.

Peter Lemkin
02-07-2011, 08:11 PM
Frank Wisner, Son of Nazi-Recruiting CIA Official, Sent to Prod Mubarak
5th February 2011



Also see: “The CIA, an American Pinay Circle & the Muslim Brotherhood”

Frank Wisner, Sr.
” … Here in Washington, news that Mr. Obama had tapped Mr. Wisner revived memories for some of an even more colorful Frank Wisner: Mr. Wisner’s father, a freewheeling if mentally unstable cold-war-era spy who helped found the modern C.I.A. and ran its clandestine service. The elder Mr. Wisner’s clandestine exploits were said to have included masterminding an anticommunist coup in Guatemala in 1954. He suffered a mental breakdown after the Soviets crushed the Hungarian revolution in 1956 and never quite recovered; in 1965, he committed suicide. … “
Frank Wisner, the Diplomat Sent to Prod Mubarak

By SHERYL GAY STOLBERG
New York Times | February 2, 2011

Frank Wisner, Jr.

WASHINGTON — Once a month or so, a coterie of aging diplomats convenes at the elegant Metropolitan Club of New York. Over lunch in a glass-enclosed restaurant overlooking Central Park, they engage in verbal thrust and parry over the foreign policy issues of the day.

The man who sits at the head of the table is Frank G. Wisner, a bald, barrel-chested, martini-drinking (he gave up cigars, friends say) 72-year-old retired ambassador and businessman. Like his lunch mates, he is of a distinct class in Washington: a corps of foreign policy realists who came of age in an era when American power reigned supreme, and who have the heft and experience to troubleshoot the crises of the moment.

When the United States and Iran headed into a stalemate on nuclear issues during the administration of George W. Bush — who had branded Iran part of the “axis of evil” — Mr. Wisner was among several well-connected former officials pursuing a “track two” process of back-channel communications to find a way out. (The effort fizzled.)

When Mr. Bush was contemplating war in Iraq, Mr. Wisner joined with Edward P. Djerejian, another fellow former ambassador, to publicly warn against it. Yet when Mr. Bush needed help bringing Kosovo to independence, his State Department deployed Mr. Wisner as chief negotiator there. (He was successful.)

“He’s one of the supreme American diplomats of the last 30 to 40 years,” said R. Nicholas Burns, who oversaw the Kosovo talks as under secretary of state.

This week, Mr. Wisner, whose stints around the globe have included four ambassadorships, one of them to Egypt, was briefly President Obama’s man in Cairo, charged with prodding an old friend, President Hosni Mubarak, to make his exit. How much effect he had was unclear. On Wednesday, as Mr. Mubarak resisted Mr. Obama’s demand for an immediate peaceful transition and each side dug in its heels, Mr. Wisner left the country.

“He wasn’t sent there to flatter him and hold his hand,” said Leslie H. Gelb, the longtime diplomat and journalist who co-founded the lunch club with Mr. Wisner. “He was sent there because he has a very close relationship with Mubarak, and because that’s the kind of person who can best deliver some hard messages.”

An imposing presence with a resonant voice whose last posting was as ambassador to India, Mr. Wisner has spent the years since his retirement in 1997 operating at the nexus of diplomacy and business. For more than a decade, he was vice chairman of the insurance giant A.I.G.; he left in 2009, just as the company was getting bailed out by American taxpayers, and joined the lobbying firm Patton Boggs.

He is well known in foreign policy circles, but not beyond them. Unlike the late Richard C. Holbrooke — the Obama administration envoy to Pakistan and Afghanistan, who was one of Mr. Wisner’s best friends — he does not crave the limelight. But he is respected enough that his name is being bandied about as a possible Holbrooke replacement, a job friends say he would be unlikely to take.

“He’s not a flashy fellow in the sense that Dick was,” said Morton I. Abramowitz, another longtime diplomat who knows Mr. Wisner well. “But he’s very solid, he studies the issues, he’s a very serious guy who works very quietly, very effectively and knows how to deal with people.”

Mr. Gelb put it this way: “Dick saw being a public figure as part of the power he needed to do what he wanted. Frank was much more of an inside man.”

But as did Mr. Holbrooke, Mr. Wisner relished the frisson of the diplomat’s life. He has been married twice to upper-crust French women; Mr. Wisner’s current wife, from whom he is separated, was once married to Pal Sarkozy, the father of President Nicolas Sarkozy of France.

He is accustomed to being dropped into chaotic situations. During the administration of the first President Bush, Mr. Wisner was sent to the Philippines to help stabilize the administration of President Corazon Aquino. She had survived several coup attempts by rogue elements of the Philippine military, and Mr. Wisner’s office in the United States Embassy was part of the old American governor-general’s suite.

Cigar in hand, he loved to take visitors out on the giant veranda overlooking the bay and describe the sweep of American interactions with the Philippines, back to the days of the Spanish-American War.

Here in Washington, news that Mr. Obama had tapped Mr. Wisner revived memories for some of an even more colorful Frank Wisner: Mr. Wisner’s father, a freewheeling if mentally unstable cold-war-era spy who helped found the modern C.I.A. and ran its clandestine service. The elder Mr. Wisner’s clandestine exploits were said to have included masterminding an anticommunist coup in Guatemala in 1954. He suffered a mental breakdown after the Soviets crushed the Hungarian revolution in 1956 and never quite recovered; in 1965, he committed suicide.

His son chose a more conventional path, the Foreign Service. He graduated from Princeton University in 1961, learned Arabic and pursued a career that took him from Algeria to Vietnam at the height of the war there, to Zambia, Egypt, the Philippines and India, with tours every so often back in Washington.

“I told Frank, ‘The title of ambassador does not suffice for you, Frank. We need to call you Pasha,’ ” said Mr. Djerejian, using the honorary title. “He reveled in the role of being an ambassador. He loved the substance and the trappings of the role, and was very enthusiastic about representing the United States abroad.”

At the monthly lunch meetings, Mr. Wisner plays the role of enforcer when the discussion gets too rowdy. The high-powered attendees include J. Stapleton Roy, an East Asia specialist and three-time ambassador, and Mr. Holbrooke before his death.

Mr. Gelb says they met for a time at an Albanian restaurant, which everyone liked, until Mr. Wisner insisted they move to the Metropolitan Club. Mr. Gelb decided it was a waste of time to negotiate.

“A Zambian minister once told me it was always easier to agree with Frank than to let the meeting go on for four days,” he said. “He has that kind of persistence.”

Mark Landler and David E. Sanger contributed reporting.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/03/world/middleeast/03wisner.html?_r=1&partner=rss&emc=rss&pagewanted=print

Paul Rigby
02-07-2011, 08:41 PM
Frank Wisner, Jr. Change you can believe in, in action.

Ed Jewett
02-07-2011, 10:07 PM
Frank Wisner, Jr. Change you can believe in, in action.

Obama Special Envoy To Cairo Calling For Mubarak To Stay, Uncovered To Be On Mubarak Payroll (http://www.prisonplanet.com/obama-special-envoy-to-cairo-calling-for-mubarak-to-stay-uncovered-to-be-on-mubarak-payroll.html)


Tyler Durden
Zero Hedge (http://www.zerohedge.com/article/obama-special-envoy-cairo-calling-mubarak-stay-uncovered-be-mubarak-payroll)
Feb 7, 2011
It is a Monday, and like any day ending in “y” we get another Obama administration foreign relations screw up. Today’s edition comes from President Obama’s special envoy to Cairo, Frank Wisner, who over the weekend made waves with his call urging for Hosni Mubarak to remain president. The glitch, however, is that supposedly unbeknownst to the administration and to the journalist cadre, Mr. Wisner works for litigation firm Patton Boggs, which according to the Independent: “openly boasts that it advises “the Egyptian military, the Egyptian Economic Development Agency, and has handled arbitrations and litigation on the [Mubarak] government’s behalf in Europe and the US”. Wisner’s words, now making the rounds, and which appear to have infuriated Egypt’s opposition just as things were going back to normal: “President Mubarak’s continued leadership is critical: it’s his opportunity to write his own legacy.” In other words, yet another huge conflict of interest by a man paid by none other than the president of Egypt, which has “called into question Mr Obama’s judgement, as well as that of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton”, and puts Obama’s (in)ability to handle foreign conflicts, in an even more questionable light.
From The Independent (http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-envoys-business-link-to-egypt-2206329.html):

Mr Wisner is a retired State Department 36-year career diplomat – he served as US ambassador to Egypt, Zambia, the Philippines and India under eight American presidents. In other words, he was not a political appointee. But it is inconceivable Hillary Clinton did not know of his employment by a company that works for the very dictator which Mr Wisner now defends in the face of a massive democratic opposition in Egypt.
So why on earth was he sent to talk to Mubarak, who is in effect a client of Mr Wisner’s current employers?
Patton Boggs states that its attorneys “represent some of the leading Egyptian commercial families and their companies” and “have been involved in oil and gas and telecommunications infrastructure projects on their behalf”. One of its partners served as chairman of the US-Egyptian Chamber of Commerce promoting foreign investment in the Egyptian economy. The company has also managed contractor disputes in military-sales agreements arising under the US Foreign Military Sales Act. Washington gives around $1.3bn (£800m) a year to the Egyptian military.
Mr Wisner joined Patton Boggs almost two years ago – more than enough time for both the White House and the State Department to learn of his company’s intimate connections with the Mubarak regime. The New York Times ran a glowing profile of Mr Wisner in its pages two weeks ago – but mysteriously did not mention his ties to Egypt.
Nicholas Noe, an American political researcher now based in Beirut, has spent weeks investigating Mr Wisner’s links to Patton Boggs. Mr Noe is also a former researcher for Hillary Clinton and questions the implications of his discoveries.
“The key problem with Wisner being sent to Cairo at the behest of Hillary,” he says, “is the conflict-of-interest aspect… More than this, the idea that the US is now subcontracting or ‘privatising’ crisis management is another problem. Do the US lack diplomats?
“Even in past examples where presidents have sent someone ‘respected’ or ‘close’ to a foreign leader in order to lubricate an exit,” Mr Noe adds, “the envoys in question were not actually paid by the leader they were supposed to squeeze out!”
Patton Boggs maintains an “affiliate relationship” with Zaki Hashem, one of Egypt’s most prominent legal firms. It was founded in 1953 and Zaki Hashem himself was a cabinet minister under Mubarak’s predecessor, President Anwar Sadat, and later became head of the Egyptian Society for International Law.
The Independent is understandably scratching its head over this most recent diplomatic faux pas:

We still do not know exactly what kind of “expertise” he has bestowed upon the dictator of Egypt. But his remarks at the weekend leave no room to doubt he advised the old man to cling on to power for a few more months. The vast network of companies with family connections to Mubarak’s regime is, of course, one of the targets of the pro-democracy demonstrators in Egypt.
A spokesman for the State Department said he “presumed” Mrs Clinton knew of Mr Wisner’s employment by Patton Boggs and the firm’s links with the Mubarak government, but refused to comment on any conflict of interest for the envoy. A spokesman for Patton Boggs could not be reached yesterday.
On the other hand, if Egyptian protesters managed to forgive the “Made in America” signs on teargas canisters used against demonstrators in recent riots, they surely will find nothing wrong with this foreign relations snafu from an administration which is becoming known for nothing but.


http://www.prisonplanet.com/obama-special-envoy-to-cairo-calling-for-mubarak-to-stay-uncovered-to-be-on-mubarak-payroll.html

Jan Klimkowski
02-07-2011, 10:34 PM
There's also a DPF thread specifically about Wisner, the Empire's Bagman, here (https://deeppoliticsforum.com/forums/showthread.php?6289-The-Empire-s-Bagman-Frank-Wisner-Jr).

Bernice Moore
02-08-2011, 12:16 AM
Mubarak family fortune could reach $70bn, say experts | World news | guardian.co.uk:gossip:


http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/feb/04/hosni-mubarak-family-fortune

Magda Hassan
02-08-2011, 01:08 AM
WikiLeaks: Israel's secret hotline to the man tipped to replace Mubarak

The new vice-president of Egypt, Omar Suleiman, is a long-standing favourite of Israel's who spoke daily to the Tel Aviv government via a secret "hotline" to Cairo, leaked documents disclose.


http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01820/wiki_1820812c.jpg Omar Suleiman, left, was Israel's preferred candidate to replace President Mubarak according to secret cables released to The Daily Telegraph by WikiLeaks






By Tim Ross (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/journalists/tim-ross/), Christopher Hope, Steven Swinford and Adrian Blomfield 9:25PM GMT 07 Feb 2011 48 Comments (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/wikileaks/8309792/WikiLeaks-Israels-secret-hotline-to-the-man-tipped-to-replace-Mubarak.html#disqus_thread)


Mr Suleiman, who is widely tipped to take over from Hosni Mubarak as president, was named as Israel's preferred candidate for the job after discussions with American officials (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/wikileaks-files/egypt-wikileaks-cables/8309338/DEFENSE-MINISTER-BARAKS-DISCUSSIONS-IN-EGYPT-FOCUS-ON-SHALIT-TAHDIYA-ANTI-SMUGGLING-AND-IRAN.html) in 2008.

As a key figure working for Middle East (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/middleeast/) peace, he once suggested that Israeli troops would be "welcome" to invade Egypt (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaandindianocean/egypt/) to stop weapons being smuggled to Hamas terrorists in neighbouring Gaza.

The details, which emerged in secret files obtained by WikiLeaks and passed to The Daily Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/wikileaks-files/egypt-wikileaks-cables/), come after Mr Suleiman began talks with opposition groups on the future for Egypt's government.

On Saturday, Mr Suleiman won the backing of Hillary Clinton, the US Secretary of State, to lead the "transition" to democracy after two weeks of demonstrations calling for President Mubarak to resign.

David Cameron, the Prime Minister, spoke to Mr Suleiman yesterday and urged him to take "bold and credible steps" to show the world that Egypt is embarking on an "irreversible, urgent and real" transition.



Leaked cables from American embassies in Cairo and Tel Aviv disclose the close co-operation between Mr Suleiman and the US and Israeli governments as well as diplomats' intense interest in likely successors to the ageing President Mubarak, 83.
The documents highlight the delicate position which the Egyptian government seeks to maintain in Middle East politics, as a leading Arab nation with a strong relationship with the US and Israel. By 2008, Mr Suleiman, who was head of the foreign intelligence service, had become Israel's main point of contact in the Egyptian government.
David Hacham, a senior adviser from the Israeli Ministry of Defence, told the American embassy in Tel Aviv that a delegation led by Israel's defence minister, Ehud Barak had been impressed by Mr Suleiman, whose name is spelled "Soliman" in some cables.
But Mr Hacham was "shocked" by President Mubarak's "aged appearance and slurred speech".
The cable, from August 2008, said: "Hacham was full of praise for Soliman, however, and noted that a 'hot line' set up between the MOD and Egyptian General Intelligence Service is now in daily use.
"Hacham noted that the Israelis believe Soliman is likely to serve as at least an interim President if Mubarak dies or is incapacitated." The Tel Aviv diplomats added: "We defer to Embassy Cairo for analysis of Egyptian succession scenarios, but there is no question that Israel is most comfortable with the prospect of Omar Soliman."
Elsewhere the documents disclose that Mr Suleiman was stung by Israeli criticism of Egypt's inability to stop arms smugglers transporting weapons to Palestinian militants in Gaza. At one point he suggested that Israel send troops into the Egyptian border region of Philadelphi to "stop the smuggling".
"In their moments of greatest frustration, [Egyptian Defence Minister] Tantawi and Soliman each have claimed that the IDF would be 'welcome' to re-invade Philadelphi, if the IDF thought that would stop the smuggling," the cable said.
The files suggest that Mr Suleiman wanted Hamas "isolated", and thought Gaza should "go hungry but not starve".
"We have a short time to reach peace," he told US diplomats. "We need to wake up in the morning with no news of terrorism, no explosions, and no news of more deaths."
Yesterday, Hosni Mubarak's control of Egypt's state media, a vital lynchpin of his 30-year presidency, started to slip as the country's largest-circulation newspaper declared its support for the uprising.
Hoping to sap the momentum from street protests demanding his overthrow, the president has instructed his deputy to launch potentially protracted negotiations with secular and Islamist opposition parties. The talks continued for a second day yesterday without yielding a significant breakthrough.
But Mr Mubarak was dealt a significant setback as the state-controlled [I]Al-Ahram, Egypt's second oldest newspaper and one of the most famous publications in the Middle East, abandoned its long-standing slavish support for the regime.
In a front-page leading article, the newspaper hailed the "nobility" of the "revolution" and demanded the government embark on irreversible constitutional and legislative changes.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/wikileaks/8309792/WikiLeaks-Israels-secret-hotline-to-the-man-tipped-to-replace-Mubarak.html

Ed Jewett
02-08-2011, 02:53 AM
‘They broke my legs with bars in prison’ (http://therearenosunglasses.wordpress.com/2011/02/07/they-broke-my-legs-with-bars-in-prison/)

7 02 2011 ‘They broke my legs with bars in prison’ (http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/world/they-broke-my-legs-with-bars-in-prison/story-e6frg6so-1226001310131)




James Hider
From:The Australian (http://www.theaustralian.com.au/)



AHMED Douma knows there is nowhere else for him to go if the protests on Tahrir Square fizzle out. He will end up back in the state’s torture cells, where he has already suffered so much abuse.

“I have been detained by the police 25 times,” said the 21-year-old computer engineer and political activist. “They broke my legs with bars in prison and left me with no medical treatment. They broke my arm four different times.”
He was also subjected to electric shocks and left without food, water or toilet facilities for up to five days at a time. “The police asked only one question: ‘Why are you against the Mubarak regime?’ After that, they used their torture tools on me,” he said.
“Torture is an endemic problem in Egypt,” the New York-based Human Rights Watch said in a report last week, adding that “ending police abuse has been a driving element behind the massive popular demonstrations”.
Amnesty International yesterday gave warning that Wael Ghuneim, Google’s head of marketing for the Middle East and North Africa, faced a serious risk of torture after being arrested. The authorities were furious at the demonstrators’ use of the internet to organise protests.
“The Egyptian authorities must immediately disclose where Wael Ghuneim is and release him or charge him with a recognisable criminal offence,” said Amnesty’s Hassiba Hadj Sahraoui.
Businessman Naguib Sawiris has been negotiating the release of Ghoneim, and announced yesterday on his television channel ON TV that the IT executive is to be freed later today.
Until the past week, Egyptians alone were subjected to the brutality. But faced with an uprising, the Government set its henchmen on dozens of foreign media representatives, beating, stabbing and detaining them in what Washington called a coordinated campaign to silence the press.
Two New York Times journalists described being detained and handed to the dreaded Mukhabarat, or secret police, into whose murky cells thousands have disappeared for days, months or even years. “Our discomfort paled in comparison to the dull whacks and the screams by Egyptian people that broke the stillness of the night,” they wrote.
Activists doubt that Egypt’s dire human-rights record will improve under the new Vice-President, Omar Suleiman, who was in charge during last week’s bloody crackdown.
The Times

Christer Forslund
02-08-2011, 09:15 AM
Some thoughts to comtemplate on the role of the US and colour revolutions. From mr. Engdahl.

Egypt’s Revolution: Creative Destruction for a ’Greater Middle East’?
by F. William Engdahl. 7 February 2011. From Frankfurt (Germany)
http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html

Controverting majority opinion, F. William Engdahl maintains there is nothing spontaneous about the mass protest movements in Arab countries and sees them as a replay of the US-orchestrated colour revolutions that triggered regime change in post-Soviet countries. The same script and cast of characters are at hand: local opposition leaders coached by the NED and other US-funded organizations in the art of staging "spontaneous" uprisings. The contours of a US covert strategy for the region have been clear for some time. The question is: will it work?

http://www.voltairenet.org/local/cache-vignettes/L400xH291/go4-149c7.gif (http://www.voltairenet.org/IMG/gif/go4.gif)
Game over?
Fast on the heels of the regime change in Tunisia (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168224.html) came a popular-based protest movement launched on January 25 against the entrenched order of Egypt’s Hosni Mubarak. Contrary to the carefully-cultivated impression that the Obama Administration is trying to retain the present regime of Mubarak, Washington in fact is orchestrating the Egyptian as well as other regional regime changes from Syria to Yemen to Jordan and well beyond in a process some refer to as "creative destruction".
The template for such covert regime change has been developed by the Pentagon, US intelligence agencies and various think-tanks such as RAND Corporation (http://www.voltairenet.org/article7623.html#article7623) over decades, beginning with the May 1968 destabilization of the De Gaulle presidency in France. This is the first time since the US-backed regime changes in Eastern Europe some two decades back that Washington has initiated simultaneous operations in many countries in a region. It is a strategy born of a certain desperation and one not without significant risk for the Pentagon and for the long-term Wall Street agenda. What the outcome will be for the peoples of the region and for the world is as yet unclear. Yet while the ultimate outcome of defiant street protests in Cairo and across Egypt and the Islamic world remains unclear, the broad outlines of a US covert strategy are already clear.
No one can dispute the genuine grievances motivating millions to take to the streets at risk of life. No one can defend atrocities of the Mubarak regime and its torture and repression of dissent. No one can dispute the explosive rise in food prices as Chicago and Wall Street commodity speculators, and the conversion of American farmland to the insane cultivation of corn for ethanol fuel drive grain prices through the roof. Egypt is the world’s largest wheat importer, much of it from the USA. Chicago wheat futures rose by a staggering 74% between June and November 2010 leading to an Egyptian food price inflation of some 30% despite government subsidies.
What is widely ignored in the CNN and BBC and other Western media coverage of the Egypt events is the fact that whatever his excesses at home, Egypt’s Mubarak represented a major obstacle within the region to the larger US agenda.
To say relations between Obama and Mubarak were ice cold from the outset would be no exaggeration. Mubarak was staunchly opposed to Obama policies on Iran and how to deal with its nuclear program, on Obama policies towards the Persian Gulf states, to Syria and to Lebanon as well as to the Palestinians [1 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb1)]. He was a formidable thorn in the larger Washington agenda for the entire region, Washington’s Greater Middle East Project, more recently redubbed the milder-sounding "New Middle East."
As real as the factors are that are driving millions into the streets across North Africa and the Middle East, what cannot be ignored is the fact that Washington is deciding the timing and as they see it, trying to shape the ultimate outcome of comprehensive regime change destabilizations across the Islamic world. The day of the remarkably well-coordinated popular demonstrations demanding Mubarak step down, key members of the Egyptian military command including Chief of General Staff Lt. Gen. Sami Hafez Enan were all in Washington as guests of the Pentagon. That conveniently neutralized the decisive force of the Army to stop the anti-Mubarak protests from growing in the critical early days [2 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb2)].
The strategy had been in various State Department and Pentagon files since at least a decade or longer. After George W. Bush declared a War on Terror in 2001 it was called the Greater Middle East Project. Today it is known as the less threatening-sounding “New Middle East” project. It is a strategy to break open the states of the region from Morocco to Afghanistan, the region defined by David Rockefeller’s friend Samuel Huntington in his infamous Clash of Civilizations (http://www.voltairenet.org/article30037.html) essay in Foreign Affairs.

Egypt rising?
The current Pentagon scenario for Egypt reads like a Cecil B. DeMille Hollywood spectacular, only this one with a cast of millions of Twitter-savvy well-trained youth, networks of Muslim Brotherhood operatives, working with a US-trained military. In the starring role of the new production at the moment is none other than a Nobel Peace Prize winner who conveniently appears to pull all the threads of opposition to the ancient regime into what appears as a seamless transition into a New Egypt under a self-proclaimed liberal democratic revolution.
Some background on the actors on the ground is useful before looking at what Washington’s long-term strategic plan might be for the Islamic world from North Africa to the Persian Gulf and ultimately into the Islamic populations of Central Asia, to the borders of China and Russia.

Washington ’soft’ revolutions
The protests that led to the abrupt firing of the entire Egyptian government by President Mubarak on the heels of the panicked flight of Tunisia’s Ben Ali into a Saudi exile are not at all as "spontaneous" as the Obama White House, Clinton State Department or CNN, BBC and other major media in the West make them to be.
http://www.voltairenet.org/local/cache-vignettes/L197xH197/images-_2_-2-53f8f.jpg (http://www.voltairenet.org/IMG/jpg/images-_2_-2.jpg)
Muslim Brotherhood logo
They are being organized in a Ukrainian-style high-tech electronic fashion with large internet-linked networks of youth tied to Mohammed ElBaradei and the banned and murky secret Muslim Brotherhood, whose links to British and American intelligence and freemasonry are widely reported [3 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb3)].
At this point the anti-Mubarak movement looks like anything but a threat to US influence in the region, quite the opposite. It has all the footprints of another US-backed regime change along the model of the 2003-2004 Color Revolutions in Georgia and Ukraine and the failed Green Revolution against Iran (http://www.voltairenet.org/article160764.html#article160764)’s Ahmedinejad in 2009.
http://www.voltairenet.org/local/cache-vignettes/L133xH380/april_6-82c1f.jpg (http://www.voltairenet.org/IMG/jpg/april_6.jpg)
"January 25 Day of Anger" poster signed by April 6 movement.
The call for an Egyptian general strike and a January 25 Day of Anger that sparked the mass protests demanding Mubarak resign was issued by a Facebook-based organization calling itself the April 6 Movement. The protests were so substantial and well-organized that it forced Mubarak to ask his cabinet to resign and appoint a new vice president, Gen. Omar Suleiman, former Minister of Intelligence.
April 6 is headed by one Ahmed Maher Ibrahim, a 29-year-old civil engineer, who set up the Facebook site to support a workers’ call for a strike on April 6, 2008.
According to a New York Times account from 2009, some 800,000 Egyptians, most youth, were already then Facebook or Twitter members. In an interview with the Washington-based Carnegie Endowment (http://www.voltairenet.org/article30044.html#article30044), April 6 Movement head Maher stated, "Being the first youth movement in Egypt to use internet-based modes of communication like Facebook and Twitter, we aim to promote democracy by encouraging public involvement in the political process" [4 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb4)].
Maher also announced that his April 6 Movement backs former UN International Atomic Energy Aagency (IAEA) head and declared Egyptian Presidential candidate, ElBaradei along with ElBaradei’s National Association for Change (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Association_for_Change) (NAC) coalition. The NAC includes among others George Ishak, a leader in Kefaya Movement, and Mohamed Saad El-Katatni, president of the parliamentary bloc of the controversial Ikhwan or Muslim Brotherhood. Today Kefaya is at the center of the unfolding Egyptian events. Not far in the background is the more discreet Muslim Brotherhood [5 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb5)].
http://www.voltairenet.org/local/cache-vignettes/L400xH265/EgyptElBaradeiRally_452-c2df1.jpg (http://www.voltairenet.org/IMG/jpg/EgyptElBaradeiRally_452.jpg)
Former IAEA Director-General Mohammed ElBaradei taking center stage in opposition front to President Hosni Mubarak.
ElBaradei at this point is being projected as the central figure in a future Egyptian parliamentary democratic change. Curiously, though he has not lived in Egypt for the past thirty years, he has won the backing of every imaginable part of the Eyptian political spectrum from communists to Muslim Brotherhood to Kefaya and April 6 young activists [6 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb6)]. Judging from the calm demeanour ElBaradei presents these days to CNN interviewers, he also likely has the backing of leading Egyptian generals opposed to the Mubarak rule for whatever reasons as well as some very influential persons in Washington.

Kefaya—Pentagon ’non-violent warfare’
http://www.voltairenet.org/local/cache-vignettes/L197xH250/egyptwomen-2-17dea.gif (http://www.voltairenet.org/IMG/gif/egyptwomen-2.gif)
Egyptian woman wearing sticker of the Kefaya (enough) Movement, the main force behind ElBaradei’s candidature.
Kefaya is at the heart of mobilizing the Egyptian protest demonstrations that back ElBaradei’s candidacy. The word Kefaya translates to "enough!"
Curiously, the planners at the Washington National Endowment for Democracy (http://www.voltairenet.org/mot120927.html?lang=en) (NED) [7 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb7)] and related color revolution NGOs apparently were bereft of creative new catchy names for their Egyptian Color Revolution. In their November 2003 Rose Revolution (http://www.voltairenet.org/article30087.html#article30087) in Georgia, the US-financed NGOs chose the catch word, Kmara! In order to identify the youth-based regime change movement. Kmara in Georgian also means "enough!"
http://www.voltairenet.org/local/cache-vignettes/L140xH157/kmara_kmara-c8335.jpg (http://www.voltairenet.org/IMG/jpg/kmara_kmara.jpg)
Kmara (enough) in Georgia.
The Technique of a Coup d’État (http://www.voltairenet.org/article163453.html), by John Laughland, Voltaire Network, 5 January 2010. Like Kefaya, Kmara in Georgia was also built by the Washington-financed trainers from the NED and other groups such as Gene Sharp’s misleadingly-named Albert Einstein Institution (http://www.voltairenet.org/article30032.html) which uses what Sharp once identified as "non-violence as a method of warfare" [8 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb8)].
The various youth networks in Georgia as in Kefaya were carefully trained as a loose, decentralized network of cells, deliberately avoiding a central organization that could be broken and could have brought the movement to a halt. Training of activists in techniques of non-violent resistance was done at sports facilities, making it appear innocuous. Activists were also given training in political marketing, media relations, mobilization and recruiting skills. The formal name of Kefaya is Egyptian Movement for Change. It was founded in 2004 by select Egyptian intellectuals at the home of Abu ‘l-Ala Madi, leader of the al-Wasat party, a party reportedly created by the Muslim Brotherhood [9 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb9)] . Kefaya was created as a coalition movement united only by the call for an end Mubarak’s rule.
Kefaya as part of the amorphous April 6 Movement capitalized early on new social media and digital technology as its main means of mobilization. In particular, political blogging, posting uncensored youtube shorts and photographic images were skillfully and extremely professionally used. At a rally already back in December 2009 Kefaya had announced support for the candidacy of Mohammed ElBaradei for the 2011 Egyptian elections [10 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb10)].

RAND and Kefaya
No less a US defense establishment think-tank than the RAND Corporation has conducted a detailed study of Kefaya. The Kefaya study as RAND themselves note, was "sponsored by the Office of the Secretary of Defense, the Joint Staff, the Unified Combatant Commands, the Department of the Navy, the Marine Corps, the defense agencies, and the defense Intelligence Community" [11 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb11)].
A nicer bunch of democratically-oriented gentlemen and women could hardly be found.
In their 2008 report to the Pentagon, the RAND researchers noted the following in relation to Egypt’s Kefaya:
"The United States has professed an interest in greater democratization in the Arab world, particularly since the September 2001 attacks by terrorists from Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Egypt, and Lebanon. This interest has been part of an effort to reduce destabilizing political violence and terrorism. As President George W. Bush noted in a 2003 address to the National Endowment for Democracy, ’As long as the Middle East remains a place where freedom does not flourish, it will remain a place of stagnation, resentment, and violence ready for export’ (The White House, 2003). The United States has used varying means to pursue democratization, including a military intervention that, though launched for other reasons, had the installation of a democratic government as one of its end goals. However, indigenous reform movements are best positioned to advance democratization in their own country" [12 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb12)].
RAND researchers have spent years perfecting techniques of unconventional regime change under the name "swarming," the method of deploying mass mobs of digitally-linked youth in hit-and-run protest formations moving like swarms of bees [13 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb13)].
Washington and the stable of "human rights" and "democracy" and "non-violence" NGOs it oversees, over the past decade or more has increasingly relied on sophisticated "spontaneous" nurturing of local indigenous protest movements to create pro-Washington regime change and to advance the Pentagon agenda of global Full Spectrum Dominance. As the RAND study of Kefaya states in its concluding recommendations to the Pentagon:
"The US government already supports reform efforts through organizations such as the US Agency for International Development and the United Nations Development Programme. Given the current negative popular standing of the United States in the region, US support for reform initiatives is best carried out through nongovernmental and non-profit institutions" [14 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb14)].
The RAND 2008 study was even more concrete about future US Government support for Egyptian and other "reform" movements:
"The US government should encourage non-governmental organizations to offer training to reformers, including guidance on coalition building and how to deal with internal differences in pursuit of democratic reform. Academic institutions (or even non-governmental organizations associated with US political parties, such as the International Republican Institute or the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs) could carry out such training, which would equip reform leaders to reconcile their differences peacefully and democratically.
Fourth, the United States should help reformers obtain and use information technology, perhaps by offering incentives for US companies to invest in the region’s communications infrastructure and information technology. US information technology companies could also help ensure that the Web sites of reformers can remain in operation and could invest in technologies such as anonymizers that could offer some shelter from government scrutiny. This could also be accomplished by employing technological safegaurds to prevent regimes from sabotaging the Web sites of reformers" [15 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb15)].
As their Kefaya monograph states, it was prepared in 2008 by the "RAND National Security Research Division’s Alternative Strategy Initiative, sponsored by the Rapid Reaction Technology Office in the Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics".
The Alternative Strategy Initiative, just to underscore the point, includes "research on creative use of the media, radicalization of youth, civic involvement to stem sectarian violence, the provision of social services to mobilize aggrieved sectors of indigenous populations, and the topic of this volume, alternative movements" [16 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb16)].
http://www.voltairenet.org/local/cache-vignettes/L400xH268/hc-eact-8e517.jpg (http://www.voltairenet.org/IMG/jpg/hc-eact.jpg)
US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks with "Egyptian activists promoting freedom and democracy", prior to meetings at the State Department in Washington, DC, May 28, 2009.
In May 2009 just before Obama’s Cairo trip to meet Mubarak, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton hosted a number of the young Egyptian activists in Washington under the auspices of Freedom House (http://www.voltairenet.org/article30112.html), another "human rights" Washington-based NGO with a long history of involvement in US-sponsored regime change from Serbia to Georgia to Ukraine and other Color Revolutions. Clinton and Acting Assistant Secretary of State for Near Eastern Affairs Jeffrey Feltman met the sixteen activists at the end of a two-month "fellowship" organized by Freedom House’s New Generation program [17 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb17)]
Freedom House and Washington’s government-funded regime change NGO, National Endowment for Democracy (NED) are at the heart of the uprisings now sweeping across the Islamic world. They fit the geographic context of what George W. Bush proclaimed after 2001 as his Greater Middle East Project to bring "democracy" and "liberal free market" economic reform to the Islamic countries from Afghanistan to Morocco. When Washington talks about introducing “liberal free market reform” people should watch out. It is little more than code for bringing those economies under the yoke of the dollar system and all that implies.

Washington’s NED in a larger agenda
If we make a list of the countries in the region which are undergoing mass-based protest movements since the Tunisian (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168224.html) and Egyptian (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168319.html) events and overlay them onto a map, we find an almost perfect convergence between the protest countries today and the original map of the Washington Greater Middle East Project that was first unveiled during the George W. Bush Presidency after 2001.
Washington’s NED has been quietly engaged in preparing a wave of regime destabilizations across North Africa and the Middle East since the 2001-2003 US military invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq. The list of where the NED is active is revealing. Its website lists Tunisia, Egypt, Jordan, Kuwait, Libya, Syria, Yemen and Sudan (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168198.html) as well, interestingly, as Israel. Coincidentally these countries are almost all today subject to "spontaneous" popular regime-change uprisings.
The International Republican Institute and the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs mentioned by the RAND document study of Kefaya are subsidiary organizations of the Washington-based and US Congress-financed National Endowment for Democracy.
The NED is the coordinating Washington agency for regime destabilization and change. It is active from Tibet to Ukraine, from Venezuela to Tunisia, from Kuwait to Morocco in reshaping the world after the collapse of the Soviet Union into what George H.W. Bush in a 1991 speech to Congress proclaimed triumphantly as the dawn of a New World Order [18 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb18)].
As the architect and first head of the NED, Allen Weinstein told the Washington Post in 1991 that, "a lot of what we do today was done covertly 25 years ago by the CIA" [19 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb19)].
The NED Board of Directors includes or has included former Defense Secretary and CIA Deputy head Frank Carlucci of the Carlyle Group (http://www.voltairenet.org/mot120862.html?lang=en); retired General Wesley Clark of NATO; neo-conservative warhawk Zalmay Khalilzad (http://www.voltairenet.org/article166013.html) who was architect of George W. Bush’s Afghan invasion and later ambassador to Afghanistan as well as to occupied Iraq. Another NED board member, Vin Weber (http://www.voltairenet.org/auteur6426.html?lang=en), co-chaired a major independent task force on US Policy toward Reform in the Arab World with former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, and was a founding member of the ultra-hawkish Project for a New American Century think-tank with Dick Cheney and Don Rumsfeld, which advocated forced regime change in Iraq as early as 1998 [20 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb20)].
The NED is supposedly a private, non-government, non-profit foundation, but it receives a yearly appropriation for its international work from the US Congress. The National Endowment for Democracy is dependent on the US taxpayer for funding, but because NED is not a government agency, it is not subject to normal Congressional oversight.
NED money is channelled into target countries through four “core foundations”—the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs, linked to the Democratic Party; the International Republican Institute tied to the Republican Party; the American Center for International Labor Solidarity linked to the AFL-CIO US labor federation as well as the US State Department; and the Center for International Private Enterprise linked to the free-market US Chamber of Commerce.
The late political analyst Barbara Conry noted that,
"NED has taken advantage of its alleged private status to influence foreign elections, an activity that is beyond the scope of AID or USIA and would otherwise be possible only through a CIA covert operation. Such activities, it may also be worth noting, would be illegal for foreign groups operating in the United States" [21 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb21)].
Significantly the NED details its various projects today in Islamic countries, including in addition to Egypt, in Tunisia, Yemen, Jordan, Algeria, Morocco, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Syria, Iran and Afghanistan. In short, most every country which is presently feeling the earthquake effects of the reform protests sweeping across the Middle East and North Africa is a target of NED [22 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb22)].
In 2005 US President George W. Bush made a speech to the NED. In a long, rambling discourse which equated "Islamic radicalism" with the evils of communism as the new enemy, and using a deliberately softer term "broader Middle East" for the term Greater Middle East that had aroused much distruct in the Islamic world, Bush stated,
"The fifth element of our strategy in the war on terror is to deny the militants future recruits by replacing hatred and resentment with democracy and hope across the broader Middle East. This is a difficult and long-term project, yet there’s no alternative to it. Our future and the future of that region are linked. If the broader Middle East is left to grow in bitterness, if countries remain in misery, while radicals stir the resentments of millions, then that part of the world will be a source of endless conflict and mounting danger, and for our generation and the next. If the peoples of that region are permitted to choose their own destiny, and advance by their own energy and by their participation as free men and women, then the extremists will be marginalized, and the flow of violent radicalism to the rest of the world will slow, and eventually end...We’re encouraging our friends in the Middle East, including Egypt and Saudi Arabia, to take the path of reform, to strengthen their own societies in the fight against terror by respecting the rights and choices of their own people. We’re standing with dissidents and exiles against oppressive regimes, because we know that the dissidents of today will be the democratic leaders of tomorrow... " [23 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb23)].

The US Project for a ’Greater Middle East’
The spreading regime change operations from Tunisia to Sudan, from Yemen to Egypt to Syria are best viewed in the context of a long-standing Pentagon and State Department strategy for the entire Islamic world from Kabul in Afghanistan to Rabat in Morocco.
The rough outlines of the Washington strategy, based in part on their successful regime change operations in the former Warsaw Pact communist bloc of Eastern Europe, were drawn up by former Pentagon consultant and neo-conservative, Richard Perle and later Bush official Douglas Feith in a white paper they drew up for the then-new Israeli Likud regime of Benjamin Netanyahu in 1996.
That policy recommendation was titled "A Clean Break: A New Strategy for Securing the Realm". It was the first Washington think-tank paper to openly call for removing Saddam Hussein in Iraq, for an aggressive military stance toward the Palestinians, striking Syria and Syrian targets in Lebanon (http://www.voltairenet.org/article142429.html#nh3) [24 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb24)]. Reportedly, the Netanyahu government at that time buried the Perle-Feith report, as being far too risky.
By the time of the events of September 11, 2001 and the return to Washington of the arch-warhawk neoconservatives around Perle and others, the Bush Administration put highest priority on an expanded version of the Perle-Feith paper, calling it their Greater Middle East Project. Feith was named Bush’s Under Secretary of Defense.
Behind the facade of proclaiming democratic reforms of autocratic regimes in the entire region, the Greater Middle East was and is a blueprint to extend US military control and to break open the statist economies in the entire span of states from Morocco to the borders of China and Russia.
In May 2009, before the rubble from the US bombing of Baghdad had cleared, George W. Bush, a President not remembered as a great friend of democracy, proclaimed a policy of "spreading democracy" to the entire region and explicitly noted that that meant "the establishment of a US-Middle East free trade area within a decade" [25 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb25)].
Prior to the June 2004 G8 Summit on Sea Island, Georgia, Washington issued a working paper, "G8-Greater Middle East Partnership". Under the section titled Economic Opportunities was Washington’s dramatic call for "an economic transformation similar in magnitude to that undertaken by the formerly communist countries of Central and Eastern Europe".
The US paper said that the key to this would be the strengthening of the private sector as the way to prosperity and democracy. It misleadingly claimed it would be done via the miracle of microfinance where as the paper put it, "a mere $100 million a year for five years will lift 1.2 million entrepreneurs (750,000 of them women) out of poverty, through $400 loans to each" [26 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb26)].
The US plan envisioned takeover of regional banking and financial affairs by new institutions ostensibly international but, like World Bank and IMF, de facto controlled by Washington, including WTO. The goal of Washington’s long-term project is to completely control the oil, to completely control the oil revenue flows, to completely control the entire economies of the region, from Morocco to the borders of China and all in between. It is a project as bold as it is desperate.
http://www.voltairenet.org/local/cache-vignettes/L400xH399/image001-59-6ea3d.gif (http://www.voltairenet.org/IMG/gif/image001-59.gif)
The G8 Map of Washington’s Greater Middle East extends right to the borders of China and Russia and West to Morocco.
Once the G8 US paper was leaked in 2004 in the Arabic Al-Hayat, opposition to it spread widely across the region, with a major protest to the US definition of the Greater Middle East. As an article in the French Le Monde Diplomatique in April 2004 noted, "besides the Arab countries, it covers Afghanistan, Iran, Pakistan, Turkey and Israel, whose only common denominator is that they lie in the zone where hostility to the US is strongest, in which Islamic fundamentalism in its anti-Western form is most rife" [27 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb27)]. It should be noted that the NED is also active inside Israel with a number of programs.
Notably, in 2004 it was vehement opposition from two Middle East leaders—Hosni Mubarak of Egypt and the King of Saudi Arabia—that forced the ideological zealots of the Bush Administration to temporarily put the Project for the Greater Middle East on a back burner.

Will it work?
At this writing it is unclear what the ultimate upshot of the latest US-led destabilizations across the Islamic world will bring. It is not clear what will result for Washington and the advocates of a US-dominated New World Order. Their agenda is clearly one of creating a Greater Middle East under firm US grip as a major control of the capital flows and energy flows of a future China, Russia and a European Union that might one day entertain thoughts of drifting away from that American order.
It has huge potential implications for the future of Israel as well. As one US commentator put it, "The Israeli calculation today is that if ’Mubarak goes’ (which is usually stated as ’If America lets Mubarak go’), Egypt goes. If Tunisia goes (same elaboration), Morocco and Algeria go. Turkey has already gone (for which the Israelis have only themselves to blame). Syria is gone (in part because Israel wanted to cut it off from Sea of Galilee water access). Gaza has gone to Hamas, and the Palestine Authority might soon be gone too (to Hamas?). That leaves Israel amid the ruins of a policy of military domination of the region" [28 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nb28)].
The Washington strategy of "creative destruction" is clearly causing sleepless nights not only in the Islamic world but also reportedly in Tel Aviv, and ultimately by now also in Beijing and Moscow and across Central Asia.

http://www.voltairenet.org/elements/transpix.gif F. William Engdahl (http://www.voltairenet.org/auteur124557.html?lang=en)
A widely discussed U.S. analyst of current political and economic developments whose articles have appeared in numerous newspapers and magazines and well-known international websites. F. William Engdahl’s numerous books include Full Spectrum Dominance: Totalitarian Democracy in the New World Order (https://www.createspace.com/3403093), Gods of Money: Wall Street and the Death of the American Century (https://www.createspace.com/3445716) and Seeds of Destruction: The Hidden Agenda of Genetic Manipulation (http://www.amazon.com/Seeds-Destruction-Hidden-Genetic-Manipulation/dp/0973714727). A Century of War: Anglo-American Oil Politics and the New World Order has just been reissued in a new edition. He may be contacted via his website (http://www.engdahl.oilgeopolitics.net/).

Notes:

[1 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh1)] DEBKA, "Mubarak believes a US-backed Egyptian military faction plotted his ouster (http://www.debka.com/weekly/480/)", February 4, 2011. DEBKA is open about its good ties to Israeli intelligence and security agencies. While its writings must be read with that in mind, certain reports they publish often contain interesting leads for further investigation.
[2 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh2)] Ibid.
[3 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh3)] The Center for Grassroots Oversight, "1954-1970: CIA and the Muslim Brotherhood ally to oppose Egyptian President Nasser (http://www.historycommons.org/context.jsp?item=western_support_for_islamic_milit ancy_202700&scale=0)". According to the late Miles Copeland, a CIA official stationed in Egypt during the Nasser era, the CIA allied with the Muslim Brotherhood which was opposed to Nasser’s secular regime as well as his nationalist opposition to brotherhood pan-Islamic ideology.
[4 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh4)] Jijo Jacob, "What is Egypt’s April 6 Movement? (http://www.ibtimes.com/articles/107387/20110201/what-is-egypt-s-april-6-movement.htm)", February 1, 2011.
[5 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh5)] Ibid.
[6 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh6)] Janine Zacharia, "Opposition groups rally around Mohamed ElBaradei (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/01/31/AR2011013103470_2.html?sid=ST2011013003319.)", Washington Post, January 31, 2011.
[7 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh7)] National Endowment for Democracy, Middle East and North Africa Program Highlights 2009 (http://www.ned.org/where-we-work/middle-east-and-northern-africa/middle-east-and-north-africa-highlights).
[8 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh8)] Amitabh Pal, "Gene Sharp: The Progressive Interview", The Progressive, March 1, 2007.
[9 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh9)] Emmanuel Sivan, "Why Radical Muslims Aren’t Taking over Governments (http://www.meforum.org/369/why-radical-muslims-arent-taking-over-governments)", Middle East Quarterly, December 1997, pp. 3-9
[10 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh10)] Carnegie Endowment, The Egyptian Movement for Change (Kifaya) (http://egyptelections.carnegieendowment.org/2010/09/22/the-egyptian-movement-for-change-kifaya).
[11 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh11)] Nadia Oweidat, et al, The Kefaya Movement: A Case Study of a Grassroots Reform Initiative (http://www.rand.org/pubs/monographs/2008/RAND_MG778.pdf), Prepared for the Office of the Secretary of Defense, Santa Monica, Ca., RAND, 2008, p. iv.
[12 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh12)] Ibid.
[13 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh13)] For a more detailed discussion of the RAND "swarming" techniques see F. William Engdahl, Full Spectrum Dominance: Totalitarian Democracy in the New World Order, Edition.Engdahl, 2009, pp. 34-41.
[14 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh14)] Nadia Oweidat et al, op. cit., p. 48.
[15 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh15)] Ibid., p. 50
[16 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh16)] Ibid., p. iii.
[17 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh17)] Michel Chossudovsky, "The Protest Movement in Egypt: ’Dictators’ do not Dictate, They Obey Orders (http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=22993)", January 29, 2011.
[18 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh18)] George Herbert Walker Bush, "State of the Union Address to Congress", 29 January 1991. In the speech Bush at one point declared in a triumphant air of celebration of the collapse of the Sovoiet Union, "What is at stake is more than one small country, it is a big idea—a new world order...".
[19 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh19)] Allen Weinstein, quoted in David Ignatius, "Openness is the Secret to Democracy", Washington Post National Weekly Edition, 30 September 1991, pp. 24-25.
[20 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh20)] National Endowment for Democracy, Board of Directors (http://www.ned.org/about/board).
[21 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh21)] Barbara Conry, "Loose Cannon: The National Endowment for Democracy (http://www.cato.org/pubs/fpbriefs/fpb-027.html)", Cato Foreign Policy Briefing No. 27, November 8, 1993.
[22 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh22)] National Endowment for Democracy, "2009 Annual Report, Middle East and North Africa (http://www.ned.org/publications/annual-reports/2009-annual-report)".
[23 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh23)] George W. Bush, "Speech at the National Endowment for Democracy (http://www.presidentialrhetoric.com/speeches/10.06.05.html)", Washington, DC, October 6, 2005.
[24 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh24)] Richard Perle, Douglas Feith et al, "A Clean Break: A New Strategy for Securing the Realm (http://www.iasps.org/strat1.htm)", 1996, Washington and Tel Aviv, The Institute for Advanced Strategic and Political Studies.
[25 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh25)] George W. Bush, "Remarks by the President in Commencement Address at the University of South Carolina", White House, 9 May 2003.
[26 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh26)] Gilbert Achcar, "Fantasy of a Region that Doesn’t Exist: Greater Middle East, the US plan (http://mondediplo.com/2004/04/04world)", Le Monde Diplomatique, April 4, 2004.
[27 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh27)] Ibid.
[28 (http://www.voltairenet.org/article168381.html#nh28)] William Pfaff, American-Israel Policy Tested by Arab Uprisings (http://www.truthdig.com/report/item/american-israeli_policy_tested_by_arab_uprisings_20110201/).

Peter Lemkin
02-08-2011, 09:15 AM
I'd heard 77 Billion....did they already spend or hide 7 Billion of it?!:lol:

Great debate by experts [out of the country, but all Egyptian] just now. One economist said Mubarak makes [officially] 1 Billion per year and pays 20% tax on it. The man who sweeps the street who makes 1000$ per year also pays 20% on that. Fair enough. I forget the exact figure, but it was something like 4% of Egyptians own almost 90% of the wealth....sort of like the UK and USA.

Bernice Moore
02-08-2011, 02:43 PM
Hi Peter; makes one want to barf...don't it, but then again he is and has been one of many now and in the past, and there will be more outted in the future, though the money was supposedly for the country, some rulers think they are the country, they must...recall emeldas shoes, never forgot that one...:shutup: take care, i take it and hope your arms and hands are all healed by now,and some things are better...for now.. best b..ps send me a line in an email please to see if it gets through, some are but some certainly now cannot, and the techie says there is nothing more i can do, horse feathers..:darthvader:.b

Peter Lemkin
02-08-2011, 03:07 PM
Hi Peter; makes one want to barf...don't it, but then again he is and has been one of many now and in the past, and there will be more outted in the future, though the money was supposedly for the country, some rulers think they are the country, they must...recall emeldas shoes, never forgot that one...:shutup: take care, i take it and hope your arms and hands are all healed by now,and some things are better...for now.. best b..ps send me a line in an email please to see if it gets through, some are but some certainly now cannot, and the techie says there is nothing more i can do, horse feathers..:darthvader:.b

interestingly, Mubarak, apparently once compared him with the Pharaohs....but that is 'our kind of guy'...like the Shah; the Saudi Royals who'd be dead if the USA wasn't protecting them....Marcos and so many, many others.

N.B. sent email and PM, hope you got both. If not, let me know.

Peter Lemkin
02-08-2011, 04:24 PM
Cables Suggest Suleiman Handling Egyptians as He Has Handled Palestinians
Submitted by kgosztola on Tue, 02/08/2011 - 16:08

Congressional delegation meeting in June 2008 detailed in cable

A recently released cable describes three congressional delegation meetings with Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, Egyptian Vice President Omar Suleiman and Foreign Minister Aboul Gheit. The congressional delegation present at the meetings included Rep. Gary Ackerman (D-NY), Rep. Sheila Jackson-Lee (D-TX), Rep. Thad McCotter (R-MI), Rep. Randy Neugebauer (R-TX), Rep. Russ Carnahan (D-MO), Rep. Al Green (D-TX), and professional staff members David Adams, Jamie McCormick and Howard Diamond.

The meetings described in 08CAIRO1416, on CODEL Ackerman (“congressional delegation”) posted by Norwegian newspaper Aftenposten focused on Israeli-Palestinian developments (the building of a “calming period”), Egypt’s regional relations, and human rights criticisms of Egypt.

The past twenty four hours make the description of the delegation meeting with Suleiman particularly noteworthy. Suleiman, who just announced the formation of a constitutional committee, has come under increased scrutiny as cables are released revealing how friendly he is to Israel.

From the cable:

In a subsequent meeting, EGIS Director Suleiman asserted that the "real threat" is extremism, and underlined what the Egyptians plan to do to combat it - (1) strengthen relations and coordination with the Israelis, (2) support Mahmoud Abbas, and (3) bring the Palestinian Authority (PA) back to Gaza. He opined that Hamas is under pressure, as the Gazan population is very poor and "becoming wild." Suleiman enumerated the benefits of the "calming" period that he engineered as the lack of violence preventing which prevents a further inflaming of Palestinian emotions (and the resultant increase in Hamas´ popularity) due to TV footage of Palestinians injured and killed by Israelis. He also said the "calming" allows for Israeli cities near Gaza to not be threatened. Ultimately, Suleiman hopes that if the quiet period persists, jobs can be found for Gazans, and thus their hope for the future will return. Outlining an overall three-stage vision for the future, Suleiman said first, calm in Gaza must be achieved, to be followed within weeks by talks regarding Shalit´s release. After that, a dialogue will be started about returning the PA to Gaza, using as an incentive the "sweetener" that Rafah will be re-opened, under Israeli and European observation, with the PA in control…

Notice there is nothing specific about easing the blockade of Gaza, which had begun in 2007. Egypt’s role, to Suleiman, is primarily to help keep Palestinians from getting “wild."Suleiman presents himself as someone Israel can depend on to work to develop Palestinian security forces so that the Gazan population can be controlled. [See this document posted as part of the “Palestine Papers” for more on Egypt’s role in the Palestinian security sector.]

Suleiman is keenly aware of how he can mediate conflict in the region because he is part of the Egyptian government.

Throughout the meeting, it seems Suleiman is interested in providing aid to Palestinians but not really interested in advocating for reforms that would afford Palestinians greater civil and political rights. He repeats “throughout the meeting his goal of creating a ‘new atmosphere’ that can "build confidence, keep the region quieter, and give Abbas and Israel a better chance of achieving agreement on final status issues." He said that before the end of the year, the Palestinians and Israelis need to reach some sort of understanding – ‘not necessarily a final agreement, but something tangible’ - on border issues, Palestinian refugees, and Jerusalem.”

Suleiman understands the need to make “family unification” possible and allow Palestinians the right to return. He urges enhanced economic support for Palestinians from the international community. And, he asks that the delegation put great faith in Palestinian Authority leader Mahmoud Abbas and the Palestinian Authority itself.

The recent fifteen percent pay raise for government employees suggest this might be how Suleiman and others in government plan to “calm” Egypt. Compromise skewed to maintain Egyptian government control over the people looks like a tactic that will be employed. Unfortunately for Suleiman, it does not, at this point, seem that the demonstrators are going to be pacified by minor concessions, which don’t really fundamentally change anything.

During the meeting with President Mubarak, it is clear that Suleiman is a man capable of bringing groups together to engage in discussion and come to agreements. Mubarak tells the delegation that “Hamas cannot be trusted, but at least we can try to make them calm for the time being” and observes “‘Gaza is not only Hamas,’ and therefore, he had asked EGIS Director Omar Suleiman to bring the leaders of at least ten Palestinian factions to Cairo for discussions.”

Of the leaders present, two, Rep. Ackerman and Rep. McCotter, are well-known defenders of Israel in the United States. In 2007, Rep. Ackerman condemned the Bush Administration for increasing assistance to the Palestinian Authority. Rep. McCotter criticized the Obama Administration in 2010 for “admonishing the Israeli government” for saying the approval of further settlements was “regrettable.” He and many others in Congress defended Israel saying it has been willing to “advance the peace process—even when its concessions have led to decreased security.

The meetings detailed here (and details on Suleiman in other cables released thus far) all further demonstrate Suleiman would likely do nothing to get in the way of Israeli or US interests if president. Suleiman is a favorable candidate for taking control of Egypt. The problem, however, is the protesters will never settle for Suleiman, no matter how much Congress or the State Department works to get him elected.

Jan Klimkowski
02-08-2011, 07:37 PM
The CIA's secret policeman speaks about his quisling friend, Mahmoud Abbas:


In a subsequent meeting, EGIS Director Suleiman asserted that the "real threat" is extremism, and underlined what the Egyptians plan to do to combat it - (1) strengthen relations and coordination with the Israelis, (2) support Mahmoud Abbas, and (3) bring the Palestinian Authority (PA) back to Gaza.

Peter Lemkin
02-08-2011, 07:41 PM
Ah, 'continuity'....and NO changes.....countable or uncountable....

The more I think on it, the more I think revolutions or evolutions in 'other' countries are nice, but not sufficient...only the MOTHER of all revolutions [in the only super-power around] now will do....all else will follow naturally, as night follows day..... We are in a VERY ugly period in history. It is not the first time humanity has been here...but each time it has before the consequences were genocide on monumental proportions and enslavement for the rest [minus the few in Power]. With the advance (sic) of technology and weaponry...I fear this current situation could well be humanities last....not this week or this year....but in the next few years....tops..... unless things change 180 degrees on the part of the Plebs. The would-be rulers/Oligarchs/Pharaohs/Corporatists/fascists/Emperors/dictators, etc. be damned. Humanity faces a fork in the road of history, IMO....one fork leads to an end of homo sapiens (sic); the other road is rocky, but offers some hope of a return to our Natural wisdom. May I suggest the great book by Rene Eisler called The Chalice and the Blade. (http://www.rianeeisler.com/chalice.htm)

Peter Lemkin
02-08-2011, 08:03 PM
Suleiman just said that 'Egypt is not ready for democracy'......the Americans think the same for their own nation, so I don't expect much to change....

....nothing short of World Revolution at this point will do anything....

Peter Lemkin
02-08-2011, 10:24 PM
Egypt's Social Crisis: Financial Bonanza for Wall Street Investors and Speculators
Hidden Agenda behind Mubarak's Decision Not to Resign?

by Michel Chossudovsky

Global Research, February 6, 2011

Mubarak's decision not to resign was taken in close consultation with Washington. The US administration including US intelligence had carefully identified the possible scenarios. If Washington had instructed Mubarak to step down, he would have obeyed forthright.

His decision not to resign indelibly serves US interests. It creates a situation of social chaos and political inertia, which in turn generates a vacuum in decision making at the government level.

The continued social crisis has also resulted in a massive outflow of money capital. More concretely, what this signifies is that Egypt's official foreign exchange reserves are being confiscated by major financial institutions.

The ransacking of the country's money wealth is an integral part of the macroeconomic agenda. The newly formed government on instructions from Washington has not taken concrete steps to curtail the massive outward flow of money capital. A prolonged social crisis means that large amounts of money will be appropriated.

According to official sources, Egypt's Central Bank had (prior to the protest movement) 36 billion dollars in foreign exchange reserves as well as an additional $21 billion of deposits with international banking institutions which are said to to constitute its so-called "unofficial reserves." (Reuters, 30 January, 2011).

Egypt's external debt, which has increased by more than fifty percent in the last five years is of the order 34.1 billion (2009). What this means is that these Central Bank reserves are de facto based on borrowed money.

In early 2010, there was a large influx of hot money deposits into Egyptian government debt instruments.

Foreign exchange flows into the country and is exchanged for Egyptian pounds (EgP), which are then used by institutional investors and speculators to purchase high yielding government bonds and treasury bills (denominated in Egyptian pounds) with short term interest rates of the order 10 percent.

The interest rate on long term government bonds shot up to 7.2 percent at the outset of the protest movement. (Egypt Banks to Open Amid Concern Deposit-Run May Weaken Pound, Lift Yields - Bloomberg, January 2, 2011)

At the onset of the crisis, international investors owned about $25bn of Egyptian T-bills and bonds, almost a fifth of the total T-bill market and about 40 per cent of the domestic bond market. Foreign investors also accounted for about 17 per cent of the stock market’s turnover, and held about $5bn-$6bn of Egyptian shares. (Ibid)

Under its agreement with the IMF, Egypt is not allowed to implement foreign exchange controls. These hot money deposits are now leaving the country in anticipation of a devaluation of the Egyptian pound. In the days preceding Mubarak's speech, capital flight was running at several hundred million dollars a day.

In a bitter irony, Egypt deposits 21 billion with the commercial banks as "unofficial reserves" on the one hand, while the commercial banks acquire $25bn worth of EgP debt, with a yield of the order of 10 percent. What this suggests is that Egypt is financing its own indebtedness.

The protest movement started on a bank holiday. While the closure of the Cairo stock market and domestic banking system had put a temporary lid on the outflow of money capital, large amounts of capital flight instrumented by major financial institutions had already occurred in the days leading up to the protest movement.

Egypt's banking system reopened on February 5, leading to a renewed process of capital flight resulting in the depletion of central bank reserves and a corresponding increase in Egypt's foreign debt.

A devaluation of at least 20 percent is contemplated. According to UBS' emerging markets currency division, "the pound could “easily” drop by a further 50 per cent or so to E£9 per US dollar". FT.com / Currencies - Banks weigh risk of capital flight, February 1, 2010)

A devaluation of more than ten percent would wreck social havock: Domestic prices of food are dollarized. If there is a devaluation of the Egyptian pound, this would inevitably trigger a renewed increase in the prices of essential food staples, leading to a further process of impoverishment.

A scenario of currency devaluation, rising external debt coupled with a renewed package of IMF sponsored austerity measures would inevitably lead to an accentuation of the social crisis and a new wave of protests.

The newly appointed Finance Minister Samir Radwan is firmly committed to the Washington consensus, which has served to impoverish the Egyptian people. In a contraditory statement on February 3, Radwan confirmed that "the government won’t reduce subsidies even if global prices of food and commodities rise. Public spending will be used as a tool to “achieve social justice,” he told a news conference in Cairo." (Bloomberg, February 5, 2011)

Radwan is abiding by IMF-World Bank guidelines: no restrictions will be placed on capital flight. The Central Bank will ensure the conversion of hot money deposits into hard currency by major financial institutions. The coffers of the central will be ransacked.

With capital flight, domestic debt is transformed into foreign debt, putting the country into the stranglehold of foreign creditors:

Radwan said Egypt will honor its debt obligations and urged foreign investors to have confidence in the country. “All the bond obligations, everything will be honored on time,” Radwan said in a Feb. 4 telephone interview from Cairo. “We are not defaulting on any obligations.” (Bloomberg, February 5, 2011)

In a bitter irony, Mubarak's decision to remain as head of State with Washington's approval has served the interests of institutional investors, currency traders and speculators.
Financial dislocation, rising debt and spiralling food prices: Before "democratic" elections are called, Egypt will have been pushed into the straightjacket of a new set of deadly IMF conditionalities.

The important question is how will the various opposition forces tackle the demands of external creditors and financial institutions, not to mention the broader geopolitics of US-NATO influence in the region.

Magda Hassan
02-08-2011, 11:25 PM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaandindianocean/egypt/8309469/Egypt-crisis-Hosni-Mubarak-loses-control-of-state-media.html
Egypt crisis: Hosni Mubarak loses control of state media

Hosni Mubarak's control of Egypt's state media, a vital linchpin of his 30-year presidency, has started to slip as the country's largest-circulation newspaper declared its support for the uprising against him.


Hoping to sap the momentum from street protests demanding his overthrow, the president has instructed his deputy to launch potentially protracted negotiations with secular and Islamist opposition parties. The talks continued for a second day on Monday without yielding a significant breakthrough.

But Mr Mubarak was dealt a significant setback as the state-controlled Al-Ahram, Egypt's (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaandindianocean/egypt/) second oldest newspaper and one of the most famous media publications in the Middle East, abandoned its long-standing position of slavish support for the regime.

In a front-page leader, the newspaper's editor-in-chief, Osama Saraya hailed the "nobility" of what he described as a "revolution" and demanded that the government embark of irreversible constitutional and legislative changes.

"The state and all its denizens, the elder generation, the politicians and all other powers on the political stage must humble themselves and rein themselves in to understand the ambitions of the young and the dreams of this nation," he wrote.

There was no call on the president to resign and while it may yet prove that Al Ahram's editorial shift may be tactical rather than genuine, opposition supporters expressed astonishment at the development.

Ed Jewett
02-09-2011, 02:08 AM
Chris Floyd over at Empire Burlesque is his usual sharp and insightful self. http://www.chris-floyd.com/

Make sure you have your malware shields in their upright and locked positions though, because he has been a frequent target of hackers who leave behind little bomblets of nasties. He must be saying something someone doesn't want you to read.

Here are two of his latest:

Torturers R Us: The Continuity Kid Does Cairo (http://www.chris-floyd.com/component/content/article/1-latest-news/2082-torturers-r-us-the-continuity-kid-does-cairo.html)
Written by Chris Floyd Monday, 07 February 2011 22:49 Below is a piece that never got posted in all the hackfoonery that was going with the site recently. It was written in the first heat of Egypt's uprising, but in some ways, it is even more pertinent today, as the Obama Administration rallies around the suave and vicious torturer they have installed in Cairo, in a desperate attempt to produce the kind of "continuity" of militarist-elitist corruption in Egypt that Barack Obama has achieved so magnificently at home in his takeover from the Bush Regime.

This is when you know a regime is in on the ropes: when its security apparatchiks start the panicked, wholesale destruction of the evidence of their crimes.

and


Cry Freedom: Cairo Crowds Shred the Lies of the Power Players (http://www.chris-floyd.com/component/content/article/1-latest-news/2083-cry-freedom-cairo-crowds-shred-the-lies-of-the-power-players.html)
Wednesday, 09 February 2011 00:35 "The American power structure has been set reeling by something that is simply outside the boundaries of their mental universe: a non-violent, non-sectarian, non-ideological, leaderless revolution by ordinary people."

Ed Jewett
02-09-2011, 02:12 AM
Washington Faces the Arab Revolts: Sacrificing Dictators to Save the State

by James Petras / February 8th, 2011
To understand the Obama regime’s policy toward Egypt, the Mubarak dictatorship and the popular uprising it is essential to locate it in an historical context. The essential point is that Washington, after several decades of being deeply embedded in the state structures of the Arab dictatorships, from Tunisia through Morocco, Egypt, Yemen, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia and the Palestinian Authority, is attempting to re-orient its policies to incorporate and/or graft liberal-electoral politicians onto the existing power configurations.
While most commentators and journalists spill tons of ink about the “dilemmas” of US power , the novelty of the Egyptian events and Washington’s day to day policy pronouncements, there are ample historical precedents which are essential to understand the strategic direction of Obama’s policies.


Continued at the link:
http://dissidentvoice.org/2011/02/washington-faces-the-arab-revolts-sacrificing-dictators-to-save-the-state/#more-29167

Ed Jewett
02-09-2011, 02:47 AM
1992

http://www.truthdig.com/arts_culture/item/mr_fish_goes_to_egypt_20110208/

Ed Jewett
02-09-2011, 02:51 AM
Image (too large for insertion): http://www.truthdig.com/images/eartothegrounduploads/NotEasyBeingGreen-500.jpg

It's another Mr. Fish cartoon....

Ed Jewett
02-09-2011, 03:04 AM
The Division of Egypt: Threats of US, Israeli, and NATO Military Intervention?

by Mahdi Darius Nazemroaya

[minus the photos]


The protests in Tunisia have had a domino effect in the Arab World. Egypt, the largest Arab country, is now electrified with popular uproar to remove the Mubarak regime in Cairo. It must be asked what effects would this event have? Will the U.S., Israel, and NATO simply watch the Egyptian people establish a free government?

The parable of the Arab dictators is like that of the spider's web. Although the spider feels safe in its web, in reality the web is one of the frailest homes. All the Arab dictators and tyrants, from Morocco to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, are in fear now. Egypt is on the brink of what could amount to being one of the most important geo-political events in this century.

Pharaohs, ancient or modern, all have their end days. Mubarak's days are numbered, but the powers behind him have not yet been defeated. Egypt is an important part of America's global empire. The U.S. government, Tel Aviv, the E.U., and NATO all have significant interests in maintaining Egypt as a puppet regime.

The U.S. and Israel want to use the Egyptian Military to Police the Egyptian People


When protests started in Egypt, the heads of the Egyptian military all went to the U.S. and consulted with U.S. officials for orders. The Egyptians are well aware that the regime in Cairo is a pawn in the services of the U.S. and Israel. This is why Egyptian slogans are not only directed against the Mubarak regime but are also aimed against the U.S. and Israel, in similarity to some of the slogans of the Iranian Revolution. The U.S. has been involved in every aspect of the Egyptian government's activities. Cairo has not made a single move without consulting both the White House and Tel Aviv. Israel has also permitted the Egyptian military to move into urban areas in the Sinai Peninsula.
The reality of the situation is that the U.S. government has worked against freedom in the Arab World and beyond. When President Obama says that there should be a period of "transition" in Egypt, it means that Mubarak and the Egyptian regime should stay intact. The U.S. does not want a people's government in Cairo.

Martin Indyk, a former Clinton Administration official at the U.S. National Security Council with an area of responsible for the Middle East and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict and an individual closely tied to the Obama Administration, told The New York Times that the U.S. must work towards bringing the Egyptian military into control of Egypt until a "moderate and legitimate political leadership [can] emerge." [1] Not only did Indyk call for a military takeover in Egypt, he also used U.S. State Department double-speak. What U.S. officials mean by "moderate" are dictatorships and regimes like Saudi Arabia, the U.A.E., Jordan, Morocco, and Ben Ali's Tunisia. As for legitimacy, in the eyes of U.S. officials, it means individuals who will serve U.S. interests.

Tel Aviv is far less coy than the U.S. about the situation in Egypt. Out of fear of losing Cairo, Tel Aviv has been encouraging the Mubarak regime to unleash the full force of the Egyptian military on the civilian protesters. It has also been defending Mubarak internationally. In this regard, the Egyptian military's primary role has always been to police the Egyptian people and to keep the Mubarak regime in power. U.S. military aid to Egypt is solely intended for this purpose.

Revolutionary Egypt: A Second Iran in the Middle East?

If the Egyptian people manage to establish a new and truly sovereign government, it would equate to a second Iran in the Middle East. This would cause a major regional and global geo-political shift. It would also deeply upset and cripple the interests of the U.S., Britain, Israel, France, the E.U., and NATO in what would amount to a colossal loss, like that of Iran in 1979.

If a new revolutionary government were to emerge in Cairo the bogus Israeli-Palestinian peace talks would be over, the starvation of the Palestinians of the Gaza Strip would end, the cornerstone of Israeli military security would be gone, and the Iranian-Syrian Awliyaa (Alliance) could possibly gain a significant new member.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu expressed Tel Aviv's fears about Egypt allying with Iran and a new gateway of Iranian influence being opened in a speech by saying: "Tehran is waiting for the day in which darkness descends ." [2] Netanyahu is correct about one thing, the Iranian Foreign Ministry has been monitoring the events in Egypt very eagerly and the Iranians are awaiting the establishment of a new revolutionary government that could join Iran and the Resistance Bloc. Tehran has been overjoyed and Iran is abuzz with speeches by its officials about what they believe to be an "Islamic Awakening."

While the Arab members of the Resistance Bloc have made low-key statements about the protests in Egypt, non-Arab Iran has been vocal in its support of the protesters in the Arab World. Syria has made low-key remarks, because of its own fears of revolt at home. Hezbollah and Hamas have also been relatively low-key on their stances about the protests in the Arab World, because they wish to avoid being targeted by the Arab regimes through accusations of meddling.

At every opportunity the so-called "moderate" Arab regimes seek to demonize these Arab players. On the other hand the Turkish government, which maintains close ties to the Arab regimes, has also been virtually silent about the protests in the Arab World.

Israel is preparing itself for the possible reality that an unfriendly government will be taking office in Cairo, which is what will happen if the Egyptian people are successful. Tel Aviv has secret military-security contingency plans for Egypt. In the words of Netanyahu to the Israeli Knesset: "A peace agreement does not guarantee the existence of peace , so in order to protect it and ourselves, in cases in which the agreement disappears or is violated due to regime change on the other side, we protect it with security arrangements on the ground." [3]


Threats of U.S., Israeli, and NATO Military Intervention in Egypt: Recall the 1956 Invasion of Egypt?

There is also the chance of renewed war with Israel and even American and NATO military intervention in Egypt. The threat of military intervention in Egypt must be considered. In 1956, the British, the French, and the Israelis jointly attacked Egypt when President Gamal Abdel Nasser nationalized the Suez Canal. Recalling 1956, the U.S. and NATO could do the same. General James Mattis, the commander of U.S. Central Command said that the U.S. will deal with Egypt "diplomatically, economically, [and] militarily" should access to the Suez Canal be shut by Egypt to the U.S. and its allies. [4]

In 2008, Norman Podhoretz proposed a unthinkable nightmare scenario. In this nightmare scenario the Israelis would militarily occupy the oil refineries and naval ports of the Persian Gulf to insure "energy security" and they would also launch a so-called pre-emptive nuclear attack against Iran, Syria, and Egypt. [5]

In 2008, the main questions that arose were: "energy security" for whom and why attack Egypt, where the Mubarak government has been a staunch Israeli ally?

Would the Israelis attack Egypt if a revolutionary government emerged in Cairo? This is what essentially happened a few years after Gamal Abdel Nasser took power from Mohammed Naguib in Egypt. Also, is such a military attack on Egypt tied to Israel's secret military-security contingency plans that Netanyahu assured the Israeli Knesset about.

Is such a nightmare scenario, which includes the use of nuclear weapons, a distinct possiblity? Podhoretz has close ties to both Israeli and U.S. officials. It should also be mentioned that Podhoretz is a recipient of the U.S. Presidential Medal of Freedom for his intellectual influence in the U.S. and is one of the original 1997 signatories of the Project for the New American Century (PNAC) along with Elliot Abrams, Richard Cheney, John (Jeb) Bush, Donald Rumsfeld, Steen Forbes Jr., and Paul Wolfowitz. The PNAC has essentially outlined plans for transforming America into a global empire through militarism overseas and domestic militarization.

"Managed Chaos" and the Threats of Balkanization in Egypt: The Yinon Plan at Work?

Egypt cannot be managed by the Mubarak regime, the U.S., Israel, and their allies anymore. Thus, the U.S., Israel, and their allies are now working to divide and destabilize Egypt, as the most powerful Arab state, so that no strategic challenge can emerge from Cairo. The attacks on the peaceful protestors in Cairo's central Tahrir Square by Mubarak's club-wielding thugs riding camels and horses was a stage-managed event to build public support outside of the Arab World for having a dictatorial strongman in Cairo. It epitomized every stereotype and incorrect Orientalist attitude about Arabs and the peoples of the Middle East. It would come as no surprise if the U.S., Israel, and Britain played direct or advisory roles in the event.

In a major departure from reality, the Mubarak regime's state-controlled media is reporting popular support for Mubarak by millions of Egyptians and wide-spread approval of his speech and his "transitional government" plans. In a show of desperation, the same state-controlled media is also trying to blame Iran and its Arab allies for the Egyptian protests. Egyptian state-controlled media has reported that Iranian commandos and special forces, along with the Lebanese Hezbollah and the Palestinian Hamas, have been on destabilization and sabotage missions against Egypt.

These types of accusations by the regime in Cairo are not new. Yemen, Bahrain, Jordan, and Mahmoud Abbas also all do the same. The Mubarak regime has blamed Iran, Hezbollah, the Free Patriotic Movement, Syria, and Hamas for meddling and inciting revolt several times in the past. When the Free Patriotic Movement criticized the Mubarak regime about the treatment of Egyptian Christians, the Mubarak regime accused Michel Aoun of sectarian sedition. On the other hand, Hezbollah was accused of attempting to create chaos in Egypt when Hassan Nasrallah asked the Egyptian people to show solidarity with the Palestinians and demand that their government allow humanitarian aid to go to the people of the Gaza Strip.

Managed Chaos at Work

Although Mubarak's thugs are also creating chaos in Egypt to try to keep his regime in power, the doctrine of "managed chaos" is being used by external actors with the Israeli Yinon Plan in mind. Making Egyptians fight against one another and turning Egypt into a divided and insecure state, just like Anglo-American Iraq, appears to be the objective of the U.S., Israel, and their allies. The building tensions between Egyptian Muslims and Egyptian Christians, which includes the attacks on Coptic churches, is tied to this project. In this context, on the thirteenth day of the protests in Egypt, the Mar Girgis Church in the Egyptian town of Rafah, next to Gaza and Israel, was attacked by armed men on motorcycles. [6]

The White House and Tel Aviv do not want a second Iran in the Middle East. They will do whatever they can to prevent the emergence of a strong and independent Egypt.

A free Egypt could prove to be a much bigger threat than non-Arab Iran within the Arab World to the objectives of the U.S., Israel, and NATO.

The Return of the Egyptian Eagle as the Champion of Arab Independence?

Egypt was once a major strategic challenge to the U.S., Israel, France, and Britain in the Arab World and Africa. Nasserite Egypt aided the Algerian Resistance against the French occupation of Algeria, openly supported the Palestinians against the Israeli occupation of their homes, supported the Yemenite Resistance against the British occupation in South Yemen, challenged the legitimacy of the British-installed Hashemites and the American-supported House of Saud, and offered support to national liberation and anti-imperialist movements. Cairo under a revolutionary government, whether deeply tied to Islam or not, could give the Arab World a new leader that would revive pan-Arabism, make Tel Aviv further nervous about trying to launch wars, and rally the Arabs and other peoples worldwide in revolt against the global confederacy formed by the U.S. and its allies.

Egypt is not free from bondage yet. The Egyptian people must also address the role of global capitalism in supporting the Mubarak regime. At the same time they must remain united. If they are successful, they will make a huge impact on the history of the current century.



[B]Mahdi Darius Nazemroaya is a Research Associate of the Centre for Research on Association (CRG).


NOTES

[1] Elisabeth Bumiller, "Calling for Restraint, Pentagon Faces Test of Influence With Ally," The New York Times, January 29, 2011; Indyk's words are as follows: "What we have to focus on now is getting the military into a position where they can hold the ring for a moderate and legitimate political leadership to emerge."

[2] Attila Somfalvi, "Natanyahu: Democratic Egypt no threat," [I]Yedioth Ahronoth, February 2, 2011.

[3] Ibid.

[4] Adrian Croft, "U.S. sees Suez Canal closure as inconceivable," eds. Peter Griffiths and Elizabeth Fullerton, Reuters, February 1, 2011.

[5] Norman Podhoretz, "Stopping Iran: Why the Case for Military Action Still Stands," Commentary Magazine, vol.125, no. 2, (February, 2008): pp.11-19.

[6] "Church in flames in Egypt's Sinai: witness," Agence France-Presse (AFP), February 6, 2011.

[7] "Senior US envoy presses for democracy in Tunisia," Agence France-Presse (AFP), January 24, 2011.


Related articles are as follows:

The Balkanization of Sudan: The Redrawing of the Middle East and North Africa (http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=22736)

Dictatorship and Neo-Liberalism: The Tunisian People's Uprising (http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=22850)

Revolution: Is 1848 Repeating Itself in the Arab World? (http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=23096)

Plans for Redrawing the Middle East: The Project for a “New Middle East” (http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=3882)



Mahdi Darius Nazemroaya is a frequent contributor to Global Research. Global Research Articles by Mahdi Darius Nazemroaya (http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=listByAuthor&authorFirst=Mahdi%20Darius&authorName=Nazemroaya)

http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=23102

Bernice Moore
02-09-2011, 04:46 AM
Sending Pharaoh Mubarak packing (http://www.google.com/url?sa=X&q=http://onlinejournal.com/artman/publish/article_6895.shtml&ct=ga&cad=CAcQAhgAIAAoATAIOAhA_9HH6gRIAVAAWABiBWVuLVVT&cd=SODOZ2Cd_ig&usg=AFQjCNG4lnxN37qR8YIhIBrx1RQDcIpIKA)
Online Journal
Wisner is the son of Frank G. Wisner, Sr., co-founder of the CIA and Operation Gladio, which left stand-behind armies post WW II to combat socialist or ...

Bernice Moore
02-10-2011, 02:53 AM
Omar Suleiman: a dark man haunted by lights (http://www.google.com/url?sa=X&q=http://www.islamonline.net/cs/ContentServer%3Fpackedargs%3Dlocale%253Den%26c%3DI OLArticle_C%26childpagename%3DIslamOnline%252FIsla mOnlineLayout%26p%3DNews%26pagename%3DIslamOnlineW rapper%26cid%3D1278407431650&ct=ga&cad=CAcQAhgAIAAoATAAOABArM3M6gRIAVgBYgVlbi1VUw&cd=ph2EEIViUyw&usg=AFQjCNGMnj5oKoyJitR6GIlQiJLGwv8vEQ)
Islam Online
The CIA asked him to wrest confessions from him that he was a senior members ... dating back to February 2006 Suleiman also said to the FBI Director Robert ...

Bernice Moore
02-10-2011, 02:58 AM
The CIA's Puppet VP Omar Suleiman Threatens to Smash Egyptian Rebellion (http://www.google.com/url?sa=X&q=http://www.deathandtaxesmag.com/51892/the-cias-puppet-vp-omar-suleiman-threatens-to-smash-egyptian-rebellion/&ct=ga&cad=CAcQAhgAIAAoATACOAJA2PTM6gRIAVAAWABiBWVuLVVT&cd=52IzcZj9Adg&usg=AFQjCNGo1AmkxmgUByTPZgDFq7upX11kgQ)
Death and Taxes
By DJ Pangburn Wednesday, February 09, 2011 Omar Suleiman is the CIA's man in Cairo and if Egypt will not accept the United States' terms of a transition, ...

Bernice Moore
02-10-2011, 06:13 AM
Jewish Prayers for Egypts Uprising;

http://www.truth-out.org/rabbi-michael-lerner-jewish-prayers-egypts-uprising67606

Ed Jewett
02-10-2011, 05:10 PM
WikiLeaks: Egyptian torturers trained by FBI (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/wikileaks/8314475/WikiLeaks-Egyptian-torturers-trained-by-FBI.html) 09 Feb 2011 The US provided officers from the Egyptian secret police with training at the FBI, despite allegations that they routinely tortured detainees and suppressed political opposition. According to leaked diplomatic cables, the head of the Egyptian state security and investigative service (SSIS) thanked the US for "training opportunities" at the FBI academy in Quantico, Virginia... In October 2009, "credible" human rights lawyers representing alleged Hizbollah detainees provided details of the techniques employed by the SSIS. The cable states: "The lawyers told us in mid-October that they have compiled accounts from several defendants of GOE [Government of Egypt] torture by electric shocks, sleep deprivation, and stripping them naked for extended periods."

Ed Jewett
02-10-2011, 07:18 PM
King Abdullah Rising To the Top of the Regime Change Line (http://therearenosunglasses.wordpress.com/2011/02/10/king-abdullah-rising-to-the-top-of-the-regime-change-line/)

10 02 2011 This is logical. (http://mostaqueali.blogspot.com/2011/02/this-is-logical.html)

MOSTAQUE ALI (http://mostaqueali.blogspot.com/)
Negotiations should begin immediately if they have not already done so between the foreign ministries of Egypt, Libya, Algeria, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Jordan and the Gulf Arab countries about creating special funds for protecting their regimes from chaotic, Western funded Revolutions which bring utter Chaos, and Balkanisation to the Middle East. This is an issue of self preservation…….it was meaningless for the Shah of Iran to deposit $20 billion of the country’s money in Western banks since frozen, after he was toppled by the USA/UK/France/Israel. It was meaningless for the Shah to have spent $28 billion in defense purchase from the USA (1969–1977.) only to be toppled by the USA/UK/France/Israel, because his weapons systems were worthless without Western spares.
It is meaningless for Egypt to buy $50 billion worth of arms from the USA if they destabilize Egypt, or put the nations money in Western Banks. Mubarak has a few billion $ which can be used to protect the country. It is worthless for Saudi Arabia to buy $100 billion worth of arms from the USA ……….if the USA after Egypt decides to destabilize the country in another color coded Revolution.
It does however make sense for the Middle East countries to work together, and help each other in the face of American treachery, and Imperial designs either for Eretz Israel, or their own Imperial goals.
____________________________

Exclusive: Saudis told Obama to back Mubarak (http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/news/world/middleeast/article2905628.ece)

Hugh Tomlinson of the London Times.
Saudi Arabia has threatened to prop up President Mubarak if the White House tries to force a swift change of regime in Egypt.
In a testy personal telephone call on January 29, King Abdullah told President Obama not to humiliate Mr Mubarak and warned that he would step in to bankroll Egypt if the US withdrew its aid programme, worth $1.5 billion annually.
America’s closest ally in the Gulf made clear that the Egyptian President must be allowed to stay on to oversee the transition towards peaceful democracy and then leave with dignity.
“Mubarak and King Abdullah are not just allies, they are close friends, and the King is not about to see his friend cast aside and humiliated,” a senior source in the Saudi capital told The Times.
Two sources confirmed details of the King’s call, made four days after the people of Egypt took to the streets. The revelation of Saudi concerns sheds new light on America’s apparent diplomatic paralysis and lays bare the biggest rift between the nations since the oil price shock of 1973.
The tough line from Riyadh is driven by concern that Western governments were too eager to shove aside Mr Mubarak when the uprising began, without proper consideration of what should follow him.
“With Egypt in chaos, the kingdom is Washington’s only major ally left in the Arab world and the Saudis want the Americans to remember that,” said a source in Riyadh.
Egypt is the fourth-highest recipient of American aid after Afghanistan, Pakistan and Israel, with most of the money going to the Armed Forces. Slashing this was seen as a key weapon in Washington’s armoury should it wish to force Mr Mubarak from office, but Riyadh’s intervention seriously undermines America’s leverage.
The White House declined to comment yesterday, saying that the Administration did not divulge what other leaders said to Mr Obama. The King is in Morocco, recuperating from surgery on his back late last year in New York. Behind the scenes, however, the octogenarian monarch has been sticking his neck out for his longstanding friend in Cairo — the pair are believed to be speaking daily.
Immediately after his phone call with Mr Obama, the King issued a statement of support for Mr Mubarak, blaming “intruders” for meddling in Egypt’s security “in the name of freedom of expression, exploiting it to inject their destructive hatred”.
Riyadh is feeling increasingly hemmed in by Iran and its proxies Hamas and Hezbollah. The expulsion of the Mubarak regime would not only remove a key Saudi and American ally in the region but a major bulwark against Iranian expansionism. “[The uprising] is a very dangerous phenomenon. If we encourage it, anything could happen. Iran or al-Qaeda might take advantage,” said a Saudi official.
The inconsistent messages from American politicians since the crisis in Egypt began have also irritated the kingdom. “There is certainly quite strong disagreement with the Americans on the messaging. They can understand why Western countries have taken the positions they have, but they are not convinced it’s been thought through. They see the Americans as abandoning long-term allies,” said a Western analyst in Riyadh.
Behind the scenes, the Saudi leadership has been urging Mr Mubarak for some time to begin the process of reform and was dismayed that last year’s parliamentary elections were so blatantly rigged. Many Saudi citizens express private admiration for the courage of the protesters in Tahrir Square.
In the interests of stability, however, the kingdom has insisted that Washington should deal with Omar Suleiman, the Egyptian Vice-President, and not undermine him. The signs are that Washington has heeded the appeals for caution from Riyadh and elsewhere. The Administration, which appeared ready last week to sever America’s 30-year alliance with Mr Mubarak, is now placing greater emphasis on stability in its public statements, while keeping up pressure on Mr Suleiman to push ahead with reforms.
The White House expressed frustration last night with the “lack of steps” Cairo has taken to meet protesters’ demands. “It is clear that what the Government has thus far put forward has yet to meet a minimum threshold for the people of Egypt,” said Robert Gibbs, President Obama’s spokesman.
Ahmed Aboul Gheit, the Egyptian Foreign Minister, accused the US of “imposing on a great country like Egypt”, and brushed aside American calls for more freedom as “unhelpful”.


##


Saudi King Abdullah Promises Mubarak: “I Got Your Back” (http://therearenosunglasses.wordpress.com/2011/02/10/saudi-king-abdullah-promises-mubarak-i-got-your-back/)

10 02 2011 The Times”: King of Saudi Arabia threatened to support Mubarak if Washington tried to impose rapid change (http://www.almanar.com.lb/adetails.php?eid=5341&cid=31&fromval=1&frid=31&seccatid=91&s1=1)

http://www.almanar.com.lb/upimg/articleimg/first/lvl120110210093040.jpg Newspaper “The Times” British “Saudi King Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz, threatened the support of President Hosni Mubarak and the duration of the necessary money if the White House tried to force a quick change of the ruling regime in Egypt.”The paper reported that “King Abdullah held in the twenty-ninth of last month’s telephone conversation with U.S. President Barack Obama, told him of the angry tone in which not to display Mubarak to insult and humiliation.” And achievement of the British newspaper adds reference to “King Abdullah has threatened to support the Mubarak regime in the event the United States withdrew its financial aid program to Egypt, which was made Washington to Cairo from which an annual $ 1.5 billion.” The paper said that “the closest American ally in the Gulf clearly explained that he should be allowed to stay Egyptian President to oversee the transition to democracy in a peaceful manner, and then leaves the government with dignity

Keith Millea
02-10-2011, 07:57 PM
Mubarak to announce stepping down in a few minutes.Hundreds of thousands gathered in LIBERATION SQUARE.

Watch live NOW at:



http://english.aljazeera.net/watch_now/

Keith Millea
02-10-2011, 09:11 PM
Mubarak to the People in historic speech:

:moon:

OH MY!

Kenneth Kapel
02-10-2011, 09:22 PM
Mubarak actually said " F U Egyptian People ". :hitler:

Magda Hassan
02-16-2011, 02:59 AM
I got an email this morning from Vivienne who is Australian but was in Egypt last year as part of trying to break the siege of Gaza to bring humanitarian supplies. This is an email from her friend there a doctor. I feel so happy and sad for them at the same time. Happy for what they have achieved and sad for what they have yet to achieve.

Comments from a doctor friend of mine in Cairo - all are so ecstatic – I hope their hopes for a better life are fully fulfilled. Vivienne

From Dr Taher


thanks vivienne for your participation and your concern
since tuesday 25/1 I have felt like I am a new person. first my tears rolled down my face every time I watched the news on FOREIGN channels (CNN, BCC, al jazeerah) and I felt this was egypt reborn. I helped resuscitate several protesters in the hospital during the friday of wrath and 3 young people died, one of them in my own hands. I couldn't sit and watch the news since that day. I took to Tahrir Square every day since then and have been one in hundreds of thousands of protesters every day. my belonging to the country has been shaken back to life and my respect and love for the egyptians burst in my heart.
tahrir was my utopia althroughout. there I saw the kind of people I want to belong to, the country I want to belong to, the unity I wanted to belong to. everybody was curteous, everybody was civil, everybody was cooperative. against the army of security agents, gangs of thugs or a relentless war of rumours and tarnishing, they stood their grounds. my love and respect for them grew every day, and so did, luckily, their supporters. I saw the crowd growing from a few thousands every day to more than a million. we were united by our common goal, but also by our solidarity and love for another, no matter the social background, religious creed or political conviction.
I lived my best days in Tahrir Square. Now I know I will miss it.
My only consolation is that we achieved our goal, got rid of the corrupt regime and will be looking forward to new democracy.

Magda Hassan
02-18-2011, 08:23 AM
http://www.tnr.com/blog/jonathan-chait/83725/peter-ackerman-nonviolence-protest

The New Republic
February 17, 2011

The Godfather of Middle Eastern Protest
Ezra Deutsch-Feldman

With the sudden success of nonviolent revolution in Egypt, attention has turned to the seemingly ubiquitous influence of Peter Ackerman, a former investment banker who became something of an intellectual godfather to the Middle Eastern protest movements. His group, the International Center for Nonviolent Conflict, produced instructional videos for leaders of nonviolent revolutions, held conferences where would-be revolutionaries could meet and swap tactics, and even financed a video game meant to help organizers plan and practice grassroots uprisings. In 2005, our current editor-at-large Franklin Foer profiled Ackerman for TNR:

The State Department has begun paying attention to Ackerman for a good reason: His tactics are suited to the current political climate. The wars against Saddam Hussein and the Taliban have exhausted the U.S. appetite for forcible regime change. At the same time, the goal of promoting democracy in the Middle East and Central Asia remains. To be sure, there is a slew of NGOs that advise and finance democratic activists, but they specialize in working with movements as they approach full bloom —especially as elections near. In places like Iran, however, there are few vibrant movements to foster. That’s where Ackerman has found his niche.

Of all Ackerman’s whiz-bang ideas, he’s most enamored with the development of a video game named after A Force More Powerful that allows players to practice their dictator-toppling skills virtually. On a winter morning, I went to a suburban Baltimore office park to play a beta version. Ackerman has spent $3 million outsourcing the project to a company called BreakAway Games, which helped produce the popular Civilization series. Its offices were creepily quiet.

To provide insights into the mind of the dictator, Ackerman sent Otpor veterans to consult with BreakAway, and you could see their influence in the game’s Serb flair. The opening screen showed a map of a generic Balkan country with towns named after Darko Milicic and other Serbian NBA players. I clicked on a town, providing an overhead view of buildings and streets. A message informed me that a student leader of my movement had been imprisoned. My immediate task, the game told me, was to free him.

More recently Ackerman has stepped up his involvement. He worked with Bob Helvey to train Iranian-Americans, many of whom worked for Reza Pahlavi, the son of the deposed shah.

Azar Nafisi has introduced him to the Iranian human rights community. And the ICNC has made some preliminary contacts with the referendum movement — he most broad-based and promising of the opposition coalitions, uniting monarchists, communists, and Islamists behind a simple demand for a vote on the regime’s future. According to his friends, Ackerman and his circle have begun to kick around creative ideas for challenging the mullahs. What if every Iranian withdrew money from the ATMs at once, overwhelming the country’s financial system? What if they boycotted state-run industries?

Ultimately, he envisions events unfolding as they did in Serbia, with a small, well-trained, nonviolent vanguard introducing the idea of resistance to the masses.

When the Rose Revolution began in the fall of 2003, there was little reason to hope for a happy ending. Twelve years earlier, the former Soviet Republic of Georgia had stepped from communism into civil war. The old Communist eminence Eduard Shevardnadze may have brought greater stability when he took over the government in 1992, but his corrupt rule also generated huge new pools of ill will among the populace. Some of this disgust manifested itself in small, peaceful street protests. But it was also expressed in aborted mutinies and failed assassination attempts on the despot, meaning that, over the post-Soviet era, the peaceful and the violent commingled, leading to bloody crackdowns.

As the Rose Revolutionaries, a group of liberal dissidents, prepared to campaign against Shevardnadze, their leaders vowed to introduce a new culture of resistance better suited to a nation that had lost patience with the cycle of uprising and repression.

The movement would tolerate no guns. Its leaders studied the methods of American civil rights activists and dog-eared the writings of Harvard University researcher Gene Sharp, a theorist of nonviolent struggle.

For a time, this strategy nurtured a fledgling movement with a few hundred adherents. But, as the movement grew, its grip on its followers became more tenuous. Demonstrations swelled into large, angry throngs that had no knowledge of the Nashville sit-ins and zero familiarity with Sharp. Once again, the threat of violence loomed. “Our revolution happened so quickly. Everything became spontaneous,” one of the movement’s leaders, Giorgi Meladze, told me. “That’s where the film came in.”
....
The full contents of this article are available to subscribers with archive access only.

Magda Hassan
02-18-2011, 09:01 AM
This Isn't All About Mubarak

Egypt's Workers Revolt

By MIKE WHITNEY

"The revolution in Egypt is an expression of the will of the people, the determination of the people, the commitment of the people....Muslims and Christians have worked together in this revolution, as have the Islamic groups, secular parties, nationalist parties, and intellectuals....In fact every sector has played part in this revolution: the young, the old, women, men, clerics, artists, intellectuals, workers, and farmers."
-- Hassan Nasrallah, Secretary General of Hezbollah
The real story about what's going on in Egypt is being suppressed in the US because it doesn't jibe with the "ain't capitalism great" theme that the media loves to reiterate ad nauseam. The truth is that the main economic policies that Washington exports through bribery and coercion have ignited massive labor unrest which has set the Middle East ablaze. Mubarak is the first casualty in this war against neoliberalism, but there will be many more to come. In fact, Mubarak's resignation is probably just a sop to Egyptian workers, hoping that they'll follow the military's advice and sheepishly return to their sweatshops so fatcat CEOs in Berlin and Chicago can extract a few more farthings from their labor. But that probably won't happen, because the 18 days in Tahrir Square has had a transformative affect on the consciousness of 80 million Egyptians who've suddenly "had enough". The people have awaken from their slumber and now they're ready to rumble.
The revolution started long before the demonstrations in Tahrir Square, and it will continue for a long time to come. Workers everywhere are rebelling against the miserable conditions, slave wages and "privatization", the crown jewel of neoliberalism. The privatization of state industries in Egypt is the proximate cause of the current uprising. It's led to a general slide in living standards to the point where people would rather face a policeman's truncheon than endure more-of-the-same. Here's an excerpt from Foreign Policy which helps to explain what's going on:

"In the sprawling factories of El-Mahalla el-Kubra, a gritty, industrial town a few hours' drive north of Cairo, lies what many say is the heart of the Egyptian revolution. "This is our Sidi Bouzid," says Muhammad Marai, a labor activist, referring to the town in Tunisia where a frustrated street vendor set himself on fire, sparking the revolution there.
Indeed, the roots of the mass uprising that swept dictator Hosni Mubarak from power lie in the central role this dust-swept company town played years ago in sparking workers' strikes and grassroots movements countrywide. And it is the symbolic core of the latest shift in the revolution: a wave of strikes meant to tackle social and economic inequities, which has brought parts of Egypt to a standstill.
More than 24,000 workers at dozens of state-owned and private textile mills, in particular the mammoth Egypt Spinning and Weaving plant, went on strike and occupied factories for six days in 2006, winning a pay raise and some health benefits. Similar actions took place in 2007....
"After Mahalla in 2008, the first weaknesses in the regime appeared," says Gamal Eid of the Arabic Network for Human Rights Information. "Nothing was the same in Egypt after that." ("Egypt's Cauldron of Revolt", Anand Gopal, Foreign Policy)
Compare this story to the narrative that appears in the US media, that the revolution was triggered by Twitter-happy "twenty somethings" text messaging their friends while buzzing around Cairo. It's utter nonsense. This revolution has working class roots, which is why the establishment press refuses to explain what's really going on. Any talk about "class" is verboten in US media because it tends to reflect poorly on the deep-pocket robber barons who created the greatest extremes in inequality in the history of the world. Here's more from Michael Collins at The Economic populist:

"Egypt began a series of reforms in the 1990's that stacked the deck against workers and farmers. The government sold off the large state enterprises. New owners had little incentive to keep people in jobs or jobs in Egypt. The government enacted new measures to protect large farmers, with peasant farmers left on their own.
When conservative Prime Minister, Ahmed Nafiz, took power in 2004, the situation became desperate. With the help of a new anti labor law, pressure mounted on Egypt's industrial workers. The ETUF had little to offer in support and frequently overruled the votes to strike of local chapters....
The same labor movement that staged the 2006 strike and a follow up in 2007, called for a national strike on April 6, 2008 to raise the nation's minimum wage and protest high food prices. Mubarak's government sent in police who took over the factory in hopes of preventing the strike. Conflict broke out with violence on the part of police toward the union members calling for the strike. Police arrested workers. Trials, convictions and prison sentences followed quickly. Other members continued to protest.
An Egyptian writer noted, "In the 6 April uprising, the demands of the workers and the general population overlapped. People called for lower food prices as workers called for a minimum wage."
In addition, the April 6 Youth Movement emerged as a key player advancing the aims of the national strike. This is the same organization that has been central to rallying crowds throughout the country." ("Forces Behind the Egyptian Revolution", Michael Collins, The Economic Populist)
See? This isn't about removing a despot. It's about class warfare, of which no one will speak in western media.
The revolution signals the rise of organized labor and a frontal assault on the Washington Consensus and the race-to-the-bottom regime that has pushed Egyptian workers to the breaking point. This didn't happen overnight; these forces have been coalescing for a very long time and now the tinder has been lit.
This is a struggle for workers rights and political power as much as it is about wages and conditions. Mubarak's resignation has emboldened the people and strengthened their resolve to affect real structural change. This is their chance to shape the future, which is why Washington is so worried. This is also why US-backed NGOs and their agents were actively trying to depose Mubarak, because they believed that by removing the tyrant, they could appease the masses and send them merrily back to their factories and sweatshops with a pat on the head. But that's not the way it's playing out. Workers seem to know intuitively that Mubarak is just replaceable cog in the imperial mechanism. So far, they have not been placated, subdued or co-opted, although the Obama crew and their junta-leader Tatawi will undoubtedly keep trying. Here's an excerpt from an interview Mona El-Ghobashy, assistant professor of political science at Barnard College, on Democracy Now which adds a bit of context to what's happening in Cairo:

"There's a pre-history to this revolt. Egyptian politics didn't begin on January 25th. In fact,....Egypt has actually been gripped by a rather extraordinary wave of social protest since at least 2000. This is by no means new. It's by no means post-February 13th. This is something that's been happening and peaked in 2006 and 2007, which lends the protest that broke out among civil servants, police officers and other state employees yesterday—it lends it an extra weight. ... What this shows is a convergence of the old style of protest with a completely changed political environment. That's the significance of it....
So, for us to be able to really understand the significance of what's happening today, we have to link it to the fabric of Egyptian politics starting in 2000, for simplicity's sake, but protests actually occurred in the 1990s, as well. One of the largest protests was a quarry workers' strike in 1996 that really shook the country at the time. Of course, nobody remembers this now.
But again, the point I want to emphasize is, we are entering in a period, as Issandr mentioned, a real revolutionary moment in Egyptian politics where this constitution and parliament are suspended, but at the same time we have this roiling social structure where almost each and every sector of the population is taking to the streets, grasping the political opportunity afforded by the change of the regime, but they are doing this because they already know how to do that. They know how to encamp on the streets. They know how to negotiate with the government ministers. They know how many people to put on a street corner to make sure that the government minister comes and talks to them on the street corner. That's why this is significant, not because this is a rebirth of Egyptian politics after February 13th." ( Mona El-Ghobashy, Democracy Now)
The Obama administration isn't "pulling the strings" in this revolution, in fact, they're hanging on by the skin of their teeth. The US has very little control over events on the ground and all of their efforts are focused on "damage control". That's why Obama continues to make his silly pronouncements every day, cautioning protesters to remain peaceful and invoking the words of Martin Luther King to calm the waters. But no one's paying any attention to Obama. He's completely irrelevant. Nor do they care that Hillary Clinton wants Congress to allocate more money for "to bolster the rise of secular political parties". Whatever for?? The horse has already left the barn.
The Egyptian military isn't in control either, which is why they keep issuing conflicting communiques--one minute celebrating the triumph of Tahrir Square and the next minute threatening a crackdown if people don't return to work. Once the military commits to a given-strategy, and starts mowing down striking workers en masse, then the real revolution will begin and a new political reality will begin to emerge. Nothing galvanizes the attention or stirs one's class roots more than blood in the streets.
And, there's no set-way to conduct a revolution, no blueprint for success. Every revolution is different, as unique as the aspirations of the people involved. Rosa Luxemburg realized this when she said:

"The modern working class does not carry out its struggle according to a plan set out in some book or theory; the modern workers' struggle is a part of history, a part of social progress, and in the middle of history, in the middle of progress, in the middle of the fight, we learn how we must fight... That's exactly what is laudable about it, that's exactly why this colossal piece of culture, within the modern workers' movement, is epoch-defining: that the great masses of the working people first forge from their own consciousness, from their own belief, and even from their own understanding the weapons of their own liberation."
The Egyptian people have avoided a full-blown confrontation with government forces with impressive nimbleness. But the threat of a crackdown is still very real. Workers have laid out their demands, and in this new environment of political activism, it's unlikely that they will back down until they achieve their goals. They're not taken-in by Mubarak's departure. They know that the "new boss, is same as the old boss". As the Center for Trade Unions and Worker's Service's states in their manifesto, this isn't just about "decent wages" or "medical care" any more. Egypt's working people "refuse to live a life of humiliation."
From the Center for Trade Unions manifesto:

"....300 young persons have paid with their lives as a price for our freedom and to free us from the humiliation of slavery that we suffer from. And now the road, the path is open for all of us....
Freedom is not just the demand of youth only ....we want freedom so that we can express our demands and rights … so we can find a way to monitor the wealth of our country, the result of our hard work that is being stolen … and so we can re-distribute with some sense of justice … so that different sectors of society who have been oppressed can get more of what it is owed to them so they don't have to needlessly suffer from hunger and illness."
The Egyptian people want what's owed to them---their freedom, their dignity, and a fair share of the pie. And it looks like they might get it all.
http://www.counterpunch.org/whitney02172011.html

Jan Klimkowski
02-18-2011, 05:39 PM
Mubarak is the first casualty in this war against neoliberalism, but there will be many more to come

Amen to that. :mexican:

Bernice Moore
02-19-2011, 04:52 AM
Why Was the CIA Blind in Egypt? (http://www.google.com/url?sa=X&q=http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,2045328_2045333_2049947,00.html&ct=ga&cad=CAcQAhgAIAAoATAAOABA6a_86gRIAVAAWABiBWVuLVVT&cd=9ke4ySNbKyg&usg=AFQjCNG-4K7KotffD0iLEyUFG3y96s19RA)
TIME
But there will also be the question why the CIA failed to predict events there. The first, obvious explanation is that the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have been a giant black hole sucking in CIA operatives and resources from around the world. ...

Peter Lemkin
04-03-2011, 02:53 PM
I'm just hearing on Al Jazeerra Pssssst~ Don't tell anyone, but he was under both house-arrest and a legal order [I]not to leave the country...I smell the CIA / MI6, and their ilk here.....[/SIZE]

Peter Lemkin
04-03-2011, 03:40 PM
Mubarak has left Egypt for the UAE. From here it is 'out of the depths or the MSM', and I fear even the 'progressive community'. Only the MOST immune to the indoctrination dejour, [radicals!] will be immune....

Peter Lemkin
04-03-2011, 04:30 PM
Been, 'a 'thinkin'......It was always likely that Mubarak would get a 'get-out-of-jail-free card...for his 'hard' work for the CIA, MIA. MI6 and Mossad...and a few others; but it is still interesting he disappears at this moment...I think an analysis of what is happening in Yemen, Syria and Libya at them moment. would give background to what is gong/ will be going on.............

Magda Hassan
04-03-2011, 10:05 PM
Al Jazeera did very well covering the Egyptian events but their coverage of Libya leaves a bit to be desired and it just so happens that Al Jazeera's boss is one of the countries attacking Libya.

Magda Hassan
10-24-2011, 08:25 AM
https://rt.com/news/mubarak-died-559/
Rumors in Egypt say that the ousted Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, who was being tried for alleged ordering to kill civilians and corruption in Cairo, may have died in custody, RT’s Paula Slier reports.
If true, Mubarak becomes the second head of state to become a victim of the so-called Arab Spring and not be properly tried for the crimes the opposition charged him with. Earlier, Libya’s Muammar Gaddafi died under suspicious circumstances after being captured by rebel forces.
Egyptian media say Mubarak, whose health had deteriorated to the point where he had to be lying in bed during his trial, was informed about Gaddafi’s death, which worsened his condition. The former Egyptian leader suffered a heart attack after seeing his long-rime friend’s body bloodied and still.
Whether the attack was fatal or not is unclear. However the Egyptian army decided to rap up security in the hospital where Mubarak is being kept under arrest. Extra guards have surrounded the building as well as entered the floor on which the ailing ex-president is being treated, says Slier.
Mubarak has been charged with various crimes, including ordering to shoot at protesters who took to the streets of Egypt in February and eventually overthrew the government. The uprising ended the four-decade rule of the regime. So far, a number of his former subordinates have testified before the court, but none confirmed the accusations.
Another famous similar case in resent history is that of Slobodan Milosevic. The president of Serbia and Yugoslavia was in custody of the Hague Tribunal for alleged crimes committed during the 1990s Balkan wars. The trial was never finished as the defendant died in custody in 2006 of a heart attack.

Keith Millea
12-19-2011, 05:06 PM
Published on Monday, December 19, 2011 by the Guardian/UK (http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2011/dec/18/egypt-military-beating-female-protester-tahrir-square)

Image of Unknown Woman Beaten by Egypt's Military Echoes Around World

by Ahdaf Soueif (https://deeppoliticsforum.com/author/ahdaf-soueif)

The woman is young, and slim, and fair. She lies on her back surrounded by four soldiers, two of whom are dragging her by the arms raised above her head. She's unresisting – maybe she's fainted; we can't tell because we can't see her face. She's wearing blue jeans and trainers. But her top half is bare: we can see her torso, her tummy, her blue bra, her bare delicate arms. Surrounding this top half, forming a kind of black halo around it, is the abaya, the robe she was wearing that has been ripped off and that tells us that she was wearing a hijab.

Six years ago, when popular protests started to hit the streets of Egypt as Hosni Mubarak's gang worked at rigging the 2005 parliamentary elections, the regime hit back – not just with the traditional Central Security conscripts – but with an innovation: militias of strong, trained, thugs. They beat up men, but they grabbed women, tore their clothes off and beat them, groping them at the same time. The idea was to insinuate that females who took part in street protests wanted to be groped.

Women developed deterrent techniques: layers of light clothing, no buttons, drawstring pants double-knotted – and carried right on protesting. Many of the smaller civil initiatives that grew into the protest movement: "We See You", "Against Corruption", "The Streets are Ours" were women-led.

But, a symbiotic relationship springs up between behaviors. Mubarak and Omar Suleiman turn Egypt into the US's favorite location for the torture of "terror suspects" and torture becomes endemic in police stations. The regime's thugs molest women as a form of political bullying – and harassment of women in the streets rises to epidemic levels.

Until 25 January. The Revolution happened and with it came the Age of Chivalry. One of the most noted aspects of behavior in the streets and squares of the 18 days of the Egyptian Revolution was the total absence of harassment. Women were suddenly free; free to walk alone, to talk to strangers, to cover or uncover, to smoke to laugh to cry to sleep. And the job of every single male present was to facilitate, to protect, to help. The Ethics of the Square, we called it.

Now our revolution is in an endgame struggle with the old regime and the military.
The young woman is part of this.

Since Friday the military has openly engaged with civilian protesters in the heart of the capital. The protesters have been peacefully conducting a sit-in in Ministries' Street to signal their rejection of the military's appointment of Kamal Ganzouri as prime minister.

Ganzouri announced that no violence would be used to break up the Cabinet Office sit-in. Moments later the military took on the protesters. For a week Military Police and paratroopers had kidnapped activists from the streets, driven them off in unmarked vehicles, interrogated them and beaten them. On Friday they kidnapped Aboudi – one of the "Ultras" of the Ahli Football Club. They gave him back with his face so beaten and burned that you couldn't see features – and started the street war that's been raging round Ministries' Street for the last three days.

The protesters have thrown rocks at the military. The military has shot protesters, and thrown rocks, Molotov cocktails, china embossed with official parliament insignia, chairs, cupboards, filing-cabinets, glass panes and fireworks. They've dragged people into parliament and into the Cabinet Office and beaten and electrocuted them – my two nieces were beaten like this.

They beat up a newly elected young member of parliament, jeering: "Let parliament protect you, you son of … ". They took a distinguished older lady who's become known for giving food to the protesters and slapped her repeatedly about the face till she had to beg and apologize. They killed 10 people, injured more than 200, and they dragged the unconscious young woman in the blue jeans – with her upper half stripped – through the streets.

The message is: everything you rose up against is here, is worse. Don't put your hopes in the revolution or parliament. We are the regime and we're back.

What they are not taking into account is that everybody's grown up – the weapon of shame can no longer be used against women. When they subjected young women to virginity tests one of them got up and sued them. Every young woman they've brutalized recently has given video testimony and is totally committed to continuing the struggle against them.

The young woman in the blue jeans has chosen so far to retain her privacy. But her image has already become icon. As the tortured face of Khaled Said broke any credibility the ministry of the interior might have had, so the young woman in the blue jeans has destroyed the military's reputation.

© 2011 Ahdaf Soueif


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TWt0EiEPLvA&feature=player_detailpage

Keith Millea
12-20-2011, 04:42 PM
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/dec/18/egpyt-military-tahrir-square-woman

Young woman beaten and dragged by Egyptian soldiers wants anonymity

Female protester tells friends her identity is not important but her image should expose the brutality of the military regime

Amro Hassan in Cairo and Julian Borger (http://www.guardian.co.uk/profile/julianborger)
guardian.co.uk (http://www.guardian.co.uk/), Sunday 18 December 2011 17.52 EST
Article history (https://deeppoliticsforum.com/forums/#history-link-box)
http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2011/12/18/1324209662950/Egyptian-army-soldiers-ar-005.jpg Egyptian army soldiers beat a female protester during clashes at Tahrir Square, pulling up her head scarf and dragging her through the street. Photograph: Reuters


The woman photographed being beaten in Cairo is an activist who does not want her name revealed because of her shame at the way she was treated, according to those who were with her at the time.

Hassan Mahmoud, a journalist with the newspaper Al Badeel who was there, said the woman stumbled as she tried to flee from the military police, who managed to grab her and beat her. "It was clear to me that they wanted to take her away from us but then a few brave protesters came in and started hurling stones and that was the one thing that saved her from their hands."

He said she was treated for hand and leg wounds, then taken to a centre for rehabilitation of violence victims called El Nadeem Centre, before being taken home where she was said to be feeling wretched about her treatment.

Though her case was drawing comparison with the instant fame accorded posthumously to Neda Agha Soltan, the Iranian woman killed during the 2009 uprising, the woman appealed for her identity to be kept secret.

Mahmoud said she told him: "It doesn't matter if I talk [to the media] or not, their stripping me is enough to reveal them [the army] and tell enough to those who still believe them."

Clashes continued on Sunday for a third straight day, with the toll rising to 10 dead and 505 injured, according to the Egyptian health ministry. Army sources said 164 people had been detained.

As many as 1,000 protesters were still hurling stones and being confronted by both military police and Interior Ministry police – the latter having only joined the fighting that day – in Sheikh Rihan road nearby Tahrir Square and overlooking the rear of the cabinet building. The street leading from Tahrir towards the front of the cabinet is blocked by cement barricades set up by military police earlier on Sunday.

Most confrontations involved hurling stones, along with occasional hit and run raids by security officers chasing protesters towards Tahrir Square using sticks. There were also a considerable number of plainclothes officers hurling stones at protesters from the rear roof of the cabinet building.

The continuing violence has overshadowed phased elections intended to form a new elected government next year.

Magda Hassan
07-03-2013, 11:08 AM
Egypt's Army Says Morsi Role at Syria Rally Seen as Turning Point


(http://gdb.voanews.com/D2382FFC-2A58-42A0-A1CB-CF97138D6B69_mw1024_n_s.jpg)
Fireworks burst over opponents of Egypt's Islamist President Mohamed Morsi, in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, July 2, 2013.










Reuters
July 02, 2013

CAIRO, EGYPT — Army concern about the way President Mohamed Morsi was governing Egypt reached a tipping point when the head of state attended a rally packed with hardline fellow Islamists calling for holy war in Syria, military sources said.

At the June 15 rally, Sunni Muslim clerics used the word “infidels” to denounce both the Shi'ites fighting to protect Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and the non-Islamists that oppose Morsi at home.

Morsi himself called for foreign intervention in Syria against Assad, leading to a veiled rebuke from the army, which issued an apparently bland but sharp-edged statement the next day stressing that its only role was guarding Egypt's borders.

“The armed forces were very alarmed by the Syrian conference at a time the state was going through a major political crisis,” said one officer, whose comments reflected remarks made privately by other army staff. He was speaking on condition of anonymity because he was not permitted to talk to the media.

The controversy surrounding the Syria conference pointed to a crippling flaw in the Morsi presidency: Though the constitution names Morsi as supreme commander of the armed forces, the military remains master of its own destiny and a rival source of authority to the country's first freely elected head of state.

The army's dramatic ultimatum demanding Morsi and other politicians settle their differences by Wednesday afternoon caught the presidency completely off guard. Triggered by mass protests against Morsi's rule, it amounted to a soft coup by a military that has been a major recipient of U.S. aid since the 1970s, when Egypt made peace with neighboring Israel.

The army has cited the need to avoid bloodshed as its main motivation. It also is worried by other major problems facing Egypt, including an economic crisis that has wiped out more than one-tenth of the value of the currency this year, making it harder for the state to import fuel and food.

Speaking on the eve of the protests, the president had dismissed the idea that the army would take control again.

If Morsi was aware of irritation in the army, he chose to ignore it, believing his mandate as Egypt's democratically elected leader gave him license to make policy the way elected leaders do elsewhere in the world.

For the army, the Syria rally had crossed “a national security red line” by encouraging Egyptians to fight abroad, risking creating a new generation of jihadists, said Yasser El-Shimy, analyst with the International Crisis Group.

At the heart of the military's concern is the history of militant Islam in Egypt, homeland of al-Qaida leader Ayman al-Zawahri. The military source condemned recent remarks made by “retired terrorists” allied to Morsi, who has deepened his ties with the once-armed group al-Gamaa al-Islamiya.

Speaking privately, officers in the secular-leaning military have said Egyptians did not want a religious state. Though the Brotherhood never said it wanted to set up a theocracy, such concerns reflect the army's long-standing suspicion toward a movement banned by army rulers in 1954.

Presidency blind to threat

In public, Morsi and the army have kept up appearances.

The presidency repeatedly has moved to quash rumors of tensions with the generals.

The constitution signed into law by Morsi late last year protects the interests of the military, which oversees a sprawling economic empire that produces everything from bottled water to tablet computers.

“The presidency didn't perceive the military as a threat,” added Shimy of the International Crisis Group.

The current head of the armed forces, General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, was appointed by Morsi in his second month in office after he sent into retirement Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi, Mubarak's defense minister for two decades.

Twenty years Tantawi's junior, Sisi was promoted from the position of military intelligence director. Analysts have described it as an arrangement that suited both Morsi and a younger generation of army commanders seeking promotion. He was trained in the United States and Britain, like many officers in an army that receives $1.3 billion in military aid a year from Washington.

While saying the army was out of politics, Sisi repeatedly has called on Egypt's feuding politicians to settle their differences. In December, he chaired unity talks to ease tensions ignited by a decree that expanded Mursi's powers.

Earlier this year, Sisi warned that unrest could bring down the state. He also responded to calls for the army to unseat Mursi, saying: “No one is going to remove anybody”.

The army has not said what Morsi's fate will be in the plan, which it will implement if the politicians fail to agree.

Sisi is something of an Islamist himself, said Robert Springborg, an expert on the Egyptian military based at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California. He cited materials written by Sisi during his training in the United States. “As I see it, they are trying to assert as much pressure as possible to bring about a compromise settlement,” said Springborg.

The military's actions this week should be viewed as those of an institution, not individuals, added Nathan Brown, an expert on Egypt at George Washington University.

“The personal inclinations of individual members of the armed forces are not the issue and are not on display here.

“There is one thing we do know about the ideology of the military. That it sees itself as having a mission to the state rather than the constitution,” said Brown.
http://www.voanews.com/content/egypt-army-says-morsi-role-at-syria-rally-seen-as-turning-point/1693911.html

Magda Hassan
07-03-2013, 01:11 PM
The army has asked all workers but a skeleton staff leave the state media building. They are moving in.

Peter Lemkin
07-03-2013, 06:13 PM
Apparently, as I write this, a military coup d'etat is taking place in Egypt....very cleverly hidden under the cloak of civilians...very confused situation. President has no way to communicate with anyone; at moment streets are tense but peaceful - as no one really knows what is going on. Troop carriers are being deployed around Cairo center and other major cities. I'm NO fan of the Muslim Brotherhood [who were allied with the Nazis during WW2 and before], but I also do NOT see this as anything but a Giant Step away from rule by law and democracy - as Morssi won the election - even if he and his party did some very unpleasant things with the Constitution et al. Hang on...gonna be a long and bloody night, I fear....!...and next few days!

Best live coverage now that I know of is Al Jazeera http://www.aljazeera.com/watch_now/

Tracy Riddle
07-03-2013, 06:39 PM
Unfortunately, Egypt has a 5000+ year history of rule by monarchs, foreign powers and military dictators. So they have no direct experience with constitutional/republican/democratic government. Such ideas may be understood by an educated minority of professionals and students, but the masses often prefer a strongman who guarantees them food, jobs and safe streets. Look how shaky our constitutional systems are in the West, and we have centuries of experience with it.

Peter Lemkin
07-05-2013, 06:22 PM
HUGE number of pro-Morsi marchers, many with weapons, are marching in central Cairo just blocks from the anti-Morsi demonstration.....it will be a bloody night, sadly.....again.

Magda Hassan
07-06-2013, 12:00 PM
4948
The arrest of one of the elements of the ‎#MB (https://twitter.com/search?q=%23MB&src=hash) wearing a military uniform

Magda Hassan
07-09-2013, 02:44 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6aiP-vu677A

Magda Hassan
07-09-2013, 06:47 AM
When is a Military Coup Not a Military Coup? When it Happens in Egypt, Apparently

Those Western leaders who are telling us Egypt is still on the path to “democracy” have to remember that Morsi was indeed elected in a real, Western-approved election

By Robert Fisk

July 08, 2013 "Information Clearing House (http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/) - "The Independent (http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/comment/when-is-a-military-coup-not-a-military-coup-when-it-happens-in-egypt-apparently-8688000.html)"-- For the first time in the history of the world, a coup is not a coup. The army take over, depose and imprison the democratically elected president, suspend the constitution, arrest the usual suspects, close down television stations and mass their armour in the streets of the capital. But the word ‘coup’ does not – and cannot – cross the lips of the Blessed Barack Obama. Nor does the hopeless UN secretary general Ban Ki-moon dare to utter such an offensive word. It’s not as if Obama doesn’t know what’s going on. Snipers in Cairo killed 15 Egyptians this week from a rooftop of the very university in which Obama made his ‘reach-out’ speech to the Muslim world in 2009.

Is this reticence because millions of Egyptians demanded just such a coup – they didn’t call it that, of course – and thus became the first massed people in the world to demand a coup prior to the actual coup taking place? Is it because Obama fears that to acknowledge it’s a coup would force the US to impose sanctions on the most important Arab nation at peace with Israel? Or because the men who staged the coup might forever lose their 1.5 billion subvention from the US – rather than suffer a mere delay -- if they were told they’d actually carried out a coup.

Now for the kind of historical memory that Obama would enjoy. In that dodgy 2009 speech in Cairo – in which he managed to refer to Palestinian “dislocation” rather than “dispossession” – Obama made the following remarkable comment, which puts the events in Egypt today into a rather interesting perspective. There were some leaders, he said, “who advocate for democracy only when they are out of power; once in power, they are ruthless in suppressing the rights of others…you must respect the rights of minorities, and participate with a spirit of tolerance and compromise; you must place the interests of your people and the legitimate workings of the political process above your party. Without these ingredients, elections alone do not make true democracy.”

Obama did not say this in the aftermath of the coup-that-wasn’t. He uttered these very words in Egypt itself just over four years ago. And it pretty much sums up what Mohamed Morsi did wrong. He treated his Muslim Brotherhood mates as masters rather than servants of the people, showed no interest in protecting Egypt’s Christian minority, and then enraged the Egyptian army by attending a Brotherhood meeting at which Egyptians were asked to join the holy war in Syria to kill Shiites and overthrow Bashar al-Assad’s regime.

And there is one salient fact about the events of the last 48 hours in Egypt. No one is happier – no one more satisfied nor more conscious of the correctness of his own national struggle against ‘Islamists’ and ‘terrorists’ -- than Assad. The West has been wetting itself to destroy Assad – but does absolutely nothing when the Egyptian army destroys its democratically-elected president for lining up with Assad’s armed Islamist opponents. The army called Morsi’s supporters “terrorists and fools”. Isn’t that just what Bashar calls his enemies? No wonder Assad told us yesterday that no one should use religion to gain power. Hollow laughter here -- offstage, of course.

But this doesn’t let Obama off the hook. Those Western leaders who are gently telling us that Egypt is still on the path to “democracy”, that this is an “interim” period – like the ‘interim’ Egyptian government concocted by the military – and that millions of Egyptians support the coup that isn’t a coup, have to remember that Morsi was indeed elected in a real, Western-approved election. Sure, he won only 51 per cent -- or 52 per cent -- of the vote.

But did George W. Bush really win his first presidential election? Morsi certainly won a greater share of the popular vote than David Cameron. We can say that Morsi lost his mandate when he no longer honoured his majority vote by serving the majority of Egyptians. But does that mean that European armies must take over their countries whenever European prime ministers fall below 50 per cent in their public opinion polls? And by the way, are the Muslim Brotherhood to be allowed to participate in the next Egyptian presidential elections? Or will they be banned? And if they participate, what will happen if their candidate wins again?

Israel, however, must be pleased. It knows a coup when it sees one – and it’s now back playing its familiar role as the only ‘democracy’ in the Middle East, and with the kind of neighbours it understands: military rulers. And if Egypt’s wealthy military king-makers are getting a nifty $1.5 billion dollars a year from Washington – albeit postponed -- they are certainly not going to tamper with their country’s peace treaty with Israel, however unpopular it remains with the people for whom it supposedly staged the coup-that-wasn’t. Stand by then for the first US delegation to visit the country which has suffered the coup-that-wasn’t. And you’ll know whether they believe there was a coup or not by the chaps they visit on their arrival in Cairo: the army, of course

Magda Hassan
07-09-2013, 06:49 AM
America’s Plan B in Egypt: Bring Back the Old Regime

By Mahdi Darius Nazemroaya

July 08, 2013 "Information Clearing House (http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/) - "Strategic Culture Foundation (http://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2013/07/06/america-plan-b-egypt-bring-back-the-old-regime.html)"-- The road that has been taken in Egypt (http://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2013/07/05/egypt-deeper-uncertainty-or-ray-of-hope.html) is a dangerous one. A military coup has taken place in Egypt while millions of Egyptians have cheered it on with little thought about what is replacing the Muslim Brotherhood and the ramifications it will have for their society. Many people in cheering crowds have treated the Egyptian military’s coup like it was some sort of democratic act. They fail to remember who the generals of the Egyptian military work for. Those who are ideologically opposed to the Muslim Brotherhood have also cheered the military takeover without realizing that the military takeover ultimately serves imperialist behaviour. The cheering crowds have not considered the negative precedent that has been set.
Egypt was never cleansed of corrupt figures by the Muslim Brotherhood, which instead joined them. Key figures in Egypt, like Al-Azhar’s Grand Mufti Ahmed Al-Tayeb (who was appointed by Mubarak), criticized the Muslim Brotherhood when Mubarak was in power, then denounced Mubarak and supported the Muslim Brotherhood when it gained power, and then denounced the Muslim Brotherhood when the military removed it from power. The disgraced Muslim Brotherhood has actually been replaced by a far worse assembly. These figures, whatever they call themselves, have only served power and never democracy. The military’s replacements for the Muslim Brotherhood—be it the new interim president or the leaders of the military junta—were either working with or serving the Muslim Brotherhood and, even before them, Hosni Mubarak’s regime.
The Undemocratic Egyptian Full Circle
Unlike the protests, the military takeover in Egypt is a blow to democracy. Despite the incompetence and hypocrisy of the Egyptian branch of the Muslim Brotherhood’s leadership, it was democratically elected into power. While the rights of all citizens to demonstrate and protest should be protected and structured mechanisms should securely be put into place in all state systems for removing any unpopular government, democratically-elected governments should not be toppled by military coups. Unless a democratically-elected government is killing its own people arbitrarily and acting outside the law, there is no legitimate excuse for removing it from power by means of military force. There is nothing wrong with the act of protesting, but there is something wrong when a military coup is initiated by a corrupt military force that works in the services of Washington and Tel Aviv.
Things have come full circle in Cairo. The military oversight over the government in Cairo is exactly the position that Egypt’s corrupt military leaders wanted to have since the Egyptian elections in 2012 that brought the Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party into power. Since then there has been a power struggle between the Egyptian military and the Muslim Brotherhood.
Expecting to win the 2012 elections, at first the Egyptian military fielded one of its generals and a former Mubarak cabinet minister (and the last prime minister to serve under Mubarak), Ahmed Shafik, for the position of Egyptian president. If not a Mubarak loyalist per se, Shafik was a supporter of the old regime’s political establishment that gave him and the military privileged powers. When Ahmed Shafik lost there was a delay in recognizing Morsi (http://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2013/07/05/morsi-fall-and-arab-summer-spells-doom-obama-doctrine.html) as the president-elect, because the military was considering rejecting the election results and instead announcing a military coup.
The High Council of the Armed Forces, which led Egypt’s military, realized that a military coup after the 2012 elections would not fare too well with the Egyptian people and could lead to an all-out rebellion against the Egyptian military’s leadership. It was unlikely that many of the lower ranking soldiers and commissioned officers would have continued to follow the orders of the Egyptian military’s corrupt upper echelons if such a coup took place. Thus, plans for a coup were aborted. Egyptian military leaders instead decided to try subordinating Egypt’s civilian government by dissolving the Egyptian Parliament and imposing a constitution that they themselves wrote to guarantee military control. Their military constitution subordinated the president’s office and Egypt’s civilian government to military management. Morsi would wait and then reinstate the Egyptian Parliament in July 2012 and then nullify the military’s constitution that limited the powers of the presidency and civilian government after he worked with the US and Qatar to pacify Hamas. Next, Morsi would order Marshall Tantawi, the head of the Egyptian military, and General Anan, the second most powerful general in the Egyptian military, into resigning—neither one was a friend of democracy or justice.
Was Morsi’s Administration Really a Muslim Brotherhood Government?
Before it was ousted, the Muslim Brotherhood faced serious structural constraints in Egypt and it made many wrong decisions. Since its electoral victory there was an ongoing power struggle in Egypt and its Freedom and Justice Party clumsily attempted to consolidate its political control over Egypt. The Muslim Brotherhood’s attempts to consolidate power meant that it has had to live with and work with a vast array of state institutions and bodies filled with its opponents, corrupt figures, and old regime loyalists. The Freedom and Justice Party tried to slowly purge the Egyptian state of Mubarak loyalists and old regime figures, but Morsi was forced to also work with them simultaneously. This made the foundations of his government even weaker.
The situation for the Muslim Brotherhood in 2012 was actually similar to the one Hamas faced in 2006 after its electoral victories in the Palestinian elections. Just as Hamas was forced by the US and its allies to accept Fatah ministers in key positions in the Palestinian government that it formed, the Muslim Brotherhood was forced to do the same unless it wanted the state to collapse and to be internationally isolated. The main difference between the two situations is that the Muslim Brotherhood seemed all too eager to comply with the US and work with segments of the old regime that would not challenge it. Perhaps this happened because the Muslim Brotherhood feared a military takeover. Regardless of what the reasons were, the Muslim Brotherhood knowingly shared the table of governance with counter-revolutionaries and criminals.
In part, Morsi’s cabinet would offer a means of continuation to the old regime. Foreign Minister Mohammed Kamel Amr, Morsi’s top diplomat, was a cabinet minister under Marshal Tantawi and served in key positions as Mubarak’s ambassador to the United States and Saudi Arabia. Morsi’s cabinet would only have a few members of the Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party whereas the ministerial portfolios for the key positions of the Interior Ministry, Defence Ministry, and the Suez Canal Authority would be given to Mubarak appointees from Egypt’s military and police apparatus. Abdul-Fatah Al-Sisi, Mubarak’s head of Military Intelligence who has worked closely with the US and Israel, would be promoted as the head of the Egyptian military and as Egypt’s new defence minister by Morsi. It would ironically, but not surprisingly, be Al-Sisi that would order Morsi’s arrest and ouster after extensive consultations with his American counterpart, Charles Hagel (http://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2013/07/05/egypt-coup-churns-up-regional-politics-ii.html), on July 3, 2013.
The Muslim Brotherhood and the Obama Administration: An Alliance of Convenience?
As a result of the Muslim Brotherhood’s collaboration with the US and Israel, large components of the protests in Egypt against Morsi were resoundingly anti-American and anti-Israeli. This has to do with the role that the Obama Administration has played in Egypt and the regional alliance it has formed with the Muslim Brotherhood. In part, it also has to do with the fact that Morsi’s opponents—even the ones that are collaborating with the US and Israel themselves—have capitalized on anti-American and anti-Israeli sentiments by portraying Morsi as a US and Israeli puppet. In reality, both the United States and Muslim Brotherhood have tried to manipulate one another for their own gains. The Muslim Brotherhood has tried to use the Obama Administration to ascend to power whereas the Obama Administration has used the Muslim Brotherhood in America’s war against Syria and to slowly nudge the Hamas government in Gaza away from the orbit of Iran and its allies in the Resistance Bloc. Both wittingly and unwittingly, the Muslim Brotherhood in broader terms has, as an organization, helped the US, Israel, and the Arab petro-sheikhdoms try to regionally align the chessboard in a sectarian project that seeks to get Sunnis and Shias to fight one another.
Because of the Freedom and Justice Party’s power struggle against the Egyptian military and the remnants of the old regime, the Muslim Brotherhood turned to the United States for support and broke all its promises. Some can describe this as making a deal with the “Devil.” At the level of foreign policy, the Muslim Brotherhood did not do the things it said it would. It did not end the Israeli siege on the people of Gaza, it did not cut ties with Israel, and it did not restore ties with the Iranians. Its cooperation with the US allowed Washington to play the different sides inside Egypt against one another and to hedge the Obama Administration’s bets.
The Muslim Brotherhood miscalculated in its political calculus. Morsi himself proved not only to be untrustworthy, but also foolish. Washington has always favoured the Egyptian military over the Muslim Brotherhood. Like most Arab militaries, the Egyptian military has been used as an internal police force that has oppressed and suppressed its own people. Unlike the Muslim Brotherhood, the Egyptian military gives far greater guarantees about the protection of US interests in Egypt, Israel’s security, and US sway over the strategically and commercially important Suez Canal. Furthermore, the Muslim Brotherhood had its own agenda and it seemed unlikely that it would continue to play a subordinate role to the United States and Washington was aware of this.
Revolution or Counter-Revolution?
Indeed a dangerous precedent has been set. The events in Egypt can be used in line with the same type of standard that allowed the Turkish military to subordinate democracy in Turkey for decades whenever it did not like a civilian government. The Egyptian military has taken the opportunity to suspend the constitution. It can now oversee the entire political process in Egypt, essentially with de facto veto powers. The military coup not only runs counter to the principles of democracy and is an undemocratic act, but it also marks a return to power by the old regime. Egypt’s old regime, it should be pointed out, has fundamentally always been a military regime controlled by a circle of generals and admirals that operate in collaboration with a few civilian figures in key sectors.
Things have really gone full circle in Egypt. The judiciary in Egypt is being aligned with the military or old regime again. Mubarak’s attorney-general, Abdel Meguid Mahmoud, who was removed from power in November 2012 has been reinstated. The Egyptian Parliament has been dissolved again by the leaders of the High Council of the Armed Forces. President Morsi and many members of the Muslim Brotherhood have been rounded up and arrested by the military and police as enemies of the peace.
Adli (Adly) Al-Mansour, the Mubarak appointed judge that President Morsi was legally forced to appoint as the head of the Egyptian Supreme Constitutional Court, has now been appointed interim president by the High Council of the Armed Forces. Al-Mansour is merely a civilian figure head for a military junta. It is also worth noting that the Egyptian Supreme Constitutional Court, like much of the Mubarak appointees in the Egyptian judiciary, has collaborated with the Egyptian military against the Muslim Brotherhood and tried to dissolve the Egyptian Parliament.
Mohammed Al-Baradei (El-Baradei / ElBaradei), a former Egyptian diplomat and the former director-general of the politically manipulated International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), has been offered the post of interim prime minister of Egypt by the military. He had returned to Egypt during the start of the so-called Arab Spring to run for office with the support of the International Crisis Group, which is an organization that is linked to US foreign policy interests and tied to the Carnegie Foundation, the Ford Foundation, and George Soros’ Open Society Institute. Al-Baradei himself has been delighted every time that the Egyptian military has announced a coup; he supported a military takeover in 2011 and, to his benefit, he has supported it in 2013. Where he could not secure a position for himself through the ballot box, he has been offered a government position undemocratically through the military in 2013.
Many of the Muslim Brotherhood’s supporters are emphasizing that an unfair media war was waged against them. The Qatari-owned Al Jazeera Mubasher Misr, Al Jazeera’s Egyptian branch which has worked as a mouth piece for the Muslim Brotherhood, has been taken off the air by the Egyptian military. This, along with the ouster of Morsi, is a sign that Qatar’s regional interests are being rolled back too. It seems Saudi Arabia, which quickly congratulated Adli Al-Mansour, is delighted, which explains why the Saudi-supported Nour Party in Egypt betray the Muslim Brotherhood. Other media linked to the Muslim Brotherhood or supportive of it have also been censored and attacked. Much of the privately owned media in Egypt was already anti-Muslim Brotherhood. Like Grand Mufti Ahmed Al-Tayeb, many of these media outlets were supportive of Mubarak’s dictatorship when he was in power, but only changed their tune when he was out of power. The point, however, should not be lost that media censorship against pro-Muslim Brotherhood media outlets does not equate to democratic practice whatsoever.
The figures that have supported the military coup, in the name of democracy, are themselves no friends of democracy either. Many of these opportunists were Mubarak lackeys. For example, the so-called Egyptian opposition leader Amr Moussa was highly favoured by Hosni Mubarak and served as his foreign minister for many years. Not once did Moussa ever bother or dare to question Mubarak or his dictatorship, even when Moussa became the secretary-general of the morally bankrupt and useless Arab League.
The Egyptian Coma Will Backfire on the US Empire
Despite the media reports and commentaries, the Muslim Brotherhood was never fully in charge of Egypt or its government. It always had to share power with segments of the old regime or “Washington’s and Tel Aviv’s men.” Key players in different branches of government and state bodies from the old regime stayed in their places. Even President Morsi’s cabinet had members of the old regime. The discussions on Sharia law were predominately manipulated by the Muslim Brotherhood’s opponents primarily for outside consumption by predominantly non-Muslim countries and to rally Egypt’s Christians and socialist currents against Morsi. As for the economic problems that Egypt faced, they were the mixed result of the legacy of the old regime, the greed of Egypt’s elites and military leaders, the global economic crisis, and the predatory capitalism that the United States and European Union have impaired Egypt with. Those that blamed Morsi for Egypt’s economic problems and unemployment did so wrongly or opportunistically. His administration’s incompetence did not help the situation, but they did not create it either. Morsi was manning a sinking ship that had been economically ravaged in 2011 by foreign states and local and foreign lenders, speculators, investors, and corporations.
There was an undeniable constant effort to sabotage the Muslim Brotherhood’s rule, but this does not excuse the incompetence and corruption of the Muslim Brotherhood. Their attempts at gaining international respectability by going to events such as the Clinton Global Initiative hosted by the Clinton Foundation have only helped their decline. Their hesitation at restoring ties with Iran and their antagonism towards Syria, Hezbollah, and their Palestinian allies only managed to reduce their list of friends and supporters. All too willingly the Muslim Brotherhood seemed to let itself be used by the US, Israel, Saudi Arabia, and Qatar to pacify Hamas in an attempt to de-link the Palestinians in Gaza from the Resistance Bloc. It continued the siege against Gaza and continued to destroy the tunnels used to smuggle daily supplies by the Palestinians. Perhaps it was afraid or had very little say in the matter, but it allowed Egypt’s military, security, and intelligence apparatuses to continue collaborating with Israel. Under the Muslim Brotherhood’s watch Palestinians were disappearing in Egypt and reappearing in Israeli prisons. Morsi’s government also abandoned the amnesty it had given to the Jamahiriya supporters from Libya that took refuge in Egypt.
The United States and Israel have always wanted Egypt to look inward in a pathetic state of paralysis. Washington has always tried to keep Egypt as a dependent state that would fall apart politically and economically without US assistance. It has allowed the situation in Egypt to degenerate as a means of neutralizing the Egyptians by keeping them divided and exhausted. The US, however, will be haunted by the coup against Morsi. Washington will dearly feel the repercussions of what has happened in Egypt. Morsi’s fall sends a negative message to all of America’s allies. Everyone in the Arab World, corrupt and just alike, is more aware than ever that an alliance with Washington or Tel Aviv will not protect them. Instead they are noticing that those that are aligned with the Iranians and the Russians are the ones that are standing.
An empire that cannot guarantee the security of its satraps is one that will eventually find many of its minions turning their backs on it or betraying it. Just as America’s regime change project in Syria is failing, its time in the Middle East is drawing to an end. Those who gambled on Washington’s success, like the Saudi royals, the Muslim Brotherhood, and Turkey’s Prime Minister Recep Erdogan, will find themselves on the losing side of the Middle East’s regional equation…
Mahdi Darius Nazemroaya is a social scientist, award-winning writer, columnist, and researcher. His works have been carried internationally in a broad series of publications and have been translated into more than twenty languages. He is also a frequent guest on international news networks as a geopolitical analyst and expert on the Middle East.

Magda Hassan
07-09-2013, 12:59 PM
Saturday, February 16, 2013

#BlackBloc Mania : @BBBEgypt Who are you !??

And the Black Bloc still captures the attention of the public and the media despite we can not confirm if they do exist at all
Now there is a twitter account claiming to be the official Black Bloc Egypt. This account is called “@bbbEgypt”
This is not the only twitter account claiming to the official Black Bloc twitter account in Egypt but it is the most spread. At the same time the Black Bloc Facebook Pages claim that they do not have any Twitter accounts and the Twitter accounts claim that they do not have any Facebook Page.
Now there is something fishy about this “Black Bloc Egypt” account considering its content and updates. Aside from its violence direct incitement and lessons on how to make Molotov cocktails, I do not understand what kind of underground vigilante group is this that tells the whole world that it will attack the Presidential Palace during the protests jeopardizing the life of the protesters and their lives !!
Strangely I do not remember following this particular account , it appeared suddenly on my timeline which means that I used to follow it before but under different name. Now dear friends on twitter confirmed this information too and some believe that this used to be the account of “@rrCoalition”.
That “rrCoalition” account claimed to be the official account of the Revolution Youth Coalition posting false rumors and information in the past like for instance claiming thatthe Ultras groups have stormed Maspero and demanding the protesters to go to the streets in order to support them. (https://twitter.com/bbbegypt/statuses/294092020027379712) That account does not exist anymore as it has become “@bbbEgypt”. The first time “@rrCoalition” mentioned the term “Black Masked brigades” was on January 25th ,2013 (https://twitter.com/bbbegypt/statuses/294810352330342401) before it would become “@bbbEgypt”


http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-odOhVcnH_Ro/UR-aJ3tq8NI/AAAAAAAAcRY/7vzZH6sgCqE/s320/Replies.JPG (http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-odOhVcnH_Ro/UR-aJ3tq8NI/AAAAAAAAcRY/7vzZH6sgCqE/s1600/Replies.JPG)


Replies @rrcoalition



Check the replies , it was directed to “@rrCoalition” , this was the beginning

Now as I curious person , I used some twitter analytic services to check the history of “@BBBEgypt” and “rrCoalition”. Interestingly the account was made on February 9,2011.
This is according to Twirth (http://twirth.com/) and Twitonomy (http://www.twitonomy.com/)
I do not know if you will be to see the Twitonomy’s bbbEgypt’s profile page (http://www.twitonomy.com/profile.php?sn=bbbegypt) or not but it is detailed with a complete archive of the tweets.


http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-maOl5o9h1Ns/UR-ZMksZyVI/AAAAAAAAcRI/kCdSHjWr3EY/s320/BBBegypt.JPG (http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-maOl5o9h1Ns/UR-ZMksZyVI/AAAAAAAAcRI/kCdSHjWr3EY/s1600/BBBegypt.JPG)


Zoom to see when @bbbegypt joined twitter



Here is the Twirth’s “rrcoalition ” Profile. (http://twirth.com/twitter-accounts/rrcoalition/)


http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-JcsOOqeUGIE/UR-Z2eVX7kI/AAAAAAAAcRQ/8lFdVuPlNuE/s320/twirth.JPG (http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-JcsOOqeUGIE/UR-Z2eVX7kI/AAAAAAAAcRQ/8lFdVuPlNuE/s1600/twirth.JPG)


Zoom in to see when @rrcoalition joined twitter



Now as I proved that the two accounts were one , I must ask : Who operates that the account and what does he want with all these lies and incitement he or they causing !!?
You must know innocent young men and even underage minors are being arrested and accused of being members of that new enemy of the state with no proof what so ever except wearing black according to those who report them !! Some of these young men were subject torture for God sake !!
Please be careful in the information you read or share online nowadays.
http://egyptianchronicles.blogspot.com.au/2013/02/blackbloc-mania-bbbegypt-who-are-you.html

Jan Klimkowski
07-09-2013, 02:05 PM
Fisk asks the only question:


When is a Military Coup Not a Military Coup?

Peter Lemkin
07-09-2013, 05:18 PM
Mubarak's health seems to have improved greatly....so maybe he'll be 'tapped' for the job of dictator again....just a thought...the USA always likes dictators....less messy than democratic Presidents or Parliaments etc.If old Mr. Mubarak is too old, has too many skeletons in his closet, or is not interested, I'm sure they can find someone just like him. The last thing to consider would be the will of the Egyptian People - or the People anywhere, for that matter [even in the USA!] The more things change...the more they seem to stay the same [with some new PR 'dressing']

Magda Hassan
07-10-2013, 12:44 AM
Fisk asks the only question:


When is a Military Coup Not a Military Coup? Because if it is a coup the US cannot give them any $s. They still desperately want to give them $s because they are very good and strong strings to control what happens there....

Jan Klimkowski
07-10-2013, 06:47 PM
Fisk asks the only question:


When is a Military Coup Not a Military Coup? Because if it is a coup the US cannot give them any $s. They still desperately want to give them $s because they are very good and strong strings to control what happens there....

Yes.

And....

Q: When is a Terrorist not a Terrorist?

Ans: When he's furthering our Strategy of Tension.

Magda Hassan
07-10-2013, 11:25 PM
Fisk asks the only question:


When is a Military Coup Not a Military Coup? Because if it is a coup the US cannot give them any $s. They still desperately want to give them $s because they are very good and strong strings to control what happens there....

Yes.

And....

Q: When is a Terrorist not a Terrorist?

Ans: When he's furthering our Strategy of Tension.

Surely you must mean "Bringing Freedom and Democracy to the Middle East"?

Magda Hassan
07-11-2013, 03:40 AM
By BEN HUBBARD and DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/k/david_d_kirkpatrick/index.html)Published: July 10, 2013As crime and traffic worsened under President Mohamed Morsi, the police refused to respond, hurting the quality of life and the economy. Since his ouster last week, officers have returned to patrols.
CAIRO — The streets seethe with protests and government ministers are on the run or in jail, but since the military ousted President Mohamed Morsi, life has somehow gotten better for many people across Egypt: Gas lines have disappeared, power cuts have stopped and the police have returned to the street.


The apparently miraculous end to the crippling energy shortages, and the re-emergence of the police, seems to show that the legions of personnel left in place after former President Hosni Mubarak was ousted in 2011 played a significant role — intentionally or not — in undermining the overall quality of life under the Islamist administration of Mr. Morsi.
And as the interim government struggles to unite a divided nation, the Muslim Brotherhood and Mr. Morsi’s supporters say the sudden turnaround proves that their opponents conspired to make Mr. Morsi fail. Not only did police officers seem to disappear, but the state agencies responsible for providing electricity and ensuring gas supplies failed so fundamentally that gas lines and rolling blackouts fed widespread anger and frustration (http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/27/world/middleeast/anger-at-egypts-leaders-intensifies-in-gas-lines.html?pagewanted=all).
“This was preparing for the coup,” said Naser el-Farash, who served as the spokesman for the Ministry of Supply and Internal Trade under Mr. Morsi. “Different circles in the state, from the storage facilities to the cars that transport petrol products to the gas stations, all participated in creating the crisis.”
Working behind the scenes, members of the old establishment, some of them close to Mr. Mubarak and the country’s top generals, also helped finance, advise and organize those determined to topple the Islamist leadership, including Naguib Sawiris, a billionaire and an outspoken foe of the Brotherhood; Tahani El-Gebali, a former judge on the Supreme Constitutional Court who is close to the ruling generals; and Shawki al-Sayed, a legal adviser to Ahmed Shafik, Mr. Mubarak’s last prime minister, who lost the presidential race to Mr. Morsi.
But it is the police returning to the streets that offers the most blatant sign that the institutions once loyal to Mr. Mubarak held back while Mr. Morsi was in power. Throughout his one-year tenure, Mr. Morsi struggled to appease the police, even alienating his own supporters rather than trying to overhaul the Interior Ministry. But as crime increased and traffic clogged roads — undermining not only the quality of life, but the economy — the police refused to deploy fully.
Until now.
White-clad officers have returned to Cairo’s streets, and security forces — widely despised before and after the revolution — intervened with tear gas and shotguns against Islamists during widespread street clashes last week (http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/06/world/middleeast/egypt.html), leading anti-Morsi rioters to laud them as heroes. Posters have gone up around town showing a police officer surrounded by smiling children over the words “Your security is our mission, your safety our goal.”
“You had officers and individuals who were working under a specific policy that was against Islamic extremists and Islamists in general,” said Ihab Youssef, a retired police officer who runs a professional association for the security forces. “Then all of a sudden the regime flips and there is an Islamic regime ruling. They could never psychologically accept that.”
When Mr. Mubarak was removed after nearly 30 years in office in 2011, the bureaucracy he built stayed largely in place. Many business leaders, also a pillar of the old government, retained their wealth and influence.
Despite coming to power through the freest elections in Egyptian history, Mr. Morsi was unable to extend his authority over the sprawling state apparatus, and his allies complained that what they called the “deep state” was undermining their efforts at governing.
While he failed to broaden his appeal and build any kind of national consensus, he also faced an active campaign by those hostile to his leadership, including some of the wealthiest and most powerful pillars of the Mubarak era.
Mr. Sawiris, one of Egypt’s richest men and a titan of the old establishment, said Wednesday that he had supported an upstart group called “tamarrod,” Arabic for “rebellion,” that led a petition drive seeking Mr. Morsi’s ouster. He donated use of the nationwide offices and infrastructure of the political party he built, the Free Egyptians. He provided publicity through his popular television network and his major interest in Egypt’s largest private newspaper. He even commissioned the production of a popular music video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kZArV7Z-oMo)that played heavily on his network.
“Tamarrod did not even know it was me!” he said. “I am not ashamed of it.”
He said he had publicly predicted that ousting Mr. Morsi would bolster Egypt’s sputtering economy because it would bring in billions of dollars in aid from oil-rich monarchies afraid that the Islamist movement might spread to their shores. By Wednesday, a total of $12 billion had flowed in from Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Kuwait. “That will take us for 12 months with no problem,” Mr. Sawiris said.
Ms. Gebali, the former judge, said in a telephone interview on Wednesday that she and other legal experts helped tamarrod create its strategy to appeal directly to the military to oust Mr. Morsi and pass the interim presidency to Hazem el-Beblawi, a former chief of the constitutional court.
“We saw that there was movement and popular creativity, so we wanted to see if it would have an effect and a constitutional basis,” Ms. Gebali said.


Mr. Farash, the trade ministry spokesman under Mr. Morsi, attributed the fuel shortages to black marketers linked to Mr. Mubarak, who diverted shipments of state-subsidized fuel to sell for a profit abroad. Corrupt officials torpedoed Mr. Morsi’s introduction of a smart card system to track fuel shipments by refusing to use the devices, he said
.


But not everyone agreed with that interpretation, as supporters of the interim government said the improvements in recent days were a reflection of Mr. Morsi’s incompetence, not a conspiracy. State news media said energy shortages occurred because consumers bought extra fuel out of fear, which appeared to evaporate after Mr. Morsi’s fall. On Wednesday, Al Ahram, the flagship newspaper, said the energy grid had had a surplus in the past week for the first time in months, thanks to “energy-saving measures by the public.”
“I feel like Egypt is back,” Ayman Abdel-Hakam, a criminal court judge from a Cairo suburb, said after waiting only a few minutes to fill up his car at a downtown gas station. He accused Mr. Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood of trying to seize all state power and accused them of creating the fuel crisis by exporting gasoline to Hamas, the militant Islamic group in the Gaza Strip.
“We had a disease, and we got rid of it,” Mr. Abdel-Hakam said.
Ahmed Nabawi, a gas station manager, said he had heard several reasons for the gas crisis: technical glitches at a storage facility, a shipment of low-quality gas from abroad and unnecessary stockpiling by the public. Still, he was amazed at how quickly the crisis disappeared.
“We went to sleep one night, woke up the next day, and the crisis was gone,” he said, casually sipping tea in his office with his colleagues.
Regardless of the reasons behind the crisis, he said, Mr. Morsi’s rule had not helped.
“No one wanted to cooperate with his people because they didn’t accept him,” he said. “Now that he is gone, they are working like they’re supposed to.”
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/11/world/middleeast/improvements-in-egypt-suggest-a-campaign-that-undermined-morsi.html?pagewanted=1&_r=0

Magda Hassan
07-11-2013, 04:05 AM
Fisk asks the only question:


When is a Military Coup Not a Military Coup? Because if it is a coup the US cannot give them any $s. They still desperately want to give them $s because they are very good and strong strings to control what happens there....
And the answer is:

Egypt unrest: US to go ahead with F-16 jets delivery

The US is going ahead with plans to deliver four F-16 fighter jets to Egypt despite the political unrest in the country, senior American officials say.
This comes as Washington is continuing to evaluate last week's overthrow of President Mohammed Morsi by the army.
US massive military aid to Cairo would have to be cut by law if the removal of the Islamist leader is determined by Washington to have been a coup.
The Muslim Brotherhood, which backs Mr Morsi, is demanding his reinstatement.
Its supporters have been staging mass protests near Cairo's barracks, where he is believed to be being held. On Monday, more than 50 Brotherhood loyalists were killed in clashes with the army.
'In US interests'The US officials say Washington will deliver four F-16 fighter jets in the next few weeks.
They are part of an already agreed bigger order of 20 planes - eight of which were sent to Egypt in January. The final eight are expected to be shipped later this year.

White House spokesman Jay Carney on Wednesday reiterated that it would not be "in the best interests of the United States to make immediate changes to our assistance programmes".
He added that the administration would take its time to consider the implications of removing Mr Morsi from power.
US military aid to Egypt is estimated to be $1.3bn (£860m) each year.
President Barack Obama has been careful not to use the word "coup" in relation to the recent events in Egypt to avoid triggering a legal cut-off of aid, the BBC's Katy Watson in Washington reports.
'Strong condemnation'An Egyptian foreign ministry spokesman has said Mr Morsi is being held in a "safe place" and treated in a "very dignified manner".
Meanwhile, arrest warrants have been issued for the leader of the Muslim Brotherhood, Mohamed Badie, and nine senior figures.
They are charged with inciting Monday's deadly violence in the capital.
There are conflicting reports about what happened during the protest outside the Presidential Guard barracks, when more than 50 Brotherhood supporters were killed, as well as a soldier and two policemen.
The Brotherhood says the army fired on peaceful demonstrators and is accusing the interim authorities of a cover up. The military, however, say they acted in self-defence after being attack by armed assailants.
Many Brotherhood members are already in detention and warrants are said to have been been issued for hundreds more.
Continue reading the main story (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-23265632#story_continues_3)
The new arrest warrants could scupper any attempts to persuade the Brotherhood to participate in the transitional political process, analysts say.
There is a feeling among the protesters that they have returned to the situation they were in under former President Hosni Mubarak, when the movement was banned and its members hunted down, our correspondent adds.
The timetable for new elections, announced in a constitutional declaration by interim President Adly Mansour on Monday evening, laid out plans to set up a panel to amend the suspended constitution within 15 days.
The changes would then be put to a referendum - to be organised within four months - which would pave the way for parliamentary elections, possibly in early 2014.
Once the new parliament convenes, elections would be called to appoint a new president.
However, the Brotherhood's political wing, the Freedom and Justice Party, and main liberal National Salvation Front opposition coalition and the grassroots Tamarod protest movement have all rejected the transition plan.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-23265632#TWEET817627

Jan Klimkowski
07-11-2013, 05:32 PM
US to go ahead with F-16 jets delivery

Where's Tony Blair?

I'm sure he could spout some complete shite about how this furthers the cause of democracy..

Magda Hassan
07-16-2013, 12:08 PM
US to go ahead with F-16 jets delivery

Where's Tony Blair?

I'm sure he could spout some complete shite about how this furthers the cause of democracy..
Tony Bliar is nowhere to be found, an improvement in being in our faces on the TV actually, but they have wheeled out some one just as odious in a wheel barrow pushed by the equally odious tool Christine Amanpour:

By Mick Krever, CNNWill Egypt get a second chance at democracy?
That’s what the world is asking, a week after Egypt’s military forced President Mohamed Morsy from office, after a year of what the opposition called tyrannical governance.
“Second chances are rare in any country,” U.S. Deputy Secretary of State William Burns said in Cairo on Monday, after meeting with the interim leader, Adly Mansour.
Speaking with CNN’s Christiane Amanpour, Frank Wisner, the former U.S. envoy to Egypt, said that Egypt should seize the opportunity.
“[It’s] a second chance,” he said. “One worth achieving, and there’s a chance Egypt can do it.

Last week, Egypt’s acting foreign minister, Mohamed Kamel Amr, said that there would be a “maximum of six to seven months” before new presidential elections are held.
“It’s an adventuresome goal, but it’s not impossible,” Wisner said in reaction. “Much of the construction has already been written, Egypt has a very sophisticated election machinery.”
What is critical between now and then, Wisner said, was consensus-building.
“I can’t predict what the Muslim Brothers will do,” he said. “I know they are being called upon to join. But it is an opportunity for Egypt to bind up its wounds and come together.”

Magda Hassan
07-25-2013, 02:08 PM
:orly:

After years of 'alliance' General Sisi said "if the US tries to intervene in Egypt Israel "will be wiped of the map"

http://www.egy-press.com/storydetails.aspx?storyid=30834#.UfEpNGT09e5