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Magda Hassan
02-08-2011, 12:31 PM
Mmmm...seems quite a serious step to take over a Blackwater employee. I wonder where this is leading to? The widow of the man he killed committed suicide the other day. Seems the US wants Pakistan to let them kill their citizens with impunity. And to operate their mercenaries minions where and how ever they like
US suspends 'all high-level dialogue' with Pakistan

Updated at 1115 PST Tuesday, February 08, 2011

http://old.thenews.com.pk/updates_pics/2-8-2011_10484_l_u.jpg

WASHINGTON: US government has suspended all high-level dialogue with Pakistan over the case of an American detained on murder charges, US and Pakistani officials quoted as saying by a Washington based US daily.

The case of American killer, Raymond Davis, has severely strained relations between the two governments and threatens to scuttle a planned summit among US, Afghan and Pakistani leaders scheduled for the end of this month in Washington, the newspaper reported.

The report said: "Secretary of State Hillary Clinton canceled a meeting last weekend with Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi at an international security conference in Munich to protest Davis' detention, according to officials from both countries who were not authorized to discuss the situation on the record".

"Pakistan's Ambassador to the US Husain Haqqani has also been summoned twice to the White House for formal complaints and demands that Pakistan recognize Davis's diplomatic immunity and release him immediately."

Davis, 36, holds a diplomatic passport and is a member of the "technical and administrative staff" at the US Embassy in Islamabad "entitled to full criminal immunity in accordance with the Vienna Convention," the State Department said Monday.

The administration and Congress, the statement said, "have repeatedly made clear at the highest levels that this matter must be resolved by the Pakistan government or it could impact other bilateral initiatives."
http://thenews.com.pk/NewsDetail.aspx?ID=10806

Jan Klimkowski
02-08-2011, 06:23 PM
The Empire throws a tantrum over a colony's attempts to bring a hired killer to justice.

:mexican:

Keith Millea
02-08-2011, 07:46 PM
February 8, 2011
A CounterPunch Special Report

The Deepening Mystery of Raymond Davis and Two Slain Pakistani Motorcyclists

By DAVE LINDORFF
The mystery of American Raymond A. Davis, currently imprisoned in the custody of local police in Lahore, Pakistan and charged with the Jan. 27 murder of two young men, whom he allegedly shot eight times with pinpoint accuracy through his car windshield, is growing increasingly murky. Also growing is the anger among Pakistanis that the US is trying to spring him from a Punjab jail by claiming diplomatic immunity. On Feb. 4, there were massive demonstrations, especially in Lahore, demanding that Davis be held for trial, an indication of the level of public anger at talk of granting him immunity.

Davis (whose identity was first denied and later confirmed by the US Embassy in Islamabad), and the embassy have claimed that he was hired as an employee of a US security company called Hyperion Protective Consultants, LLC, which was said to be located at 5100 North Lane in Orlando, Florida. Business cards for Hyperion were found on Davis by arresting officers.

However CounterPunch has investigated and discovered the following information:
First, there is not and never has been any such company located at the 5100 North Lane address. It is only an empty storefront, with empty shelves along one wall and an empty counter on the opposite wall, with just a lone used Coke cup sitting on it. A leasing agency sign is on the window. A receptionist at the IB Green & Associates rental agency located in Leesburg, Florida, said that her agency, which handles the property, part of a desolate-looking strip mall of mostly empty storefronts, has never leased to a Hyperion Protective Consultants. She added, “In fact, until recently, we had for several years occupied that address ourselves.”
The Florida Secretary of State’s office, meanwhile, which requires all Florida companies, including LLSs (limited liability partnerships), to register, has no record, current or lapsed, of a Hyperion Protective Consultants, LLC, and there is only one company with the name Hyperion registered at all in the state. It is Hyperion Communications, a company based in W. Palm Beach, that has no connection with Davis or with security-related activities.

The non-existent Hyperion Protective Consultants does have a website (www.hyperion-protective.com (http://www.hyperion-protective.com/)), but one of the phone numbers listed doesn’t work, an 800 number produces a recorded answer offering information about how to deal with or fend off bank foreclosures, and a third number with an Orlando exchange goes to a recording giving Hyperion’s corporate name and asking the caller to leave a message. Efforts to contact anyone on that line were unsuccessful. The local phone company says there is no public listing for Hyperion Protective Consultants--a rather unusual situation for a legitimate business operation.

Pakistani journalists have been speculating that Davis is either a CIA agent or is working as a contractor for some private mercenary firm--possibly Xe, the reincarnation of Blackwater. They are not alone in their suspicions. Jeff Stein, writing in the Washington Post on January 27, suggested after interviewing Fred Burton, a veteran of the State Department’s counter-terrorism Security Service, that Davis may have been involved in intelligence activity, either as a CIA employee under embassy cover or as a contract worker at the time of the shootings. Burton, who currently works with Stratfor, an Austin, TX-based “global intelligence” firm, even speculates that the shootings may have been a “spy meeting gone awry,” and not, as US Embassy and State Department officials are claiming, a case of an attempted robbery or car-jacking.

Even the information about what actually transpired is sketchy at this point. American media reports have Davis driving in Mozang, a busy commercial section of Lahore, and being approached by two threatening men on motorcycles. The US says he fired in self-defense, through his windshield with his Beretta pistol, remarkably hitting both men four times and killing both. He then exited his car and photographed both victims with his cell phone, before being arrested by local Lahore police. Davis, 36, reportedly a former Special Forces officer, was promptly jailed on two counts of murder, and despite protests by the US Embassy and the State Department that he is a “consular official” responsible for “security,” he continues to be held pending trial.

What has not been reported in the US media, but which reporter Shaukat Qadir of the Pakistani Express Tribune, says has been stated by Lahore police authorities, is that the two dead motorcyclists were each shot two times, “probably the fatal shots,” in the back by Davis. They were also both shot twice from the front. Such ballistics don’t mesh nicely with a protestation of self-defense.

Also left unmentioned in the US media is what else was found in Davis’ possession. Lahore police say that in addition to the Beretta he was still holding, and three cell phones retrieved from his pockets, they found a loaded Glock pistol in his car, along with three full magazines, and a “small telescope.” Again, heavy arms for a consular security officer not even in the act of guarding any embassy personnel, and what’s with the telescope? Also unmentioned in US accounts: his car was not an embassy vehicle, but was a local rental car.

American news reports say that a “consular vehicle” sped to Davis’ aid after the shooting incident and killed another motorcyclist enroute, before speeding away. The driver of that car is being sought by Lahore prosecutors but has not been identified or produced by US Embassy officials. According to Lahore police, however, the car in question, rather than coming to Davis’s aid, actually had been accompanying Davis’s sedan, and when the shooting happened, it “sped away,” killing the third motorcyclist as it raced off. Again a substantially different story that raises more questions about what this drive into the Mozang district was all about.
Davis has so far not said why he was driving, heavily armed, without anyone else in his vehicle, in a private rental car in a business section of Lahore where foreign embassy staff would not normally be seen. He is reportedly remaining silent and is leaving all statements to the US Embassy.

The US claim that Davis has diplomatic immunity hinges first and foremost on whether he is actually a “functionary” of the consulate. According to Lahore police investigators, he was arrested carrying a regular US passport, which had a business visa, not a diplomatic visa. The US reportedly only later supplied a diplomatic passport carrying a diplomatic visa that had been obtained not in the US before his departure, but in Islamabad, the country’s capital.

(Note: It is not unusual, though it is not publicly advertised, for the US State Department to issue duplicate passports to certain Americans. When I was working for Business Week magazine in Hong Kong in the early 1990s, and was dispatched often into China on reporting assignments, my bureau chief advised me that I could take a letter signed by her to the US Consulate in Hong Kong and request a second passport. One would be used exclusively to enter China posing as a tourist. The other would be used for going in officially as a journalist. The reason for this subterfuge, which was supported by the State Department, was that once Chinese visa officials have spotted a Chinese “journalist” visa stamped in a passport, they would never again allow that person to enter the country without first obtaining such a visa. The problem is that a journalist visa places strict limits on a reporter’s independent travel and access to sources. As a tourist, however, the same reporter could – illegally -- travel freely and report without being accompanied by meddling foreign affairs office “handlers.”)

Considerable US pressure is currently being brought to bear on the Pakistani national government to hand over Davis to the US, and the country’s Interior Minister yesterday issued a statement accepting that Davis was a consular official as claimed by the US. But Punjab state authorities are not cooperating, and so far the national government is saying it is up to local authorities and the courts to decide whether his alleged crime of murder would, even if he is a legitimate consular employee, override a claim of diplomatic immunity.

Under Pakistani law, only actual consular functionaries, not service workers at embassy and consulate, have diplomatic status. Furthermore, no immunity would apply in the case of “serious” crimes--and certainly murder is as serious as it gets.

The US media have been uncritically quoting the State Department as saying that Pakistan is “violating” the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations of 1963 by holding Davis in jail on murder charges. Those reporters should check the actual document.

Section II, Article 41 of the treaty, in its first paragraph regarding the “Personal inviolability of consular officers,” states:

“Consular officers shall not be liable to arrest or detention pending trial, except in the case of a grave crime and pursuant to a decision by the competent judicial authority.”
In other words, the prosecutorial, police and judicial authorities in Lahore and the state of Punjab are doing exactly what they are supposed to do in holding Davis on murder charges, pending a judicial determination concerning whether or not he can properly claim diplomatic immunity.

The US claim that Pakistan is violating the convention is simply nonsense.
There is also the matter of double standards. The US routinely violates the Vienna Diplomatic Accord that governs international diplomatic rights. For example, the same convention requires countries that arrest, jail and prosecute foreigners for crimes to promptly notify the person’s home country embassy, and to grant that embassy the right to provide legal counsel. Yet the US has arrested, charged with murder, and executed many foreign nationals without ever notifying their embassies of their legal jeopardy, and has, on a number of occasions, even gone ahead with executions after a convict’s home country has learned of the situation and requested a stay and a retrial with an embassy-provided defense attorney. The US, in 1997, also prosecuted, over the objections of the government of Georgia, a Georgian embassy diplomat charged with the murder of a 16-year-old girl.
Apparently diplomatic immunity has more to do with the relative power of the government in question and of the embassy in question than with the simple words in a treaty.

It remains to be seen whether Davis will ever actually stand trial in Pakistan. The US is pushing hard in Islamabad for his release. On the other hand, his arrest and detention, and the pressure by the US Embassy to spring him, are leading to an outpouring of rage among Pakistanis at a very volatile time, with the Middle East facing a wave of popular uprisings against US-backed autocracies, and with Pakistan itself, increasingly a powder keg, being bombed by US rocket-firing pilotless drone aircraft.

Some Pakistani publications, meanwhile, are speculating that Davis, beyond simple spying, may have been involved in subversive activities in the country, possibly linked to the wave of terror bombings that have been destabilizing the central government. They note that both of the slain motorcyclists (the third dead man appears to have been an innocent victim of the incident) were themselves armed with pistols, though neither had apparently drawn his weapon.

A State Department official, contacted by Counterpunch, refused to provide any details about the nature of Davis’ employment, or to offer an explanation for Hyperion Protective Consultants LLC’s fictitious address, and its lack of registration with the Florida Secretary of State’s office.

Davis is currently scheduled for a court date on Feb. 11 to consider the issue of whether or not he has immunity from prosecution.

Dave Lindorff, a frequent contributor to Counterpunch, is the founder of the online alternative newspaper ThisCantBeHappening! at www.thiscantbehappening.net (http://www.thiscantbehappening.net)

http://www.counterpunch.org/

Jan Klimkowski
02-08-2011, 09:06 PM
Keith - thanks for posting. Excellent additional material.

Now who are the two Pakistanis that The Empire's hired killer executed?

Magda Hassan
02-08-2011, 10:39 PM
Keith - thanks for posting. Excellent additional material.

Now who are the two Pakistanis that The Empire's hired killer executed?
Some more info here Jan (https://deeppoliticsforum.com/forums/showthread.php?6231-US-embassy-official-Blackwater-agent-and-he-s-using-fake-number-plates.)

David Guyatt
02-10-2011, 09:25 AM
As I keep repeating - rather boringly so I suspect - one must never forget the military and intelligence communities love of esoteric symbolism, which itself is very firmly rooted in ancient, particularly Greek, mythology.

Take the name of Hyperion Protective Consultants, LLC. Google that name under the search term "definition of" and we get:

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Hyperion


Hy·pe·ri·on (h-pîr-n)
n.
1. Greek Mythology A Titan, the son of Gaea and Uranus and the father of Helios.
2. A satellite of Saturn.

Thus Hyperion is a Titan and a satellite.

Titan Corporation perhaps.

Just a thought.

Keith Millea
02-10-2011, 03:27 PM
Thus Hyperion is a Titan and a satellite.

Titan Corporation perhaps.

Just a thought.

Titan Corp. Wiki page.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titan_Corp.

David Guyatt
02-10-2011, 03:43 PM
Strange that Keith. I hit the link and get this:


Titan Corp
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Look for Titan Corp on one of Wikipedia's sister projects:
Wiktionary (free dictionary)
Wikibooks (free textbooks)
Wikiquote (quotations)
Wikisource (free library)
Wikiversity (free learning resources)
Commons (images and media)
Wikinews (free news source)
Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. Please search for Titan Corp in Wikipedia to check for alternative titles or spellings.
Start the Titan Corp article, using the Article Wizard if you wish, or add a request for it.
Search for "Titan Corp" in existing articles.
Look for pages within Wikipedia that link to this title.
Other reasons this message may be displayed:
If a page was recently created here, it may not yet be visible because of a delay in updating the database; wait a few minutes and try the purge function.
Titles on Wikipedia are case sensitive except for the first character; please check alternative capitalizations and consider adding a redirect here to the correct title.
If the page has been deleted, check the deletion log, and see Why was my page deleted?.

However, if I Google the name with "Wiki" as the search term I get the whole nine yards. So I'm linking again but using the Google Cache (http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:UhRx9wRubW0J:en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titan_Corp.+Titan+Corporation&cd=2&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=uk&client=safari&source=www.google.co.uk) link for them.

As I recall, I have several documents about Titan Corp from files of the South African intelligence front run by Rolf van Rooyen and Riaan Stander, so there is no question in my mind that Titan are deeply enmeshed in the covert world of black operations.

Keith Millea
02-10-2011, 04:43 PM
Interesting David

At first I just typed in "Titan Corporation" in my search window,and it came up with the full Wiki page.Now when I just tried my link again,it shows the short page you got.WTF........

:shrug:

David Guyatt
02-10-2011, 04:48 PM
Methinks dirty tricks Keith. A taste of what is to come. Because the link you posted was precisely the same I used this morning to wiki Titan too.

Keith Millea
02-10-2011, 05:44 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titan_Corp.

I think what is happening is that the dot on the end of the Wiki url does not show up when you hit the link.

Keith Millea
02-10-2011, 06:37 PM
A little bit stranger everyday.......


February 10, 2011
Lahore Killings Update

US Terror Campaign in Pakistan?

By DAVE LINDORFF
The mystery surrounding Raymond A. Davis, the American former Special Forces operative jailed in Lahore, Pakistan for the murder of two young motorcyclists, and his funky “security” company, Hyperion-Protective Consultants LLC, in the US continues to grow.

When Davis was arrested in the immediate aftermath of the double slaying in a busy business section of Lahore, after he had fatally shot two men in the back, claiming that he feared they might be threatening to rob him, police found business cards on him for a security company called Hyperion-Protective Consultants LLC, which listed as its address 5100 North Lane, Orlando, Florida.

A website for the company gave the same address, and listed the manager as a Gerald Richardson.

An investigation into the company done for CounterPunch (http://www.counterpunch.org/lindorff02082011.html) that was published on Tuesday, disclosed that the address was actually for a vacant storefront in a run-down and almost completely empty strip mall in Orlando called North Lane Plaza. The 5100 shop was completely empty and barren, save for an empty Coke glass on a vacant counter.

Now Tom Johnson, executive of a property company called IB Green, owner of the strip mall property, says that the 5100 address was rented by a man named Gerald Richardson, who used it to sell clothing. “We made him move out in December 2009 for nonpayment of rent,” he says. Johnson recalls that at one point when Richardson was leasing the space for his clothing store, he told him, “Oh, I have another company called Hyperion which might get mail there.”

Hyperion-Protective Consultants LLC, as reported in the Counterpunch article, is not registered with the Florida Secretary of State’s office, although it still lists the vacant 5100 North Lane, Orlando address as its headquarters on the company website, which also provides an email address for Richardson, who is described as the company’s “manager and chief researcher.” (Efforts to reach Richardson via his email and by leaving a message on the one functioning number listed on the website have gone unanswered.)

But there are other mysteries here, too, regarding Davis (whose name does not appear on the Hyperion-Protective website), and regarding Hyperion.

As reported today in the New York Times Wednesday in an article by Jane Perlez, there is also a company in Las Vegas Nevada called Hyperion Protective Services. That firm’s 2006 registration information lists as its owners Raymond A Davis and his wife Rebecca J. Davis of 9811 W. Charleston St., Las Vegas, Nevada, 89117. It lists the company’s address as 9345 Boulder Opal Ave., Las Vegas. A registration in Nevada of that name says that Gerald Richardson “founded the firm” in 1999.

This company, which Perlez says claims it at least hoped to win government contracts, advertises its services (basically providing due diligence for companies making property purchases, and running background checks on employees), on a website called LasVegasComplete.com. On that site, it lists its website, which is the same original site for Hyperion-Protective Consultants, LLC, the apparently virtual company that was run out of Gerald Richardson’s clothing shop at 5100 North Lane, Orlando until he couldn’t pay the rent and got evicted, and that doesn’t have a listed number, or a person to answer the phone.

Meanwhile, the phone number listed for the Nevada incarnation of Hyperion-Protective is a cell phone with a Tucson, Arizona area code, which is registered to Raymond A. Davis. A call to that phone reached a recording of a male voice, with no mention of Hyperion-Protective, and no name offered, asking for call-back information. The call was not returned.

Perlez in her article, datelined Lahore, Pakistan, at least for the first time mentions the forensic evidence that both of Davis’s victims were shot in the back, and quotes police as saying that Davis had told them he shot the men not because they had menaced him with guns, as has earlier been asserted in the US media, based on statements from the State Department, but because “he believed that the men were armed.”

If that was the accepted standard for shooting someone in Texas or Arizona, half the residents of the state would be shooting the other half. It’s also a pretty lame justification for shooting two people in the back!

Perlez also confirms another point--the suspicious array of items that police found in Davis’s rented Honda Civic when they arrested him--though she diminishes their significance by offering the snide comment that the local Pakistani press has been “dwelling” on the items, as well as on his various, and mutually exclusive array of business cards, which included one listing him as working out of the Peshawar Consulate, on the edge of the Pashtun Tribal area, one listing him as a Defense Department contractor, and one listing him as an employee of the seemingly non-existent Hyperion-Protective Consultants LLC in Orlando.

The items that the Pakistani press are “dwelling” on though, as listed by Perlez, include a Glock handgun, a flashlight that attaches to a headband, and a pocket telescope. Unmentioned by Perlez, but also found by police in Davis’s car, were a large number of cellphones, including at least one satellite phone, a collection of batteries, bucketloads of bullets, both for the Glock and a Beretta allegedly used by Davis to kill the two motorcyclists in his pinpoint shots through his front windshield, and a load of M-16 shells. Police report that the bullets were high-powered killer projectiles not allowed in many countries. There were military-grade knives, wires, and a surprising array of high-capacity magazines for the handguns, too (like the one used to such devastating effect in the recent Tucson massacre. There was also something else police found that is profoundly puzzling and disturbing: a camera loaded with pictures of dozens of madrassas (religious schools) and other buildings around Lahore.

This was not the run-of-the-mill armament for an embassy security guard (one of the various titles -- covers? -- that the State Department has claimed for Davis at the Lahore Consulate).

The US, which seems to really want this guy out of Pakistani hands, is reportedly threatening to cut off financial assistance to Pakistan and to cancel a planned visit by President Obama if Davis is not released--pretty heavy pressure for a low-ranking consular contractor--especially one who has admitted he shot two locals to death while apparently not working in any official capacity.

Perlez also uncritically parrots the US government’s line that Davis is “protected by diplomatic immunity under the Vienna Conventions and that he must be released from custody.”

The problem, as I reported in my earlier CounterPunch article, is that Vienna Convention that Perez and the US government are relying on to demand his release states very clearly that any immunity for diplomats or consular staff does not apply to “serious crimes,” and it would be hard to imagine a more serious crime than a double murder, which is what Davis is currently being charged with.

What seems clear at this point is that Davis, 36, is not what the US government is now claiming he is: a “technical advisor” to the consulate.
His record --10 years in US Special Forces, supposedly ending in 2003--and his shell “security” company in the US, with its faked addresses, suggest strongly that he is working for the US, either in some intelligence branch, or more likely as an employee of some mercenary-for-hire company like Xe (Blackwater).

What he was actually doing on his ill-fated drive into the commercial heart of Lahore is up for grabs.

There have been several reports in the Pakistani press, unmentioned by Perlez, that the two men he killed were not, as initially reported by the US, petty thieves, but were actually agents working for Pakistan’s intelligence service, the ISI. Today, ABC’s Nick Schifrin, who has been the best reporter on this story in the US corporate media, reports that while the State Department “adamantly denies” the claim (big surprise, that!), four Pakistani officials, off the record, have told ABC that the two men Davis killed were ISI agents assigned to tail Davis because he was a spy who had “crossed a red line.”

What “red line?” Again there is speculation in Pakistan’s media that Davis may have been involved in some kind of covert US program to actually finance or orchestrate some of the bombings that have been rocking, and destabilizing Pakistan. (Certainly that could explanation for the stop at the ATM for a bundle of cash, and for all of those cell phones recovered from Davis’s car, which could serve nicely as bomb detonators--a popular method adopted by terrorists everywhere, though of course they could also have been dedicated lines or throwaways for “cutouts,” as one veteran of such black-ops notes.)

The suicide by rat poison of the 18-year-old bride of one of the two slain men would seem to point to the victim’s being more than just a petty street thief, too. The young woman, from her hospital bed, before dying, said that she was killing herself because she despaired of seeing justice done for the murder of her husband.

Dave Lindorff is a founding member of ThisCantBeHappening!, the new independent, collectively-owned, journalist-run, reader-backed (we hope!), online alternative newspaper. His work, and that of colleagues John Grant, Linn Washington, Jr., and Charles M. Young, can be found at www.thiscantbehappening.net (http://www.thiscantbehappening.net)

http://www.counterpunch.org/lindorff02102011.html

Jan Klimkowski
02-10-2011, 09:17 PM
Keith - thanks.


The US, which seems to really want this guy out of Pakistani hands, is reportedly threatening to cut off financial assistance to Pakistan and to cancel a planned visit by President Obama if Davis is not released--pretty heavy pressure for a low-ranking consular contractor--especially one who has admitted he shot two locals to death while apparently not working in any official capacity.

(snip)

What seems clear at this point is that Davis, 36, is not what the US government is now claiming he is: a “technical advisor” to the consulate.

His record --10 years in US Special Forces, supposedly ending in 2003--and his shell “security” company in the US, with its faked addresses, suggest strongly that he is working for the US, either in some intelligence branch, or more likely as an employee of some mercenary-for-hire company like Xe (Blackwater).

What he was actually doing on his ill-fated drive into the commercial heart of Lahore is up for grabs.

There have been several reports in the Pakistani press, unmentioned by Perlez, that the two men he killed were not, as initially reported by the US, petty thieves, but were actually agents working for Pakistan’s intelligence service, the ISI. Today, ABC’s Nick Schifrin, who has been the best reporter on this story in the US corporate media, reports that while the State Department “adamantly denies” the claim (big surprise, that!), four Pakistani officials, off the record, have told ABC that the two men Davis killed were ISI agents assigned to tail Davis because he was a spy who had “crossed a red line.”

What “red line?” Again there is speculation in Pakistan’s media that Davis may have been involved in some kind of covert US program to actually finance or orchestrate some of the bombings that have been rocking, and destabilizing Pakistan. (Certainly that could explanation for the stop at the ATM for a bundle of cash, and for all of those cell phones recovered from Davis’s car, which could serve nicely as bomb detonators--a popular method adopted by terrorists everywhere, though of course they could also have been dedicated lines or throwaways for “cutouts,” as one veteran of such black-ops notes.)

The suicide by rat poison of the 18-year-old bride of one of the two slain men would seem to point to the victim’s being more than just a petty street thief, too. The young woman, from her hospital bed, before dying, said that she was killing herself because she despaired of seeing justice done for the murder of her husband.

So, was The Empire's hired killer engaged in false flag "terrorist" attacks to destablize Pakistan still further?

David Healy
02-10-2011, 10:46 PM
A little bit stranger everyday.......
...

What seems clear at this point is that Davis, 36, is not what the US government is now claiming he is: a “technical advisor” to the consulate.
His record --10 years in US Special Forces, supposedly ending in 2003--and his shell “security” company in the US, with its faked addresses, suggest strongly that he is working for the US, either in some intelligence branch, or more likely as an employee of some mercenary-for-hire company like Xe (Blackwater).
...
http://www.counterpunch.org/lindorff02102011.html

10 years in SF, 36 today, out of the ARMY in 2003? Nah... He'd be around 16 when he entered the ARMY, and that won't wash... are these guys actually reporters in Pakistan or simply passing on info others are passing to them?

IMHO -- The thread title: "US suspends 'all high-level dialogue' with Pakistan" bullshit, ceasing high-level dialogue with Pakistan won't happen till we leave Afghanistan, and more than likey not then... think, Pakistan and Nukes = high level dialogue...

Magda Hassan
02-10-2011, 10:54 PM
Agreed David. I think it just means they will be withholding intelligence from Pakistan. There is no way the US is going to remove themselves from the loop. I still think this is an awful lot of bother for a Blackwater employee using fake diplomatic cover. They want their man back come hell or high water.

Ed Jewett
02-14-2011, 11:00 PM
The Two Men Gunned Down by U.S. National Raymond Davis Were Working for ISI (http://cryptogon.com/?p=20506)

February 14th, 2011 Via: Times of India (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/world/pakistan/Two-men-killed-by-American-in-Lahore-worked-for-ISI-Report/articleshow/7468082.cms):
The two men gunned down by US national Raymond Davis in Lahore last month were working for ISI which was tailing the American because he was spying and “encroaching on their turf”, according to a media report. The two men were sent to track Davis by the ISI, which believed that he had crossed “a red line” and needed to be followed, four unnamed Pakistani officials were quoted as saying by ABC News. The men Davis shot had been following him for at least two hours and recorded some of his movements on their cell phone cameras, one of the Pakistani officials said.
In late January, Davis was asked to leave an area of Lahore restricted by the military, the officials said. Davis’ cell phone was tracked and some of his calls were made to the Waziristan tribal area, where the Pakistani Taliban and a dozen other militant groups have a safe haven, one official said. Pakistani intelligence officials saw Davis as a threat who was “encroaching on their turf,” the official was quoted as saying.
Posted in Assassination (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=11), Covert Operations (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=27)

Jan Klimkowski
02-14-2011, 11:09 PM
The source of both Counterpunch and the Times of India that the two men gunned down by Raymond Davis were Pakistani ISI is anonymous but supposedly official Pakistani sources briefing American ABC News.

Perhaps predictably, the Times of India take the official "Pakistani sources" line that


intelligence officials saw Davis as a threat who was “encroaching on their turf,” the official was quoted as saying.

Whilst Dave Lindorff in Counterpunch speculatively proposes another interpretation:


There have been several reports in the Pakistani press, unmentioned by Perlez, that the two men he killed were not, as initially reported by the US, petty thieves, but were actually agents working for Pakistan’s intelligence service, the ISI. Today, ABC’s Nick Schifrin, who has been the best reporter on this story in the US corporate media, reports that while the State Department “adamantly denies” the claim (big surprise, that!), four Pakistani officials, off the record, have told ABC that the two men Davis killed were ISI agents assigned to tail Davis because he was a spy who had “crossed a red line.”

What “red line?” Again there is speculation in Pakistan’s media that Davis may have been involved in some kind of covert US program to actually finance or orchestrate some of the bombings that have been rocking, and destabilizing Pakistan. (Certainly that could explanation for the stop at the ATM for a bundle of cash, and for all of those cell phones recovered from Davis’s car, which could serve nicely as bomb detonators--a popular method adopted by terrorists everywhere, though of course they could also have been dedicated lines or throwaways for “cutouts,” as one veteran of such black-ops notes.)

Peter Presland
02-15-2011, 03:50 PM
More from ABC. (http://abcnews.go.com/Blotter/ray-davis-pakistan-starts-pave-detained-american-release/story?id=12910728&page=2)

Videos at the link are worth a look too - with a comically grave-faced presenter ending the piece with the observation that what the US is really concerned about is Davis' safety.

Of course! what could they POSSIBLY be concerned about other than the safety of one of their poor innocent hard-working armed-to-the-teeth-with-illegal-weaponry 'Embassy Staff'?

Despite the headline this looks as serious as ever. The US gives every indication of not being prepared to take no for an answer no matter the consequences.


Ruling Party Spokesperson Invokes Vienna Convention in Case of U.S. Diplomat Raymond Davis Accused in Shooting

By NICK SCHIFRIN, MATTHEW COLE and LEE FERRAN
Feb. 14, 2011

The spokesperson for Pakistan's ruling party invoked the Vienna Convention and diplomatic immunity for the first time today as a possible avenue for the U.S. to secure the release of Raymond Davis, the American diplomat who allegedly gunned down two Pakistani men last month.

Fauzia Wahab, a spokesperson for the Pakistan People Party, said that no diplomat can be kept in captivity and that Davis has an official diplomatic visa. The U.S. State Department has been demanding Davis' release based on the same points since the Jan. 25 shooting incident, but today marks the first time a prominent Pakistani official publicly backed the international agreement in Davis' case.
Wahab's comments come just a day after the Taliban issued a threat on the lives of anyone involved in Davis' release.
"Whether he is a judge, police, lawyer, army, policy maker or a politician, we will target him. We will kill him," a Taliban spokesman told The Associated Press Sunday.
Davis, 36, was arrested after allegedly shooting and killing two men on the streets of Lahore, Pakistan, who the U.S. State Department said were trying to rob him. A third Pakistani man was struck and killed by a vehicle that was reportedly racing to Davis' aid. U.S. officials have repeatedly declined to answer questions about Davis' precise job in Pakistan, saying only he was a "member of the administrative and technical staff" of the Islamabad embassy and traveled on a diplomatic passport. Public records show Davis has experience with the U.S. Special Forces and runs a small security company.
Despite holding a diplomatic passport, Davis has been held in Lahore since the incident and Lahore's police chief Friday rejected the idea he had acted in self-defense. The shooting was "intentional and cold-blooded murder," police chief Aslam Tareen said.
After the court's decision to detain Davis for an extended period Friday, Carmela Conroy, the U.S. Consul General in Lahore, said that the incident was a tragedy, and extended her sympathy to the family of the men killed, but said that Davis is "entitled to full immunity from prosecution" as a member of the U.S. Embassy staff in Islamabad.
"Under the rules, he should be freed immediately," said Conroy, who visited Davis in prison last week. She also said she regretted that authorities "did not consider ... eyewitness accounts and physical evidence" that indicated Davis acted in self defense.

Ray Davis and Diplomacy: Caught Between America and Pakistan
Davis' continuing detention, his recent move to a prison from the police station, and the apparent impending murder charge could infuriate the United States. A senior U.S. official said that so long as Davis is detained, any major U.S.-Pakistan meeting would be dominated by a discussion about Davis -- making normal bilateral discussions right now difficult to impossible.
But the embassy in Islamabad rejected the claim made by Pakistani officials in an ABC news report that pressure to release Davis included a meeting between National Security Advisor Tom Donilon and Pakistan Ambassador to the United States Husain Haqqani in which Donilon threatened Haqqani with expulsion and the closure of U.S. consulates in Pakistan if Davis wasn't released last week.
"ABC News carried a story regarding a conversation in Washington between senior U.S. and Pakistani officials," said the statement, released by embassy spokeswoman Courtney Beale. "Although we are unable to discuss the substance of a private diplomatic meeting, U.S. Embassy Islamabad can state categorically that the description of the conversation in this report is simply inaccurate."
U.S. officials declined to specify which details in the story were inaccurate.
Haqqani also denied that he had been threatened.
"The characterization of my conversation with White House officials by ABC News borders fabrication," he said in a statement to ABC News today. "It is not our policy to reveal details of diplomatic conversations. I can say, however, that National Security Adviser Tom Donilon did, indeed, convey the US government's views about the case of Mr. Raymond Davis during a meeting on Monday evening but no ultimatum or threat was given. I conveyed the government of Pakistan's commitment to resolve the matter in accordance with Pakistani and international law. Both sides are working together to resolve the case expeditiously and to continue our multi-faceted strategic partnership."

Pakistani Officials: Shooting Victims Were Members of Pakistani Intelligence
Davis has become a political and intelligence football: he is caught between a federal government ruled by the Pakistan People's party and a Punjab government led by the opposition, which is more skeptical of U.S. policies; and he is caught in an intelligence game because he killed two men working for Pakistan's premiere intelligence agency, according to four Pakistani officials.
A congressional delegation from the House Armed Services committee visited Pakistan last weekend and raised the possibility that Davis' continuing detention would threaten military aid, according to a committee aide. But a senior Pakistani military official denied that was true.
"There were no threats," he said casually, shrugging his shoulders.
But there have been threats delivered to government officials, and the larger problem, those officials say, is that the pressure is boxing them in -- because it is eroding overall support for the United States.
Speaking in private drawing room conversations or in high-end coffee shops, even some of those who support the United States say they feel like they can't support Davis' release, especially not publicly. In their minds, the ambiguous nature of Davis' job, his killing two Pakistanis in broad daylight, and the wide coverage given to U.S. anger in Pakistan has shrunk the public acceptance of all U.S. policies in Pakistan.
"I think the response to the U.S. anger is more aggressive anti-American sentiments," said Ahmed Malik, sitting at the upscale Gloria Jean's coffee in Lahore. He and his friends said the U.S. was "bullying" Pakistan. "I think people feel it's totally unjustified for the Americans to ask for a man who's done something like this" to be released, Malik said.
Their increasing skepticism of U.S. diplomacy was echoed by the senior military official, who discussed Davis' detention on the condition of anonymity.
"It should disturb the U.S. when the liberal class, on the account of U.S. attitude and bullying… is showing a lot of frustration, anger, reservations," the official told ABC News.

Jan Klimkowski
02-15-2011, 07:06 PM
But the embassy in Islamabad rejected the claim made by Pakistani officials in an ABC news report that pressure to release Davis included a meeting between National Security Advisor Tom Donilon and Pakistan Ambassador to the United States Husain Haqqani in which Donilon threatened Haqqani with expulsion and the closure of U.S. consulates in Pakistan if Davis wasn't released last week.
"ABC News carried a story regarding a conversation in Washington between senior U.S. and Pakistani officials," said the statement, released by embassy spokeswoman Courtney Beale. "Although we are unable to discuss the substance of a private diplomatic meeting, U.S. Embassy Islamabad can state categorically that the description of the conversation in this report is simply inaccurate."
U.S. officials declined to specify which details in the story were inaccurate.

Ah - a non-denial denial.

If the Empire wants to up the ante still further, it can despatch Richard Armitage to threaten to "bomb the country (Pakistan) back to the Stone Age", as Colin Powell's pointman did in the immediate aftermath of 9/11.

Jan Klimkowski
02-18-2011, 06:12 PM
For the historical record, I'm copying the Islamabad Globe article into this thread, as it provides a speculative explanation for much of the iceberg that is still below the waterline:


Raymond Davis Affair: Deeper than you think - and profound repercussions

Original article: The Islamabad Globe - 14 February 2011

Undoubtedly this is the biggest scandal in US Foreign relations since the US was shot down by the Soviets in the sixties. Then, as now, both sides played out the drama in an iterative manner–neither side letting the other know how much they know.

There are clear indications that there is much more to the “Raymond Davis” affair than the Pakistanis are letting on. THis isn’t about murder and diplomatic immunity. This is mush bigger. Something is very wrong with this picture, and Islamabad is tight lipped because it now has concrete evidence that Mr “Raymond Davis” is linked with the Tehrik e Taliban e Pakistan (TTP) and some of the terror activities that have been happening in Pakistan. The Pakistanis are not stupid. Americans stick out like sore thumbs in Pakistan. When they go running around in their black SUVs laced with Satellite equipment they are tracked, traced and followed. In a cat and mouse game, the contractors can sometimes shake their “tails”. On other occasions they cannot. In fact the ISI gives them enough rope to hang themselves with. In this case, it seems Mr. Davis fell into a trap and his situation is now fully compromised. In panic Mr. “Davis” used the Nuclear option and killed the two Pakistanis who were trailing him–knowing full well that killing Pakistani spies or those who knew his identity would blow up in this face. He doesn’t have to say much–the equipment he carried tells a long and bloody story. All this is irrefutable evidence in a Pakistani court of law. The Pakistanis have already released the pictures of the equipment and the evidence that they have gathered. Of course they are still holding on to the juiciest details.

The US has postponed the Afghan-Pakistan-US Trilateral meeting, dropped hints about postponing the date of Mr. Zardari’s visit to the US, and floated all sorts of other threats. Normally Islamabad would have been cognizant of the the problems of spoiling its relationship with the sole Superpower. However the smirking Pakistanis are so confident in the validity of their cause, that they are letting the US escalate the issue.

Pakistan has ignored some of the US pressure and has not buckled under intense US pressure. Both General Kayani and Former Foreign Minister Mahmood Qureshi were not very impressed by US posturing. In fact right after their threatening phone calls and messages Islamabad formally charged Davis with pre-meditated murder in the Lahore High Court. The Court promptly remanded Mr. “Davis” to prison for another 14 days of interrogation. There were stories that if Mr. “Davis” does not cooperate, the interrogation would have been upgraded to level 3 (a euphemism for torture). There are reports that despite admonitions from the US Embassy, Mr. Davis is singing like a bird, and has already given enough information to the Pakistanis to get him convicted in any court of law.

The Former Foreign Minister Qureshi publicly confirmed that Secretary of State Hillary Clinton pressured him to “publicly confirm diplomatic immunity of Davis. However, I refused to do so because it was against the factual position in the case.” FM Qureshi’s confirmation that Mr “Davis” is not a diplomat was repeatedly discussed on all 80 TV channels with copies of his passports and visas prominently displayed for the audience. Mr. Quresh said that:

“The kind of blanket immunity Washington is pressing for Davis is not endorsed by the official record of the Foreign Ministry,” adding that Washington even “threatened that Hillary Clinton would not meet me at the Munich conference on February 6 if the request was not granted.”
The situation is so polarized that even traditional US allies in Pakistan have condemned the intrusive murders. Mr. Pervez Hoodbhoy who almost never criticizes the US has condemned the “Davis” affair. The PMLN is of course threatened the PPP with a vote of no-confidence.

It is clear that Mr. “Davis” shot the Pakistani operatives knowing full well who they were. The Pakistani authorities have informed the the media that they are very well aware that Mr. Davis was in touch with the “Pakistani Taliban” (TTP). There is conjecture that Mr. “Davis” walked into a trap laid out by the ISI. In fact his contacts were actually ISI agents. All that he said and did is in the hands of the Pakistanis. Mr. “Davis” thought that by shooting the two operatives, he would eliminate the evidence against him. In fact, it made matters worse. Other operatives who were in the vicinity had already taken the necessary precautions. The ISI has leaked information to the media that Mr. “Davis” had crossed a “red line”.

Clearly, the Americans have panicked because they know that the Pakistani side knows much more than it is prepared to admit in public. This is typical behavior when spies are caught with their thumbs up their noses. There are clear indications that Mr. “Davis” has broken down after sustained interrogation in police custody, and has spilled his guts–making the Pakistanis aware of explosive stuff. Its not that this stuff has surprised the Pakistanis. When you have 3000 of these guys running around the country–something gives. The ISI is one of the world’s most powerful spy organizations in the world. It has deep roots in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Nothing that crawls or walks in Pakistan is hidden from the ISI and other agencies. On top of this there is a million man Pakistani army. 180 million Pakistanis are also watching the Americans and reporting on them. The panicked Americans have continually given highly contradictory versions about Mr. “Davis’s” identity and the nature of his assignment in Pakistan.

It is very clear that Mr. “Davis’s” discovery and detention has sent alarm bells ringing all the way to President Obama’s White House. In a way the Pakistanis are amused. They know they have the Americans where they want them–right up against the wall. The Americans are fully aware that the “Davis” case is shaking the very foundations of the transactional relationship with Pakistan. While the CIA, the State Department and the White House think that this is a new discovery–the Pakistanis point to a long trail of evidence that directly points to the US consultants and their hirelings in Afghanistan and Pakistan. The ISI and the Army believe that at the right time, the details of what the Pakistanis know will be revealed to President Obama and the world.

Pakistan and Pakistanis have known for a long time who is behind the TTP (Tehrik e Taliban e Pakistani). Its not that hard to guess. What surprised the Pakistanis was their ability to inflict bloody attacks on the Pakistani military in order to destabilize Pakistani. Mr. Davis is not an isolated incident–there is a history behind much of what is happening in Pakistan–most of which can be correlated to the rise of the US “consultants” and “contractors” in Pakistan. It is pedagogical to note that last year when the ISI put in requests for deep security checks on those coming into Pakistan–the US put up a hissy fit and forced about 500 of these “Davis types” through without any background checks. Is is noted that the ISI became very suspicious of the insistence of the US in getting these guys into Pakistan at short notice. These guys got very special attention–and that has paid off in the arrest and detention of Mr. Davis. This points to the fact that this incident was not just an accident–it was an incident waiting to happen. The ISI was ready to pounce on the situation once it happened.

Pakistan has been very suspicious of these “contractors” especially when Pakistani state institutions were attacked. The attacks on the the Army HQ, and the ISI sent alarm bells among the rank and file of the Pakistani government. The vibrant Pakistani press has also been on the trail and has repeatedly pointed out the facts about the former Afghan intelligence chief Amrullah Saleh (who was eventually fired by Mr. Karzai). However the US security establishment was in cahoots with him.

The Pakistani military and its highly efficient intelligence set-up had concluded a very long time ago that the TTP was being aided by the very sort of free-wheeling “contractors” that Mr. Davis represents. It was just a matter of time when things came to a boil. It is amazing that the Americans are surprised they have finally be caught red-handed. This has happened in the past, but during the reign of President Musharraf, the Americans got away with it and escaped. This time Mr. “Davis” was caught with his hands in the cookie jar.

Over 100,000 American troops in Afghanistan facing the new Taliban “Spring Offensive” are totally dependent on supplies running through Pakistan. The last time Pakistan shut off the spigot, the Americans ran out of toilet paper and had to cut down on food rations. It must have been hard eating food with dirty hands! If the tiff between the US and Pakistan is not resolved the US may face the consequences in Afghanistan. Failure in the Hindu Kush will certainly impact the presidential elections in 2012.

https://deeppoliticsforum.com/forums/content.php?209-Raymond-Davis-Affair-Deeper-than-you-think-and-profound-repercussions

Magda Hassan
02-18-2011, 11:49 PM
Was Davis Running Drone Programme in Pakistan?

By Chidanand Rajghatta

February 18, 2011 "Times Of India (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/world/us/Was-Davis-running-drone-programme-in-Pakistan/articleshow/7519475.cms)" -- WASHINGTON: A mysterious halt to U.S Predator strikes on Pakistan after the Raymond Davis incident in Lahore has led to intense speculation the American "diplomat" was connected to the Drone program even as Washington and Islamabad are going eyeball-to-eyeball over his status.

Davis, 36, was apprehended by Pakistani police after he shot dead two Pakistanis on a busy Lahore thoroughfare on January 27, four days after the last drone U.S Drone strike in Pakistan. There has not been a single strike in the 25 days since then, making it the third-longest period of inactivity since the U.S ramped up the Predator program to take out terrorists infesting Pakistan's frontier regions, according to Long War Journal (LWJ), a blog that tracks U.S Predator attacks.

Speculation is now rife that Davis was somehow connected to the Predator program since he was reportedly carrying a GPS, telescope, camera and assorted equipment not usually associated with thoroughbred diplomats. Pakistani authorities have also accused him of unauthorized travels to the Frontier region and being in touch with extremist elements in Waziristan, which suggests he might have been coordinating the attacks with U.S moles in the region.

While Davis claimed that he shot the two Pakistanis in self-defense when they were trying to rob him, some reports have said they were ISI tails assigned to follow him because the Pakistani intelligence felt he had crossed certain unspecified "red lines." Those red lines may have involved discovering the Pakistani establishment's links with terrorists group, a pursuit which led to the death of Wall Street Journalist Danny Pearl.

According to the LWJ, it is also possible the Obama administration has halted the Drone strikes for political reasons, as Washington negotiates Davis' release.

A Lahore court on Thursday gave the Pakistani government three weeks to determine whether Davis had diplomatic immunity while extending his custody, even as Washington demanded that Islamabad (and not the court) make the call immediately and release him.

But a bitter wrangle has erupted in Islamabad between ultra-nationalist/pro-Jihadi elements in the government determined to stand up to Washington and deny Davis diplomatic immunity and those in favor of immunity because of Pakistan's parlous financial situation and its need to remain in Washington's good books.

Pakistan's ousted foreign minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi, who signed up with the former group, lost his job earlier this week for his stand, and on Wednesday, foreign office spokesman Abdul Basit was replaced overnight after he too toed an anti-American line. On Thursday, Pakistan's prime minister Yousuf Raza Gilani warned his new cabinet not to speak out of turn on the Davis issue.

Amid all this political and diplomatic brouhaha though, there has been a reprieve on the ground in the Frontier regions from incessant Drone attacks that sometimes numbered two to three a week. According to LWJ, the two most extended periods of operational inactivity so far have occurred in 2009. The longest recorded pause was 33 days, from Nov. 4 to Dec. 8, 2009. The second-longest pause was 28 days, from May 16 to June 14, 2009.

Magda Hassan
02-20-2011, 08:29 AM
http://en.apa.az/news.php?id=141059

Azeri Press Agency
February 18, 2011

Pakistani seeks arrest of second U.S. employee


Baku: A Pakistani man is demanding the arrest of a second U.S. embassy employee in Pakistan, his lawyer said on Friday, adding fuel to an incident that has severely strained ties between Washington and Islamabad, APA reports quoting “Reuters”.

The move comes as U.S. officials pressure Pakistan to release Raymond Davis, a U.S. consulate employee who is locked in a jail after shooting and killing two Pakistanis in the city of Lahore last month in what he said was an attempted robbery.

Ijaz-ur-Rehman, whose brother Ibad was killed when a U.S. vehicle came to Davis’ rescue in the aftermath of the January 27 shooting, filed a petition in the Lahore High Court demanding the car’s driver be arrested, lawyer Noman Atiq said.

Atiq said his client had asked for the vehicle, which the U.S. State Department said was driven by an embassy staff member, to be impounded.

"We want a proper investigation to be carried out in the murder of my brother," Rehman said. "What we want is for the culprits to be punished for their crime."
....
Hundreds of opposition and Islamist activists protested in front of the U.S. consulate in Lahore and across town, burning tires and the U.S. flag and demanding Davis stay in Pakistan. Similar protests were held in Karachi, Peshawar and Multan.

The United States insists Davis is covered by diplomatic immunity but, while it has signaled it agrees, the Zardari government has so far said the matter must be decided in court.

The identity of the U.S. embassy employee who drove the car that struck and killed Ibad-ur-Rehman has not been made public.

Rana Sanaullah, law minister in Punjab province, where Lahore is located, said officials were pressing the federal government to arrange for the car to be handed over from the United States, but had not yet received a reply.

Peter Lemkin
02-20-2011, 08:04 PM
just imagine if a Pakistani 'diplomat' or embassy employee with unclear affiliations had been in the USA and killed to persons for no apparent reason....do you think they'd be sent back to Pakistan under 'diplomatic immunity'...if you do....you also believe in Santa Claus and the Tooth Fairy....as well as Justice.....and equal justice and dealings among nations...... this INTELLIGENCE creep was up to no good....it is only exactly which 'no good' he was up to. I hope he gets tried in Pakistan. America be damned.

Bernice Moore
02-21-2011, 06:30 AM
"CIA spy" Davis was giving nuclear bomb material to Al-Qaeda, says report (http://www.google.com/url?sa=X&q=http://www.sify.com/news/cia-spy-davis-was-giving-nuclear-bomb-material-to-al-qaeda-says-report-news-international-lcumEfbecfi.html&ct=ga&cad=CAcQAhgAIAAoATAFOAVAoPaG6wRIAVAAWABiBWVuLVVT&cd=y33GjXekPiU&usg=AFQjCNEnTx5QVteXU1Xot5ibPj8iZz5n5w)
Sify
Double murder-accused US official Raymond Davis has been found in possession of top-secret CIA documents, which point to him or the feared American Task Force 373 (TF373) operating in the region, providing Al-Qaeda terrorists with "nuclear fissile ...:shutup:

Trowbridge H. Ford
02-21-2011, 07:04 AM
Sounds to me as if the Russians are just stoking up a Pakistani-American problem whcih could lead to the overthrow of the Pakistani government.

Davis was no Al-Qaeda spy but a CIA one who was checking apparently on what the government was doing to protect itself against Al-Qaeda, especially the stealing of its nuclear technology and/or weapons. Perhaps, the two people Davis killed had ISI connections, and were following him.

If the Pakistani government hands Davis over to Washington, it could well be overthrown by its own people. If it doesn't, Washington may save the Pakistanis the trouble.

Could be something like the overthrow of the Shah.

Magda Hassan
02-21-2011, 07:18 AM
Riveting: How Dare You Arrest Our Killer Diplomat? Axis of Logic Exclusive.
By Shahid R. Siddiqi. Axis of Logic
Axis of Logic
Sunday, Feb 20, 2011

America scolds Pakistan for having arrested a Consulate security guard for committing double murder in broad daylight. Did he do this in his line of duty?
http://axisoflogic.com/artman/uploads/1/ramond_davis450.jpg Raymond Davis working for the US government, arrested in Pakistan for the murders of two young Pakistani men on January 27, 2011.
The Killer ‘Diplomat’
On the crispy afternoon of January 27, in crowded downtown Lahore a guy, who later identified himself as Raymond Davis and technical advisor at the US Consulate, Lahore, created a furor by fatally shooting two young motorcyclists riding ahead of his car. He fired 9 bullets from his Beretta with deadly accuracy of a trained marksman, belying the geeky description that he gave about the nature of his job. He fired five bullets through his windshield and pumped four bullets into the boys as they lay on the ground breathing their last, after he exited from his car. He called the US Consulate for back up, calmly photographed the bodies with his cell phone but panicked when he saw the crowded turning hostile and fled in his car, losing his way in the downtown area.
The police soon caught up with him, took him into custody along with his belongings and his car, which was found to be locally rented.
The backup consulate vehicle driven by another American, that got stuck in the crowd at the scene of the shooting crossed over the road divider and drove at high speed against the traffic, in the process running over and killing another motorcyclist. Finding that Davis was gone, it took a U-turn and sped away.
An Undercover Rambo
Items recovered from Davis’s car included, in addition to the unlicensed Beretta he was holding, a loaded unlicensed Glock handgun along with a bucket load of bullets for both guns, three full magazines, a load of M16 shells, GPS tracker, several mobile phones, a satellite phone, wireless sets, survival kit, small telescope, mask, military-grade knives, a wire cutter, a collection of batteries and a mutually exclusive array of business cards. One of these cards listed him as working out of the Peshawar Consulate, another listed him as a defense department contractor and yet another as an employee of a (unregistered and nonexistent) security company called Hyperion-Protective Consultants LLC, with its address as 5100 North Lane, Orlando, Florida. Later, upon inquiry this premises was found to be a closed clothing store in a rundown mall that has been vacant for several months and whose telephone numbers did not respond.
"Profoundly puzzling and disturbing was the camera recovered ..." Profoundly puzzling and disturbing was the camera recovered from him loaded with pictures of dozens of madrassas (religious schools) and other sensitive buildings in and around Lahore. Such places have been in the past or are likely to be the targets of terrorism and his interest in such locations, when viewed in conjunction with his demeanor, dubious credentials and questionable items recovered from his car, including a bundle of cash drawn from ATM and all those cell phones that are generally used as bomb detonators by terrorists, point to his involvement in some kind of covert US program to finance or orchestrate subversive activities that have recently resulted in the spate of bomb blasts in the country.
Arrest & Investigations
Davis was arrested on two counts of murder, and despite protests by the US Embassy and the State Department which insisted that he is a “consular official” responsible for “security,” he continues to be held for trial.
Davis initially told the police that he shot the two men in self-defense because they had pointed their guns at him to rob him. This statement was splashed by the State Department and the US media. It was later changed and he said he shot them because “he believed that the men were armed”, believing that his life was in danger.
Having completed its investigations, the Punjab police submitted a provisional charge-sheet in the court for proceedings under Section 302 of Pakistan Penal Code for premeditated murder. Whether or not this was to the liking of the Zardari central government, who was looking for ways to oblige Washington, the Rubicon was crossed and the trial has begun.
Punjab police chief Tareen (http://www.dawn.com/2011/02/12/us-demands-full-immunity-daviss-self-defence-claim-rejected.html) told the media last Friday:
"We have proof in the form of eyewitness accounts and forensic reports that it was not a case of self-defense. Rather it was a clear murder. He [Davis] gave no chance of survival to them."
He further said that although the motorcyclists carried licensed pistols, there were no bullets in the chamber and no fingerprints on the trigger, which showed that the gun had not been pointed at Davis. One of the boys was shot in the back as he tried to flee, Tareen said.
Davis is reported to have told the police that he was a technical advisor at the Consulate and this was his 10th visit to Pakistan. Tareen did not answer questions about the purpose of Davis’s visit to the congested area of Mozang and Davis has reportedly not so far explained why he was driving alone and so heavily armed. One US official conceded he was not authorized to carry any weapon as required by law.

The Case of Mysterious Identity
The real identity of Raymond Davis became a mystery. There were hints that Raymond Davis was actually his cover name. The embassy and the State Department first said he was a security advisor at the Lahore Consulate but then on second thought called him a US Embassy employee entitled to diplomatic immunity. The mystery deepened when the Americans later refused to confirm or deny his real name and identity, to confirm his actual station of duty and explain the nature of duties he was performing to justify the immunity they claimed.
They also refused to identify and hand over the driver and the vehicle that crushed the motorcyclist.
How Dare You Arrest our Man?
"The US Consulate refused to hand over the vehicle and the driver that killed a motorcyclist for investigation." Apparently concerned that Davis’s continued detention and interrogation might blow his cover and expose his dubious activities, the attitude of State Department became extremely arrogant, harsh and bullying. It scolded the government for Davis’s arrest, stonewalled the police investigation into three deaths, refused to accept the writ of the Pakistan government over a criminal of American origin and refused to recognize the jurisdiction of Pakistani courts to try him. Their demand: he should be released forthwith without trial.
Despite repeated demands by Punjab government, the Consulate refused to hand over the vehicle and the driver that killed a motorcyclist for investigation. It is now confirmed that he was smuggled out to the US in violation of the Pakistan’s law.
The attitude of the American administration and the embassy was also callous. No regrets were expressed over the brutal killings, no condolences were conveyed to the families of the deceased and no concern was shown for public sentiment. The only sentiment it showed was anger at the delay, murder or no murder.
The Americans conveyed a feeling that the three dead persons were no more than partridges bagged in an afternoon hunt.
Diplomatic Standoff
Whatever happened in the span of those 30 minutes on January 27 it led to a diplomatic standoff between the US and Pakistan. In an internal exercise to determine Davis’s immunity, Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi was advised by experts in his ministry that there were neither any papers nor grounds for grant of diplomatic immunity to Davis. Accordingly, Qureshi apprised both Zardari and Hillary Clinton. Confidential information says that the Americans wanted foreign office documentation to be manipulated for grant of backdated diplomatic status. While Zardari was inclined to oblige, Qureshi refused.
Clinton was enraged. Although this was not officially linked to Davis incident, Washington suspended all high level contacts with Islamabad, called off crucial trilateral talks of Pakistani, Afghani and the US foreign ministers and called off a planned meeting between Clinton and Qureshi on the sidelines of the 47th Munich security conference. It was conveyed to Zardari that his upcoming visit to Washington was now uncertain and that Obama’s planned visit to Pakistan might not go through. In an extraordinary move, President Obama himself intervened by calling for Davis’s release.
Pakistan’s ambassador was summoned and threatened by the National Security Advisor that he will be kicked out if Davis is not handed over to the US. Threats of suspension of economic aid and future cooperation were given amid indications that the strategic alliance between the two countries was also at risk.
Apparently Clinton was ill advised to pursue such an abrasive policy in full public view. Although the intention was to intimidate Zardari into submission, the factor of public opinion that could prevent him from obliging the US administration was ignored.
What Is America Trying To Desperately Hide?
For a low ranking contractor - a mere security guard (that is what his title actually translates into) who had admitted having committed the capital offence of killing two people, this is pretty heavy pressure. The kind of sound and fury the Americans were engaging in signified that there was more to it than the concern for a lowly guard.
"Why is this man so important that they are ready to sacrifice a 60-year old relationship and a strategic partnership?" This, therefore, raises a lot of questions. Why is the State Department so nervous and jittery with Davis being held in the custody of Pakistani authorities? What secrets are the Americans afraid of being revealed by him? Why is this man so important that they are ready to sacrifice a 60-year old relationship and a strategic partnership? Do they want to block his trial at all costs because of the risk of his explosive confession that he killed those boys in his line of duty, an admission that would implicate the State Department, CIA and other US agencies? Was it these considerations that warranted the intervention by the President of the United States?
Pak-American Relations
And if none of the above was the case, the American response simply did not make sense. By bullying Pakistan the Americans undermined its sovereignty on an issue in which it had no legs to stand on. It provoked Pakistanis to rise against the American diktat with one voice, which has cornered an unpopular pro-American government, hurting America’s own interests. Pakistanis are reminded once again, so soon after promises were made for a lasting friendship, that Pak-American relations, like always, hang by a thread and Pakistan can be jettisoned any time if it refuses to fall in line when dictated or when the American interests have been served, enormous sacrifices made by Pakistan notwithstanding.
Although most people believe these to be empty threats, the question now being asked in Pakistan is: if the US wants to end the strategic partnership with Pakistan merely on this issue, which President Obama was so keen to strengthen few months back knowing its implications for the US in Afghanistan, why shouldn’t Pakistan move towards ending all kinds of cooperation with the US and its dependence on the IMF and World Bank to be able to stand on its own feet, get rid of unreliable partners and preserve Pakistan’s sovereignty and dignity.
Diplomatic Immunity Under Vienna Convention?
The US officials vehemently insist that Davis, as a functionary of the Consulate, enjoys a blanket diplomatic immunity under Vienna Convention and must get immunity from trial, but have not been able to establish their claim. Instead, they have gone on to accuse Pakistan of violating the Vienna Convention. A simple reading of the Convention would show that the US position is utter nonsense.
"Whether Davis has diplomatic immunity hinges first and foremost on whether he is actually a “functionary” of the consulate." Whether Davis has diplomatic immunity hinges first and foremost on whether he is actually a “functionary” of the consulate. Notwithstanding the claims of the US Embassy, Davis was carrying a regular US passport with a business visa when arrested. The embassy is said to have later produced another passport of him with diplomatic visa, the authenticity of which appears doubtful after the statement of former foreign minister Qureshi, who categorically stated that the foreign office has no documentation to establish this man as a diplomat or that he was ever granted diplomatic privileges. This evidence is believed to have been conveyed to US officials and Senator John Kerry visited Pakistan a few days back to seek Davis’s release after which the tone and tenor of the US administration has softened somewhat. Other factors that disprove the US claim for diplomatic immunity are listed later in this piece.
The Vienna Convention that the US officials quote in support of their claim does not provide absolute immunity. It is conditional. Article 38 of the Vienna Convention 1961 (http://untreaty.un.org/ilc/texts/instruments/english/conventions/9_1_1961.pdf) states that,
“except where additional privileges and immunities have been specifically granted by the host State, a diplomatic agent who is a national of or permanently resident in that State shall enjoy only immunity from jurisdiction, and inviolability, in respect of official acts performed in the exercise of his functions.”
This article differentiates between an act carried out as part of his official duties and one that is done in his personal capacity. Any personal actions that lie outside the ambit of official consular duties shall not be covered by "diplomatic immunity."
Article 37 of the 1961 (http://untreaty.un.org/ilc/texts/instruments/english/conventions/9_1_1961.pdf) convention reinforces the above limitation on immunity by stating:
“..…Members of the administrative and technical staff of the mission, together with members of their families forming part of their respective households, shall, if they are not nationals of or permanently resident in the receiving State, enjoy the privileges and immunities specified in articles 29 to 35, except that the immunity from civil and administrative jurisdiction of the receiving State specified in paragraph 1 of article 31 shall not extend to acts performed outside the course of their duties”.
If Davis claims diplomatic immunity from arrest and trial for the crime of a double murder, he will have to prove, firstly, that he fulfills the conditions and possesses necessary documentation to qualify as member of diplomatic staff of the US Embassy, and secondly, even if he qualifies, then he should admit that he carried out the killings while performing official duty.
The US State Department intentionally avoids the mention of a later treaty, the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations of 1963 (http://untreaty.un.org/ilc/texts/instruments/english/conventions/9_2_1963.pdf), which further clarifies in Section II, article 41:
“… And where there may be a conflict, this would supersede the earlier treaty”. It goes on to say that: “Consular officers shall not be liable to arrest or detention pending trial, except in the case of a grave crime and pursuant to a decision by the competent judicial authority”.
The Vienna Convention, therefore, quite clearly states that Pakistani authorities are perfectly within their rights to arrest, investigate and prosecute Davis for a grave crime (and murder is as grave as crime can be) that he perhaps committed in his personal capacity.
Pakistan’s Foreign Minister is shown The Door
Incidentally, this episode occurred when the federal cabinet was being reshuffled. Due to his old political rivalry with the prime minister, Foreign Minister Qureshi, was conveniently eased out in the process. This served another purpose too. The head of a defiant foreign minister was presented to Secretary Clinton to please her.
Qureshi settled his scores by spilling the beans to the media about the negative conclusions that the foreign office had internally arrived at while determining Davis’s diplomatic status. This has made it impossible for Zardari’s men to now fudge the documents.
Did Davis Enjoy Diplomatic Status?
Evidence that is now public shows that Davis was not issued a diplomatic visa to begin with but a business visa. He was not assigned to the embassy in Islamabad, as was being claimed, but was moving between the consulates. His nature of duty was never provided to Pakistan’s Foreign Office for determination of his status despite reminders and all that was known was that he was a technical advisor (security guard). His case was not among the cases submitted by the US Embassy to the foreign office as late as one day before the murders for grant of diplomatic status. And he did not hold the ID issued by foreign offices to diplomats – a universal practice.
The Angry Pakistanis
A survey for ‘al Jazeera’ by Gallup Pakistan found 70% Pakistanis (http://www.defence.pk/forums/pakistans-war/59121-u-s-must-help-pakistan-beat-insurgency-officials-say.html) holding America to be the greatest threat to Pakistan’s sovereignty. Another survey in mid 2009 by the Washington-based Pew Research Center (http://pewresearch.org/pubs/1312/pakistani-public-opinion) found that 64% of Pakistanis regard America as an enemy, only 9% believing it to be a partner. In another recent poll by World Public Opinion, Pakistan’s perception of the U.S. under the Obama administration was found not substantively different from that of the U.S. under Bush. Only 30% of Pakistanis (http://www.worldpublicopinion.org/pipa/articles/views_on_countriesregions_bt/618.php) showed any confidence that the U.S. president would do ‘the right thing regarding world affairs’.
People in the street blame America for all of Pakistan ills. They cite a pattern of deceit, exploitation and misuse of trust by America over five decades. They perceive America to be an arrogant, war mongering super power which, propelled solely by its global agenda and imperial hubris, foments trouble, attacks and destroys people and countries. They are also angry with the US for misusing Pakistan in its war on terror and have been demanding immediate end to illegal drone attacks that violate Pakistan’s sovereignty and have claimed hundreds of civilian lives in FATA area, towards which the US shows no concern.
In this backdrop, the Raymond Davis incident proved to be a flashpoint. People were enraged, firstly, because an American killed two Pakistanis in cold blood, secondly, because the US administration instead of showing any remorse, began bullying Pakistani government for investigating the murder and pressurizing it to release him forthwith, and thirdly, because it once again brought into focus the threat to Pakistan’s security at the hands of the ill-reputed Blackwater and DynCorp.
"US contractors ... deploy spies, murderers, terrorists, thugs and rogues under the guise of diplomats to render illegal service for money, including kidnapping, torture, murder, sabotage..." Coming as it did at a volatile time when the Arab world is rocked by uprisings against corrupt and incompetent US-backed autocracies and when the need for a similar revolution in Pakistan is being openly encouraged by the civil society leaders who draw a parallel with conditions in those countries, the Davis episode has proven to be extremely dicey for Zardari government. On the one hand its tail is being twisted by Washington and on the other the people are ready to lynch it if it succumbs to Washington’s pressure. Prime Minister Gilani admitted this when he said his government is between the devil and the deep sea.
Concerns About Pakistan’s Security
Again into focus has come the issue of dangers to Pakistan’s security at the hands of US defense contractors who deploy spies, murderers, terrorists, thugs and rogues under the guise of diplomats to render illegal service for money, including kidnapping, torture, murder, sabotage, etc., acts that the US Constitution prohibits the US government to engage in.
In Pakistan, Blackwater operatives (http://www.axisoflogic.com/artman/publish/Article_60988.shtml) have long been reported to be positioned. Jeremy Scahill, author of the NYT Best Seller Blackwater, in his article “The Secret US War in Pakistan” states:
“At a covert forward operating base run by the US Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC) in the Pakistani port city of Karachi, members of an elite division of Blackwater are at the center of a secret program in which they plan targeted assassinations of suspected Taliban and Al Qaeda operatives, "snatch and grabs" of high-value targets and other sensitive action inside and outside Pakistan.”
It is now clear that Davis, 36, a former US Special Forces operative, is either a CIA agent or an employee of a mercenary firm--possibly Xe, the reincarnation of Blackwater. Jeff Stein, quoting Fred Burton, a veteran of the State Department’s counter-terrorism Security Service, wrote in the Washington Post on January 27 (http://voices.washingtonpost.com/spy-talk/2011/01/lahore_shootout_spy_rendezvous.html), that Davis may have been involved in intelligence activity, either as a CIA employee under embassy cover or as a contract worker at the time of the shootings. Burton, who currently works with Stratfor, a Texas-based “global intelligence” firm, even speculates that the shootings may have been a “spy meeting gone awry,” and not, as US Embassy and State Department officials claim, a case of an attempted robbery or car-jacking.
Or was it that Davis was on a mission to contact such a group and felt threatened by the motorcyclists whom he thought to be intelligence agents tracking him, whom he could not shake off and killed them? Perhaps he had crossed the red line and feared being exposed.
Blackwater affiliates are said to be honeycombed with CIA, US Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC), Pentagon and State Department in conducting a variety of operations. It is also perceived by the people and the media to be involved in supporting the agenda of destroying the fabric of Pakistan’s nationhood through suicide bombings, fanning religious extremism and supporting nationalist and separatist movements, using Pakistanis whose loyalties are up for sale.
There is a strong indication that Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) and other terror groups are acting as fronts for the American contractors assigned the job of destabilizing Pakistan. It is now common knowledge that Zardari had buckled under US pressure (http://www.axisoflogic.com/artman/publish/Article_60988.shtml) and personally authorized visas to hundreds of dubious Americans in connivance with Haqqani, an American stooge of a Pakistani Ambassador in Washington, bypassing the foreign office and the verification process. Raymond Davis is apparently one such case.
Zardari’s Woes
Rising political temperature caused the government’s coalition partners to distance themselves from Zardari for fear of public backlash. Then there was a hostile media coupled with rightist-led nationwide rallies, potentially getting out of hand, which demanded Davis’s trial.
The Americans showed poor understanding of Pakistan’s ground realities and of the limitations of the government of President Zardari, who is seen as an American poodle (http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2010/12/02/104662/leaked-us-cables-a-stain-on-pakistani.html). The condescending American attitude and information that Davis was neither a diplomat nor entitled to immunity, evoked hostile response across the country. All this has unnerved Zardari.
http://axisoflogic.com/artman/uploads/1/Shumaila_Kanwal462.JPG Shumaila Kanwal, the 18 year old widow of man killed by Raymond Davis lay dying in a local hospital in Faisalabad after she committed suicide when she saw no chance of getting justice for her husband's killer. A family member and nurse are at her side.
In the middle of this debate, the situation took another dramatic turn when the 18-year old widow of one of the slain persons committed suicide because she saw no chance of getting justice and every chance of this American getting away with murder. Her last words on her death bed were: “I want justice done. I want blood for blood”.
This left Zardari and his ilk with no choice but to perforce abandon their earlier position on immunity and, denying that they were under American pressure, publicly took the stand that Davis’s case is for the courts to decide. But the foreign office has still not publicly stated the correct position on the immunity issue, in the hope that some way might eventually be found to oblige the US.

Is There A Way Out?
Currently there is an impasse. Public pressure leaves no room for any compromise. The U.S. State Department, having mishandled the issue now needs to act more sensibly and back off to let the temperature cool down. More threats would further worsen an already bad situation. John Kerry, a seasoned and soft spoken politician, hurriedly visited Pakistan offering belated condolences and expressing remorse at the loss of life, but this was too little too late. He could only extract promises which a weak Zardari government would find hard to deliver.

Suggestions were floated to explore the option of blood money in exchange for pardon with the consent of the family, a provision that exists in Pakistani law. This has been rejected by the family which is also under pressure to stand firm on Davis’s prosecution. The president also has the powers to grant pardon to a convict, but only after the whole process of law has taken its course. Nothing can be achieved in a hurry. The Americans overplayed their cards and now need to show patience, whatever the cost.

Aafia Siddiqui’s Case
Among the many things that Pakistanis hold against the US is the recent case of Dr. Aafia Siddiqui, a Pakistan neuroscientist. This woman was abducted from Karachi, apparently by CIA, and taken to the US for trial on charges of attempted murder of an American serviceman while she was in custody in Kabul. After a sham trial she was sentenced to 86 years in prison (http://axisoflogic.com/artman/publish/Article_61210.shtml), an unusually harsh sentence by any standard.
http://axisoflogic.com/artman/uploads/1/aafia_siddiqui--219x181.JPG http://axisoflogic.com/artman/uploads/1/aafia-siddiqui221x139.JPG Dr. Aafia Siddiqui, a Pakistan neuroscientist studied at MIT in Cambridge, MA. Dr. Siddiqui, arrested with questionable evidence and tortured by the US during interrogation. The United States sentenced her to 86 years in a US prison.
There was public uproar. (http://axisoflogic.com/artman/publish/Article_58406.shtml) The popular demand to allow her to serve her sentence in Pakistan on humanitarian grounds was rejected. There is now unanimity of view that if the Americans can be so callous, the Zardari Government has no business of showing any leniency to Davis.
A suggestion (http://axisoflogic.com/artman/publish/Article_62283.shtml) about exchanging Raymond Davis for Aafia was quickly rejected by the American authorities. This does not appear to be a suitable option for now from Pakistan’s standpoint too. Firstly, Davis is not a convict yet and it is important that charges against him are first proved in the court of law to set the record straight. Secondly, Pakistan must not agree to Davis’s premature release before extracting information about his activities in Pakistan and those of other members of his network. It is imperative for the government to come down heavily on the likes of Davis, American pressure or no pressure, to bring an end to terrorism that has destroyed peace and stability in the country.

Contact the Author (shahidrsiddiqi@gmail.com)
Read his bio and more analyses and essays by
Axis of Logic Columnist, Shahid R. Siddiqi (http://axisoflogic.com/artman/publish/shahid.shtml)

© Copyright 2011 by AxisofLogic.com

This material is available for republication as long as reprints include verbatim copy of the article in its entirety, respecting its integrity. Reprints must cite the author and Axis of Logic as the original source including a "live link" to the article. Thank you!
http://axisoflogic.com/artman/publish/Article_62333.shtml

Carsten Wiethoff
02-21-2011, 11:50 AM
From http://nation.com.pk/pakistan-news-newspaper-daily-english-online/Politics/21-Feb-2011/Davis-CIAs-acting-chief-in-Pakistan

Davis CIA’s acting chief in Pakistan

By: Jawad R Awan | Published: February 21, 2011LAHORE - Raymond Allen Davis, who killed two Pakistanis last month in the provincial capital, is second-in-comm-and to Jonathan Banks, the former station chief of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) in Islamabad, The Nation has learnt.

Well-placed sources said that the highly-trained operative of the CIA was the second important man of the CIA in Pakistan after ex-station chief Jonathan Banks who left Pakistan after his cover was blown. Banks left Islamabad when Karim Khan, a resident of North Waziristan, submitted an application at the Secretariat Police Station, Islamabad for a FIR against the CIA station chief for the killing of Karim’s brother and son in one of the drone attacks directed by the CIA boss in Pakistan.
The sources said that Davis could be called the deputy station chief of the CIA in Pakistan, or the acting station chief.
They said that after Banks left the federal capital, Davis assumed the charge of his office by carrying out all the tasks previously under the domain of his boss, including gathering information for drone attacks. The sources said that one of the main tasks of Davis was to keep CIA network intact in the tribal agencies as well as Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP).
Establishing their point regarding Davis, the sources said that the detained killer of Pakistanis demanded ‘naswar’ in jail, which reflects he visited the KP frequently. He also speaks the local languages and has complete information about the cultures being practised in all the provinces.

Carsten Wiethoff
02-21-2011, 12:32 PM
The Guardian also identifies Raymond Davis as a CIA employee:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/feb/20/us-raymond-davis-lahore-cia


American who sparked diplomatic crisis over Lahore shooting was CIA spy

• Raymond Davis employed by CIA 'beyond shadow of doubt'
• Former soldier charged with murder over deaths of two men
• Davis accused of shooting one man twice in the back as he fled

Bernice Moore
02-23-2011, 12:00 PM
Big Peace - http://bigpeace.com/ (http://www.google.com/url?sa=X&q=http://bigpeace.com/&ct=ga&cad=CAcQAhgAIAIoBzANOANA38GR6wRIAVAAWABiBWVuLVVT&cd=vx9La30DS-Y&usg=AFQjCNEfr70XekfsUuTEWFSnGQzUdl1kWw)Raymond Davis a CIA Contractor, US Confirms -- News from Antiwar.com (http://www.google.com/url?sa=X&q=http://news.antiwar.com/2011/02/21/raymond-davis-a-cia-contractor-us-confirms/&ct=ga&cad=CAcQAhgAIAIoATAOOARA38GR6wRIAVAAWABiBWVuLVVT&cd=vx9La30DS-Y&usg=AFQjCNFiWmx94CrRM0TEaG8W7u5NAgtiMQ)
By Jason Ditz
Faced with growing allegations that this was the case, the US admitted today that US “Consulate Employee” Raymond Davis, currently held in a Lahore prison facing double murder charges, is indeed a CIA employee. ...

Peter Lemkin
02-23-2011, 12:59 PM
Big Peace - http://bigpeace.com/ (http://www.google.com/url?sa=X&q=http://bigpeace.com/&ct=ga&cad=CAcQAhgAIAIoBzANOANA38GR6wRIAVAAWABiBWVuLVVT&cd=vx9La30DS-Y&usg=AFQjCNEfr70XekfsUuTEWFSnGQzUdl1kWw)Raymond Davis a CIA Contractor, US Confirms -- News from Antiwar.com (http://www.google.com/url?sa=X&q=http://news.antiwar.com/2011/02/21/raymond-davis-a-cia-contractor-us-confirms/&ct=ga&cad=CAcQAhgAIAIoATAOOARA38GR6wRIAVAAWABiBWVuLVVT&cd=vx9La30DS-Y&usg=AFQjCNFiWmx94CrRM0TEaG8W7u5NAgtiMQ)
By Jason Ditz
Faced with growing allegations that this was the case, the US admitted today that US “Consulate Employee” Raymond Davis, currently held in a Lahore prison facing double murder charges, is indeed a CIA employee. ...


In my best Gomer Pyle voice, "Well, Surprise!, Surprise!, Surprise! :p

Peter Lemkin
02-24-2011, 07:11 PM
Davis’s Employer: Hyperion Protective Services

A man From Highlands Ranch [Colo.] accused of shooting two Pakistanis reportedly had been working as a CIA security contractor, and living in a safe house in Lahore. …

Public records examined by KCNC News in Denver name Davis as an officer of Hyperion Protective Consultants, a Florida-based firm with an empty office and no one answering the phone. While the man listed as “Managing Director” remains the object of an angry international tug of war, Protesters have already been calling for his hanging. …

http://www.kktv.com/news
Hyperion and Blackwater

Bureau of Investigative Journalism | February 21, 2011:

… The case illustrates the degree to which even the CIA’s frontline work has been privatised.

When first arrested on January 27 for gunning down two men in Lahore, Davis described himself as a “contractor” and presented police with a business card identifying his company as Hyperion Protective Services, based in Orlando, Florida.

When the Bureau attempted to speak with the company’s co-founder, Mr Gerald Richardson, it was told Mr Richardson had simply provided building security for a previous business at that address, and that his whereabouts were no longer known.

A Hyperion Protective Services is also listed in Las Vegas, Nevada. Raymond A Davis and wife Deborah are listed as the owners, in a company offering ‘private investigations’ and an ‘armored car service’.

The given number transfers callers to a rural Arizona address.

Paperwork filed with Arizona State describes Hyperion’s work as ‘high risk threat protection’. But the Davis family has moved on, this time to Highlands Ranch, near Denver, Colorado. Calls by local media to the Davis house were initially forwarded to the CIA, inadvertently outing his main employer, according to The Guardian.

Despite being a frontline CIA agent, Davis remains a freelance contractor. Leaked invoices obtained by Pakistan’s Dawn newspaper appear to show that Davis is paid $780 a day while stationed in Pakistan – and in total is paid $200,000 a year, presumably by the CIA.

It has also been reported that Davis once worked for Blackwater, now known as Xe, the mercenary organisation which is contracted by the CIA on various projects.

Both the US Department of Defense and the CIA have rapidly expanded their use of private contractors in the past decade. Recent estimates have placed the annual contractor bill at $45bn - representing more than half of the entire intelligence budget. …

Magda Hassan
02-26-2011, 11:04 AM
ISLAMABAD: Head of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) Leon Panetta phoned head of the Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) Ahmed Shuja Pasha, DawnNews reported. The two intelligence chiefs reportedly discussed the issue of CIA contractor Raymond Davis and the status of cooperation between the CIA and the ISI. Defence sources confirmed the conversation and said the ISI chief expressed his reservations over covert activities of CIA operatives during the talk with Panetta. Sources said the ISI chief emphasised on Pakistan’s security and sovereignty during the conversation. Sources further said that the CIA will now be providing the ISI with complete records and data on all such operatives. The CIA will also explain the procedures pertaining to the operatives’ activities, sources said. When contacted, the Inter-Services Public Relations (ISPR) refused to confirm or negate the telephone conversation. Earlier on Thursday, Pakistani intelligence officials said cooperation between the two intelligence agencies had been scaled back because of the Davis incident. A senior official in Islamabad on Thursday said the Davis case had strained but not broken relations between the CIA and the ISI because the ISI didn’t know about Davis before he shot and killed two Pakistanis on January 27. “It’s not business as usual; it’s not open war,” the official said. “Cooperation and operations together will continue at a lesser scale.”
http://www.dawn.com/2011/02/26/isi-cia-chiefs-discuss-davis-cooperation-issues.html

Christer Forslund
03-01-2011, 07:05 PM
U.TV.News - Friday, 25 February 2011
ISI tells American agency to unmask all its covert operatives after arrest of Aaron DeHaven in Peshawar, over visa expiry.

Islamabad authorities have arrested a US government security contractor amid a worsening spy agency row between the countries, with Pakistani intelligence calling on the Americans to "come clean" about its network of covert operatives in the country.
The arrest came at the start of the murder trial of another American held in Pakistan, the CIA agent Raymond Davis.

Peshawar police arrested Aaron DeHaven, a contractor who recently worked for the US embassy in Islamabad, saying that his visa had expired.
Little was known about DeHaven except that his firm, which also has offices in Afghanistan and Dubai, is staffed by retired US military and defence personnel who boast of direct experience in the "global war on terror".
It was unclear whether his arrest was linked to escalating tensions between the Inter-Services Intelligence and the CIA, triggered by the trial of Davis, who appeared in handcuffs at a brief court hearing in a Lahore jail.
The 36-year-old former special forces soldier, whose status as a spy was revealed by the Guardian, refused to sign a chargesheet presented to him by the prosecution, which says he murdered two men at a traffic junction on January 27.
Davis instead repeated his claim of diplomatic immunity – a claim supported by President Barack Obama, who called him "our diplomat".
The press and public were excluded from the hearing in Kot Lakhpat jail, where Pakistani officials have taken unusual measures to ensure Davis's security amid a public clamour for his execution.
The furore has also triggered the most serious crisis between the ISI and the CIA since the 9/11 attacks. A senior ISI official told the Guardian that the CIA must "ensure there are no more Raymond Davises or his ilk" if it is to repair the tattered relationship of trust.
"They need to come clean, tell us who they are and what they are doing. They need to stop doing things behind our back," he said. There are "two or three score" covert US operatives roaming Pakistan, "if not more", he said.
CIA spokesman George Little said that agency ties to the ISI "have been strong over the years, and when there are issues to sort out, we work through them. That's the sign of a healthy partnership".
Pakistani civilian officials warned that the ISI was amplifying fallout from the Davis crisis through selective media leaks to win concessions from the US.
"They're playing the media; in private they're much more deferential to the Americans," said a senior government official, who added that the two agencies had weathered previous disagreements in private.
The crisis has sucked in the military top brass from both countries. On Tuesday, a Pakistani delegation led by General Ashfaq Kayani met US generals, led by Admiral Mike Mullen, at a luxury resort in Oman to hammer out the issues.
The US stressed that it "did not want the US-Pakistan relationship to go into a freefall under media and domestic pressures", according to an account of the meeting obtained by Foreign Policy magazine.
The ISI official agreed that future co-operation was vital. "They need us; we need them," he said. "But we need to move forward in the right direction, based on equality and respect."
The media furore over Davis has fuelled scrutiny of other American security officials in Pakistan and their visa arrangements, and may have led police to Aaron DeHaven in Peshawar on Friday.
DeHaven runs a company named Catalyst Services which, according to its website, is staffed by retired military and defence department personnel who have "played some role in major world events" including the collapse of the Soviet Union, the military mission to Somalia and the "global war on terror". Services offered include "full-service secure residences", protective surveillance and armed security.
One prospective customer who met DeHaven last year described him as a small, slightly-built man, who wore glasses and had broad knowledge of Pakistani politics. DeHaven said he had lived in Kandahar, Afghanistan, for one year, had married a Pakistani woman from Khyber Pakthunkhwa province along the border with Afghanistan, and spoke Urdu fluently.
He said he moved his base from Peshawar to Islamabad last year over suspicions that he worked for Blackwater, the controversial US military contracting firm.
His business partner is listed on company documents as Hunter Obrikat with an address in Charlotte, North Carolina. The Guardian was unable to contact either men at listed numbers in Pakistan, Afghanistan, the US and Dubai.
US embassy spokeswoman Courtney Beale said DeHaven was "not a direct employee of the US government" but added that details could not be confirmed until a consular officer had met him. The arrest is another sign of brittle relations between the two countries.
US officials in Washington argue that Davis is a registered diplomat who should be immediately released under the provisions of the Vienna convention. But that plea has fallen on deaf ears in Pakistan, where the papers have been filled with lurid accounts of the spy's alleged activities, including unlikely accounts of him working with the Taliban and al-Qaida.
The US has also struck some blows in the covert public relations war. After a lull of three weeks, the CIA restarted its drone campaign in the tribal belt last Monday, with near-daily attacks on militant targets since then. "It's their way of showing who's in charge," said a senior Pakistani official.
And at the Oman meeting, Mullen warned Kayani he would apply "other levers" to the Pakistanis if a solution to the case was not found, the official added.
Since Davis's CIA status was revealed, US officials have told Pakistani officials that their best hope is in offering compensation to the families of the two men Davis shot in Lahore. Religious parties, however, have pressured relatives not to accept money.
Meanwhile, the Zardari government says it will settle the issue of Davis's diplomatic status at a court hearing scheduled for 14 March.

guardian.co.uk © Guardian News and Media 2011

Magda Hassan
03-02-2011, 12:08 PM
The yanquis are getting very tardy with their paperwork these days. :pinkelephant:

Magda Hassan
03-07-2011, 12:30 PM
USZ citizen Aaron Mark DeHaven, who was arrested from Peshawar, has turned out to be the Blackwater’s chief in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Fata region, sources said. British website TheNewsTribe.Com reported that the revelation came at a time when a local court in Peshawar is set to decide on his bail application on Monday. Sources in security organizations informed that the activities of Mark had been being monitored for a long time. He came under more suspicious when he tried to shut down his company ‘Catalyst Services Private Limited’ after the arrest of Raymond Davis, the CIA's “Cold Blooded Killer” as the police calls him. Sources close to the investigation said that his mobile phone record revealed he had contacts in Fata agencies.

https://s-hphotos-ash4.fbcdn.net/190485_203797546313508_152497481443515_791912_1403 579_n.jpg
Aaron Mark, the Blackwater Chief in KPK & Fata arrested in Peshawar


Those close to the American claim that he got married to a Pakistani girl after converting to Islam, but could not renew his passport validity on which he was caught along with his wife in Peshawar. The security organizations have also included his wife in the investigation. Meanwhile, Federal Interior Minister Shaitan Malik has once again shamelessly repeated his rhetoric that there is no existence of Blackwater in Pakistan. Security officials were shocked to find Raymond Davis had more than 40 computerized national identity cards and not even a single ID card recovered from his possession proves him a diplomat. USZ has been insisting that Davis has diplomatic immunity and should be released.

Magda Hassan
03-08-2011, 01:51 PM
Why did the CIA’s Raymond Davis Make Cell Phone Calls to the Taliban?

7th March 2011


From: “Blowback From the Arrest of the CIA’s Raymond Davis”


By DAVE LINDORFF | CounterPunch | March 2, 2011
http://www.antifascistencyclopedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/000untitled.bmp (http://www.antifascistencyclopedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/000untitled.bmp)… Both Pakistani and Indian news organizations are claiming, based upon intelligence sources, that Davis was involved in not just intelligence work, but in orchestrating terrorist activity by both the Pakistani Taliban and the terrorist organization Lashkar-e-Jhangvi, which has been linked to both the assassination of Benezir Bhutto and the capture and beheading of Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl. Multiple calls to members of both groups were found by police on some of the cell phones found on Davis and in his car when he was arrested in Lahore.
It is unclear how far the blow-up in Pakistan over the exposure of America’s role in stirring up unrest in that country will go. Clearly, the ISI and the Pakistani military have long had their own complicated relationship with the Pakistani Taliban, and much of the current anger in both the ISI and the military has to do with the US being found to be working behind their backs, including in its contact with those groups. …
http://www.counterpunch.org/lindorff03022011.html

Raymond Davis had Taliban links: Pak media


Press Trust of India | NDTV | February 22, 2011
http://www.antifascistencyclopedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/pakistan-swat-taliban-sword-11052007-300x216.jpg (http://www.antifascistencyclopedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/pakistan-swat-taliban-sword-11052007.jpg)Islamabad: American official Raymond Davis, arrested for double murder, had “close links” with Taliban and was “instrumental” in recruiting youths for it, the Pakistani media claimed today, close on the heels of reports in the US that he was a CIA agent tracking movements of terror groups like the LeT.

The “close ties” of 37-year-old Davis, arrested in Lahore on January 27 for killing two men he claimed were trying to rob him, with the Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan came out during investigations, ‘The Express Tribune’ reported quoting an unnamed senior official of Punjab Police.
“Davis was instrumental in recruiting young people from Punjab for the Taliban to fuel the bloody insurgency (in Pakistan),” the official said.
The report came a day after The New York Times, citing US government officials, said that Davis “was part of a covert, CIA-led team of operatives conducting surveillance on militant groups deep inside the country.”
Among the groups that Davis was keeping an eye on was the banned Lashker-e-Taiba, which carried out the 2008 Mumbai terror attacks, the New York Times said.

The Express Tribune quoting unnamed sources said that call records retrieved from mobile phones found on Davis had allegedly established his links with 33 Pakistanis, including 27 militants from the banned Taliban and Lashkar-e-Jhangvi. The report claimed Davis was “said to be working on a plan to give credence to the American notion that Pakistan’s nuclear weapons are not safe.”

“For this purpose, he was setting up a group of the Taliban which would do his bidding,” it said.
Davis’ job was to trace the links of the Taliban and al-Qaeda in different parts of Pakistan but instead investigators found that he had developed “close links” with the Taliban, the report said quoting a source. …

http://www.ndtv.com/article/india/raymond-davis-had-taliban-links-pak-media-87066?cp
From: “The Case of Raymond Davis: A CIA Operative Working with the Taliban?”


By Greg L | African American Clarion Call | February 27, 2011
http://www.antifascistencyclopedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/raymond-davis-protest.jpg (http://www.antifascistencyclopedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/raymond-davis-protest.jpg)… Now there are reports coming out that Davis was masterminding terrorist activities working with the Taliban. If true, there are two main reasons for that; destablization of Pakistan and never ending war. Destablization feeds the war machine which justifies them continuing to be at the government trough. Further, this feeds into the designs of the oligarchs for that region of the world.
There is still right and wrong in this world and regardless of how some may try to flip that and mislabel them, that doesn’t alter fundamental truths. A tiger doesn’t change his stripes just because he moves from place to place and the things he’s accustomed to doing one place he will do in another. A government can not claim to be a force for good or to support freedom, while doing the exact opposite abroad. It’s only a matter of time before the experience and knowledge honed against a foreign nation is deployed domestically. That is why we need to be concerned about this story. Again, just to be clear, the allegation being made by both Indian and Pakitani newspapers is that the CIA is actively working with the Taliban to foment terrorism; a significant allegation and something that’s quite newsworthy. I must have missed the headlines on this.
http://theafricanamericanclarioncall.com/?p=3095


Recruiting “Freshmen” Taliban by unlikely character: Raymond Davis … (http://www.pashtunforums.com/world-news-16/recruiting-freshmen-taliban-unlikely-character-raymond-davis-14635/)



Mar 4, 2011 … ” … The news that the CIA contractor recruited for the Taliban came when the US was encouraging Pakistan to send military against Taliban forces near the Afghanistan border. … “



Raymond Davis‘ close ties with the TTP (the Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan) has also been established. “Davis was instrumental in recruiting …


pashtunforums.com

Jan Klimkowski
03-12-2011, 07:07 PM
“Davis was instrumental in recruiting young people from Punjab for the Taliban to fuel the bloody insurgency (in Pakistan),” the official said.
The report came a day after The New York Times, citing US government officials, said that Davis “was part of a covert, CIA-led team of operatives conducting surveillance on militant groups deep inside the country.”
Among the groups that Davis was keeping an eye on was the banned Lashker-e-Taiba, which carried out the 2008 Mumbai terror attacks, the New York Times said.

The Express Tribune quoting unnamed sources said that call records retrieved from mobile phones found on Davis had allegedly established his links with 33 Pakistanis, including 27 militants from the banned Taliban and Lashkar-e-Jhangvi. The report claimed Davis was “said to be working on a plan to give credence to the American notion that Pakistan’s nuclear weapons are not safe.”

“For this purpose, he was setting up a group of the Taliban which would do his bidding,” it said.
Davis’ job was to trace the links of the Taliban and al-Qaeda in different parts of Pakistan but instead investigators found that he had developed “close links” with the Taliban, the report said quoting a source. …

And there we have it.

The False Flag of Gladio flying brazenly in the rarefied air of the mountainous Hindu Kush and the Khyber Pass betwen Pakistan and Afghanistan.

The so-called War on Terror. Cui bono?

Mammon.

Magda Hassan
03-17-2011, 07:24 AM
Behind the scenes of Raymond Davis's release

By Huma Imtiaz, March 16, 2011 http://www.foreignpolicy.com/images/091022_meta_block.gif Wednesday, March 16, 2011 - 11:27 AM [/URL]


http://afpak.foreignpolicy.com/files/davisfree.jpg
As March 16 dawned over Pakistan, perhaps no one except for the powers-that-be realized that Raymond Davis would soon be free.
Earlier in the morning, the Lahore Sessions Court had indicted Davis, a CIA contractor, for murder, after he allegedly shot dead Faizan Haider and Mohammad Faheem in Lahore this past January 27.
Hours later, the news broke that Davis was a free man, after he paid blood money to the families of Faizan and Faheem. According to Geo News, Punjab Law Minister Rana Sanaullah announced that the families had forgiven Davis, and been paid blood money under the Shariah law of Qisas and Diyat (http://www.addthis.com/bookmark.php?v=20). Another report aired on the channel said that 18 members of both families had announced in front of the judge in Kot Lakhpat jail that they had forgiven Raymond Davis, after which cash was handed over to the families. However, the families' lawyer Asad Manzoor Butt told Geo News that they were forcibly made to forgive Davis, after being led to jail by a man without identification.
Munawar Hasan, leader of the right-wing religious party Jamaat-e-Islami, reacted to the news by accusing the government of being slaves of the United States. "They should know that traitor governments do not last for very long," he said. "They have mocked the law, and the families were forcibly made to sign the Diyat document. Davis was involved with terrorist organizations, and yet they have let him go. The ISI claims to love the country, but they sell people to the States in exchange for dollars, they have failed in their love for the nation today." Hasan says protests against the release of Raymond Davis will be held in the major cities of Pakistan.
Conflicting reports have emerged about how much money has been paid to the families. Sources on various TV channels aired figures ranging from Rs. 60 million to Rs. 200 million (approximately $700,000 to $2,350,000). Davis's whereabouts are also unknown - Dunya News said he had flown to the United States, whereas Geo News claimed he had flown to Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan. Another story attributed to "sources" on Geo News also said that Faizan's widow Zehra had allegedly left for the United States.
Ahsan Iqbal, member of the PML-N, a major opposition party in Pakistan headed by former Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, told me in a telephone interview:

What has happened is between the families of the victims and the court and the law, if they have settled for the blood money under the law, then it is the law of the land. If the court has made a judgment we cannot challenge the judgement. However, it also shows that Davis didn't enjoy diplomatic immunity and his case was settled under Pakistan's law and not under the clauses of the diplomatic immunity.
Najam Sethi, a TV anchor and journalist, claimed on TV and Twitter that Punjab's Chief Minister and PML-N leader (and Nawaz Sharif's brother) Shahbaz Sharif had been involved in the negotiations between both parties. However, Iqbal denied the story to me, saying, "It has been very categorically clarified that Punjab government had nothing to do with the settlement, it is between the families and the accused."
Retired General Talat Masood, a defence analyst, told me that that Davis's release is a consequence of the smoothing over of relations between the CIA's and the ISI. "It's a good development, it demonstrates that both have come to an understanding about how they will operate with each other, and co-operate in Pakistan and Afghanistan. The ISI has also determined certain boundaries about how the CIA will operate in the country." Masood says that this was a difficult decision for Pakistan for many reasons, which include changing the Pakistan-U.S. relationship from co-operative to confrontational, and then dealing with the right-wing and religious parties' aggressive (http://afpak.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2011/03/11/pakistans_islamists_take_center_stage) stance on Raymond Davis.
A senior security official in Pakistan, speaking under condition of anonymity, told me that, "The Americans had been working on this, they thought that this (the diyat law) was the only way out." And ISI and CIA relations? "The ISI has laid down their terms for reengagement of certain areas where they felt they'd been bypassed, and the other side realized that they needed them. Both agencies need each other."
While rumours and more conspiracy theories continue to swirl in the air, it is evident that Pakistan has emerged as the biggest winner from Davis's strange and sordid case. While the religious parties may cry themselves hoarse over sovereignty of the country and rule of law, the ISI in particular has the upper hand here, and has impressed upon the CIA to make it clear that they cannot run a network under the noses of the powerful spy agency. To use tennis lingo: Advantage: ISI. What happens in the next round is anyone's guess.

[url]http://afpak.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2011/03/16/behind_the_scenes_of_raymond_davis_release

Jan Klimkowski
03-18-2011, 06:52 PM
Earlier in the morning, the Lahore Sessions Court had indicted Davis, a CIA contractor, for murder, after he allegedly shot dead Faizan Haider and Mohammad Faheem in Lahore this past January 27.
Hours later, the news broke that Davis was a free man, after he paid blood money to the families of Faizan and Faheem.

The Empire has paid the bounty on its hired killer.

This was always going to be the outcome.

As a PMC mercenary, I bet Davis billed the "blood money" on a costs-plus basis to the US taxpayer.

Magda Hassan
10-02-2011, 05:56 AM
I notice he is no longer a Diplomat but a CIA agent.


CIA operative arrested outside of bagel shop in Highlands Ranch

http://media.trb.com/media/alternatethumbnails/story/2011-10/23456381965240-01174852.jpg6:40 p.m. MDT, October 1, 2011


HIGHLANDS RANCH, Colo. -- A local CIA (http://www.kdvr.com/topic/politics/espionage-intelligence/central-intelligence-agency-ORGOV000009.topic) contractor who was released from Pakistan (http://www.kdvr.com/topic/intl/pakistan-PLGEO00000020.topic) after the U.S. paid millions of dollars to free him has been arrested in Highlands Ranch after a fight Saturday morning.

Police say Raymond Davis was arguing with a man about a parking spot outside of the Einstein Bagels at the Town Center at around 9 a.m.


The verbal argument turned physical, according to Lt. Glenn Peitzmeier, a spokesperson for the Douglas county Sheriff’s Office.

Peitzmeier says medial crews were called to the scene, but Davis and the other man involved refused treatment.

Davis was taken into custody on charges of third degree assault and disorderly conduct. He was released on bond a short time later.

In January, Davis was jailed in Pakistan, accused of shooting and killing 2 men in that country. According to the Pakistan government, the families of the two forgave him, and, under Islamic practice, more than $2.4 million in compensation was paid.

Davis maintains he acted in self-defense and says the shooting happened while he was driving through a Pakistani neighborhood and was attacked by the two men.

Peter Lemkin
10-02-2011, 06:33 AM
A bagel eating CIA contractor, at that! By the way, they make it sound as if it is a little town. It is the Southern part of Denver, Colorado. Apparently, Denver was chosen by HS as their main fall-back - as it is the largest city in the center of the country. Just south is Colorado Springs, with the underground command center for nuclear war.

Ed Jewett
10-02-2011, 11:08 AM
I notice he is no longer a Diplomat but a CIA agent.


CIA operative arrested outside of bagel shop in Highlands Ranch

... Raymond Davis was arguing with a man about a parking spot outside of the Einstein Bagels at the Town Center at around 9 a.m.


The verbal argument turned physical, according to Lt. Glenn Peitzmeier, a spokesperson for the Douglas county Sheriff’s Office.....


Davis maintains he acted in self-defense and says the shooting happened while he was driving through a Pakistani neighborhood and was attacked by the two men.


Life is a bitch on US streets when you can't call in UAV back-up... but this too will change.

Jan Klimkowski
04-12-2013, 06:23 PM
The other DPF thread about Raymond Davis.

Jan Klimkowski
04-12-2013, 06:37 PM
“If you’re going to send a Jason Bourne character to Pakistan, he should have the skills of a Jason Bourne to get away.”

Some elements of this NYT piece have the ring of partial truth, and it's clearly based on limited hangouts by insiders.

There are clues in the fact that Ambassador Munter and Hillary Clinton get favourable treatment.

So, fwiw:


After Davis (http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/14/magazine/raymond-davis-pakistan.html?pagewanted=all&_r=3&) was picked up by the Lahore police, the embassy became a house divided by more than mere geography. Just days before the shootings, the C.I.A. sent a new station chief to Islamabad. Old-school and stubborn, the new chief did not come to Pakistan to be friendly with the I.S.I. Instead, he wanted to recruit more Pakistani agents to work for the C.I.A. under the I.S.I.’s nose, expand electronic surveillance of I.S.I. offices and share little information with Pakistani intelligence officers.

That hard-nosed attitude inevitably put him at odds with the American ambassador in Islamabad, Cameron Munter. A bookish career diplomat with a Ph.D. in history, Munter had ascended the ranks of the State Department’s bureaucracy and accepted several postings in Iraq before ultimately taking over the American mission in Islamabad, in late 2010. The job was considered one of the State Department’s most important and difficult assignments, and Munter had the burden of following Anne W. Patterson, an aggressive diplomat who, in the three years before Munter arrived, cultivated close ties to officials in the Bush and Obama administrations and won praise from the C.I.A. for her unflinching support for drone strikes in the tribal areas.

Munter saw some value to the drone program but was skeptical about the long-term benefits. Arriving in Islamabad at a time when relations between the United States and Pakistan were quickly deteriorating, Munter wondered whether the pace of the drone war might be undercutting relations with an important ally for the quick fix of killing midlevel terrorists. He would learn soon enough that his views about the drone program ultimately mattered little. In the Obama administration, when it came to questions about war and peace in Pakistan, it was what the C.I.A. believed that really counted.

With Davis sitting in prison, Munter argued that it was essential to go immediately to the head of the I.S.I. at the time, Lt. Gen. Ahmad Shuja Pasha, to cut a deal. The U.S. would admit that Davis was working for the C.I.A., and Davis would quietly be spirited out of the country, never to return again. But the C.I.A. objected. Davis had been spying on a militant group with extensive ties to the I.S.I., and the C.I.A. didn’t want to own up to it. Top C.I.A. officials worried that appealing for mercy from the I.S.I. might doom Davis. He could be killed in prison before the Obama administration could pressure Islamabad to release him on the grounds that he was a foreign diplomat with immunity from local laws — even those prohibiting murder. On the day of Davis’s arrest, the C.I.A. station chief told Munter that a decision had been made to stonewall the Pakistanis. Don’t cut a deal, he warned, adding, Pakistan is the enemy.

The strategy meant that American officials, from top to bottom, had to dissemble both in public and in private about what exactly Davis had been doing in the country. On Feb. 15, more than two weeks after the shootings, President Obama offered his first comments about the Davis affair. The matter was simple, Obama said in a news conference: Davis, “our diplomat in Pakistan,” should be immediately released under the “very simple principle” of diplomatic immunity. “If our diplomats are in another country,” said the president, “then they are not subject to that country’s local prosecution.”

Calling Davis a “diplomat” was, technically, accurate. He had been admitted into Pakistan on a diplomatic passport. But there was a dispute about whether his work in the Lahore Consulate, as opposed to the American Embassy in Islamabad, gave him full diplomatic immunity under the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations. And after the shootings in Lahore, the Pakistanis were not exactly receptive to debating the finer points of international law. As they saw it, Davis was an American spy who had not been declared to the I.S.I. and whom C.I.A. officials still would not admit they controlled. General Pasha, the I.S.I. chief, spoke privately by phone and in person with Leon Panetta, then the director of the C.I.A., to get more information about the matter. He suspected that Davis was a C.I.A. employee and suggested to Panetta that the two spy agencies handle the matter quietly. Meeting with Panetta, he posed a direct question.

Was Davis working for the C.I.A.? Pasha asked. No, he’s not one of ours, Panetta replied. Panetta went on to say that the matter was out of his hands, and that the issue was being handled inside State Department channels. Pasha was furious, and he decided to leave Davis’s fate in the hands of the judges in Lahore. The United States had just lost its chance, he told others, to quickly end the dispute.

That the C.I.A. director would be overseeing a large clandestine network of American spies in Pakistan and then lie to the I.S.I. director about the extent of America’s secret war in the country showed just how much the relationship had unraveled since the days in 2002, when the I.S.I. teamed with the C.I.A. in Peshawar to hunt for Osama bin Laden in western Pakistan. Where had it gone so wrong?

While the spy agencies had had a fraught relationship since the beginning of the Afghan war, the first major breach came in July 2008, when C.I.A. officers in Islamabad paid a visit to Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, the Pakistani Army chief, to tell him that President Bush had signed off on a set of secret orders authorizing a new strategy in the drone wars. No longer would the C.I.A. give Pakistan advance warning before launching missiles from Predator or Reaper drones in the tribal areas. From that point on, the C.I.A. officers told Kayani, the C.I.A.’s killing campaign in Pakistan would be a unilateral war.

The decision had been made in Washington after months of wrenching debate about the growth of militancy in Pakistan’s tribal areas; a highly classified C.I.A. internal memo, dated May 1, 2007, concluded that Al Qaeda was at its most dangerous since 2001 because of the base of operations that militants had established in the tribal areas. That assessment became the cornerstone of a yearlong discussion about the Pakistan problem. Some experts in the State Department warned that expanding the C.I.A. war in Pakistan would further stoke anti-American anger on the streets and could push the country into chaos. But officials inside the C.I.A.’s Counterterrorism Center argued for escalating the drone campaign without the I.S.I.’s blessing. Since the first C.I.A. drone strike in Pakistan in 2004, only a small number of militants on the C.I.A.’s list of “high-value targets” had been killed by drone strikes, and other potential strikes were scuttled at the last minute because of delays in getting Pakistani approval, or because the targets seemed to have been tipped off and had fled.

So, in July 2008, when the C.I.A.’s director, Michael Hayden, and his deputy, Stephen Kappes, came to the White House to present the agency’s plan to wage a unilateral war in the mountains of Pakistan, it wasn’t a hard sell to a frustrated president. That began the relentless, years-long drone assault on the tribal areas that President Obama continued when he took office. And as the C.I.A.’s relationship with the I.S.I. soured, Langley sent station chiefs out to Islamabad who spent far less time and energy building up good will with Pakistani spies than their predecessors had. From 2008 on, the agency cycled a succession of seasoned case officers through Islamabad, and each left Pakistan more embittered than the last. One of them had to leave the country in haste when his identity was revealed in the Pakistani press. The C.I.A. suspected the leak came from the I.S.I.

(snip)

The furor over the Davis incident was quickly escalating, threatening to shut down most C.I.A. operations in the country and derail the intelligence-gathering operation in Abbottabad. But the C.I.A. stood firm and sent top officials to Islamabad, who told Ambassador Munter to stick to the strategy.

By then, though, Munter had decided that the C.I.A.’s strategy wasn’t working, and eventually even high-level officials in the agency began to realize that stonewalling the Pakistanis was only causing the I.S.I. to dig in. After discussions among White House, State Department and C.I.A. officials in Washington, Munter approached General Pasha, the I.S.I. chief, and came clean. Davis was with the C.I.A., he said, and the United States needed to get him out of the country as quickly as possible. Pasha was fuming that Leon Panetta had lied to him, and he was going to make the Americans squirm by letting Davis sit in jail while he considered — on his own timetable — the best way to resolve the situation.

Back in Washington, Ambassador Haqqani was summoned to C.I.A. headquarters on Feb. 21 and taken into Panetta’s spacious office overlooking the agency’s campus in Langley, Va. Sitting around a large conference table, Panetta asked Haqqani for his help securing Davis’s release.

“If you’re going to send a Jason Bourne character to Pakistan, he should have the skills of a Jason Bourne to get away,” Haqqani shot back, according to one person who attended the meeting.

More than a week later, General Pasha came back to Ambassador Munter to discuss a new strategy. It was a solution based on an ancient tradition that would allow the matter to be settled outside the unpredictable court system. The issue had already been discussed among a number of Pakistani and American officials, including Ambassador Haqqani in Washington. The reckoning for Davis’s actions would come in the form of “blood money,” or diyat, a custom under Shariah law that compensates the families of victims for their dead relatives. The matter would be handled quietly, and Davis would be released from jail.

Pasha ordered I.S.I. operatives in Lahore to meet the families of the three men killed during the January episode and negotiate a settlement. Some of the relatives initially resisted, but the I.S.I. negotiators were not about to let the talks collapse. After weeks of discussions, the parties agreed on a total of 200 million Pakistani rupees, approximately $2.34 million, to offer “forgiveness” to the jailed C.I.A. officer.

Only a small group of Obama administration officials knew of the talks, and as they dragged on, Lahore’s high court was preparing to rule on whether Davis would be granted diplomatic immunity, a decision the C.I.A. expected to go against the United States and worried might set a precedent for future cases in Pakistan.

Davis remained in the dark about all of this. When he arrived for his court appearance on March 16, he was fully expecting to hear that the trial would proceed and that the judge would issue a new court date. He was escorted into the courtroom, his wrists cuffed in front of him, and locked inside an iron cage near the judge’s bench. According to one person’s account, General Pasha sat in the back of the courtroom, his cellphone out. He began sending out a stream of nervous text messages to Ambassador Munter, updating him about the court proceedings. Pasha was one of the most powerful men in Pakistan, and yet the I.S.I. had little control over the mercurial courts in Lahore, and he wasn’t entirely sure that things would proceed according to plan.

The first part of the hearing went as everyone expected. The judge, saying that the case would go ahead, noted that his ruling on diplomatic immunity would come in a matter of days. Pakistani reporters frantically began filing their stories about how this seemed a blow to the American case, and that it appeared that Davis would not be released from jail anytime soon. But then the judge ordered the courtroom cleared, and General Pasha’s secret plan unfolded.

Through a side entrance, 18 relatives of the victims walked into the room, and the judge announced that the civil court had switched to a Shariah court. Each of the family members approached Davis, some of them with tears in their eyes or sobbing outright, and announced that he or she forgave him. Pasha sent another text message to Munter: The matter was settled. Davis was a free man. In a Lahore courtroom, the laws of God had trumped the laws of man.

The drama played out entirely in Urdu, and throughout the proceeding, a baffled Davis sat silently inside the cage. He was even more stunned when I.S.I. operatives whisked him out of the courthouse through a back entrance and pushed him into a waiting car that sped to the Lahore airport.

The move had been choreographed to get Davis out of the country as quickly as possible. American officials, including Munter, were waiting for Davis at the airport, and some began to worry. Davis had, after all, already shot dead two men he believed were threatening him. If he thought he was being taken away to be killed, he might try to make an escape, even try to kill the I.S.I. operatives inside the car. When the car arrived at the airport and pulled up to the plane ready to take Davis out of Pakistan, the C.I.A. operative was in a daze. It appeared to the Americans waiting for him that Davis realized only then that he was safe.

(snip)

The perils of this approach were laid bare on March 17, 2011, the day after Davis was released from prison and spirited out of the country. C.I.A. drones attacked a tribal council meeting in the village of Datta Khel, in North Waziristan, killing dozens of men. Ambassador Munter and some at the Pentagon thought the timing of the strike was disastrous, and some American officials suspected that the massive strike was the C.I.A. venting its anger about the Davis episode. More important, however, many American officials believed that the strike was botched, and that dozens of people died who shouldn’t have.

Other American officials came to the C.I.A.’s defense, saying that the tribal gathering was in fact a meeting of senior militants and therefore a legitimate target. But the drone strike unleashed a furious response in Pakistan, and street protests in Lahore, Karachi and Peshawar forced the temporary closure of American consulates in those cities.

Munter said he believed that the C.I.A. was being reckless and that his position as ambassador was becoming untenable. His relationship with the C.I.A. station chief in Islamabad, already strained because of their disagreements over the handling of the Davis case, deteriorated even further when Munter demanded that the C.I.A. give him the chance to call off specific missile strikes. During one screaming match between the two men, Munter tried to make sure the station chief knew who was in charge, only to be reminded of who really held the power in Pakistan.

“You’re not the ambassador!” Munter shouted.

“You’re right, and I don’t want to be the ambassador,” the station chief replied.

This turf battle spread to Washington, and a month after Bin Laden was killed, President Obama’s top advisers were arguing in a National Security Council meeting over who really was in charge in Pakistan. At the June 2011 meeting, Munter, who participated via secure video link, began making his case that he should have veto power over specific drone strikes.

Panetta cut Munter off, telling him that the C.I.A. had the authority to do what it wanted in Pakistan. It didn’t need to get the ambassador’s approval for anything.

“I don’t work for you,” Panetta told Munter, according to several people at the meeting.

But Secretary of State Hillary Clinton came to Munter’s defense. She turned to Panetta and told him that he was wrong to assume he could steamroll the ambassador and launch strikes against his approval.

“No, Hillary,” Panetta said, “it’s you who are flat wrong.”

There was a stunned silence, and National Security Adviser Tom Donilon tried to regain control of the meeting. In the weeks that followed, Donilon brokered a compromise of sorts: Munter would be allowed to object to specific drone strikes, but the C.I.A. could still press its case to the White House and get approval for strikes even over the ambassador’s objections. Obama’s C.I.A. had, in essence, won yet again.


.