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Magda Hassan
03-12-2011, 05:33 AM
Wouldn't happen at a wind or tidal farm.

Thousands ordered to evacuate as nuclear emergency is declared

SONIA VERMA

Globe and Mail Update

Published Friday, Mar. 11, 2011 7:27AM EST

Last updated Friday, Mar. 11, 2011 10:11PM EST



Japan declared a nuclear emergency after Friday’s earthquake compromised the cooling systems of at least two of its nuclear plants, forcing the evacuation of people living near both of them. Officials warned that small amounts of radioactive material were likely to leak from the plants, known as Daiichi and Daini and operated by Tokyo Electric Power.

The evacuation zone for the Daiichi plant was tripled to 10 kilometres after authorities detected eight times the normal radiation levels outside the facility. Inside the plant’s control room, levels were a thousand times higher than normal. The evacuation of the second Daini plant was for a 1.6-kilometre radius because “there is no sign that radiation has been emitted outside,” an official said.
As workers struggled to cool two of the plant’s reactors, the cooling systems of three reactors at a second plant failed, fuelling fears of more widespread problems.
By Saturday morning Japan had declared states of emergency for five reactors at the two plants. The news capped a day fraught with confusion over the risk posed by possible radioactive leakage from Japan’s 11 nuclear reactors, all of which automatically shut down during the earthquake.
While the shutdowns were successful, some of the reactors did not appear to be cooling properly, due to disruptions to the electrical supply that powers the cooling pumps. There were worries that a backup battery-operated system would not be robust enough to bring down the reactor’s temperatures.
The Daiichi and Daini plants are 15 kilometres apart in Fukushima Prefecture, about 240 kilometres north of Tokyo and close to the quake’s epicenter off the coast.
Meanwhile, the Japanese government seemed caught between competing impulses, wanting to ease public fear on the one hand, while taking measures against the risk of radioactive contamination on the other.
In a statement broadcast on the Japanese state television network NHK, nuclear safety officials said there was “no immediate health hazard” to the public from the leakage, which was characterized as “minute.” Nuclear experts appeared on camera, using diagrams to explain how the elevated levels of radiation were caused by a breach in the containment building, not the reactor itself.
But as coolant pressure rose to one and a half times normal inside one of the plant’s six reactors, the government announced it would release radioactive steam into the atmosphere, a measure meant to ease the pressure inside the reactor that it said would pose no significant threat to public safety.
Tokyo Electric said that by Saturday morning it had installed a mobile generator at Daiichi to ensure that the cooling system would continue operating even after reserve battery power was depleted. Even so, the company said it was considering a “controlled containment venting” in order to avoid an “uncontrolled rupture and damage” to the containment unit.
“With evacuation in place and the oceanbound wind, we can ensure the safety,” a nuclear safety official, Yukio Edano, said at a news conference early Saturday.
While most experts continued to play down the risk of a Chernobyl-style meltdown, the scramble to contain the risk posed by the compromised reactor underscored some of the dangers associated with the nuclear power on which Japan relies to produce one-third of its electricity.
Japan’s reactors are designed to hold up under the harsh punishment of an earthquake, but some analysts had expressed concern over the enforcement of safety standards at the facilities. The failure of the Fukushima plants’ diesel generators, which ran for only a short time after starting up when the main power supply failed, leading to a crippling loss of cooling capacity, raised particular concern.
“Obviously everybody wants to know why the diesel generator stopped working. Because you don’t just seismically qualify the reactor, you have to seismically qualify everything. This whole thing will become a huge case study,” said Ian Wilson, president of the Canadian Nuclear Society.
The problems in each of the faulty reactor’s cases appeared to stem from the cooling systems, which become especially crucial in the event of an automatic shutdown such as that triggered by the earthquake. Even after the nuclear fission process is stopped, the cooling system must continue to work to keep the reactor from melting down. Pumps operated by electricity, supplied through the national grid or by backup diesel generators, circulate water through the system. If they fail, the pumps operate on batteries, which eventually run out.
“You can’t just say tools down and shut everything off. You get what you call heat decay,” said William Garland, a professor in the department of engineering physics at McMaster University.
“So even when you shut off, you’re generating 6 per cent heat. In the case of this reactor, that could be the equivalent of 30,000 toasters. If you don’t take that heat away, then you’re going to overheat and something’s going to melt.”
Two workers were reported missing at the Daiichi plant, but the company did not explain what might have happened to them.
During much of the early morning on Saturday, safety officials focused on getting emergency power supplies to the Daiichi plant to restore the normal cooling function. The International Atomic Energy Agency stated new electrical supplies had arrived at the site to prevent the situation from becoming more dangerous.
In the meantime, most observers said they would take a wait-and-see approach: “This is still playing out,” Mr. Wilson said.
“So far it looks like all of the systems are kicking in. … There’s this public perception that there’s this green goo that’s somehow going to burst out of these reactors, but that’s simply not the case.”

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/asia-pacific/thousands-ordered-to-evacuate-as-nuclear-emergency-is-declared/article1938199/

Magda Hassan
03-12-2011, 08:53 AM
Well, it's happened. Earthquake, tsunami and now the nuclear reactor has exploded. Roof and walls gone. The 2nd reactor is about to meltdown as well.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/42044156/ns/world_news-asia-pacific/
TOKYO — An explosion was heard and smoke was seen at a quake-hit Japanese nuclear power plant on Saturday, officials said.
Several workers were injured by the blast at Fukushima Unit 1, Japanese TV station NHK reported. A trail of white smoke was seen at the site and shaking was felt, The Associated Press reported.
Britain's Sky News cited NHK as saying that the walls and roof of a building at the site had been destroyed.
Japan earlier warned of a meltdown after the nuclear reactor was damaged when a massive earthquake and tsunami struck the northeast coast.
Experts said any threat of widespread radiation leaks would be contained as long as the reactor's outer container is intact.
Authorities have been scrambling to reduce pressure at two nuclear power plants in Fukushima, 150 miles north of Tokyo, damaged by Friday's devastating quake (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/42044293/ns/world_news-asia-pacific/) .
Two reactors had lost cooling ability at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Because of the overheating, a meltdown was possible at one of the reactors, said Ryohei Shiomi, an official with Japan's nuclear safety commission.
But even if there was a meltdown, it wouldn't affect people outside a six-mile radius, he said. Most of the 51,000 residents living within the danger area had been evacuated, he said.
Before the blast, authorities detected eight times the normal radiation levels outside the facility and 1,000 times normal inside Unit 1's control room.

Peter Lemkin
03-12-2011, 09:19 AM
Well, it's happened. Earthquake, tsunami and now the nuclear reactor has exploded. Roof and walls gone. The 2nd reactor is about to meltdown as well.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/42044156/ns/world_news-asia-pacific/
TOKYO — An explosion was heard and smoke was seen at a quake-hit Japanese nuclear power plant on Saturday, officials said.
Several workers were injured by the blast at Fukushima Unit 1, Japanese TV station NHK reported. A trail of white smoke was seen at the site and shaking was felt, The Associated Press reported.
Britain's Sky News cited NHK as saying that the walls and roof of a building at the site had been destroyed.
Japan earlier warned of a meltdown after the nuclear reactor was damaged when a massive earthquake and tsunami struck the northeast coast.
Experts said any threat of widespread radiation leaks would be contained as long as the reactor's outer container is intact.
Authorities have been scrambling to reduce pressure at two nuclear power plants in Fukushima, 150 miles north of Tokyo, damaged by Friday's devastating quake (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/42044293/ns/world_news-asia-pacific/) .
Two reactors had lost cooling ability at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Because of the overheating, a meltdown was possible at one of the reactors, said Ryohei Shiomi, an official with Japan's nuclear safety commission.
But even if there was a meltdown, it wouldn't affect people outside a six-mile radius, he said. Most of the 51,000 residents living within the danger area had been evacuated, he said.
Before the blast, authorities detected eight times the normal radiation levels outside the facility and 1,000 times normal inside Unit 1's control room.

Yes, it is a very dire scenario.....and all they can do now is hope it stays somewhat contained...if not, welcome to Chernobyl 2! It is clear that a partial meltdown [at the mininum] has already occurred, causing the heating that caused the explosion. The outer walls [at a mininum] of the #1 reactor has been blown away. There is a containment structure under that, but in all likelihood it has been breached, cracked or itself has exploded or melted [or soon will]...this is really likely to be as deadly and dangerous [or more so] than the earthquake and tsunami...if slower...!

Peter Lemkin
03-12-2011, 10:10 AM
A SECOND reactor at the same facility is NOW about to overheat and possibly blow. In Japan they are telling EVERYONE to stay indoors with the windows shut!.....This could be the death blow to the nuclear industry...and a real environmental disaster!!!

To add another problem the nuclear reactors are near the greatest tsunami disaster zone and is already hampering the rescue effort - as it is now dangerous for the rescue teams to be in the area and outside.....luckily, at the moment winds are blowing the radiation offshore....for now....

The Associated Press

Date: Saturday Mar. 12, 2011 5:32 AM ET

IWAKI, Japan — An explosion at a nuclear power station Saturday destroyed a building housing the reactor amid fears that it was close to a disastrous meltdown after being hit by a powerful earthquake and tsunami.

Peter Lemkin
03-12-2011, 10:52 AM
Great....[not!]...just did some research....while the design of the Japanese reactors is 'better' than Chernobyl, the 'better' features are largely made moot due to the lack of power there now. [that was the 'good news']....now for the bad news....each of the eight reactors being watched now contains 100X the amount of radioactive materials as did the reactor at Chernobyl!.....:smileymad: As said, one is at least partly breached and melting...with the temperature at a second following close behind!.....that would be the potential of 200 x the amount of radioactive materials at Chernobyl. While I think an explosive release [as at Chernobyl] is less likely, a fire [likely] would be almost as effective at spreading the radioactive materials. I have already heard one report of radioactive Cesium being detected outside of the plant - a VERY bad sign!

Magda Hassan
03-12-2011, 11:48 AM
Dr Helen Caldicott (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dr-Helen-Caldicott/102772801940)
NHK: "The government's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency says nuclear material cesium has been detected near the Number One reactor at the Fukushima Number One nuclear power plant. The agency says the detection indicates that some of the nuclear fuel at the reactor may have started melting, because cesium is produced during a nuclear chain reaction." Very bad news.

Peter Lemkin
03-12-2011, 12:00 PM
Dr Helen Caldicott (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dr-Helen-Caldicott/102772801940)
NHK: "The government's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency says nuclear material cesium has been detected near the Number One reactor at the Fukushima Number One nuclear power plant. The agency says the detection indicates that some of the nuclear fuel at the reactor may have started melting, because cesium is produced during a nuclear chain reaction." Very bad news.

Yup! Gonna be a lot more bad news comin'.....sooner than later.... I don't know the construction style of these reactors and not sure I can quickly find them on the internet - anyway don't know the details of what is and is not already fact on the ground; however, the 'best' of the bad scenarios would likely be a ''China-Syndrome" meltdown into the rocks below. The worst could be into the air - with dispersal of most of the materials into the sea the mid-level horror [it is directly adjacent to the ocean].


On internet just saw a photo of the reactor building.....it is not there [the building]...what is the condition of the reactor vessel is not being released and can not be seen in the photo.

Unconfirmed, but mentioned on AlJazeera from Japanese sources was that just outside the nuclear power plant the radiation levels are 525,600x normal.

Peter Lemkin
03-12-2011, 01:00 PM
You can watch the explosion here. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kjx-JlwYtyE) Latest ''ófficial'word was that the containment vessel is intact and not leaking radiation....unlikely and in contradiction to the current ongoing expansion of the exclusion zone around the reactor!!!! - which is not 30 to 60Km!!!

Magda Hassan
03-12-2011, 01:02 PM
Japan's nuclear power operator has chequered past

The company at the centre ofa nuclear reactor crisis following the biggest earthquake inJapan's recorded history has had a rocky past in an industryplagued by scandal.
| March 12, 2011 | 0 (http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=japans-nuclear-power-operator-has-c#comments)

SINGAPORE, March 12 (Reuters) - The company at the centre of a nuclear reactor crisis following the biggest earthquake in Japan's recorded history has had a rocky past in an industry plagued by scandal.
The Japanese government said on Saturday that there had been radiation leakage at Tokyo Electric Power's (TEPCO) Fukushima Daiichi plant following an explosion there.
The blast came as TEPCO was working desperately to reduce pressures in the core of a reactor at the 40-year-old plant, which lies 240 km (150 miles) north of Tokyo.
In 2002, the president of the country's largest power utility was forced to resign along with four other senior executives, taking responsibility for suspected falsification of nuclear plant safety records.
The company was suspected of 29 cases involving falsified repair records at nuclear reactors. It had to stop operations at five reactors, including the two damaged in the latest tremor, for safety inspections.
A few years later it ran into trouble again over accusations of falsifying data.
In late 2006, the government ordered TEPCO to check past data after it reported that it had found falsification of coolant water (http://www.scientificamerican.com/topic.cfm?id=water) temperatures at its Fukushima Daiichi plant in 1985 and 1988, and that the tweaked data was used in mandatory inspections at the plant, which were completed in October 2005.
And in 2007, TEPCO reported that it had found more past data falsifications, though this time it did not have to close any of its plants (http://www.scientificamerican.com/topic.cfm?id=plants). (Writing by Jonathan Thatcher; Editing by John Chalmers; jonathan.thatcher@thomsonreuters.com)
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=japans-nuclear-power-operator-has-c

Magda Hassan
03-12-2011, 01:33 PM
Japan Reactor Fuel Rods May Have Begun to Melt, Atomic Safety Agency Says

By Yuji Okada - Sat Mar 12 08:03:46 GMT 2011
A nuclear reactor in the Fukushima Dai-Ichi power station about 220 kilometers (140 miles) north of Tokyo may be starting to melt down after Japan’s biggest earthquake on record hit the area yesterday.
Fuel rods at the No. 1 reactor at the plant run by Tokyo Electric Power Co (http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=9501:JP). may be melting after radioactive Cesium material left by atomic fission was detected near the site, Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, spokesman Yuji Kakizaki said by phone today.
“If the fuel rods are melting and this continues, a reactor meltdown is possible,” Kakizaki said. A meltdown refers to a heat buildup in the core of such an intensity it melts the floor of the reactor containment housing.
Tokyo Electric, Asia’s biggest power company, started releasing radioactive gas and steam into the atmosphere to reduce pressure in the containment housing after yesterday’s magnitude 8.9 earthquake, Akitsuka Kobayashi, a company spokesman, said by phone today. Pressure has started to fall in the containment housing, said Yoshihiro Sugiyama, a spokesman at the country’s nuclear safety agency.
Winds (http://www.jma.go.jp/en/amedas/205.html?elementCode=1) in the area of the Fukushima plant are blowing at less than 18 kilometers per hour mostly in an offshore direction, according to a 4 p.m. update from the Japan Meteorological Association.
The government earlier today widened the evacuation zone around the reactor to 10 kilometers from 3 kilometers, affecting thousands of people. The quake and the tsunami that followed is estimated to have killed at least 500 people with hundreds more missing, the National Police Agency said.
Low Radiation

“When the pressure starts building up, the emergency procedure is to start venting,” Dave Lochbaum (http://search.bloomberg.com/search?q=Dave%20Lochbaum&site=wnews&client=wnews&proxystylesheet=wnews&output=xml_no_dtd&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&filter=p&getfields=wnnis&sort=date:D:S:d1&partialfields=-wnnis:NOAVSYND&lr=-lang_ja), director of the nuclear safety project at the Union for Concerned Scientists, said in a telephone interview. “They’ve essentially entered a beat the clock game. As long as there is no fuel damage, there will be radioactivity, but it will be very low.”
Radiation spread by the venting won’t be at a level dangerous to health, said Ryohei Shiomi, a spokesman at the government’s nuclear agency said earlier.
Tokyo Electric started venting gas from a containment section of the No. 1 reactor at Fukushima Dai-ichi at about 9 a.m. local time. The company is preparing to do the same at the Dai-Ni nuclear plant nearby, a spokesman said.
Tokyo Electric earlier said it had lost control of pressure building up in three reactors at the Dai-Ichi power plant. Temperatures in the control room rose to higher than 100 Celsius (212 Fahrenheit), said Naoki Tsunoda, a company spokesman.
Main Barrier

The plant’s operators need to connect to the electricity grid, fix emergency diesel generators or bring in more batteries to power a backup system that pumps the water needed to cool the reactor, said Lochbaum, a nuclear engineer who has worked at nuclear power plants for 17 years.
The air cooling system in the containment building probably failed due to the power loss, allowing pressure to increase inside, Lochbaum said.
The main barrier between a reactor and outside areas is the containment building, Lochbaum said. Without an air cooling system the air heats, causing pressure to rise inside the building, with the risk that radioactive air will escape.
Tokyo Electric has also started preparing to vent gas from the containment areas of four reactors at the Fukushima Dai-ni nuclear plant, Kobayashi said.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-03-12/japan-reactor-fuel-rods-may-have-begun-to-melt-atomic-safety-agency-says.html

Peter Lemkin
03-12-2011, 02:17 PM
It was the VERY building they vented to prevent an explosion in, that exploded...so don't worry...they have everything under control and are telling all....:D Exclusion zone just moved from 10 to 20Km!...and expected to get larger.....

By the way, the death toll now is expected to be as high as 20.000 or more....maybe much more. Whole towns are missing....

Peter Lemkin
03-13-2011, 07:35 AM
It is becoming clearer [despite official denials] that a meltdown has already occurred and is ongoing in two of the reactors - and now it is apparent the same processes have begun in a third! The design of these reactors likely will not have an 'explosive' dispersal of a radioactive aerosol, as at Chernobyl....but slowly much of the radiation will escape - and we are now talking about 300 x the amount that was at Chernobyl. It seems to me, that pretty soon all they can do is entombment, as at Chernobyl. This may well go down as the worst nuclear accident ever!

Peter Lemkin
03-13-2011, 02:06 PM
It could hardly be worse, AFP just announced a nuclear emergency being announced at a totally different nuclear facility.... All the pumps that drive the cooling system have been damaged and there is no power for them. They are trying to pump sea water into them, but it is not working - for reasons unknown. So many valves and other things could have been damaged in the quake and tsunami. Now looking at a potential of 400x the amount of radioactive material as was in Chernobyl reactor.....gulp!

Magda Hassan
03-13-2011, 02:15 PM
They keep saying it isn't going to be like Chernobyl but I keep seeing Chernobyl. Including the deflection and and evasion of talking about it openly and truthfully. 2307

Peter Lemkin
03-13-2011, 03:16 PM
News moves from bad to worse. I just learned that one of the [now] FOUR melting-down reactors was testing an experimental fuel called MOT - It contains PLUTONIUM, rather than Uranium...and if the radioactive products of that one are released it is SO many times more lethal and dangerous than the others [already very, VERY dangerous!!!]. There are still other reactors in the area where the same thing could soon happen. It is now believed that in 3, maybe 4 reactors the fuel rods have melted and are no longer interspaced with control rods, but lie as a molten mass of metal at the bottom of the containment vessel at about 3-4000C. At those temperatures it will, if not cooled, melt the concrete [takes a few days] and then melt its way directly down to the Earth's mantle....contaminating any water and air along the way....called the China Syndrome and once started, unstoppable.

Magda Hassan
03-14-2011, 06:19 AM
http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/story/2011/03/14/japan-reactor-monday.html
Officials said a second hydrogen explosion has occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, the Japanese broadcaster NHK reported Monday morning.
But the inner reactor container was intact after the explosion, said Yukio Edano, Japan's chief cabinet secretary, and little radioactivity was dispersed.
Tokyo Electric Power Co. said three people were injured and seven were missing in the explosion.

Peter Lemkin
03-14-2011, 06:39 AM
http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/story/2011/03/14/japan-reactor-monday.html
Officials said a second hydrogen explosion has occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, the Japanese broadcaster NHK reported Monday morning.
But the inner reactor container was intact after the explosion, said Yukio Edano, Japan's chief cabinet secretary, and little radioactivity was dispersed.
Tokyo Electric Power Co. said three people were injured and seven were missing in the explosion.

I think you'll find the 'missing' are now radioactive dust. A hydrogen explosion is a very powerful one, locally. One has to hope that they are telling the truth on the fact that the #1 and #3 reactor vessels are not breeched and will not be....but that depends on if they can keep the temperatures down. Uncooled these types of reactors 'naturally' heat up to 4,000C, which is hot enough to melt any metal and even concrete and rock = China Syndrome and escape of all of the radioactive materials out of the plant - straight down....down perhaps 75Km or more, depending on the rock structures below. From hints I hear it is touch-and-go, at best if they are winning the cooling battle...and remember there are very large aftershocks several times per day that will continue for months or years! We will see...but I'm not sure I trust the authorities and not sure they even know the exact situation!

Peter Lemkin
03-14-2011, 07:07 AM
Unreal....now reactor #2 is overheating...just as 1 and 3 did....they now have three side by side teetering on the edge of a meltdown.....

Peter Lemkin
03-14-2011, 11:20 AM
I guess you can guess....the number 2 reactor's control rods are now fully exposed - and beginning the process of a melt-down. They have a little [LITTLE!] time to try to cool them...but they now have 3 reactors in a row all in about the same state. I just heard an expert say something I didn't know...that the best case scenario was emergency cooling of these three for about a year and then clean up... [i.e. the locals are not going home anytime soon....!]

Magda Hassan
03-14-2011, 11:37 AM
I dare not ask if it can possibly get any worst in case it almost certainly will.

Peter Lemkin
03-14-2011, 12:14 PM
I dare not ask if it can possibly get any worst in case it almost certainly will.

Well, at that particular plant, it is as bad as it can get....except if 1,2 or all 3 meltdown....the other reactors had been off for maintenance; however, there are other nuclear plants currently struggling to keep the cooling pumps going after both damage and now without electricity! It is a real mess.....

Peter Lemkin
03-14-2011, 03:02 PM
Update, best I can get information. Interestingly it is the last [#2] reactor to have 'problems' that now looks like the most likely to melt-down...although all three are still at risk. The exact reasons for this the Japanese are not saying. But they do admit that that one has the most exposed and melted core, of the three.....all very worrying. Given the images from the tsunami, plus the potential for a nuclear accident it is like Hiroshima II waiting behind the curtains...

Peter Lemkin
03-14-2011, 08:36 PM
Reactor #2 has once again had the tops of the fuel rods exposed. It had happened once earlier today, but they then started pumping in sea water [many problem involved with that...but definitely will cool]...and it stabilized....until just now, when it was said that the tops were again exposed. They have three very unstable reactors on their hands and the sea water will corrode all the pipes quickly; add to that, if there is a great deal of the water boiling off, the salt may remain and clog up the pipes....many problems remain, but they are keeping the details quiet and trying to calm everyone. Again, those who have been removed from near the reactor and are in a school now...who think they may soon go home will [I think] find, at best, it will be many months to a year or more.....

Peter Lemkin
03-15-2011, 06:08 AM
I was hoping I would be proven wrong....think not. Reactor #4 is now on fire [a very dangerous scenario - as it can spread radiation a la Chernobyl if the fire grows]. A fire in this type of reactor is the most serious scenario. A meltdown puts most [not all] of the radioactive material deep in the Earth; a fire [or an explosion] puts it in the air.....where it will travel worldwide and settle out and get into the food chain and in the environment as a whole. The total amount of radioactive materials now in danger is equal to 400 x that in Chernobyl [although no one expect that much to be released, even in the worst case scenario. How much will be released is not possible to judge, at this point. The Prime Minister of Japan just admitted dangerous levels were now being emitted!......

Some of those being asked to evacuate are unable to, as there is no fuel for cars and public transport is down. A total mess.....

Winds are now blowing toward Tokyo and they have asked all unneeded personnel in the plant to leave!.....that bad. The reactor #2 also exploded [hydrogen explosion]...making that having happened to 1,2, 3 and 4. [a perfect Bingo!] The 20Km exclusion zone is now 30Km. Measured at 100 Km the levels are 100x those considered acceptable. It will get worse.....how much is not known - the worst case scenario is almost too horrible to mention....I personally don't understand why the pumping in of sea water isn't working...they are NOT saying why. That should be straight forward and only: 1] destroying the reactors to ever be used for power again and 2] slightly contaminating the ocean....but it seems NOT to be working for unknown reasons!...hang on.... the surrounding area from the plant, Tokyo, Japan all are in peril of this pending accident [it is releasing radiation, but not so very much - relative to what horrors could be imagined - yet!], as is the entire Planet...to some extent! Oh, and yes, they have brought in a few hundred thousand Iodine pills for the locals....a very bad sign! Japan has also immediately requested experts from the IAEA [International Atomic Energy Agency] and GE [who built the plant] to come to help. A sure sign they feel they have lost control!!!! They have raised the danger level from 4 to 5 [7 is equal to Chernobyl]......:what:

This also has taken out 20% of Japan's electrical supply.....a lesson...a hard one. There is NO repair or rebuilding of these reactors - they are finished and only now can be buried, when under control. Nuclear power, IMO, is just playing with fire......literally.

Not directly related, but a sign of just how powerful the quake was, the ENTIRE main island of Japan was shaken [it moved] 2.4 meters [almost 10 ft.] East!!!

Update: Reactor #2 now has a fire under [repeat UNDER] the core.....now the MOST serious situation of many....it all seems to quickly be spinning out of control. I fear in a few hours or days they will have to evacuate those few radiated souls now fighting the situation.....and Nature will take its course..... :what::what::what::popworm::joystick:

Peter Lemkin
03-15-2011, 09:09 AM
Radiation levels up to 11,000 mSv have been measured.....an AMAZINGLY high amount. [equivalent to getting 44 million X-rays!] It is more 'regularly' at about 5,000 in the area....unacceptable. Police are now going around and forcing the removal of persons in the exclusion zone! It looks increasingly like the 'worst' is about to happen soon...a total meltdown of one to four of the reactors!...other things could happen too. The situation really now seems to be out of control. I don't even understand how reactor #4 overheated and caused a fire, as it was shut down for maintenance before the earthquake, but details are being withheld.

While the amounts of radiation now coming out are HUGE, the risk factor is by time exposed. For those evacuated, they might get by without cancers, et al. For those now working in the plant.....:darthvader:

Peter Lemkin
03-15-2011, 09:57 AM
1 Sv = 100 rem
1 mSv = 100 mrem = 0.1 rem
1 μSv = 0.1 mrem
1 rem = 0.01 Sv = 10 mSv
1 mrem = 0.00001 Sv = 0.01 mSv = 10 μSv

Dose Benchmarks
Living near a nuclear power station = less than 0.01 mSv/year[1]
Chest x-ray = 0.04 mSv[1]
Cosmic radiation (from sky) at sea level = 0.24 mSv/year[1]
Terrestrial radiation (from ground) = 0.28 mSv/year[1]
Mammogram = 0.30 mSv[1]
Natural radiation in the human body = 0.40 mSv/year[1]
Radon in the average US home = 2 mSv/year[1]
Smoking 1.5 packs/day = 13 mSv/year[2]
Gastrointestinal series = 14 mSv[1]

Symptom Benchmarks

Effects to humans of acute radiation (within one day):[3]
0–0.25 Sv: None
0.25–1 Sv: Some people feel nausea and loss of appetite; bone marrow, lymph nodes, spleen damaged.
1–3 Sv: Mild to severe nausea, loss of appetite, infection; more severe bone marrow, lymph node, spleen damage; recovery probable, not assured.
3–6 Sv: Severe nausea, loss of appetite; hemorrhaging, infection, diarrhea, skin peels, sterility; death if untreated.
6–10 Sv: Above symptoms plus central nervous system impairment; death expected.
Above 10 Sv: Incapacitation and death.

Peter Lemkin
03-15-2011, 02:11 PM
Now at level 6 on a 1 - 7 scale!....

Albert Doyle
03-15-2011, 02:31 PM
You can assume China Syndrome at this point. There's nothing to stop it. They're past the point of no return.


They are going to have to burn people like at Chernobyl to build a last ditch sarcophagus...

Peter Lemkin
03-15-2011, 02:52 PM
You can assume China Syndrome at this point. There's nothing to stop it. They're past the point of no return.


They are going to have to burn people like at Chernobyl to build a last ditch sarcophagus...

It is touch-and-go. We have not yet reached that point...and we should hope it won't happen. I also worry it might...but it has not yet and it is NOT inevitable. However, given the way this has all gone...it is getting more and more likely. Luckily [sic] even a total meltdown here will not LIKELY be as bad as it was at Chernobyl. Yes, it will be horrible and dangerous worldwide and to a few places [depending on wind and rainfall] really, REALLY horrible, it will not be a Chernobyl....but it will likely rate just between Three Mile Island and Chernobyl.....and I hope yet a new wake-up call about the dangers of Nuclear Power.

Bernice Moore
03-15-2011, 03:53 PM
http://news.discovery.com/earth/japan-before-and-after-110314.html#mkcpgn=rssnws1


discovery before and after earthquake

no cherbobylhttp://news.discovery.com/earth/nuclear-power-plant-japan-chernobyl-110314.html#mkcpgn=rssnws1

Peter Lemkin
03-15-2011, 05:34 PM
That Discovery piece was a tad too optimistic, methinks. Chernobyl had an explosive rupture of the containment vessel....these Japanese ones would likely have a meltdown without explosion. Chernobyl had graphite control rods which added to the fires and provided particles on which radioactive particles could attach. I don't believe the Japanese reactors have graphite. However, the four reactors are NOT under control, in fact they seem to be increasingly OUT of control......and there are four of them, each with much greater amounts of radioactive materials than had Chernobyl...and one has experimental fuel with Plutonium.....especially deadly in the air!......So far, it is a tragedy in the making......the next days will tell, but the ten days they talk about are in a normal reactor....doesn't apply here... it will be weeks or months before these can be declared as 'safe'....but they will, at best' have to be entombed or dismantled to pollute some other location.

Peter Lemkin
03-15-2011, 06:50 PM
(Reuters) - Russia's nuclear chief warned on Tuesday that all six reactors at a stricken Japanese nuclear plant could melt down unless the authorities scrambled to cool down the nuclear fuel rods.

....I didn't put the whole article. Too depressing. It seems the last two of the six are now slowly heating up too.... At the moment, they are NOT at critical temperatures. Details are very very sketchy, so hard to say what will happen....we apparently will be told AFTERWARDS.....

Everything is under control....HA HA HA HA HA!

Peter Lemkin
03-15-2011, 08:13 PM
SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: Japan is on the verge of a nuclear catastrophe after a third explosion at the nuclear reactor most damaged by Friday’s 9.0-magnitude earthquake and tsunami. The blast at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant has seriously damaged the Number Two reactor’s steel containment structure for the first time and caused the leaking of radioactive materials. Radiation levels around the plant in one hour were at eight times the legal limit for exposure in a year. Residents within 12 miles of the plant have been ordered to evacuate, while those living up to 18 miles away have been ordered to remain indoors.

Government officials initially downplayed the severity of the damage to the plant, but in a nationwide address, Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan acknowledged radiation levels are dangerous.

PRIME MINISTER NAOTO KAN: [translated] There were hydrogen explosions at reactors Number One and Number Three, and there was a fire at reactor Number Four. There is radiation in this area, and the level is pretty high. There is mounting fear that there will be more leaks. So, once again, I would like to reiterate that the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi plant—most people have already been evacuated from the 20-kilometer radius, but we reiterate, people need to stay away from this area.

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: Emergency workers have also been ordered to evacuate the plant. If a meltdown ensues, Japan could face the world’s largest radiation emissions since the Chernobyl disaster 25 years ago. The threat of catastrophe comes amidst a massive recovery effort in the aftermath of the tsunami and earthquake that’s believed to have killed over 10,000 people and left over 500,000 homeless.

We’ll be going to a break and coming back. We’ll be joined by Arnie Gundersen, a nuclear engineer who’s coordinated projects at 70 nuclear power plants around the country. He provides independent testimony on nuclear and radiation levels to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and congressional and state legislatures. Arnie Gundersen was a nuclear industry executive for many years before blowing the whistle on the company he worked for in 1990, when he found inappropriately stored radioactive material. He joins us right now from Burlington, Vermont.

And joining us from San Francisco is Aileen Mioko Smith. She is director of the Kyoto-based Green Action and a board member of Greenpeace International. Aileen is one of Japan’s leading voices challenging the production, commerce and transport of nuclear material, and calling for sustainable energy policies. She joins us from San Francisco.

But first, we to Arnie Gundersen in Burlington, Vermont. Mr. Gundersen, can you explain exactly what is happening right now at the plant in Tokyo?

ARNIE GUNDERSEN: Yes, thank you. The first unit exploded over the weekend, and the second unit, which is Unit Three, exploded the next day. Yesterday, the third unit, which is Unit Two there—so, One, Two and Three now have all had hydrogen explosions. This is not a nuclear explosion; this is a chemical explosion. Hydrogen is created because the fuel is too hot and enormous amounts of hydrogen are created.

The biggest problem seems to be in the second reactor, where the containment appears to be ruptured, and the reactor, as well, may be damaged from this explosion. So the explosion yesterday was the most severe. The most telling issue, as far as I’m concerned, is that the site has been evacuated. There was 800 people on the site, and then they evacuated all but 60 people. That’s basically telling the crew to man the lifeboats.

In the fourth unit, there is—there was a fire in the fuel pool. And I have heard unconfirmed reports that it has started back up again. In the fifth and six units, the fuel pools are getting warmer.

So, basically, three units are in meltdown condition. One is definitely worse than the other two. But, you know, "meltdown" and "worse" are relative terms. It’s very bad in three units. The fire in the fourth unit is also a serious concern.

Small amounts of radiation have been detected in Tokyo, which is not a problem, yet. Thank goodness. If there is any goodness coming out of this, it’s that the wind is blowing out to sea right now. If the wind were to shift inland, I think we’d have a different situation.

And the last thing is that the emergency zone, out to 20 kilometers, people have been told to leave. And out to 30 kilometers, people have been told to stay indoors, wash your clothes when you come in, wash your body if you go outside and come back in. I think that’s not enough. I really think that emergency planning needs to be—at least children out in that zone should be sent elsewhere.

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: And explain what you mean, what you understand, by the levels of radiation that are leaking right now. The levels around the plant, in one hour, at eight times the legal limit for exposure in one year—what does this mean?

ARNIE GUNDERSEN: It’s very difficult to determine that right now. You have to remember, with the explosions, most of the radiation detectors have been destroyed. So, the New York Times is reporting that workers are picking up in seven minutes their yearly exposure in certain areas within the plant. I studied Three Mile Island extensively, and it’s very difficult to chase one of these radioactive clouds to determine exactly where it’s touching down. So, numbers in the vicinity of the plant are probably too low. It’s very difficult to be right at the spot where the worst exposures are occurring. So, I take with almost no credence any of the numbers in the vicinity of the plant. But my experience shows that they’re probably too low.

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: What are the efforts right now to cool down the plant? Why do these explosions keep happening? This is the third explosion now.

ARNIE GUNDERSEN: Yeah, that’s a great question. They will continue. I think, given that the site has been evacuated—you know, those 800 people were not sitting around playing poker. They were all doing critical, critical things. So, if you’ve let 800 people go and are trying to do the work of 800 with 60 people, clearly critical items are not going to be accomplished.

So, the reason these things are continuing to blow is because the zirconium oxide reactions are continuing. What that means is that the fuel is so hot, it’s chemically stripping water, and it’s creating oxygen and hydrogen. It’s just ripping the water molecule apart and creating hydrogen and oxygen. And that hydrogen continues to build up. That’s what’s causing the explosions.

In order to avoid that, they were manually opening valves into these containments to keep the pressure from building up. And that’s one of the critical activities that these 800 employees were doing, as well as manning fire pumps and pushing water in. But I would suspect that a lot of those efforts have been abandoned because of the high radiation levels right now.

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: How similar is the plant in Japan, the Fukushima Daiichi plant, to many of the nuclear power plants in this country?

ARNIE GUNDERSEN: It’s almost identical to 23 of them. For instance, the Quad Cities and the Dresden plant in Illinois, the Vermont Yankee plant here in Vermont, Oyster Creek in New Jersey, Pilgrim in Massachusetts—it’s almost identical to those and more than a dozen others.

You know, this reactor design, this containment design, has been questioned since 1972. The NRC in 1972 said we never should have licensed this containment. And in 1985, the NRC said they thought it was about a 90 percent chance that in a severe accident this containment would fail. So, that we’re seeing it at Fukushima is an indication that this is a weak link. It’s this Mark I, General Electric Mark I, containment. And we have—essentially one-quarter of all of the nuclear reactors in the United States, 23 out of 104, are of this identical design.

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: Arnie Gundersen is a nuclear engineer who has coordinated projects at 70 nuclear power plants around the country. We’re going to break for 60 seconds. When we come back, we’ll also be joined by Aileen Mioko Smith, director of the Kyoto-based Green Action, and we’ll speak with the Governor of Vermont, Peter Shumlin. Stay with us.

[break]

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: We’re talking about the nuclear disaster in Japan. We’re joined right now by the Vermont Governor, Peter Shumlin. Last week, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission announced it would renew the license for Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plant, the only power plant in Vermont. Last year, state legislators voted to close the plant when its license expires next year. The 38-year-old plant is one of the oldest in the country and has had a series of leaks.

Governor Shumlin, welcome to Democracy Now! How does what’s happening right now in Japan affect Vermont Yankee?

GOV. PETER SHUMLIN: Well, let me first say that my heart obviously goes out to the people of Japan. Extraordinary crisis and everyone’s worst nightmare, when they have aging nuclear power plants in their country or in their state. Vermont is no different. We have an aging nuclear power plant here. It’s owned by Entergy Louisiana, a company that we found we can’t trust. And obviously, you know, I think it asks all of us to reexamine our policy of irrational exuberance when it comes to extending the lives of aging nuclear power plants—we have 103 in America—that were designed to be shut down after 40 years. Ours was designed be shut down in 2012.

We’re the only state in the country that’s taken power into our own hands and said that, without an affirmative vote from the state legislature, the Public Service Board cannot issue a certificate of public good to legally operate a plant for another 20 years. Now, the Senate has spoken, 26 to four, saying, no, it’s not in Vermont’s best interest to run an aging, leaking nuclear power plant. And we expect that our decision will be respected.

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: Now, the day before this earthquake and the tsunami hit Japan, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission extended the lifespan of Vermont Yankee for additional 20 years. Explain the struggle that’s happening at the state and federal level.

GOV. PETER SHUMLIN: Well, you know, that’s really—should be of no surprise to anyone. There are 104 aging nuclear power plants in America. We do have a policy of irrational exuberance, as if we can run them beyond their designed life. And the NRC so far has approved 60—all 60, I should add—of the applications for extension that have been granted. So it certainly would have been big news if for some reason the NRC said no.

The good news is, for Vermont, at least, that the chair of the NRC reaffirmed Vermont’s authority to also determine our own nuclear future, and they don’t intend to stand in the way of that. So, really, it was sort of a no news, no surprise item. It’s not a surprise that they continued their policy of, as I mentioned, irrational exuberance around our aging plants. The good news is that they respect Vermont’s authority to determine our own future.

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: The Obama administration wants to expand the use of nuclear power. Do you oppose that?

GOV. PETER SHUMLIN: Well, you know, I spoke with the President about that directly a couple of weeks ago at the White House. And I said, "You know, Mr. President, if you want to convince us that new nuclear has a future in America, you have to help us deal with old nuclear in a more rational way."

And, you know, we have a number of challenges right here in Vermont that should be an example for the country. The first is, our plant keeps leaking. It’s leaking tritium, other nuclear substances, into the ground right here in Vermont, in a state wherein—a Green Mountain state—there is nothing that Vermonters cherish more than our quality of life and protecting our natural resources. We are the environment state. So, that’s a challenge.

Second, the NRC currently is allowing the nuclear plant operators to determine, once a plant is shut down, whether they decommission it, which is what they all promised to do when they built them 40, 50 years ago, or whether they put it in something called "safe store," which allows the carcass of the plant to sit in its location for up to 60 years, because the companies who own them have been unwilling to fill up the decommissioning funds to take them away.

Now, what I said to the President is, "Listen, you’ve got to help us deal with old nuclear before we can have any confidence in new nuclear. Make sure that these profitable companies, like Entergy Louisiana, fill up the decommissioning funds so they’re taken away on time and we’re not left, in our case, with a carcass of an aging nuclear power plant in a flood plain on the banks of the Connecticut River for 60 years, because the company is unwilling to fill up the fund. Secondly, let’s deal with the high-level waste issue." We have high-level nuclear waste sitting in dry cask storages on the banks of the Connecticut River for as long as the eye can see, after having been promised when the plant was built that the federal government would magically take all that high-level waste away. So, I said, "Mr. President, you know, help us deal with old nuclear first. Let’s stop this policy of insanity about old nuclear, and we’ll be happy to talk to you about new nuclear."

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: Governor Peter Shumlin, I want to thank you very much for being with us. Governor Shumlin is the Democratic governor of Vermont.

We go right now to Aileen Mioko Smith. She’s the director of Kyoto-based Green Action. She’s on the board of Greenpeace International. She’s joining us from San Francisco right now, one of Japan’s leading voices challenging nuclear power.

Welcome to Democracy Now!

AILEEN MIOKO SMITH: Thank you very much.

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: Can you tell us what you understand is happening right now in Japan in terms of the evacuation?

AILEEN MIOKO SMITH: Yes. By the way, I’m not a board member of Greenpeace International. I’m working with Green Action in Kyoto, Japan.

Right now, the evacuation is underway, and we’re very concerned about the people around the plants. I think that what we’re suffering very much right now in Japan is that the government only said a evacuation area within 10 kilometers, or six miles, was necessary. So, there’s nothing on the books about any evacuation to be undertaken beyond that limit. And I think that we are right now suffering from the fact that nothing was on the books to evacuate people beyond that area. I agree with Arnie Gundersen, what he just said, that evacuations should be a larger area right now. Thirty kilometers is not enough. That’s 18 miles. It’s not sufficient. It should be going on beyond that right now, so that people can be prepared for wider areas of radiation contamination.

We’re very concerned with the complete lack of environmental monitoring around the region where people are evacuated and where people need to be evacuating even further. And that was a concern of Japanese citizens way back. This plant, from the very start, even before it was built, citizens said that the land was not proper for building a nuclear power plant. There was opposition. There were lawsuits. And of all—in all the areas, 54 nuclear power plants in Japan, every area, citizens have fought siting, because of seismic concerns. So this is very much a man-made problem. People may think it’s a combination of man-made and human—natural disaster, but no plant should have been here in the first place.

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: Japan’s policy right now is to build eight more nuclear plants. What do you understand is happening with that right now?

AILEEN MIOKO SMITH: Well, right now, just the day before this accident happened, people were—citizens who had been opposing a plant site for 30 years down in Yamaguchi Prefecture, southwest of Osaka, were actually virtually in hand-to-hand combat with people who—with the utility who was coming in and trying to start a landfill in order to build a plant. Of the eight sites, they’re still supposed to be under construction and be built, but obviously that situation would change as of this week.

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: And the information coming right now from the Japanese government, very little information, what do you understand they’re saying or they’re not saying?

AILEEN MIOKO SMITH: Well, I think that there are three things. One is that they themselves don’t really know what’s going on. But the other is, I think that they are trying to protect the public. I think it’s very important not to panic people, so the tone, which is very calm, is good and should remain that way. But they should be informing the public exactly all the things that they know and exactly all the things—admit to all the things that they don’t know. And I don’t think that they’re informing the public. I feel like—we really feel that the government is patronizing of the citizens. You can’t protect the people from reality. The reality is that the situation is very serious, and emissions could become much greater.

And I think that the public really needs to be warned that, carefully, and that evacuations should be leading the situation, not like the situation is really bad and then you delay and delay but then you evacuate a little bit. Actually, what you should be doing is initially start the evacuation and be quite proactive about it, and evacuate ahead of the problem versus evacuating as a result of things that have happened. And that’s not happening right now. So I think that they have to be very quick right now in initiating calm evacuation of a larger area.

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: I want to turn back to Arnie Gundersen for a moment now, joining us from Burlington, Vermont. What is the significance of the removal of 750 workers from the nuclear plant? How will this affect the effort to prevent a meltdown?

ARNIE GUNDERSEN: It’s got to make the efforts worse. You know, these 750 people that are being evacuated were doing critical work. They weren’t sweeping floors and washing windows; they were doing critical work. So, when the staff, basically, is cut—90 percent of the staff is told, "You have to leave the site"—that’s an indication that a lot of critical work isn’t getting done. I really think it’s also—it’s an indication that management at the site has thrown in the towel and is going to let this thing run its course without any more human intervention. What that means is that—I’m particularly concerned about another aftershock, especially if an aftershock—on the weak Unit 2 containment, which already apparently has failed, and an aftershock would make it worse. The other thing that especially concerns me is that a large group of personnel were fighting the fire in the fuel pool on Unit 4, and again, you can’t have 60 people on a six-unit site and expect that anything gets done.

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: There was the disaster at Three Mile Island, the Chernobyl disaster. This is a disasters of a different sort. There’s been three explosions. Are we in unchartered territory right now?

ARNIE GUNDERSEN: This is certainly right now bumping up against the magnitude of Chernobyl. It’s clearly passed what happened at Three Mile Island. And it’s not clear that this situation may not get worse, not better. You know, Chernobyl was one reactor. There are three in either partial meltdown or meltdown. And then the other one has a fuel pool fire. And I understand this morning that the temperatures in the other two fuel pools are also increasing. So, you know, I’ve said before that this could easily become Chernobyl on steroids. It’s not there yet, but given that the essential personnel have been evacuated, it could easily get there within 24 hours.

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: And the issue of plutonium, Arnie Gundersen?

ARNIE GUNDERSEN: Yeah, you know, plutonium is named after Pluto, the god of Hell. And that’s an indication that it’s a pretty nasty element. It’s in all these reactors. Unit Three was using what’s called mixed oxide fuel. So Unit Three had more plutonium than the other units. But all of these reactor fuel pools and the nuclear reactors themselves have plutonium in them.

When plutonium volatilizes, when it gets hot and turns to a vapor, it can be breathed in. And, of course, it’s very—it can cause cancer in lungs very, very easily. And the containments, which are designed to contain this plutonium, are—have failed, at least in Unit Two. I believe in Unit One and Three, they are leaking, but they probably haven’t failed. So, it is likely that volatile plutonium is being released right now.

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: Finally, Arnie Gundersen, what is most important for people to understand as they follow the news in these coming days?

ARNIE GUNDERSEN: I guess if I were in Japan, I would at least get the children away from the reactor, because their bodies are growing faster and their cells are more susceptible to radiation damage. I would go out to 50 kilometers and at least get the children away from those reactors.

You know, Japan is a long way from the U.S. There’s 5,000 miles of ocean for that plume to disperse over. So, it’s a little bit too early to determine what the health effects are on the United States. But it’s clear to me we will detect it. Within about five to seven days, the plume will hit the West Coast, and we’ll begin to detect the radiation. Exactly what the magnitude of the radiation is, as your previous caller said, there’s not any good environmental monitoring. There’s no monitoring in the plant, because, one, there’s no people, and, two, the instruments have blown up. So, we just simply don’t know how much radiation is getting out. I think the numbers we’re seeing now are on the low side, and they don’t really represent the true magnitude of what’s already happening.

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: I’d like to end with Aileen Mioko Smith. You’ve been in touch with many people in Japan. Talk about the recovery efforts right now—in the north, there’s bodies washing ashore, there’s millions without food or power—as this nuclear crisis is unfolding.

AILEEN MIOKO SMITH: Yes, that’s correct. All the people that we know in Fukushima and Miyagi, we haven’t heard from them. In, finally, the last day and a half, we received, like, a phone call, where it’s just an instant. You can hear a voice for a split second, and you know that the person is alive.

These are all people who were fighting and concerned about the seismic safety of the Fukushima plants. Actually, the last two years, there was a review of all the seismic situation at the nuclear power plants, whether the land was safe and the facility, the nuclear power plant, was strong enough to withstand quakes. And just the last few months, the last few weeks, citizens had pointed out that TEPCO’s analysis was insufficient, and the government should not approve TEPCO’s analysis, but the government approved it. And these are the citizens that are now—I don’t know, some of them, if they’re alive or not.

The areas, the towns—we know people in all those towns. And you look at the photograph of the town, and it’s just completely devastated. I just completely believe that we would hear from all of them, and it was just a matter of time of hearing from them, but when you look at their towns, you know, you’re not sure, if you haven’t heard from them yet, whether they’re alive. So, they can’t—they can’t fight this situation now at the plant. All the people who were the spokespeople, who knew about the problems with the plant and the land there and the problems, they are all evacuated, or I don’t know if they’ve survived. And here we are—we’re the other spokespeople that lived further away, knew them, and are trying to speak on their behalf. And that’s where it is.

I was at the Fukushima plant last August with Kevin Kamps from Beyond Nuclear, based in Washington, D.C. We were there to warn about the dangers of spent nuclear fuel. I remember standing there with one of the people in Fukushima and looking down on the Daiichi plant on one side and the Daini plant on the other, and we took a photograph there, the three of us. And we met with the mayor of Futaba town, and also we were with—Kumano town, and also we went to Futaba town. These are two villages that are now completely evacuated.

We had independent scientists go in there three days ago, and they went in there to monitor. These are independent journalists that went with monitors to the actual towns that were evacuated. And all their radiation monitors went off. You could—they walked into the hospital of the town, and you could see that the evacuation was really rushed. They said that beds were turned over. Equipment, tubes for injections and everything was scattered all over the place. It was obvious people had left in a big hurry from the hospital. And when they went to the town hall, it was completely evacuated, and the levels just went off. So, they’re right now monitoring.

This person—as I was coming here to the studio, he was monitoring 50 kilometers, 30 kilometers from the plant and getting readings and putting it on the blog. I mean, this is the kind of information the government should be telling the people, but they don’t have the monitoring, because beyond 10 kilometers, radiation wasn’t supposed to leave. Every site in Japan, citizens have said, "Look, why do you say radiation stops immediately at 10 kilometers?" You know, it doesn’t, and you have to have a plan for if the radiation goes beyond 10. And the government, the national government, refuses to do this, and therefore, the prefectures didn’t get a plan. We’ve been to our prefecture over and over again about this.

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: Well, we’ll continue to—

AILEEN MIOKO SMITH: One of the problems that we have is that—yeah, we have plans for earthquake—

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: We’re going to continue to follow this story over the coming days. Aileen Mioko Smith, we have to leave it there.

AILEEN MIOKO SMITH: OK.

SHARIF ABDEL KOUDDOUS: We’re going to continue to cover this story very closely in the coming days. Aileen Mioko Smith is the director of the Kyoto-based Green Action, on of Japan’s leading voices challenging the production, commerce and transport of nuclear material. And thank you very much to Arnie Gundersen, a nuclear engineer who’s coordinated projects at 70 nuclear power plants around the country.

Peter Lemkin
03-16-2011, 06:11 AM
Reactor #4 is now on fire badly, and out of control. White smoke and steam is coming off the top - highly radioactive!!!! They are about to try one last emergency procedure - droping boric acid and water on it from the air. I personally think that will only delay the inevitable now...it looks like the worst is about to happen!!! Sorry to report this. It now looks very, very bad....the remaining two reactors are approaching critical temperatures [5 and 6] and it looks like in a few days (maybe less, we will have all six reactors melting-down - some more than others). The 860 person crew who had been lowered [stupidly!, I think] to 80, has been reduced further to a 'skeleton crew' due to the radiation - and are most of the time in a radiation-proof bunker - but from there they can do little! It is now near total disaster!!! At this point, it is fairly clear that the radionucleides are in control, not the Plant Controllers.

It is not yet at a total disaster....but so close......so very close.....with nothing I can see they can do. Those workers still on site are now receiving enormous doses of radiation....they won't live long. The only thing one can hope for [sic] is that the meltdowns occur as 'china syndrome' melts into the earth - the least horrible scenario. If they cause fires, or explosions, then much more of the radiation gets into the air - which is one blanket over the entire planet.....as with Chernobyl, the distributed doses will will depend on two factors - the total amount released into the air and the weather patterns [wind direction and rainfall].

Two nuclear reactors in CA are on active earthquake faults! 23 reactors in the USA are of the EXACT same design as those in Japan.

Peter Lemkin
03-16-2011, 07:14 AM
News...not good news. Two reactor containment vessels are now [at the least] cracked and thus can leak the molten nuclear fuel. The situation today is infinitely worse than yesterday and most all the once nearly 900 persons who worked there are gone. It seems they have only about 30, or less, there now.. [who hide in a radiation bunker when not doing a specific task]. This is an impossibly low number to handle such an absolute emergency!!!

Peter Lemkin
03-16-2011, 08:06 AM
Just saw videos of helicopters dropping water on the reactors - certainly a last-ditch effort [I'm afraid will not prevail]. I don't know if they are adding boric acid [which absorbs radiation] in the sea water; but at 'best' the sea water dumped on an active fire in at least one reactor will turn to steam - and very radioactive steam! Many in Tokyo who can, are planning their leaving for other locations...but Japan is a small island nation and the winds can and do keep changing directions. Reactors #2 and #3 have open vessels [not exploded - but cracked open]. The entire idea of a containment structure is to NEVER be open and NEVER let the radioactives inside out.
Incredibly, the two reactors that had long been shut down before the quake [#5 and #6] are now experiencing partial burning and overheating of the stored spent fuel rods [highly radioactive]....another ominous event - as if more are needed. At this point it might take a miracle to control the situation. They have no plan and few persons on site to even do anything IF they had a plan! They have, for the most part, 'abandoned ship' and leaving physics to do what physics does.....

Kudos to GE's Mark I containment vessels! - now available on eBay at great markdowns.....slightly used, sold 'as is', without warranty.

Peter Lemkin
03-16-2011, 09:03 AM
TOKYO ELECTRIC TO BUILD US NUCLEAR PLANTS
The no-BS info on Japan's disastrous nuclear operators

by Greg Palast
New York - March 14, 2011

I need to speak to you, not as a reporter, but in my former capacity as lead investigator in several government nuclear plant fraud and racketeering investigations.


Texas plants planned by Tokyo Electric. Image:NINA
I don't know the law in Japan, so I can't tell you if Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO) can plead insanity to the homicides about to happen.

But what will Obama plead? The Administration, just months ago, asked Congress to provide a $4 billion loan guarantee for two new nuclear reactors to be built and operated on the Gulf Coast of Texas — by Tokyo Electric Power and local partnners. As if the Gulf hasn't suffered enough.

Here are the facts about Tokyo Electric and the industry you haven't heard on CNN:

The failure of emergency systems at Japan's nuclear plants comes as no surprise to those of us who have worked in the field.

Nuclear plants the world over must be certified for what is called "SQ" or "Seismic Qualification." That is, the owners swear that all components are designed for the maximum conceivable shaking event, be it from an earthquake or an exploding Christmas card from Al Qaeda.

The most inexpensive way to meet your SQ is to lie. The industry does it all the time. The government team I worked with caught them once, in 1988, at the Shoreham plant in New York. Correcting the SQ problem at Shoreham would have cost a cool billion, so engineers were told to change the tests from 'failed' to 'passed.'

The company that put in the false safety report? Stone & Webster, now the nuclear unit of Shaw Construction which will work with Tokyo Electric to build the Texas plant, Lord help us.

There's more.

Last night I heard CNN reporters repeat the official line that the tsunami disabled the pumps needed to cool the reactors, implying that water unexpectedly got into the diesel generators that run the pumps.

These safety back-up systems are the 'EDGs' in nuke-speak: Emergency Diesel Generators. That they didn't work in an emergency is like a fire department telling us they couldn't save a building because "it was on fire."

What dim bulbs designed this system? One of the reactors dancing with death at Fukushima Station 1 was built by Toshiba. Toshiba was also an architect of the emergency diesel system.

Now be afraid. Obama's $4 billion bail-out-in-the-making is called the South Texas Project. It's been sold as a red-white-and-blue way to make power domestically with a reactor from Westinghouse, a great American brand. However, the reactor will be made substantially in Japan by the company that bought the US brand name, Westinghouse — Toshiba.

I once had a Toshiba computer. I only had to send it in once for warranty work. However, it's kind of hard to mail back a reactor with the warranty slip inside the box if the fuel rods are melted and sinking halfway to the earth's core.

TEPCO and Toshiba don't know what my son learned in 8th grade science class: tsunamis follow Pacific Rim earthquakes. So these companies are real stupid, eh? Maybe. More likely is that the diesels and related systems wouldn't have worked on a fine, dry afternoon.

Back in the day, when we checked the emergency back-up diesels in America, a mind-blowing number flunked. At the New York nuke, for example, the builders swore under oath that their three diesel engines were ready for an emergency. They'd been tested. The tests were faked, the diesels run for just a short time at low speed. When the diesels were put through a real test under emergency-like conditions, the crankshaft on the first one snapped in about an hour, then the second and third. We nicknamed the diesels, "Snap, Crackle and Pop."

(Note: Moments after I wrote that sentence, word came that two of three diesels failed at the Tokai Station as well.)

In the US, we supposedly fixed our diesels after much complaining by the industry. But in Japan, no one tells Tokyo Electric to do anything the Emperor of Electricity doesn't want to do.

I get lots of confidential notes from nuclear industry insiders. One engineer, a big name in the field, is especially concerned that Obama waved the come-hither check to Toshiba and Tokyo Electric to lure them to America. The US has a long history of whistleblowers willing to put themselves on the line to save the public. In our racketeering case in New York, the government only found out about the seismic test fraud because two courageous engineers, Gordon Dick and John Daly, gave our team the documentary evidence.

In Japan, it's simply not done. The culture does not allow the salary-men, who work all their their lives for one company, to drop the dime.

Not that US law is a wondrous shield: both engineers in the New York case were fired and blacklisted by the industry. Nevertheless, the government (local, state, federal) brought civil racketeering charges against the builders. The jury didn't buy the corporation's excuses and, in the end, the plant was, thankfully, dismantled.

Am I on some kind of xenophobic anti-Nippon crusade? No. In fact, I'm far more frightened by the American operators in the South Texas nuclear project, especially Shaw. Stone & Webster, now the Shaw nuclear division, was also the firm that conspired to fake the EDG tests in New York. (The company's other exploits have been exposed by their former consultant, John Perkins, in his book, Confessions of an Economic Hit Man.)
If the planet wants to shiver, consider this: Toshiba and Shaw have recently signed a deal to become world-wide partners in the construction of nuclear stations.

The other characters involved at the South Texas Plant that Obama is backing should also give you the willies. But as I'm in the middle of investigating the American partners, I'll save that for another day.

So, if we turned to America's own nuclear contractors, would we be safe? Well, two of the melting Japanese reactors, including the one whose building blew sky high, were built by General Electric of the Good Old US of A.

After Texas, you're next. The Obama Administration is planning a total of $56 billion in loans for nuclear reactors all over America.

And now, the homicides:

CNN is only interested in body counts, how many workers burnt by radiation, swept away or lost in the explosion. These plants are now releasing radioactive steam into the atmosphere. Be skeptical about the statements that the "levels are not dangerous." These are the same people who said these meltdowns could never happen. Over years, not days, there may be a thousand people, two thousand, ten thousand who will suffer from cancers induced by this radiation.

In my New York investigation, I had the unhappy job of totaling up post-meltdown "morbidity" rates for the county government. It would be irresponsible for me to estimate the number of cancer deaths that will occur from these releases without further information; but it is just plain criminal for the Tokyo Electric shoguns to say that these releases are not dangerous. Indeed, the fact that residents near the Japanese nuclear plants were not issued iodine pills to keep at the ready shows TEPCO doesn't care who lives and who dies whether in Japan or the USA. The carcinogenic isotopes that are released at Fukushima are already floating to Seattle with effects we simply cannot measure.

Heaven help us. Because Obama won't.

Peter Lemkin
03-16-2011, 09:38 AM
I don't know how to reconcile Pallast's statement above that some of the reactors' containment vessels were made by GE and some by Toshiba. I think that is not correct, but can not confirm. I believe the containment vessels and reactors were made by GE and the emergency generators were made by Toshiba.

Amazing to me is that when all the generators/pumps failed they did not use heavy helicopters to bring in others and fuel and set them up, using seawater! Such large generators/pumps exist in all countries for emergencies! They would only need six or less, depending on size and some hoses - and people to run them! It now turns out that for a good part of the day yesterday the entire nuclear power plant was EVACUATED [i.e. no humans there....let the computers [if they are even still running....doubtful...run the out of control plant.] I think at this stage one has to agree with Pallast that one can not trust what the authorities are saying in real time. They seem more concerned in stopping panic, than in telling the whole truth.

Peter Lemkin
03-16-2011, 02:10 PM
Latest update: Helicopter use to dump water and Boric Acid on the overheating reactors and fuel ponds has been ABANDONED - as the radiation levels are too high for those in the helicopters! They have one last last option....using fire-hoses to shoot sea water onto the reactors....a desperate measure, for sure.... and unsure if the fire-trucks can pump a stream that far and high and those operating them will also be exposed to nearly lethal levels of radiation - unless they keep changing persons every 3-60 minutes. It is looking increasing bad and certainly has and is following a 'worst-case' scenario, now!..... It looks increasingly like one bad ending or another......:mexican:

Bernice Moore
03-16-2011, 05:52 PM
http://tinyurl.com/6bxwenm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AkXoiIug2AM

and we are all Japanese;

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uQgCHN4wiKU&feature=related

Peter Lemkin
03-16-2011, 06:45 PM
More and slightly greater detailed information was just released....one reactor has had at least 75 of its nuclear core melted; two reactors are breached [containment broken open to environment]; Reactors 5 and 6 are up to 85C and by tomorrow should be about to explode [as have all the others due to hydrogen explosions due to heat and catalysis of the zirconium oxide casing on the fuel rods with water. The skeleton crew was brought back and no water is being put on the fires [one reactor is burning] and no water is currently being pumped into the reactors to cool them...so they will all get hotter and more dangerous. They are pinning their hopes now on a high-voltage line they are building to the plant in the hopes of starting up the pumps again......sounds like wishful thinking to me......I give it little chance of success, even if completed in time. So, each and ever reactor has degraded since yesterday......and it won't be many days more before it will be time to evacuate all and kiss thousands a fond farewell, with hundreds of thousands having increased cancers and other diseases, malformed children, etc. Very sad. Not one bit of good news on the topic can be found.....sorry.

Peter Lemkin
03-17-2011, 05:56 AM
Red Alert in Japan: An Unfolding Nuclear Catastrophe
Submitted by Stephen Lendman on Wed, 2011-03-16 09:06 Environment

Red Alert in Japan: An Unfolding Nuclear Catastrophe - by Stephen Lendman

Since March 12, a potentially unprecedented catastrophe has been unfolding in Japan, despite official denials and corroborating media reports - managed, not real news. Believe none of them. Nonetheless, on March 15, Reuters suggested what's ongoing, headlining: "Japan braces for potential radiation catastrophe," saying:

"Japan faced potential catastrophe on Tuesday" after a fourth Fukushima reactor explosion, fire, and high-level radiation release, posing grave human health risks to an expanding area, including Toyko's 20 million population 170 miles south.

France's Nuclear Safety Authority rated the disaster a six on the international seven-point nuclear accident scale. Clearly, it's the worst ever. Europe's energy commissioner, Guenther Oettinger called it an "apocalypse," telling the European Parliament that Toyko lost control of events.

Independent experts agree. It's an unprecedented disaster spreading globally. All six Fukushima reactors are crippled, four of them spewing unknown amounts of radiation.

On March 15, city officials said levels were 20 times above normal, later stating they'd dropped, downplaying the risk. Government authorities also claimed Fukushima levels were falling. For residents throughout the country, believing them is hazardous to their health, given the gravity of the situation, likely deteriorating, not improving.

In Maebashi, 60 miles north of Tokyo and Chiba prefecture further south, Kyodo News reported radiation levels 10 times normal, perhaps downplaying much higher ones. Even Prime Minister Naoto Kan was alarmed, saying "(t)he possibility of further radioactive leakage is heightening," meaning very likely it reached extremely hazardous levels. Earlier official reports downplayed the danger.

According to Hokkaido University Professor Koji Yamazaki, "Radioactive material will reach Tokyo but it is not harmful to human bodies because it will be dissipated by the time it gets" there.

False! Any amount of radiation is harmful. Moreover, it's cumulative, causing cancer if one human gene is affected. Depending on the type and amount, it damages chromosomes and DNA. In her landmark book, "Nuclear Madness," Helen Caldicott said:

"Lower doses of radiation can cause abnormalities of the immune system and can also cause leukemia five to ten years after exposure; (other) cancer(s), twelve to sixty years later; and genetic diseases and congenital anomalies in future generations."

Moreover, "nuclear radiation is forever," says Caldicott. It doesn't dissipate or disappear. Downplaying its danger is hypocritical and outrageous. For a scientist like Yamazaki, it's scandalous.

In 1953, Nobel laureate George Wald told students (including this writer) that "no amount of radiation is safe," explaining that "Every dose is an overdose."

Radiation is unforgiving. Exposure to elevated levels for short periods is harmful. If longer, cancer and other potentially fatal illnesses may develop. It's why using nuclear reactors to generate power is irresponsible, in fact, crazy.

On March 15, New York Times writers Hiroko Tabuchi, David Sanger and Keith Bradsher headlined, "Fire and Damage at Japanese Plant Raise Risk of Nuclear Disaster," saying:

Fukushima's operator Toyko Electric Power (TEPCO), a notorious industry scofflaw, "expressed extreme concern that (they) were close to losing control over the fuel melting that has been ongoing in three (Daiichi) reactors...." After Unit 2 exploded, "pressure had dropped in the 'suppression pool" - a section at the bottom of the reactor that converts steam to water and is part of the critical function of keeping the nuclear fuel protected."

Afterward, radiation levels soared. According to Hiroaki Koide, senior reactor engineering specialist at Kyoto University's Research Reactor Institute:

"We are on the brink. We are now facing the worst-case scenario. We can assume that the containment vessel at Reactor No. 2 is already breached. If there is heavy melting inside the reactor, large amounts of radiation will most definitely be released."

Moreover, a plant official said breaching would make it hard to impossible to maintain emergency seawater cooling for an extended period, and if workers are evacuated, "nuclear fuel in all three reactors (will likely) melt down," causing "wholesale releases of radioactive material...."

Further, already over 200 magnitude five or greater aftershocks have occurred, and authorities warned of a 70% chance of a magnitude seven or greater one in days, perhaps making a bad situation much worse. In addition, chief cabinet secretary Yukido Edano said previous radioactivity levels were misreported in microsieverts instead of millisieverts - 1,000 times stronger. Earlier he said the situation isn't similar to Chernobyl. In fact, potentially it's far graver, unprecedented.

Nuclear experts also explained that even without a full meltdown (perhaps ongoing), today's emergency will last a year or longer because of problems cooling the affected cores. As a result, long-term evacuations will be necessary. Already, nearly 500,000 people are affected, a total likely to grow, besides vast destruction, spreading contamination, growing threat to human health, and tens of thousands still missing, by now presumed dead, though not reported.

"Red Alert: Radiation Rising and Heading South in Japan"

On March 15, Stratfor Global Intelligence headlined that danger, saying:

After more explosions and risk of one or more full meltdowns (perhaps ongoing though unreported), "(t)he nuclear reactor situation in Japan had deteriorated significantly." Even Japan's Nuclear Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) said Fukushima's No. 2 reactor radiation level rose 163-fold in three hours. At No. 3, it was 400-fold.

Muted Japanese media report rising radiation levels south and southwest, already reaching Tokyo and numerous prefectures. "The government says radiation levels have reached levels hazardous to human health," omitting that any level causes harm.

Reports "suggest a dramatic worsening as well as a wider spread than at any time since the emergency began." All Japan and the Pacific rim are threatened. "The situation at the (affected) facility is uncertain, but clearly deteriorating." How gravely, the fullness of time will determine.

A Final Comment

On March 12, nuclear expert Mark Grossman headlined, "Hydrogen, Zirconium, Flashbulbs - and Nuclear Craziness," saying:

Coolant loss causes hydrogen gas eruptions "because of a highly volatile substance called zirconium," chosen "in the 1940's and 50's" to build nuclear plants, "as the material (for) rods into which radioactive fuel would be loaded."

Each plant has "30,000 to 40,000 rods - composed of twenty tones of zirconium." It alone works well, allowing "neutrons from the fuel pellets in the rods to pass freely between the rods and thus a nuclear chain reaction to be sustained."

But not without "a huge problem...." Zirconium "is highly volatile and when hot will explode spontaneously upon contact with air, water or steam." With tons used in nuclear plants, in "a compound called 'zircaloy,' it "clads tens of thousands of fuel rods."

Any interruption of coolant builds quickly. However, because of zirconium's explosive power, the equivalent of nitroglycerine, it catches fire and explodes "at a temperature of 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit, well below the 5,000 degree temperature of a meltdown."

Before it happens, it can cause hydrogen explosions "by drawing oxygen from water and steam letting it off," what happened at Fukushima. They, in turn, create more heat, "bringing the zirconium itself closer and closer to its explosive level," what may, in fact, have happened, perhaps bad enough to cause a full meltdown.

Using tons of explosive material like zirconium is "absolutely crazy." Doing it makes every nuclear plant a ticking time bomb, vulnerable to explode, spewing lethal poisons into the atmosphere.

Peter Lemkin
03-17-2011, 06:13 AM
It is a total ROUT! The helicopters yesterday morning were especially lined with lead and the crew wearing radiation suits, but the radiation was too high for them to hit their targets [get close enough]...so it was abandoned. For two days they have tried to move in water cannons, but they now admit that the ground they'd have to cover is too radioactive for anyone but a robot to work in...and no such robot exists. It is now released that three [they had been saying one] reactors spent fuel rod pools are uncovered [and contain NO water]...... Spent fuel rods are MORE radioactive than the 'new' fuel rods in the reactor proper!!!...and more dangerous and more apt to overheat and meltdown. At least three reactors are cracked and one seems to have had its bottom melted through by molten nuclear fuel [which will slowly heat up to 5000C...at which time NOTHING [absolutely nothing!] can stop it...and it will melt down into the Earths Mantle [through the crust of the Earth like a hot knife through butter!]. While [a bit late] the head of the IAEA is coming today, as are some American Nuclear Experts, I think - I'm sorry to say - it is all too late now..... this is a catastrophe now and the only unknown is how bad.....I believe they will raise the level to 7 [the highest and worst] on the international scale. I presume they will soon increase the exclusion zone to 50 or more Km....but even that is useless, the winds will bring it to all Japan and, in fact, the whole World. The only question is how much - due to a variety of scenarios that can play out...but humans will not be making the decisions - Nature will. I see it as 'Blowback' - a term usually used for things deep political - but here hubris over Nature.

The ONLY card they now have to play [short of evacuating the Planet] is their fight to bring in new electric lines....which should have been done from the start - BUT I rather doubt that the motors are working; the pipes are intact and that the last connections are even possible, due to the high radiation - now at levels that can make a person weaken in a matter of hours or minutes [they are NOT telling the correct levels and may not even know - the main meters were blown up in the hydrogen explosions!]....although very simple hand-held or robot moved meters exist - so the fact they are not fully telling is 'telling'. If, as in the article just above, they have been calling milli-Seiverts micro-Seiverts, then they have been purposely lying about the levels of radiation by a factor of 1,000! Stunning, if true! Anyway you 'slice' it, it is now a disaster of epic proportions and will go down in radioactive books alongside Three Mile Island; but closer to Chernobyl, I fear.

Magda Hassan
03-17-2011, 06:43 AM
The nuclear industry seem to be pulling out all the stops to push their toxic wares in the third world. Indonesia has said that they are still going ahead with their 4 reactors, also on a known earthquake fault line. And in Chile the government there has said that because they will generate billions of dollars they must go ahead 'for the good of the nation' for the poor and orphans etc. Chile as you may remember from recent events is also on a known fault line.......

Grand idiots are in charge of the world and I fear for our collective safety. I hope they are all removed asap.

Peter Lemkin
03-17-2011, 07:14 AM
Yeah, Grand Idiot is a must on the CV of any leader - corporate or governmental, etc.

They are so desperate now, I just heard they have asked old retired nuclear plant workers to come back to work [with large monetary incentive] immediately - the 'theory' being that they will die of natural causes soon, and not from the high radiation, as will all the younger workers. One doesn't know whether to laugh or cry.... They are now making people into Nuclear Kamokazis!

Peter Lemkin
03-17-2011, 08:12 AM
They have despite the high radiation near the plant [I would imagine VERY VERY high!] brought in some riot-water trucks to try to pump sea water through them and shoot streams into the reactor holding tanks [open to the sky now, after the hydrogen explosions].....those workers doing that are both brave and not very likely to live long lives. I wish them luck....but this does NOT deal with the reactor containment vessels below [the spent fuel storage is above the reactor containments], which are heating up, 3 of six having failed [cracked open, or worse], the other three at risk in the next hours or days. Radiation levels in and near the reactor site is now SO high, that workers are being allowed to only work for short periods of time [being kept secret] and then rotated by others - those exposed not allowed to try again for a few minutes to hours for several days.....if the radiation levels go up [likely], it will really be a 'commitment' to even enter and work for a short period of time.....at high levels nausea and weakness can happen in hours or even minutes; at the highest levels death occurs in minutes.

......it is like a 'B' horror story by a bad and overly dramatic writer. Godzilla meets the Nuke.

Peter Lemkin
03-17-2011, 08:23 AM
JUAN GONZALEZ: Japan’s nuclear crisis is intensifying. A second reactor unit at the damaged Fukushima plant may have ruptured and appears to be releasing radioactive steam. According to the New York Times, it is not clear how serious the breach may be, but the vessel that possibly ruptured is the last fully intact line of defense against large-scale releases of radioactive material.

The plant has been hit by several explosions after a devastating earthquake and tsunami last Friday damaged its cooling functions. It has sent low levels of radiation wafting into Tokyo more than 130 miles away.

The radiation levels around the plant are so high that Japanese authorities abandoned a plan on Wednesday to dump water from military helicopters in an attempt to cool the reactors. The plan was made after the company operating the reactors withdrew at least 750 workers, leaving a crew of 50 struggling to lower temperatures. And even those workers were briefly moved to a bunker because of a rise in radiation levels.

Meanwhile, Japanese Emperor Akihito made an extremely rare appearance on live TV to say he is deeply worried about the situation and is praying for the people.

The nuclear crisis has sparked international alarm. France is urging its citizens in Tokyo to move further south or to leave the country. Australia is also advising its citizens to consider leaving the capital, and Turkey has warned against travel to Japan.

We go now to Japan, where we are joined by Philip White of the Citizens’ Nuclear Information Center in Tokyo. We’re also joined in Washington, D.C., by Peter Bradford, a former commissioner at the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

We welcome you both to Democracy Now! Let’s go first to Philip White in Tokyo. Can you tell us what’s the latest, from what you can tell?

PHILIP WHITE: You seem to have covered it fairly well, but certainly, at least three plants have had a significant amount of melting fuel. And certainly one has breached—the containment has been breached. And the question is whether that has also happened in reactor three. And the fourth reactor, which was actually—had actually gone into a—what do you call it?—a periodic inspection at the time the earthquake struck, so it was supposed to be stable, that—because of loss of off-site power, loss of power supply, and inability to cool the spent fuel pool, that spent fuel pool has now gone up into flames and smoke has come out and breached the roof, and a large amount of radioactivity has spewed into the sky. So, that’s a general summary of—as far as the reactors are concerned.

JUAN GONZALEZ: And this issue of the breach in one of the reactors—and there were conflicting reports last night here in terms of whether all the workers had been pulled out. They had been pulled back to a bunker. The importance of keeping workers there at the site to keep those—all of the reactors there, the six reactors, under control?

PHILIP WHITE: Well, that’s right. I mean, if they’re not being cooled—and you need water to cool them, and there’s not power—normal power supply to provide that water, then somehow or other you’ve got to have some people in there ensuring that the water supply is provided in some way or another, and were supplying it from the sea. I guess they were pumping it up in some way. And that required human beings to be involved. And if those people are pulled out, then I guess it just goes into natural—whatever escalation or whatever there is. And it’s hard to imagine how it will stop, because there are spent fuel pools in all six of the reactors.

And certainly, the first three reactors, which were operating when the earthquake struck, have very hot fuel loads inside of them. So it’s a massive amount of radioactivity. If you just consider the quantity of radioactivity that’s in all those reactors, it far exceeds what was in Chernobyl, because that was just a single reactor. The question is, how far does it get spewed out into the environment? But even if it doesn’t get spewed out, it’s sort of still sitting there, dribbling away or whatever, and it’s leaving a totally contaminated site.

JUAN GONZALEZ: We’re joined also by Peter Bradford, who was a commissioner on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission during the Three Mile Island accident in 1979. Welcome to Democracy Now!

PETER BRADFORD: Thank you.

JUAN GONZALEZ: Mr. Bradford, can you tell us, in terms of being able to, in real time, as folks who are dealing with this crisis, have an accurate handle of what is actually happening in those reactors—in your own experience during the time of Three Mile Island, can you talk about the difficulty officials have in knowing exactly what is going on?

PETER BRADFORD: It’s extremely difficult. And, in fact, it’s impossible to know exactly what’s going on. The barriers to accurate information flow are very large, to start with, especially given the chaos resulting from the tsunami and the earthquake. On top of that, a lot of the monitoring equipment, the transmitting equipment, has probably been damaged. The people who are at the site, trying to deal with things that they’ve never seen and never been trained to deal with, have very little time to spend communicating and discussing with the outside world. And so, whenever one hears assertions made with a high degree of confidence, it’s important to remember that the unknowable just can’t be stated with certainty. The figures regarding radiation emissions are subject to all the inaccuracies of monitoring, plus the predilection of the government not to want to create panic. The situation in the reactor itself is infinitely complicated by the fact that this is not a situation that has been trained for and analyzed. So, there are no manuals that people not on the site can consult in order to figure out what’s going on and what will happen next.

JUAN GONZALEZ: We’re also joined by Peter Ford of the Christian Science Monitor, Beijing bureau chief, who’s been reporting on the ground from Sendai, the city closest to the epicenter of last Friday’s earthquake. Peter, what is your sense of—and especially in the northern part of the country, which is still in the midst of trying to deal with the devastating earthquake and tsunami, what is—what are people feeling as they’re hearing these reports of what is going on in the nuclear reactors?

PETER FORD: Well, it’s just one more thing to worry about. But it’s not, at the moment, the most immediate concern for the people who are in shelters or trying to find shelters or looking for food or gas or water, all of which are in very, very short supply up here. The situation complicated and made even more miserable by the fact that today it started snowing, and temperatures are close to zero. But, of course, in the back of everybody’s minds, and on the front of—and on their television screens are all the images of what’s happening in the reactor and all the uncertainties that Mr. Bradford talked about. And as you said, this is really unknowable. Nobody really knows what to think up here.

At least for the time being, the wind is blowing southeast, away from here, so there is no immediate danger of any radiation that might leak contaminating people up here. But, of course, winds can change, and the radiation levels, which, as the government says at the moment, are not an immediate hazard to human health outside the 20-kilometer exclusion zone, those radiation levels could rise if things go wrong. And it certainly seems, from what we’ve seen today—the failed effort, for example, to send a helicopter in to drop water onto one of the reactors to cool it, because the radiation levels directly above the reactor are too high—it certainly seems that, from what we’ve seen today, the situation is far from being under control.

JUAN GONZALEZ: And in terms of the government being able to continue the rescue of those directly affected, whose homes were destroyed, and, as you say, supplying these basic necessities—we’ve heard of 100,000 of the Japanese Self-Defense Forces being mobilized—how efficient has that effort been, from what you can tell?

PETER FORD: Well, it’s certainly not been efficient enough, almost by the government’s own admission. They asked today that private businesses start helping to distribute food, as well, to people. But most people are in shelters. There are, I think, still a hundred, perhaps more than that, people who are still cut off in the most remote villages in the areas that were affected by the tsunami, but there are 400,000—more than 400,000—people in shelters now, between those who were evacuated from villages that have been destroyed, towns that have been destroyed, and those who have been moved out of the exclusion zone around the Fukushima power plant. Now, that’s an awful lot of people to look after. Not all of them are being fed and watered and sheltered and kept as warm as they might like, but most of them are at least tolerably comfortable. But this is an enormous task. And the government is going to need help from private forces, as well, to try and meet it.

JUAN GONZALEZ: I’d like to ask Philip White—you’re familiar with the record of Tokyo Electric, the main operator of these plants, and there have been reports in recent days of an increasing rift or conflict between the government and the officials of Tokyo Electric. At one point, the Prime Minister was overheard saying, "What the hell is going on? Why haven’t you given us certain information?" Your sense of the history of Tokyo Electric in handling problems at its plants?

PHILIP WHITE: [inaudible] is basically wired to conceal things. It doesn’t want to give information. We, as an organization that deals with TEPCO directly in negotiations, particularly since the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa—the earthquake that hit that plant three years ago, and you have to extract information as you extract hen’s teeth. They had a massive scandal about 10 years—nearly 10 years ago, in which they concealed cracking within a certain piece of equipment, some equipment in their reactors, and that led to them having been forced to shut down all 17 of their reactors. Since then, they have been under tremendous pressure to improve their performance. And to some extent, they have. But it’s really a fight all the way to get them to change their natural nature, as it were.

In this case, as I—I mean, I’ve been doing lots of interviews and things, so I actually missed many of the press conferences that go on, but the ones that I’ve heard, I mean, what I would notice, firstly, they give very technical reports that no layperson could possibly understand. Then you get an interpreter from the television station telling you what that all meant. And that information, itself, has probably been accurate, but—I assume; we might find that otherwise later—but it has the problem that they haven’t given real-time data on things. And our scientists and engineers have been calling for real-time, much more detailed information, not only on things like the radiation levels, but also on the temperatures of the reactor and the pressure levels and all that sort of technical detail, to help them analyze the situation.

And as for the—both TEPCO and the government, I suppose, are involved in this—but presentation of the risks associated with this radiation, there’s been downplaying of the risks. Now, Mr. Bradford talked about avoiding panic, and that’s a real issue, and I don’t think you should present information in a way that’s going to cause panic, because that will make it much harder to handle the situation. But I think that they have not been frank about the risks with the radiation.

In particular, they have repeatedly said that below—this is a technical figure, but below a dose of 100 millisievert, there is no risk. Sometimes they qualify it by saying there’s no immediate risk, which is perhaps technically accurate. But they have completely refused to point out that these lower levels of radiation are scientifically recognized—there’s maybe some debate—but basically, the consensus is that there’s—your risk is proportional to your dose. And that goes right down, you know, right down to the lowest doses. So, this notion that you’re somehow or other safe below 100 millisieverts is—it’s not recognized in the scientific community. The difference is that there’s no—you’re not going to get acute radiation sickness; you’re looking more at long-term effects, such as cancer. But they have just refused to give that perspective, which—you know, that’s getting to the point of being outright deceptive, I think.

And today, for the first time, I heard a spokesman of the—and the TV station is involved in this, too. The NHK, the national broadcaster, I heard the person who had been putting forward that view and supporting the view of the government and the Tokyo Electric Power Company, the first time, I heard him actually say that there was this risk from lower doses. But you could see that that was in response to our—organizations like mine—saying, "This is inaccurate. You can’t go out and say this." Yeah, [inaudible].

JUAN GONZALEZ: Well, Peter Bradford, former member of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, you said that it’s clearly—there’s not enough accurate information to be able to give a sense of what—how this will develop. But can you talk about a worst-case scenario and a best-case scenario, given what we know now, as to how this might end up?

PETER BRADFORD: I have no idea what the worst-case scenario is. It would involve a breach of one or more of the containments in such a way that the radiation was released in a way that propelled it up and out into the atmosphere. But at that point, the direction of the wind still makes a big difference in terms of the consequences.

The best-case scenario at this point is not a good one, not a good one for the public, not a good one for the nuclear industry. There is not going to be a happy ending to this story.

But let me also say, on this question of TEPCO’s corporate character, you know, we had that problem with the licensee at Three Mile Island also, in terms of whether the information was accurate, whether there had been falsification of some relevant records beforehand. And it will be important, in the context of subsequent investigations. Right now, my sense is that if TEPCO’s people were replaced by a band of angels, they still could not give very accurate information with regard to what’s going on within the damaged reactors, because much of the area is inaccessible, a lot of the equipment is disabled, and there are no manuals that describe this situation. So, the problem of inaccurate information has moved past the point at which TEPCO’s corporate character is the driving factor.

As to off-site measurements, both as to emissions levels and as to health effects, it’s certainly true that the conservative assumption that most regulators, public health officials go by is that the risk is proportional to the dose. Much of the measurement is probably not being done by TEPCO at this point. Certainly at Three Mile Island, the off-site measurements done by helicopters in the air were being done by various government agencies, state and federal. And the disagreements over the amounts released, the dosages received, are going on to this day. So, when you hear a particular number stated with great confidence, you have to put very large uncertainty bands on it in the context of what’s happening in Japan now.

JUAN GONZALEZ: And Peter Bradford, in terms of the—some of the statements from the nuclear industry that this could not happen here in the United States, obviously as the Obama administration and others in Congress are seeking to ramp up the development of nuclear plants here in the United States, your response?

PETER BRADFORD: Well, the statement, "This could not happen here," has a troubled history in the nuclear industry. The Soviet Union came to Three Mile Island and said that accident can’t happen in the Soviet Union. And of course they got Chernobyl. The Japanese, among others, went to Chernobyl and said, "Oh, we don’t have that kind of reactor in Japan," so now they have this. I mean, of course it’s true that particular nuclear accidents are somewhere between unlikely and simply will not repeat themselves from one decade to the next, but the underlying problem of regulators and plant builders, plant operators, deeming certain events to be impossible and therefore not something that has to be designed against and guarded against, it does seem to have a way of recurring at long intervals and rarely, thank heavens. But if you see the sentence "This cannot happen here" in that context, you ought not to believe it.

JUAN GONZALEZ: Well, I want to thank all of our guests: Peter Bradford, formerly of the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Peter Ford, a reporter from the Christian Science Monitor, who is in Sendai; and Philip White of the Citizens’ Nuclear Information Center in Tokyo.

Magda Hassan
03-17-2011, 09:04 AM
Yeah, Grand Idiot is a must on the CV of any leader - corporate or governmental, etc.

They are so desperate now, I just heard they have asked old retired nuclear plant workers to come back to work [with large monetary incentive] immediately - the 'theory' being that they will die of natural causes soon, and not from the high radiation, as will all the younger workers. One doesn't know whether to laugh or cry.... They are now making people into Nuclear Kamokazis!
It is the shareholders and managers and the people responsible for building this insane death emitting clusterfuck who should be there cleaning up. Give them a radiation proof suit and 'Nuclear Catastrophe Clean Up for Idiots' instruction book and drop them in the zone and let them go for it. There are limits to company loyalty.

Peter Lemkin
03-17-2011, 06:39 PM
JUAN GONZALEZ: Japanese authorities have begun using military helicopters and water cannon to dump water on the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station in an attempt to help cool the plant’s reactors and spent fuel rods. But fears of a full-scale nuclear meltdown are increasing as the initial attempts appear to have failed. Water dropped from the helicopters blew off course, and the water from the cannon has failed to reach its target.

There appears to be growing division between Japan and the United States on the severity of the nuclear crisis. On Wednesday, the head of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Gregory Jaczko, warned that water in the spent fuel pool at one of the plant’s six nuclear reactors had boiled away entirely, leaving extremely high radiation levels. Japan disputed his account.

Meanwhile, the United States has urged all Americans living within 50 miles of the plant to evacuate. So far Japan has only issued evacuation orders for residents living within 12 miles of the plant. On Wednesday, State Department spokesperson Mark Toner explained the U.S. response.

MARK TONER: We’ve been continuing to assess the situation, obviously. And consistent, obviously, with the guidelines of the National—or the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, we’re now telling American citizens who live within 50 miles or 80 kilometers of the Fukushima nuclear power plant to evacuate the area and to take shelters indoors if safe evacuation is not practical. Again, this is—this is based on our most current assessment. We’ve got nuclear experts on the ground. And it’s—frankly, it’s what we would advise—it’s based on what we would advise U.S. citizens here to do in a similar situation.

JUAN GONZALEZ: Japan is facing an unprecedented triple crisis caused by the earthquake, tsunami and the partial nuclear meltdown. The official death toll has now risen to above 5,000, while 9,400 people remain missing. Fears of radioactivity have severely hampered relief efforts in parts of northern Japan, which was hit with a snow storm on Wednesday.

Some 850,000 households are without power, and 1.5 million homes with no running water. Food and gas supplies have been nearly exhausted in the ravaged northern part of the country. A 21-year-old Japanese mother named Ayumi Yamazaki says she has had trouble finding enough food to feed her child.

AYUMI YAMAZAKI: [translated] We get one bowl of soup or one piece of bread to share among three people, and get a few snacks. We rarely get white rice. So I’m a little concerned about my daughter not getting enough nutrition. But it’s better than not eating at all.

JUAN GONZALEZ: We will go to Japan soon for a report on the recovery efforts, but first we discuss the latest news from the crippled Japanese nuclear plant.

Joining me here in New York is Karl Grossman. He’s an investigative journalist and professor of journalism at SUNY College at Old Westbury. He’s author of several books on the nuclear industry.

And with us in Washington, D.C., is Paul Gunter. He’s a reactor oversight project director at the nuclear watchdog group Beyond Nuclear. He’s also a co-founder of the Clamshell Alliance, an anti-nuclear group.

Paul, I want to begin with you. The latest reports that we got overnight and early this morning about the situation in the reactors of Fukushima, could you give us your sense of what’s happening there?

PAUL GUNTER: Well, obviously, right now, there is a lot of contradictory information. I think that what’s most important to understand is that among these six units at Fukushima Daiichi, Units 4, 5 and 6, the fuel in the reactor core was taken out of the reactor vessel, taken out of containment, and placed in these rooftop spent fuel pools. So all of the radioactive inventory was moved. We’re very concerned about this very large volume of radioactive material that is now in a conflict of information in its state of, you know, no water or water. But clearly, right now, there is a serious danger of a full core meltdown outside of containment at Unit 4. This could occur at Unit 5 and 6, and we still have the crippled reactors at 1, 2 and 3.

JUAN GONZALEZ: And the crippled reactor 3, which has also been releasing, pretty regularly now, radioactive steam, there are reports that there has been a breach in the containment vessel there. And that, of course, is the only reactor that had the more toxic mixed oxide fuel that was brought into it in the last couple of years as fuel. Your sense of reactor 3?

PAUL GUNTER: Well, Unit 3 is burning what they call plutonium oxide. They like to call it MOX as an acronym rather than POX, but in fact it’s plutonium oxide. This fuel has a lower melting point, for one, and it’s just loaded with plutonium, which is highly toxic at micro levels.

The containment, which is a Mark I General Electric boiling water reactor—we have 23 of these reactors in the United States, dead ringers for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 through 6—it’s right now in this state of—it’s ruptured. Unit 2 has also compromised its containment. These have all been documented. So, you know, the walls of defense are falling, with the melting of the cores, the collapsing of the—we’re expecting the collapsing of the vessels. And then, with these damaged containments, these are all open windows to the atmosphere.

JUAN GONZALEZ: Karl Grossman, you have been following now for decades the claims of the industry, the politicians, about nuclear energy, both in the United States and around the world. Your assessment of what has happened here and what it will mean in terms of nuclear power in the future?

KARL GROSSMAN: What has happened here is an enormous nuclear power tragedy, and we’re on the cusp, I fear, of an even more horrific tragedy, with a loss of cool down accident—and we have multiple loss of cool down accidents underway—and, importantly, breach of containment. And as Paul said, that’s quite possible now. Just the most enormous disaster, except for a loss of water accident in a spent fuel pool, where you have tons upon tons of nuclear poisons—no containment, except for some corrugated steel ceiling. That stuff gets out in a loss of water accident, and it would get out explosively, because of the fuel rods being made of zirconium. And I could explain that. It will just burst into the environment, become airborne, affect not only Japan but much of the world.

JUAN GONZALEZ: And Karl, in the reporting that you’ve done in the past on the battles over the siting of nuclear plants in the United States, because, obviously, all of the reports are saying, "Well, that’s all happening in Japan; here in the United States, we’re in a much better situation with our plants." But one of the things that you uncovered was an assessment that the government did back in the 1980s of the potential—the potential deaths and injuries that might occur from a reactor accident and a breach of containment in the United States. Could you talk about that memo?

KARL GROSSMAN: Yeah. They have known the consequences all along. This is a report—it’s called "Calculation of Reactor Accident Consequences 2"—done by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, not Greenpeace, and it projects peak early fatalities, peak injuries, peak cancer deaths, scale cost in billions in terms of property damage, and a large hunk of the earth being rendered uninhabitable for millennia. And just, for example, for the Indian Point 3 nuclear plant, which is about 35 miles from where we sit now in New York, 50,000 peak early fatalities; 167,000 peak early injuries; cancer deaths, 14,000; scale cost of billions, they say $314 billion—in 1980s dollars, we’re talking about a trillion.

As to the likelihood of a severe core melt accident, in 1985 the NRC acknowledged that, over a 20-year period, the likelihood of a severe core melt accident to be basically 50/50 among the 100 nuclear power plants—there’s 104 now—in the United States. They’ve known all along here in this country that disaster could come, and there’s a good likelihood of it coming, and they’ve known the consequences.

JUAN GONZALEZ: You’re saying that the NRC itself estimated a 50/50 chance of a meltdown in our plants here within 20 years?

KARL GROSSMAN: Over a 20-year period. That was formal testimony provided to a watchdog committee in Congress chaired by Senator Edward Markey of Massachusetts, when he asked the question, "What does the NRC and its staff believe the likelihood to be of a severe core meltdown?" So, you know, when you hear these lines about, "Oh, the chances of a severe core meltdown, infinitesimal," and if there is, like you’re hearing these reports out of Japan, an accident, "Oh, just some minor effects among the population"—not at all.

You go to the documents. And many of them were, well, secret for years. In my book—I did a book in 1980, Cover Up: What You Are Not Supposed to Know about Nuclear Power—there’s a line in a Atomic Energy Commission report, "WASH-740-Update": "The possible size of the area of such a disaster"—this is a meltdown with loss of containment—"might be equal to that of the State of Pennsylvania"—in other words, covering the whole state of what would be the state of Pennsylvania, which almost occurred with the Three Mile Island accident. We’re talking about huge disasters here. And with a loss of water accident in a spent fuel pool, because you’ve got much more nuclear garbage—and again, no containment—it would be even worse.

And just let me mention one other thing. Everybody should, when you hear about these hydrogen explosions, understand that the fuel rods are composed of a substance called zircaloy. It’s based on something called zirconium. And way back in the late '40s and ’50s, they were looking for something to build these—not control rods—fuel rods with, and they decided to use zirconium, because it allowed the neutrons to move from fuel rod to fuel rod and keep the chain reaction going. Problem was zirconium, the other major industrial use is the speck on a flashbulb. Zirconium is explosive; at 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit, it explodes. Before that, it emits hydrogen gases, which have exploded in several of these plants. There's, in a nuclear plant itself—this is in my book—20 tons of zirconium. At spent fuel pool, you’re talking about, because there’s all these old fuel rods, hundreds of tons. That stuff, again, as things get hot, explodes.

JUAN GONZALEZ: Well, I also wanted to talk about the history of the type of nuclear reactors. There have been warnings about the design going back for decades. The organization Nuclear Information and Resource Service recently released and posted online three memos [11/11/71, 9/20/71, 9/25/72] from the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission on the GE Mark I reactor design. The memos show that the Commission knew of serious problems with the design of these reactors as early as the 1970s. Diane D’Arrigo of the Nuclear Information and Resource Service spoke with us last evening.

DIANE D’ARRIGO: Back in 1971, Stephen Hanauer of the Atomic Energy Commission did a memo to the Atomic Energy Commission outlining serious problems with the design of the kind of reactors that are operating, and are failing and melting, in Japan right now. In September of 1971, he did a memo that recommended that the United States stop licensing reactors using this pressure suppression system. But his recommendation was rejected by the upper-level Atomic Energy Commission safety officials. The top safety official, Joseph Hendrie, he agreed with the recommendation, but he rejected it, saying that it could well mean the end of nuclear power. Now, the problems that were raised in those earlier memos are what led to the disaster here in Japan. And I wanted to point out that the United States has, since those memos were written and then ignored or rejected, licensed and has operating 23 of this type of nuclear reactor.

JUAN GONZALEZ: I also wanted to—that was Diane D’Arrigo of the Nuclear Information and Resource Service, who spoke with us last night. Paul Gunter, I’d like to ask you about the—the news has been worse each day in the efforts to try to get control of these crippled reactors. But if the government is able now to finally bring electricity back, as they’ve been saying they’ve been trying to string a new line, and to begin bringing water back into these reactors and into the spent fuel pools, do you envision any problems if they’re able—continuing problems, if they’re able to get the water back on?

PAUL GUNTER: Well, let’s first of all realize that what’s been demonstrated at this catastrophe is that nuclear power is going to be more of a liability than it is an asset during natural disaster or national crisis. We sincerely hope that the Tokyo Electric Power Company can restore power. But these six units are history. The best we can do right now is see them buried under concrete, and hopefully that can contain it. That’s the best scenario right now.

But clearly, if you want to actually have civil defense, the real issue here is to prevent this from happening. And we believe that means to be—mean you promptly shut down these most dangerous reactor designs all over the world, and then we begin the rapid phase-out of this inherently dangerous technology and phase in a 21st century energy policy of renewable energy and energy efficiency.

JUAN GONZALEZ: Well, Paul Gunter of the nuclear watchdog group Beyond Nuclear, I want to thank you for being with us. Karl Grossman, a professor at SUNY-Old Westbury, thank you, and a continuing investigative journalist on the issue of nuclear power. I want to thank both of you for being with us. We’ll be back in a moment with reports on what is going on in Japan right now.

Peter Lemkin
03-18-2011, 04:54 AM
Yeah, Grand Idiot is a must on the CV of any leader - corporate or governmental, etc.

They are so desperate now, I just heard they have asked old retired nuclear plant workers to come back to work [with large monetary incentive] immediately - the 'theory' being that they will die of natural causes soon, and not from the high radiation, as will all the younger workers. One doesn't know whether to laugh or cry.... They are now making people into Nuclear Kamokazis!
It is the shareholders and managers and the people responsible for building this insane death emitting clusterfuck who should be there cleaning up. Give them a radiation proof suit and 'Nuclear Catastrophe Clean Up for Idiots' instruction book and drop them in the zone and let them go for it. There are limits to company loyalty.

I'm afraid the Corporate Masters don't have a 'the Captain must go down with the ship' mentality. It would be significant to see the head of the Power company involved and his board of Directors and any big shareholders actually at the Nuclear Plant working on it - I'm quite sure the best you can hope for [sic] is after the meltdown and a number of immediate radiation deaths a Japanese bow of contrition and a few mumbled words of 'sorry Charlie' in Japanese.......

...as far as 'news' on the nuclear plant, they are as I type using riot-control water cannons to try to spray water onto the tops of the most endangered reactors. Watching it, it looks like it will, at best, be only mildly successful. They also think that by the end of today they will have the electric power back on....but I'd not hold my breath. Even if they do get power back, it remains to be see if any of the pumps and other equipment is still in working condition, after all it has now been through [earthquakes, tsunami, overheating from partial meltdowns, who-knows-what-else]. Nuclear Plant equipment is sensitive to all of those and as Pallast pointed out [above] the emergency generators are well known [when they start or work at all] to breakdown soon after, due to lack of maintenance and testing [as they usually remain off continuously from installation until emergency. If they haven't been maintained properly, they may not start or soon break down. Ditto if damaged by overheating. I have NOT seen any reliable figures on radiation levels near the plant or in the plume coming from the Plant. I pity those workers now on site there!.....

Magda Hassan
03-18-2011, 05:19 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ARsp0jsGFOM&feature=player_embedded#at=13
The Mayor of Minamisoma tells of how the government never even informed them about the Fukishima nuclear emergency and that he found out from TV.

He says the Japanese government have abandoned him and his people, and are leaving them there to die.

Peter Lemkin
03-18-2011, 06:52 AM
JUAN GONZALEZ: Japanese authorities have begun using military helicopters and water cannon to dump water on the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station in an attempt to help cool the plant’s reactors and spent fuel rods. But fears of a full-scale nuclear meltdown are increasing as the initial attempts appear to have failed. Water dropped from the helicopters blew off course, and the water from the cannon has failed to reach its target.

There appears to be growing division between Japan and the United States on the severity of the nuclear crisis. On Wednesday, the head of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Gregory Jaczko, warned that water in the spent fuel pool at one of the plant’s six nuclear reactors had boiled away entirely, leaving extremely high radiation levels. Japan disputed his account.

Meanwhile, the United States has urged all Americans living within 50 miles of the plant to evacuate. So far Japan has only issued evacuation orders for residents living within 12 miles of the plant. On Wednesday, State Department spokesperson Mark Toner explained the U.S. response.

MARK TONER: We’ve been continuing to assess the situation, obviously. And consistent, obviously, with the guidelines of the National—or the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, we’re now telling American citizens who live within 50 miles or 80 kilometers of the Fukushima nuclear power plant to evacuate the area and to take shelters indoors if safe evacuation is not practical. Again, this is—this is based on our most current assessment. We’ve got nuclear experts on the ground. And it’s—frankly, it’s what we would advise—it’s based on what we would advise U.S. citizens here to do in a similar situation.

JUAN GONZALEZ: Japan is facing an unprecedented triple crisis caused by the earthquake, tsunami and the partial nuclear meltdown. The official death toll has now risen to above 5,000, while 9,400 people remain missing. Fears of radioactivity have severely hampered relief efforts in parts of northern Japan, which was hit with a snow storm on Wednesday.

Some 850,000 households are without power, and 1.5 million homes with no running water. Food and gas supplies have been nearly exhausted in the ravaged northern part of the country. A 21-year-old Japanese mother named Ayumi Yamazaki says she has had trouble finding enough food to feed her child.

AYUMI YAMAZAKI: [translated] We get one bowl of soup or one piece of bread to share among three people, and get a few snacks. We rarely get white rice. So I’m a little concerned about my daughter not getting enough nutrition. But it’s better than not eating at all.

JUAN GONZALEZ: We will go to Japan soon for a report on the recovery efforts, but first we discuss the latest news from the crippled Japanese nuclear plant.

Joining me here in New York is Karl Grossman. He’s an investigative journalist and professor of journalism at SUNY College at Old Westbury. He’s author of several books on the nuclear industry.

And with us in Washington, D.C., is Paul Gunter. He’s a reactor oversight project director at the nuclear watchdog group Beyond Nuclear. He’s also a co-founder of the Clamshell Alliance, an anti-nuclear group.

Paul, I want to begin with you. The latest reports that we got overnight and early this morning about the situation in the reactors of Fukushima, could you give us your sense of what’s happening there?

PAUL GUNTER: Well, obviously, right now, there is a lot of contradictory information. I think that what’s most important to understand is that among these six units at Fukushima Daiichi, Units 4, 5 and 6, the fuel in the reactor core was taken out of the reactor vessel, taken out of containment, and placed in these rooftop spent fuel pools. So all of the radioactive inventory was moved. We’re very concerned about this very large volume of radioactive material that is now in a conflict of information in its state of, you know, no water or water. But clearly, right now, there is a serious danger of a full core meltdown outside of containment at Unit 4. This could occur at Unit 5 and 6, and we still have the crippled reactors at 1, 2 and 3.

JUAN GONZALEZ: And the crippled reactor 3, which has also been releasing, pretty regularly now, radioactive steam, there are reports that there has been a breach in the containment vessel there. And that, of course, is the only reactor that had the more toxic mixed oxide fuel that was brought into it in the last couple of years as fuel. Your sense of reactor 3?

PAUL GUNTER: Well, Unit 3 is burning what they call plutonium oxide. They like to call it MOX as an acronym rather than POX, but in fact it’s plutonium oxide. This fuel has a lower melting point, for one, and it’s just loaded with plutonium, which is highly toxic at micro levels.

The containment, which is a Mark I General Electric boiling water reactor—we have 23 of these reactors in the United States, dead ringers for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 through 6—it’s right now in this state of—it’s ruptured. Unit 2 has also compromised its containment. These have all been documented. So, you know, the walls of defense are falling, with the melting of the cores, the collapsing of the—we’re expecting the collapsing of the vessels. And then, with these damaged containments, these are all open windows to the atmosphere.

JUAN GONZALEZ: Karl Grossman, you have been following now for decades the claims of the industry, the politicians, about nuclear energy, both in the United States and around the world. Your assessment of what has happened here and what it will mean in terms of nuclear power in the future?

KARL GROSSMAN: What has happened here is an enormous nuclear power tragedy, and we’re on the cusp, I fear, of an even more horrific tragedy, with a loss of cool down accident—and we have multiple loss of cool down accidents underway—and, importantly, breach of containment. And as Paul said, that’s quite possible now. Just the most enormous disaster, except for a loss of water accident in a spent fuel pool, where you have tons upon tons of nuclear poisons—no containment, except for some corrugated steel ceiling. That stuff gets out in a loss of water accident, and it would get out explosively, because of the fuel rods being made of zirconium. And I could explain that. It will just burst into the environment, become airborne, affect not only Japan but much of the world.

JUAN GONZALEZ: And Karl, in the reporting that you’ve done in the past on the battles over the siting of nuclear plants in the United States, because, obviously, all of the reports are saying, "Well, that’s all happening in Japan; here in the United States, we’re in a much better situation with our plants." But one of the things that you uncovered was an assessment that the government did back in the 1980s of the potential—the potential deaths and injuries that might occur from a reactor accident and a breach of containment in the United States. Could you talk about that memo?

KARL GROSSMAN: Yeah. They have known the consequences all along. This is a report—it’s called "Calculation of Reactor Accident Consequences 2"—done by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, not Greenpeace, and it projects peak early fatalities, peak injuries, peak cancer deaths, scale cost in billions in terms of property damage, and a large hunk of the earth being rendered uninhabitable for millennia. And just, for example, for the Indian Point 3 nuclear plant, which is about 35 miles from where we sit now in New York, 50,000 peak early fatalities; 167,000 peak early injuries; cancer deaths, 14,000; scale cost of billions, they say $314 billion—in 1980s dollars, we’re talking about a trillion.

As to the likelihood of a severe core melt accident, in 1985 the NRC acknowledged that, over a 20-year period, the likelihood of a severe core melt accident to be basically 50/50 among the 100 nuclear power plants—there’s 104 now—in the United States. They’ve known all along here in this country that disaster could come, and there’s a good likelihood of it coming, and they’ve known the consequences.

JUAN GONZALEZ: You’re saying that the NRC itself estimated a 50/50 chance of a meltdown in our plants here within 20 years?

KARL GROSSMAN: Over a 20-year period. That was formal testimony provided to a watchdog committee in Congress chaired by Senator Edward Markey of Massachusetts, when he asked the question, "What does the NRC and its staff believe the likelihood to be of a severe core meltdown?" So, you know, when you hear these lines about, "Oh, the chances of a severe core meltdown, infinitesimal," and if there is, like you’re hearing these reports out of Japan, an accident, "Oh, just some minor effects among the population"—not at all.

You go to the documents. And many of them were, well, secret for years. In my book—I did a book in 1980, Cover Up: What You Are Not Supposed to Know about Nuclear Power—there’s a line in a Atomic Energy Commission report, "WASH-740-Update": "The possible size of the area of such a disaster"—this is a meltdown with loss of containment—"might be equal to that of the State of Pennsylvania"—in other words, covering the whole state of what would be the state of Pennsylvania, which almost occurred with the Three Mile Island accident. We’re talking about huge disasters here. And with a loss of water accident in a spent fuel pool, because you’ve got much more nuclear garbage—and again, no containment—it would be even worse.

And just let me mention one other thing. Everybody should, when you hear about these hydrogen explosions, understand that the fuel rods are composed of a substance called zircaloy. It’s based on something called zirconium. And way back in the late '40s and ’50s, they were looking for something to build these—not control rods—fuel rods with, and they decided to use zirconium, because it allowed the neutrons to move from fuel rod to fuel rod and keep the chain reaction going. Problem was zirconium, the other major industrial use is the speck on a flashbulb. Zirconium is explosive; at 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit, it explodes. Before that, it emits hydrogen gases, which have exploded in several of these plants. There's, in a nuclear plant itself—this is in my book—20 tons of zirconium. At spent fuel pool, you’re talking about, because there’s all these old fuel rods, hundreds of tons. That stuff, again, as things get hot, explodes.

JUAN GONZALEZ: Well, I also wanted to talk about the history of the type of nuclear reactors. There have been warnings about the design going back for decades. The organization Nuclear Information and Resource Service recently released and posted online three memos [11/11/71, 9/20/72, 9/25/72] from the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission on the GE Mark I reactor design. The memos show that the Commission knew of serious problems with the design of these reactors as early as the 1970s. Diane D’Arrigo of the Nuclear Information and Resource Service spoke with us last evening.

DIANE D’ARRIGO: Back in 1971, Stephen Hanauer of the Atomic Energy Commission did a memo to the Atomic Energy Commission outlining serious problems with the design of the kind of reactors that are operating, and are failing and melting, in Japan right now. In September of 1971, he did a memo that recommended that the United States stop licensing reactors using this pressure suppression system. But his recommendation was rejected by the upper-level Atomic Energy Commission safety officials. The top safety official, Joseph Hendrie, he agreed with the recommendation, but he rejected it, saying that it could well mean the end of nuclear power. Now, the problems that were raised in those earlier memos are what led to the disaster here in Japan. And I wanted to point out that the United States has, since those memos were written and then ignored or rejected, licensed and has operating 23 of this type of nuclear reactor.

JUAN GONZALEZ: I also wanted to—that was Diane D’Arrigo of the Nuclear Information and Resource Service, who spoke with us last night. Paul Gunter, I’d like to ask you about the—the news has been worse each day in the efforts to try to get control of these crippled reactors. But if the government is able now to finally bring electricity back, as they’ve been saying they’ve been trying to string a new line, and to begin bringing water back into these reactors and into the spent fuel pools, do you envision any problems if they’re able—continuing problems, if they’re able to get the water back on?

PAUL GUNTER: Well, let’s first of all realize that what’s been demonstrated at this catastrophe is that nuclear power is going to be more of a liability than it is an asset during natural disaster or national crisis. We sincerely hope that the Tokyo Electric Power Company can restore power. But these six units are history. The best we can do right now is see them buried under concrete, and hopefully that can contain it. That’s the best scenario right now.

But clearly, if you want to actually have civil defense, the real issue here is to prevent this from happening. And we believe that means to be—mean you promptly shut down these most dangerous reactor designs all over the world, and then we begin the rapid phase-out of this inherently dangerous technology and phase in a 21st century energy policy of renewable energy and energy efficiency.

JUAN GONZALEZ: Well, Paul Gunter of the nuclear watchdog group Beyond Nuclear, I want to thank you for being with us. Karl Grossman, a professor at SUNY-Old Westbury, thank you, and a continuing investigative journalist on the issue of nuclear power. I want to thank both of you for being with us. We’ll be back in a moment with reports on what is going on in Japan right now.

Magda Hassan
03-18-2011, 07:45 AM
Tokyo Passengers Trigger U.S. Airport Detectors, N.Y. Post Says

By Alan Purkiss - Thu Mar 17 06:08:48 GMT 2011
Radiation detectors at Dallas-Fort Worth and Chicago O’Hare airports were triggered when passengers from flights that started in Tokyo passed through customs, the New York Post reported.
Tests at Dallas-Fort Worth indicated low radiation levels in travelers’ luggage and in the aircraft’s cabin filtration system; no passengers were quarantined, the newspaper said.
Details of the incident at O’Hare weren’t immediately clear, the Post said.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-03-17/tokyo-passengers-trigger-u-s-airport-detectors-n-y-post-says.html

Peter Lemkin
03-18-2011, 08:09 AM
Tokyo Passengers Trigger U.S. Airport Detectors, N.Y. Post Says

By Alan Purkiss - Thu Mar 17 06:08:48 GMT 2011
Radiation detectors at Dallas-Fort Worth and Chicago O’Hare airports were triggered when passengers from flights that started in Tokyo passed through customs, the New York Post reported.
Tests at Dallas-Fort Worth indicated low radiation levels in travelers’ luggage and in the aircraft’s cabin filtration system; no passengers were quarantined, the newspaper said.
Details of the incident at O’Hare weren’t immediately clear, the Post said.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-03-17/tokyo-passengers-trigger-u-s-airport-detectors-n-y-post-says.html

Soon it will be easy to tell someone who is Japanese - even at night, from a distance....as they will glow!:hitball: Seriously, it is another indication that they are NOT telling the full nature of the amount of radiation being released!....as has happened at each and every nuclear accident! The bigger 'they' are, the bigger the lies.....it seems.

Magda Hassan
03-18-2011, 08:46 AM
Engineers consider burying Fukushima to block radiation

Japanese engineers said Friday they are weighing-up the possibility of burying Fukushima in sand, the same method used to contain the radiation leak in Chernobyl in 1986, as efforts to restore power in the Fukushima plant remain unsuccessful.
By News Wires (http://www.france24.com/en/category/tags-auteurs/news-wires) (text)
REUTERS - Japanese engineers conceded on Friday that burying a crippled nuclear reactor in sand and concrete may be the only way to prevent a catastrophic radiation leak, the method used to seal huge leakages from Chernobyl in 1986.
Officials said they still hoped to fix a power cable to at least two reactors to restart water pumps needed to cool overheating nuclear fuel rods. Workers also sprayed water on the No.3 reactor, one of the most critical of the plant's six.
It was the first time the facility operator had acknowledged that burying the sprawling complex was an option, a sign that piecemeal actions such as dumping water from military helicopters were having little success.
"It is not impossible to encase the reactors in concrete. But our priority right now is to try and cool them down first," an official from the plant operator, Tokyo Electric Power Co, told a news conference.
As Japan entered its second week after a 9.0-magnitude earthquake and 10 metre (33-foot) tsunami flattened coastal cities and killed thousands of people, the world's worst nuclear crisis since Chernobyl looked far from over.
Millions in Tokyo remained indoors on Friday, fearing a blast of radioactive material from the complex, 240 km (150 miles) to the north, although prevailing winds would likely carry contaminated smoke or steam away from the densely populated city to dissipate over the Pacific Ocean.
Radiation did not pose an immediate risk to human health outside the vicinity of the plant, said Michael O'Leary, the World Health Organisation's representative in China.
"At this point, there is still no evidence that there's been significant radiation spread beyond the immediate zone of the reactors themselves," O'Leary told reporters in Beijing.
Japan's nuclear disaster has triggered global alarm and reviews of safety at atomic power plants around the world. President Barack Obama, who stressed the United States did not expect harmful radiation to reach its shores, said he had ordered a comprehensive review of domestic nuclear plants and pledged Washington's support for Japan.
The Group of Seven rich nations, stepping in together to calm global financial markets after a tumultuous week, agreed to join in rare concerted intervention to restrain a soaring yen.
The top U.S. nuclear regulator said it could take weeks to reverse the overheating of fuel rods at the Fukushima Daiichi plant.
"This is something that will take some time to work through, possibly weeks, as you eventually remove the majority of the heat from the reactors and then the spent-fuel pools," Nuclear Regulatory Commission Chairman Gregory Jaczko told a news conference at the White House.
Yukiya Amano, head of the Vienna-based International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), arrived in his homeland on Friday with an international team of experts after earlier complaining about a lack of information from Japan.
Graham Andrew, his senior aide, called the situation at the plant "reasonably stable " but the government said white smoke or steam was still rising from three reactors and helicopters used to dump water on the plant had shown exposure to small amounts of radiation.
"The situation remains very serious, but there has been no significant worsening since yesterday," Andrew said.
The nuclear agency said the radiation level at the plant was as high as 20 millisieverts per hour. The limit for the workers was 100 per hour.
Even if engineers restore power at the plant, it was not clear the pumps would work as they may have been damaged in the earthquake or subsequent explosions and there are fears of the electricity shorting and causing another blast.
Japan's nuclear agency spokesman, Hidehiko Nishiyama, said it was also unclear how effective spraying water on the reactors from helicopters had been on Thursday. The priority was to get water into the spent-fuel pools, he said.
"We have to reduce the heat somehow and may use seawater," he told a news conference. "We need to get the reactors back online as soon as possible and that's why we're trying to restore power to them."
Asked about burying the reactors in sand and concrete, he said: "That solution is in the back of our minds, but we are focused on cooling the reactors down."
Jaczko said the cooling pool for spent-fuel rods at the complex's reactor No.4 may have run dry and another was leaking.
An official at the plant operator said he expected power to be restored at its most troubled and damaged reactors -- No.3 and No.4 -- by Sunday. Engineers are trying to reconnect power to the least damaged reactors first.
Dollar gains as financial leaders intervene
The U.S. dollar surged more than two yen to 81.80 after the G7's pledge to intervene, leaving behind a record low of 76.25 hit on Thursday.
Japan's Nikkei share index ended up 2.7 percent, recouping some of the week's stinging losses. It has lost 10.2 percent this week.
U.S. markets, which had tanked earlier in the week on the back of the crisis, rebounded on Thursday but investors were not convinced the advance would last.
The yen has seen steady buying since the earthquake, as Japanese and international investors closed long positions in higher-yielding, riskier assets such as the Australian dollar, funded by cheap borrowing in the Japanese currency.
Expectations that Japanese insurers and companies would repatriate billions of dollars in overseas funds to pay for a reconstruction bill that is expected to be much costlier than the one that followed the Kobe earthquake in 1995 also have helped boost the yen.
Radiation levels in Tokyo barely above average
The government had warned Tokyo's 13 million residents on Thursday to prepare for a possible large-scale blackout but later said there was no need for one. Still, many firms voluntarily reduced power, plunging parts of the usually neon-lit city in darkness.
The U.S. embassy in Tokyo has urged citizens living within 80 km (50 miles) of the Daiichi plant to evacuate or remain indoors "as a precaution", while Britain's foreign office urged citizens "to consider leaving the area". Other nations have urged nationals in Japan to leave the country or head south.
Japan's government has told everyone living within 20 km (12 miles) of the plant to evacuate, and advised people within 30 km (18 miles) to stay indoors.
At its worst, radiation in Tokyo has reached 0.809 microsieverts per hour this week, 10 times below what a person would receive if exposed to a dental x-ray. On Thursday and Friday, radiation levels were within average levels.
The plight of hundreds of thousands left homeless by the earthquake and tsunami worsened following a cold snap that brought heavy snow to worst-affected areas.
Supplies of water, heating oil and fuel are low at evacuation centres, where many survivors wait bundled in blankets.
About 30,000 households in the north were still without electricity in near-freezing weather, Tohuku Electric Power Co. said, and the government said at least 1.6 million households lacked running water.
The National Police Agency said on Friday it had confirmed 5,692 deaths from the quake and tsunami disaster, while 9,522 people were unaccounted for in six prefectures.
http://www.france24.com/en/20110318-engineers-weigh-chernobyl-solution-radiation-japan-nuclear-crisis?ns_linkname=20110318_engineers_weigh_cherno byl_solution_radiation_japan

Peter Lemkin
03-18-2011, 04:25 PM
The Japanese have slyly let out that they are 'considering' burying the entire six reactor plant [as was done at Chernobyl] with special Barium-Lead Cement....translation, they can't think of any way to shut it down and protect the population and Planet from the radiation. Such an undertaking is certainly possible, but will be one of the largest engineering projects in recent times....both is size and the speed it would have to be done [fast!!!]; and difficulty! [without very special structures above them, pouring concrete directly on the top spent fuel pools would cause more problems than it would solve]

......cement futures in Japan should soar. Stay tuned.

Peter Lemkin
03-19-2011, 09:19 AM
Well, after a week and a day, the new powerline is said to be at the plant and will today be connected to the various reactor pumps. Whether or not the pumps and other needed equipment is operational and will remain so, will not be known for a day or three. Elevated levels of radiation have been noted in local milk and vegetables...and no doubt there is much more, not yet detected in almost everything. There is still a slim chance at the brink of time they have eluded the worst case scenario; however, the situation at this point is horrible and will have effects - mostly locally, but as well worldwide - to some, as yet, unknown level. What it does to the Nuclear Industry will be most interesting......

Peter Lemkin
03-20-2011, 07:25 AM
Today's update [so far]. They say they have connected one [I believe reactor 5] power supply and will now test to see if the pumps are working. At least one fireman working at the plant collapsed from acute radiation exposure and is in hospital - indicating just how powerful the radiation is around the plant [not surprising]. All food from the surrounding area is now illegal to be sold or consumed and the water all over Japan shows varying increased levels of radiation. They continue to spray water to fill the spent fuel pools and cool the reactors. It is a race against time...and I'd guess they have little of it left.....

...oh yes, and Reactor three is in trouble again [melting].

Peter Lemkin
03-21-2011, 08:53 PM
Reactor #3 is increasingly in trouble!~.....if the authorities are to be believed some of the reactors are now connected again to the power mains and slowly cooling. Some of the pumps are missing parts, blown away by the hydrogen explosions. Persons leaving the area have been found to have very high levels of radiation on their shoes [ground contamination - no surprise there!]. It is very hard to get much exact news!....

good article with information a few days old and some photos of the damage to the reactors here. (http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=23764)

Magda Hassan
03-21-2011, 08:57 PM
Isn't number three the dirty one with the plutonium mox?

Magda Hassan
03-21-2011, 11:58 PM
Japanese Government Delayed Nuclear Emergency Measures to Protect TEPCO Profits




by Mike Head


https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-bo_dKMbKPOA/TYfcbNX6T-I/AAAAAAAABNw/nKhNv-7oL0k/s1600/TEPCO.jpg (https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-bo_dKMbKPOA/TYfcbNX6T-I/AAAAAAAABNw/nKhNv-7oL0k/s1600/TEPCO.jpg)
It is now clear that Prime Minister Naoto Kan’s government and the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), which owns the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant, delayed essential measures to tackle the emergency at the facility in order to protect TEPCO’s investments. There is also mounting evidence that joint government-TEPCO cover-ups have continued throughout the unfolding crisis.


More than a week after the earthquake and tsunami that hit the country, the situation at the facility remains on a knife edge despite days of desperate fire-hosing, water-bombing and other activities that have exposed the plant workers and fire fighters to extreme radioactivity levels.


Nuclear experts warned that the restoration of power to some Fukushima units on Sunday and the reported placing of two other reactors into “cold shutdown” did not necessarily end the dangers. “Overall, the situation remains very serious,” the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) said at a media conference yesterday.


The Wall Street Journal reported on the weekend that TEPCO had considered using sea water to cool one of the plant’s six reactors as early as the morning of March 12, the day after the quake struck, but delayed until that evening and did not use seawater at other reactors for another day. The company’s concern was to protect its long-term investment in the Fukushima complex, because seawater can corrode a nuclear reactor, rendering it permanently inoperable.


TEPCO “hesitated because it tried to protect its assets,” Akira Omoto, a former TEPCO executive and member of the Japan Atomic Energy Commission, told the financial newspaper. A government official stated: “This disaster is 60 percent man-made. They failed in their initial response. It’s like TEPCO dropped and lost a 100 yen coin while trying to pick up a 10 yen coin.”


Because the government was committed to leaving the emergency response in the hands of the private owner—the fourth largest power company in the world—official efforts were also critically delayed. Fire-fighting and military resources were not utilised in the cool-down operations in a substantial manner until last Wednesday, after four of the six reactors had already suffered damage and the remaining two showed signs of heating. A military spokesman said forces did not move in because they were not requested by TEPCO.


Other evidence indicated that the Fukushima complex had already been disabled by the magnitude-9 earthquake before the tsunami flooded the backup generators. Kazuma Yokota, a safety inspector for Japan’s Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) who was in the plant when the quake struck, told the Wall Street Journal that he ducked under a desk as the initial shock cracked the walls. The inspector then moved to his monitoring office, a 15-minute drive away. “There was no power, no phone, no fax, no Internet,” he said.


These power and communication failures show that the plant was not built to withstand a major earthquake, despite years of assurances to the contrary by TEPCO and successive Japanese governments. Yet TEPCO remains in control of the response, just as BP was left in charge of last year’s Gulf of Mexico oil spill disaster.


Yesterday, TEPCO reported a spike in pressure in a holding vessel around reactor 3—which contains highly toxic plutonium—forcing engineers to consider releasing more radioactive material into the atmosphere. Officials warned that the release would be larger than in the previous explosions during the week because more nuclear fuel had degraded. They said the process would involve the emission of a cloud dense with iodine, krypton and xenon.


Later in the day, TEPCO temporarily suspended the venting plan. Hikaru Kuroda, a TEPCO manager, said temperatures inside the reactor had reached 300 degrees Centigrade but had “stabilised” after seawater was continuously pumped in.


On Saturday, the dangers to human health were underscored when Japan’s health ministry reported that an abnormal amount of a radioactive material was detected in spinach grown about 110 kilometres northeast of Tokyo. The material, iodine-131, was also detected in milk from a dairy farm about 50 kilometres from the plant. Later, the science ministry said a radioactive substance had been detected in tap water in Tokyo and five nearby prefectures.


Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano, the government’s spokesman, insisted that the amounts of material detected would not immediately affect human health, but experts warned that even traces of radiation could harm children. IAEA official Gerhard Proehl told a Vienna news conference that iodine-131 levels in the milk were up to 15 times the level suitable for infants.


News of the contamination heightened the concerns among ordinary people that the government had failed to issue timely and complete information from the outset of the nuclear disaster. “The biggest problem is that we’re not getting the whole picture from the government, from the media,” Takamasa Edogawa, 76, told the Los Angeles Times as he waited in a line outside a Tokyo supermarket.


Mayumi Mizutani, who was shopping for bottled water, told the Associated Press she was worried about the health of her visiting two-year-old grandchild after radioactive iodine was found in Tokyo’s tap water. She expressed fears that the infant could get cancer. “That’s why I’m going to use this water as much as possible,” she said.


Further evidence has emerged of the culpability of TEPCO and the government for this catastrophe. Officials have admitted that they gave potassium iodide, which helps reduce the risk of throat cancer, to people living within a 20 kilometre-radius of Fukushima only three days after an explosion that should have triggered an immediate distribution. Kazuma Yokota, a safety official, said: “We should have made this decision and announced it sooner. It is true that we had not foreseen a disaster of these proportions.”


TEPCO submitted a report to NISA, the safety regulator, 10 days before the quake hit on March 11 admitting that it had failed to inspect 33 pieces of equipment in its six Fukushima reactors. Inspectors had faked records for up to 11 years, pretending to make thorough inspections when in fact they were only cursory, TEPCO said. Inspections, which were voluntary, also did not cover other devices related to cooling systems, including water pump motors and diesel generators.


“Long-term inspection plans and maintenance management were inadequate,” NISA concluded in a report two days after TEPCO’s admission. Nevertheless, the agency gave TEPCO until June 2 to draw up a corrective plan. A NISA official who declined to be named told Agence France-Presse: “We can’t say that the lapses listed in the (February 28) report did not have an influence on the chain of events leading to this crisis.”


It is now clear that TEPCO’s decades-long record of flouting elementary safety requirements, falsifying reports to regulators and covering up potential nuclear disasters, with the assistance of one government after another, continued right up to the Fukushima catastrophe.


This is despite supposed government intervention on previous occasions, including in 2002, when TEPCO admitted fabricating more than 200 safety reports dating back to 1993, and in 2007, when a much smaller 6.8-magnitude earthquake shut down TEPCO’s seven-reactor Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear plant, the world’s biggest, and more radiation leaked than TEPCO initially acknowledged (see: “Japan’s TEPCO: a history of nuclear disaster cover-ups” (http://www.wsws.org/articles/2011/mar2011/tepc-m17.shtml)).


Repeated attempts by TEPCO and the Kan government to play down the significance of the crisis over the past week have proven to be equally misleading. Three explosions over three days in reactors No. 1, No. 2 and No. 3 were followed by two fires in the fuel pool of reactor No. 4. By mid-week, TEPCO and the government were forced to resort to untested methods, sending helicopters to water-bomb the reactors and fire trucks to help pump seawater into them.


The disorganised and contemptuous character of the official response was further evidenced by reports that the company had agreed with Kan during the week that 180 workers would remain in the plant, working in shifts to prevent a meltdown. TEPCO is known to employ unqualified day labourers, earning just 9,000 yen ($US113) a day, who have little knowledge of the plant’s technology and dangers.


The 180 have all received significant doses of radiation that will inevitably damage their long-term health. Already, two are missing, presumed dead, 21 have reportedly been injured or taken to hospital, and 19 have been treated on site for radiation exposure.


According to the Mainichi Shimbun newspaper, TEPCO asked the government to permit a full withdrawal of the last workers from the plant because of high levels of radiation. Kan, however, told TEPCO: “Withdrawal is impossible. It’s not a matter of whether TEPCO collapses. It’s a matter of whether Japan goes wrong.”


These revelations illustrate the readiness of the entire Japanese ruling elite to sacrifice the lives, health and safety of ordinary working people not only to safeguard the profits and investments of its giant power utilities, but also to maintain a central axis of its strategic and economic strategy—the pursuit of nuclear energy.


Even though Japan is one of the most earthquake- and tsunami-prone areas of the world, more than 55 nuclear reactors have been built since 1970, including seven new ones opened in 2008. These reactors, which now provide 34.5 percent of the country’s electricity, are regarded as a “lifeline” to shield the Japanese business and military establishment from denial of access to global oil and gas supplies.


Across Japan, there is also growing distress over the escalating toll from the tsunami disaster. The national police agency said 8,450 people had been confirmed dead and 12,931 were officially listed as missing—a total of 21,381—as of last night. But this figure is sure to rise.


Miyagi police chief Naoto Takeuchi told a task force meeting yesterday that his prefecture alone “will need to secure facilities to keep the bodies of more than 15,000 people,” Jiji Press reported.


The whereabouts of nearly 19,000 people are still unknown, according to figures compiled by the Asahi Shimbun. The casualty figure does not include those who died at evacuation centres or medical facilities where victims were transported. At least 25 people have died in evacuation centres in Fukushima alone.


Mike Head is a frequent contributor to Global Research. Global Research Articles by Mike Head (http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=listByAuthor&authorFirst=Mike&authorName=Head)
http://www.politicalfailblog.com/2011/03/japanese-government-delayed-nuclear.html

Peter Lemkin
03-22-2011, 05:48 AM
Levels 100X higher than permissible were admitted to have been found in fish in the area of the plant. Again, not surprising, as the wind has been blowing that-a-way, plus all the run off from the water sprayed on the plant, which is directly on the ocean.......while the ocean is a BIG place and it will dissipate, much in the area will be getting quite a dose - and much of the fishing is done just offshore, the fish and other sealife most affected. :popworm: One would expect those levels to rise further and I don't know if we are being told the truth or not.... It seems it is both the 'desire' to not cause alarm among the Sheeple and also another case of Profits before People.

NB. Reactor 3 is getting hotter and hotter...and steam is coming out, despite the water put on it [boiling off]. this reactor is the only one that has plutonium in the fuel rods....so the most dangerous one on the grounds....

Close-up aerial photos of the plant's reactors shows quite a lot of damage and most of the reactors totally open to the sky....nice!:joystick:

Peter Lemkin
03-22-2011, 02:29 PM
'They' now say that all six reactors have been re-connected to the electric grid [without saying if the power can run the broken and damaged cooling systems]. Reactors #2 and 3 are still at great risk, with increasing temperatures and visible plumes rising from them [radiation is invisible, but a visible plume from a reactor always carries radiation within it!]. Reactor 3 is the the most problematic [and therefore not surprisingly] the ONLY one with plutonium, rather than uranium fuel pellets. While the Japanese authorities paint a picture of having now gotten the plant under control, I am NOT convinced. The next three days will tell. :party:

Peter Lemkin
03-23-2011, 09:59 AM
Reactor #3 seems to be the MOST dangerous still. Black smoke was seen coming from it, and the plant was evacuated......awaiting word on what was happening...but certainly nothing good!....:pirate:

Peter Lemkin
03-24-2011, 10:48 AM
For the first time, smoke is also coming out of Reactor #1...so smoke or steam or both is coming up off of most all of Reactors 1-4. Amazingly, they claim not to know WHY they are doing this, nor WHAT is causing it!..... Three workers were rushed to the hospital yesterday. Little information on this too. Obviously, large amounts of radiation continues to come out of the reactors and into the environment.....despite all their pathetic actions, to date.

Peter Lemkin
03-24-2011, 02:01 PM
Interview with Hirosh Takashi, author of many books on the nuclear industry

Yoh: Tepco [Tokyo Electric Power Company, owner/operator of the nuclear plants] says they expect to bring in a high voltage line this evening.

Hirose: Yes, there’s a little bit of hope there. But what’s worrisome is that a nuclear reactor is not like what the schematic pictures show (shows a graphic picture of a reactor, like those used on TV). This is just a cartoon. Here’s what it looks like underneath a reactor container (shows a photograph). This is the butt end of the reactor. Take a look. It’s a forest of switch levers and wires and pipes. On television these pseudo-scholars come on and give us simple explanations, but they know nothing, those college professors. Only the engineers know. This is where water has been poured in. This maze of pipes is enough to make you dizzy. Its structure is too wildly complex for us to understand. For a week now they have been pouring water through there. And it’s salt water, right? You pour salt water on a hot kiln and what do you think happens? You get salt. The salt will get into all these valves and cause them to freeze. They won’t move. This will be happening everywhere. So I can’t believe that it’s just a simple matter of you reconnecting the electricity and the water will begin to circulate. I think any engineer with a little imagination can understand this. You take a system as unbelievably complex as this and then actually dump water on it from a helicopter – maybe they have some idea of how this could work, but I can’t understand it.

Yoh: It will take 1300 tons of water to fill the pools that contain the spent fuel rods in reactors 3 and 4. This morning 30 tons. Then the Self Defense Forces are to hose in another 30 tons from five trucks. That’s nowhere near enough, they have to keep it up. Is this squirting of water from hoses going to change the situation?

Hirose: In principle, it can’t. Because even when a reactor is in good shape, it requires constant control to keep the temperature down to where it is barely safe. Now it’s a complete mess inside, and when I think of the 50 remaining operators, it brings tears to my eyes. I assume they have been exposed to very large amounts of radiation, and that they have accepted that they face death by staying there. And how long can they last? I mean, physically. That’s what the situation has come to now. When I see these accounts on television, I want to tell them, “If that’s what you say, then go there and do it yourself!” Really, they talk this nonsense, trying to reassure everyone, trying to avoid panic. What we need now is a proper panic. Because the situation has come to the point where the danger is real.

If I were Prime Minister Kan, I would order them to do what the Soviet Union did when the Chernobyl reactor blew up, the sarcophagus solution, bury the whole thing under cement, put every cement company in Japan to work, and dump cement over it from the sky. Because you have to assume the worst case. Why? Because in Fukushima there is the Daiichi Plant with six reactors and the Daini Plant with four for a total of ten reactors. If even one of them develops the worst case, then the workers there must either evacuate the site or stay on and collapse. So if, for example, one of the reactors at Daiichi goes down, the other five are only a matter of time. We can’t know in what order they will go, but certainly all of them will go. And if that happens, Daini isn’t so far away, so probably the reactors there will also go down. Because I assume that workers will not be able to stay there.

I’m speaking of the worst case, but the probability is not low. This is the danger that the world is watching. Only in Japan is it being hidden. As you know, of the six reactors at Daiichi, four are in a crisis state. So even if at one everything goes well and water circulation is restored, the other three could still go down. Four are in crisis, and for all four to be 100 per cent repaired, I hate to say it, but I am pessimistic. If so, then to save the people, we have to think about some way to reduce the radiation leakage to the lowest level possible. Not by spraying water from hoses, like sprinkling water on a desert. We have to think of all six going down, and the possibility of that happening is not low. Everyone knows how long it takes a typhoon to pass over Japan; it generally takes about a week. That is, with a wind speed of two meters per second, it could take about five days for all of Japan to be covered with radiation. We’re not talking about distances of 20 kilometers or 30 kilometers or 100 kilometers. It means of course Tokyo, Osaka. That’s how fast a radioactive cloud could spread. Of course it would depend on the weather; we can’t know in advance how the radiation would be distributed. It would be nice if the wind would blow toward the sea, but it doesn’t always do that. Two days ago, on the 15th, it was blowing toward Tokyo. That’s how it is. . . .

Yoh: Every day the local government is measuring the radioactivity. All the television stations are saying that while radiation is rising, it is still not high enough to be a danger to health. They compare it to a stomach x-ray, or if it goes up, to a CT scan. What is the truth of the matter?

Hirose: For example, yesterday. Around Fukushima Daiichi Station they measured 400 millisieverts – that’s per hour. With this measurement (Chief Cabinet Secretary) Edano admitted for the first time that there was a danger to health, but he didn’t explain what this means. All of the information media are at fault here I think. They are saying stupid things like, why, we are exposed to radiation all the time in our daily life, we get radiation from outer space. But that’s one millisievert per year. A year has 365 days, a day has 24 hours; multiply 365 by 24, you get 8760. Multiply the 400 millisieverts by that, you get 3,500,000 the normal dose. You call that safe? And what media have reported this? None. They compare it to a CT scan, which is over in an instant; that has nothing to do with it. The reason radioactivity can be measured is that radioactive material is escaping. What is dangerous is when that material enters your body and irradiates it from inside. These industry-mouthpiece scholars come on TV and what to they say? They say as you move away the radiation is reduced in inverse ratio to the square of the distance. I want to say the reverse. Internal irradiation happens when radioactive material is ingested into the body. What happens? Say there is a nuclear particle one meter away from you. You breathe it in, it sticks inside your body; the distance between you and it is now at the micron level. One meter is 1000 millimeters, one micron is one thousandth of a millimeter. That’s a thousand times a thousand: a thousand squared. That’s the real meaning of “inverse ratio of the square of the distance.” Radiation exposure is increased by a factor of a trillion. Inhaling even the tiniest particle, that’s the danger.

Yoh: So making comparisons with X-rays and CT scans has no meaning. Because you can breathe in radioactive material.

Hirose: That’s right. When it enters your body, there’s no telling where it will go. The biggest danger is women, especially pregnant women, and little children. Now they’re talking about iodine and cesium, but that’s only part of it, they’re not using the proper detection instruments. What they call monitoring means only measuring the amount of radiation in the air. Their instruments don’t eat. What they measure has no connection with the amount of radioactive material.Yoh: So damage from radioactive rays and damage from radioactive material are not the same.

Hirose: If you ask, are any radioactive rays from the Fukushima Nuclear Station here in this studio, the answer will be no. But radioactive particles are carried here by the air. When the core begins to melt down, elements inside like iodine turn to gas. It rises to the top, so if there is any crevice it escapes outside.

Yoh: Is there any way to detect this?

Hirose: I was told by a newspaper reporter that now Tepco is not in shape even to do regular monitoring. They just take an occasional measurement, and that becomes the basis of Edano’s statements. You have to take constant measurements, but they are not able to do that. And you need to investigate just what is escaping, and how much. That requires very sophisticated measuring instruments. You can’t do it just by keeping a monitoring post. It’s no good just to measure the level of radiation in the air. Whiz in by car, take a measurement, it’s high, it’s low – that’s not the point. We need to know what kind of radioactive materials are escaping, and where they are going – they don’t have a system in place for doing that now.

http://counterpunch.org/takashi03222011.html

Peter Lemkin
03-25-2011, 06:38 AM
Both reactor core containments of reactors 1 and 3 are believed to be breeched [open/cracked/leaking/melted - they are not saying exactly or don't know exactly]. Far from getting things under control, they [amazingly slowly, but surely] have been degrading day by day. I think at this point they soon have to contemplate entombment [as was done with Chernobyl]. This would involve getting just about every cement producer in Japan to formulate a special radiation-absorbing cement and keep the trucks a comin' and building up a huge sarcophagus of cement around a steel I-beam shell that would have to be pre-built and lowered by helicopter and/or crane over the top and sides....it is soon to be the only option to prevent the radiation from continually coming out. Most of the cores will likely go into meltdown and melt into the crust soon. It is a mess of enormous proportions and I don't think they are doing a very good job of honest disclosure. [Understatement!]

Peter Lemkin
03-25-2011, 10:19 AM
New pools of water somewhere in the plant are 10,000X above the danger level [not the normal level]!.....it all looks very ominous. I can think of no easy way to fix a cracked containment vessel....one must either dismantle it and bury it [in this case many of them] or, as above, make a special-concrete sarcophagus. Niether is a good solution, but at this point there ARE no good solutions!.....only flavors of bad ones.

Despite rewiring the heavy high-voltage lines back into the plant NONE of the cooling systems have become operational. Reasons are not being given, but one can assume they have been damaged. These are not the kind of item one goes to the nearest hardware center to get a new one...they are specially built and that takes months. The best they can hope for is that some spare parts they need [and will result in a working pump/cooling system] are available somewhere. However, I think it is a sinking ship that they keep trying to steer....it has no where to go....

TOKYO (AP) - A suspected breach in the reactor at the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant could mean more serious radioactive contamination, Japanese officials revealed Friday, as the prime minister called the country's ongoing fight to stabilize the plant "very grave and serious."

A somber Prime Minister Naoto Kan sounded a pessimistic note at a briefing hours after nuclear safety officials announced what could be a major setback in the urgent mission to stop the plant from leaking radiation, two weeks after a devastating earthquake and tsunami disabled it.

"The situation today at the Fukushima Dai-ichi power plant is still very grave and serious. We must remain vigilant," Kan said. "We are not in a position where we can be optimistic. We must treat every development with the utmost care."

The uncertain situation halted work at the nuclear complex, where dozens had been trying feverishly to stop the overheated plant from leaking dangerous radiation. The plant has leaked some low levels of radiation, but a breach could mean a much larger release of contaminants.

The possible breach in Unit 3 might be a crack or a hole in the stainless steel chamber of the reactor core or in the spent fuel pool that's lined with several feet of reinforced concrete. The temperature and pressure inside the core, which holds the fuel rods, remained stable and was far lower than would further melt the core.

Suspicions of a possible breach were raised when two workers waded into water 10,000 times more radioactive than levels normally found in water in or around a reactor and suffered skin burns, the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency said.

Kan apologized to farmers and business owners for the toll the radiation has had on their livelihoods: Several countries have halted some food imports from areas near the plant after milk and produce were found to contain elevated levels of radiation.

He also thanked utility workers, firefighters and military personnel for "risking their lives" to cool the overheated facility.

The alarm Friday comes two weeks to the day since the magnitude-9 quake triggered a tsunami that enveloped cities along the northeastern coast and knocked out the Fukushima reactor's cooling systems.

Peter Lemkin
03-27-2011, 05:57 AM
The entire Nuclear Plant was evacuated [only us computers here!] as a puddle [sic] of water was found in Reactor #2 that was [are you ready for this!] 10 million times the danger level...now we are 'talking'...no messing around with a bit of radiation here and a bit there....now we are talking serious radiation..... Sarcophagus time! I really pity those workers fighting to keep the 'ship' from sinking there...as they will likely die early deaths and if they keep at it, could die in days. There are even times when the radiation can become so high that death in minutes is possible [it destroys the immune system and just normal bacteria in the air and body kill you!], as happened at Chernobyl. Ah, it looks worse and worse; but they keep downplaying it. Remember there are 23 of the exact same reactors in the USA....not that the others are much better. Stay tuned.....

They have somehow gotten fresh water in and working again and have slowly been switching from sea water [corrosive to the pipes and leaving salt residue in the cooling ponds that is dangerous] to fresh water, as all cooling equipment was designed for; but it is too late....more so that some of the cooling systems have leaks and the water puddles found now in Reactors 1, 2 and 3 are likely those leaks...but while the water in those cooling systems is usually somewhat radioactive, nothing like what has now been found...indicating to me that the reactor containment is open and the core materials [likely partly melted] is mixing with the cooling water...a dangerous scenario - and one that can NOT be repaired.

Peter Lemkin
03-27-2011, 04:35 PM
Today, the Japenese Govt. is saying that the 10 million X safe radiation level is not 'correct'....but is not providing a substitute level. I think they are just reacting to the world shock at the levels...and now inventing a fiction for the facts.....few radiation meters are incorrect....and even IF a small area had that level, it doesn't change anything......Japan has learned how to spin a news story as well as anyone and are doing it here, methinks.....

Magda Hassan
03-28-2011, 06:00 AM
It's got Chernobyl written all over it and I don't mean the nuclear fallout and sargophagus to surely come. It's the spin and "Don't worry. Everything is under control. We have it under control. " bs that is coming from them. At least Gorby had glasnost after Chernobyl but these idiots with vested interests are just going to make a bigger spin machine me thinks. :joystick:

Peter Lemkin
03-28-2011, 07:07 AM
It's got Chernobyl written all over it and I don't mean the nuclear fallout and sargophagus to surely come. It's the spin and "Don't worry. Everything is under control. We have it under control. " bs that is coming from them. At least Gorby had glasnost after Chernobyl but these idiots with vested interests are just going to make a bigger spin machine me thinks. :joystick:

This latest spin error is really a joke, but much of the media bought it!. They found an area in reactor 2 - a pool of water standing on the floor [not supposed to be any water] that was 10.000.000X normal radiation.....they entire staff fled and the three men who stepped in the pool were taken to hospital in special contamination suits. Then the big officials in Tokyo said it was all a mistake [not that someone had read the dosimeter wrong - but that they hadn't confirmed it with another reading!] :lol: So....I'm waiting for the 'other' reading.....which is NOT forthcoming. Spin, spin and more spin......:hitball:

Peter Lemkin
03-28-2011, 07:39 AM
AHA....they have just announced it was only 100.000 X safety level....not that I believe them; but even if true still a clear sign the reactor cores are open to the outside....and if water is getting on the plant floor it will also get into the air and groundwater and ocean....and people and all living things....what a mess. They also mentioned that they have yet to get one cooling system started up again...but with cracked or melted containment vessels there is NO POINT - in fact it would be more dangerous to start up the pumps!!!! - which operate under pressure and would only force out more highly radioactive water. It is time to call it quits and bury that monster in special concrete!!!! The faster the better...but to save 'face', they are struggling on...to what end I can not perceive.

Peter Lemkin
03-28-2011, 05:18 PM
The Tokyo 'authorities' just stated that plutonium has been detected in the soil around the nuclear plant but....[are you sitting?]....it is "not harmful to humans". I can tell you as an Environmental Toxicologist that is one of the biggest lies ever told. Plutonium is both highly toxic, in and of itself; and highly radioactive - both of these features make it uniquely harmful to humans and all life-forms. In fact it is one of the most poisonous substances and its radioactivity is strong, and its half-life is 24,000 years....so some of those in 'temporary' shelters may have to wait 'a while' to go back home! Plutonium is aptly named after Pluto, the god of death.

Nice big fat lie!:wirlitzer:

Jan Klimkowski
03-29-2011, 06:10 PM
The official best case scenario, via Reuters, is grim, with the area around Fukushima likely becoming a dead zone.

Meanwhile, the nuclear industry and its paid professors continue to be given free reign on MSM to promote nuclear power and claim that events at Fukushima Daiichi show how resilient nuclear plants are....


Japanese engineers are struggling to gain control of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, 240 km (150 miles) north of Tokyo, which was seriously damaged by a March 11 earthquake and tsunami.

By Mayumi Negishi
TOKYO | Tue Mar 29, 2011 3:23pm IST

Two of the six reactors at the plant, operated by Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO), are considered stable but the other four are volatile.

Following are some questions and answers about efforts to end the world's worst nuclear crisis since the 1986 Chernobyl accident:


WHAT IS HAPPENING?

Workers are struggling to restart the cooling pumps in four reactors damaged by the 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami and later drenched from desperate hosing operations to keep the reactors cool.

The immediate challenge is to pump out radioactive water flooding the basements in reactors No.1, No.2 and No.3 and hampering the restoration of electricity to continuously power the cooling pumps.

The No.2 reactor has posed especially nasty risks, emitting high levels of radiation at more than 1,000 millisieverts an hour in both the water and air in the basement of the turbine building. That is the highest reading seen in the crisis and compares with a national safety standard of 250 millisieverts over a year. This most likely means that byproducts from a partial meltdown in the reactor core are leaking out into the water.

In the No.1 reactor, workers have been able to start running a circulatory steam condensing system to begin to clear contaminated water. But after five days of pumping, there is no clear indication of significant progress.

The same systems in reactors No.2 and No.3 are flooded and so need to be emptied before they can handle the contaminated water. TEPCO has said it may need to think out of the box to clear the dangerous waters, while preventing further flows into the sea and soil.


HOW LONG MIGHT THIS TAKE?

Nobody knows. The most likely scenario is a long, drawn-out fight, with incremental progress interrupted by emergency cooling measures and spikes in radioactivity.

Once the pumps and the residual heat removal systems are running, it would take only a couple days to bring the reactors to a cold shutdown. But engineers are literally working in the dark. Lights have only recently gone on in the control room, but electrically powered monitors and gauges -- workers' eyes and ears inside the reactor -- are still off. Radiation readings outside the reactors are still taken via a moving car, because the monitoring posts are not powered. Temperature and pressure readings from backup systems are all that workers have to "see" what is going on in the reactors.

Workers remain hampered by broken pipes, debris, flooded equipment and a scarcity of replacement pumps and water tanks. Work has also been interrupted by hosing operations to lower rising temperatures in the reactor cores and spent fuel pools, as well as by an occasional fire and radiation injuries.

Because of the high levels of radiation in the water, experts suspect damage to the containment structures around the No.2 reactor core. They said it may take as long as a few months to bring that reactor to a cold shutdown.


WHAT ARE THE RISKS?

The main risk comes from the radiation that will continue to seep, or burst, out each time a pipe leaks or rising pressure forces workers to vent steam. Leaking water from within the nuclear pressure vessels could find their way into the soil and the ocean, while spikes in radiation could contaminate crops over a wide area.

The risk that the spent fuel pools could reach recriticality seems remote, as long as there are workers and firefighters willing to douse the reactors with water each time temperatures start to rise.

The same could be said of a small, hypothetical risk of a corium steam explosion, particularly in the No.1 reactor, which is the plant's oldest and which is believed to have a weak spot. If workers are unable to continue hosing operations, and if the nuclear fuel manages to melt through the bottom of the reactor and fall into a water pool below, this would result in a high temperature burst and a sudden release of a huge amount of hydrogen that could, in an unlikely "perfect storm" scenario, breach the containment vessel.

Should either worst-case scenarios happen, it could disperse high levels of radiation up to 20 km (12 miles) around the site, making it impossible to bring the reactors to a cold shutdown without great sacrifice.


WILL THE SITE BECOME A NO-MAN'S LAND?

Most likely, yes. Even after a cold shutdown there is the issue of tonnes of nuclear waste sitting at the site of the nuclear reactors. Enclosing the reactors by injecting lead and encasing them in concrete would make it safe to work and live a few kilometres away from the site, but is not a long-term solution for the disposal of spent fuel, which will decay and emit fission fragments over several thousand years.

The spent nuclear fuel in Fukushima has been damaged by sea water, so recycling it is probably not an option, while transporting it elsewhere is unlikely given the opposition that proposal would bring.


WHAT RISK FROM PLUTONIUM?

Plutonium has been found in soil samples at the site, further evidence that fuel rods in at least one reactor may have melted down considerably before they were cooled, and that there is damage to the structures containing the nuclear core.

Only trace amounts of the toxic substance have been detected. The level of up to 0.54 becquerals per kg of soil is not considered harmful. Most people have some plutonium in their bodies from atmospheric and underwater nuclear tests and some pacemakers are powered by plutonium.

But the presence of the radioactive poison outside the reactors compounds worry for the workers there as long as authorities are not sure how the heaviest of primordial elements leaked out.

Plutonium-239, used most in reactors, has a half-life of 24,200 years. It is not readily absorbed by the body but what is absorbed, stays put, irradiates surrounding tissue and is carcinogenic.

(Editing by Robert Birsel)

http://in.reuters.com/article/2011/03/29/idINIndia-55955720110329

Christer Forslund
03-29-2011, 07:45 PM
And the industrial leader (i.e. the boss) does WHAT?


In normal times, Masataka Shimizu lives in The Tower, a luxury high-rise in the same upscale Tokyo district as the U.S. Embassy. But he hasn’t been there for more than two weeks, according to a doorman.
The Japanese public hasn’t seen much of him recently either. Shimizu, the president of Tokyo Electric Power Co. (http://www.tepco.co.jp/en/index-e.html), or Tepco, the company that owns a haywire nuclear power plant (http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/contaminated-water-found-in-underground-tunnels-at-japan-nuclear-plant/2011/03/28/AFD4rHoB_story.html?hpid=z2) 150 miles from the capital, is the most invisible — and most reviled — chief executive in Japan.
Amid rumors that Shimizu had fled the country, checked into a hospital or committed suicide, company officials said Monday that their boss had suffered an unspecified “small illness” because of overwork after a 9.0-magnitude earthquake sent a tsunami crashing onto his company’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.
After a short break to recuperate, they said, Shimizu, 66, is back at work directing an emergency command center on the second floor of Tepco’s central Tokyo headquarters.
Still, company officials are vague about whether they have actually seen their boss: “I’ll have to check on that,” said spokesman Ryo Shimitsu. Another staffer, Hiro Hasegawa, said he’d seen the president regularly but couldn’t provide details.
Vanishing in times of crisis is something of a tradition among Japan’s industrial and political elite. During Toyota’s recall debacle last year, the carmaker’s chief also went AWOL. “It is very, very sad, but this is normal in Japan,” said Yasushi Hirai, the chief editor of Shyukan Kinyobi, a weekly news magazine.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/vanishing-act-by-japanese-executive-during-nuclear-crisis-raises-questions/2011/03/28

Peter Lemkin
03-30-2011, 09:11 AM
And the industrial leader (i.e. the boss) does WHAT?


In normal times, Masataka Shimizu lives in The Tower, a luxury high-rise in the same upscale Tokyo district as the U.S. Embassy. But he hasn’t been there for more than two weeks, according to a doorman.
The Japanese public hasn’t seen much of him recently either. Shimizu, the president of Tokyo Electric Power Co. (http://www.tepco.co.jp/en/index-e.html), or Tepco, the company that owns a haywire nuclear power plant (http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/contaminated-water-found-in-underground-tunnels-at-japan-nuclear-plant/2011/03/28/AFD4rHoB_story.html?hpid=z2) 150 miles from the capital, is the most invisible — and most reviled — chief executive in Japan.
Amid rumors that Shimizu had fled the country, checked into a hospital or committed suicide, company officials said Monday that their boss had suffered an unspecified “small illness” because of overwork after a 9.0-magnitude earthquake sent a tsunami crashing onto his company’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.
After a short break to recuperate, they said, Shimizu, 66, is back at work directing an emergency command center on the second floor of Tepco’s central Tokyo headquarters.
Still, company officials are vague about whether they have actually seen their boss: “I’ll have to check on that,” said spokesman Ryo Shimitsu. Another staffer, Hiro Hasegawa, said he’d seen the president regularly but couldn’t provide details.
Vanishing in times of crisis is something of a tradition among Japan’s industrial and political elite. During Toyota’s recall debacle last year, the carmaker’s chief also went AWOL. “It is very, very sad, but this is normal in Japan,” said Yasushi Hirai, the chief editor of Shyukan Kinyobi, a weekly news magazine.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/vanishing-act-by-japanese-executive-during-nuclear-crisis-raises-questions/2011/03/28

He is now in the hospital with either a heart attack or something related......

Peter Lemkin
03-30-2011, 10:32 AM
The Japanese just announced they will 'abandon' 4 of the 6 reactors. [i.e. they think they can't save/repair/use them!]....what a joke...all six were 'gone' and that was obvious from where I sit from the second day!..... Oh, by the way, new highly contaminated water leaks and radioactive iodine found in the ocean water...other than that and that NONE of the control panels that run any of the reactors are back on line.....everything is fine....relax - don't worry. :mexican::what:

Peter Lemkin
03-30-2011, 01:52 PM
The company that owns the powerplant, who's CEO is now in the hospital, has for the first time suggested [hinted really] that they may have to cover [their word] the nuclear plant....but they avoided the term concrete and hinted at some giant tent [won't work!]...only cement made with barium will work, and very thick, at that!!!! Such a construction would take a year or two, at best. One group has calculated that the current releases may be 10% of what Chernobyl emitted....but you'd never know it from the MSM nor governments. Mum's the word.

Peter Lemkin
03-30-2011, 04:35 PM
AMY GOODMAN: Japan’s Prime Minister Naoto Kan said Tuesday his government is in a "state of maximum alert" over the nuclear crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

High radiation levels continue to delay efforts to fix the plant’s cooling systems, and experts are now debating whether to cover its reactor buildings with a special material in order to try and stop the spread of radioactive substances. Radioactive water is seeping into the sea, and highly radioactive liquid has been found inside and outside several reactor buildings. Small amounts of plutonium have also been detected in soil at the plant.

The Institute for Energy and Environmental Research has released data showing the radiation leak in Japan is far worse than the one at Three Mile Island in 1979. Researchers estimate the Japanese plant has released 160,000 times as much radioactive iodine-131 as the Three Mile Island accident. The researchers said the radiation leak in Chernobyl was 10 times larger than the leak so far in Japan.

On Tuesday, Peter Lyons, the head of the U.S. Energy Department’s nuclear program, said the discovery of plutonium in the soil near Japan’s damaged nuclear reactors should not be a major surprise.

PETER LYONS: All operating reactors, whether they start with any plutonium in the fuel or not, build up plutonium in the course of operation. So, finding plutonium that was derived from either the operating reactors or the spent fuel pools would not be regarded as a major surprise. Certainly, it would be a concern if it were in significant levels. At least anything I’ve seen was that it’s not significant at this point.

AMY GOODMAN: That was Peter Lyons, head of the U.S. Energy Department’s nuclear program, speaking Tuesday at a hearing for the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee.

The hearing comes as the U.S. regulator embarks on a safety review of the nation’s 104 nuclear plants in the wake of the Japanese accident, the worst the world has seen in a quarter of a century. The Obama administration says it’s trying to determine how to boost energy production without increasing global warming.

To discuss this issue, we’re joined by British journalist George Monbiot in London. He is an author, columnist with The Guardian of London. He has written in favor of nuclear energy after the Fukushima disaster. And we’re joined by Helen Caldicott, world-renowned anti-nuclear advocate, author and pediatrician, co-founder of Physicians for Social Responsibility, has spent decades warning of the medical hazards of nuclear technologies.

George Monbiot, why don’t you begin? Why doesn’t what is happening now in Fukushima concern you when it comes to nuclear power worldwide?

GEORGE MONBIOT: Well, obviously, what happened—what’s happening in Fukushima concerns me a lot about the area surrounding Fukushima. It’s a horrible, dangerous, extremely traumatic series of events that we are seeing there.

But I’m very worried that the global response to what’s happening in Fukushima will be to shut down nuclear power stations around the world and to cancel future nuclear power stations, and that what will happen is that they will be replaced by coal. Now, coal is hundreds of times more dangerous than nuclear power, not just because of climate change, though, of course, climate change is a big one, but also because of industrial accidents and because of the impacts of pollution on local people. If we just look at industrial accidents alone, these massively outweigh both the fatalities and the injuries caused by any nuclear accident we’ve ever seen. In China alone, last year, 2,300 people were killed in industrial accidents to do with coal mining; purely by coal mining accidents, 2,300 killed. That’s six people a day. That means that in one week, the official death toll from coal in China is greater than the official death toll from Chernobyl in 25 years. And that’s to say nothing of the hundreds of thousands of people contracting really unpleasant lung diseases, which will cause them a very slow and painful and terrible death.

So, what I’m calling for here is not complacency. I think it’s absolutely appropriate to be very concerned, indeed, about what’s happening in Fukushima. But I’m calling for perspective, and I’m saying that we must not replace a bad technology with a much, much worse one, because, unfortunately, that is what’s likely to happen.

AMY GOODMAN: Helen Caldicott, your reaction? Talk about where Japan is right now with its nuclear reactors, what partial meltdown means, and what you think this means for the future for nuclear power in the world.

HELEN CALDICOTT: Well, Amy, The Guardian yesterday reported that Unit No. 2 had actually melted down. The fuel had melted through the reactor vessel onto the concrete floor below. That is a problem because the zirconium in the fuel reacts with the concrete, and it could form a huge hydrogen bubble like happened at Three Mile Island. There could be a huge hydrogen explosion, which would rupture the containment vessel, and out of Unit 2 would come huge plumes of radiation, which, if the wind is blowing towards the south, could devastate much of Japan forever, or it could be blown across the Pacific towards the American—North American continent and around the globe, indeed, and pollute the whole of the northern hemisphere.

And this—and, of course, if there is such an explosion, it means that the workers who are trying to stabilize the cooling pools, one of which has been burning—or several have been burning—and the others reactors, which are in a very precarious state, they’ll have to evacuate the plant. I mean, they can’t work there anymore. And then God knows what will happen. This is the most extreme situation in nuclear power. I could never have imagined this, Amy, although I have thought a lot about meltdowns, and Chernobyl, in particular.

AMY GOODMAN: George Monbiot, your response? Do you agree with Helen Caldicott’s assessment?

GEORGE MONBIOT: Well, I agree that it’s a very parlous situation indeed. It does look as if it’s going to melt through the reactor floor, effectively, and onto the concrete, in which case exactly the scenario she’s talking about could take place.

I would disagree, though, that it will devastate a large part of Japan forever, which I think was a term that she used. I think that’s an overstatement of the impacts of the radiation. There’s no question that it will cause mass evacuation. It may cause health effects for some people. But we’ve got to be very careful about not doing what, say, the climate change deniers do when they say that there’s no danger from climate change: cherry-picking studies, plucking out work which is very much against the scientific consensus. When it comes to low-level radiation, unfortunately, environmentalists have been responsible for quite a similar approach by making what appear to be unjustifiable and excessive claims for the impact of that radiation. That is not in any way to minimize what is—what could well happen as a result of the events in Fukushima, but what it does say is we have to use the best possible science to work out what the likely effects are to be and not engage in what could be far more devastating to the lives of people in Japan: a wild overreaction in terms of the response in which we ask the Japanese people to engage.

AMY GOODMAN: We’re going to break and then come back to this discussion. Our guests are George Monbiot of The Guardian and Helen Caldicott, world-renowned nuclear—anti-nuclear advocate, co-founder of Physicians for Social Responsibility. After we continue this debate, we will go to Haiti to talk about the crisis there. Stay with us.

[break]

AMY GOODMAN: After the nuclear disaster in Japan, President Obama, in an interview with CBS, reiterated his commitment to nuclear power.

We thought we could go to that SOT, but President Obama is renewing the whole nuclear power debate by providing the loan guarantees that would allow for new plants to be built for the first time in more than 30 years. Helen Caldicott, are you concerned about this?

HELEN CALDICOTT: Oh, Amy, the whole thing’s nuclear madness, which is what I called my first book that I wrote in 1978. A new report from the New York Academy of Sciences has just translated 5,000 papers from Russian into English. It’s the most devastating report I’ve ever seen. Up to a million people have already died from Chernobyl, and people will continue to die from cancer for virtually the rest of time. What we should know is that a millionth of a gram of plutonium, or less, can induce cancer, or will induce cancer. Each reactor has 250 kilos, or 500 pounds, of plutonium in it. You know, there’s enough plutonium in these reactors to kill everyone on earth.

Now, what George doesn’t understand—and, George, I really appreciate your writing, and I understand your concern about global warming. You don’t understand internal emitters. I was commissioned to write an article for the New England Journal of Medicine about the dangers of nuclear power. I spent a year researching it. You’ve bought the propaganda from the nuclear industry. They say it’s low-level radiation. That’s absolute rubbish. If you inhale a millionth of a gram of plutonium, the surrounding cells receive a very, very high dose. Most die within that area, because it’s an alpha emitter. The cells on the periphery remain viable. They mutate, and the regulatory genes are damaged. Years later, that person develops cancer. Now, that’s true for radioactive iodine, that goes to the thyroid; cesium-137, that goes to the brain and muscles; strontium-90 goes to bone, causing bone cancer and leukemia. It’s imperative, George, because you’re highly intelligent and a very important commentator, that you understand internal emitters and radiation, and it’s not low level to the cells that are exposed. Radiobiology is imperative to understand these days. I do suggest, humbly, that if you read my book Nuclear Power Is Not the Answer, which I think I’ve tried to send you once, you’ll learn about that.

GEORGE MONBIOT: I do have a copy, yeah.

HELEN CALDICOTT: And I totally agree, global warming is a terrible, terrible catastrophe. However, I commissioned a study, done by Arjun Makhijani from IEER about three, four years ago, called "Carbon-Free [and] Nuclear-Free." The truth is, George, that there’s enough renewable technology now, right now, which is relatively cheap, to supply the whole of the U.S.'s needs by 2040 without any carbon and any nuclear. We just need to have the politicians to get out of the pockets of the nuclear companies, the coal companies, the oil companies, and start funding renewable energy. Why isn't there a solar panel on every single house in America, solar hot water systems, windmills everywhere? You know it would increase the GDP and employ hundreds of thousands of people throughout the world. This is the way to go. That’s the prescription for survival.

Nuclear power, George, creates massive quantities of radioactive waste. There is no way to put it on earth that’s safe. As it leaks into the water over time, it will bioconcentrate in the food chains, in the breast milk, in the fetuses, that are thousands of times more radiosensitive than adults. One x-ray to the pregnant abdomen doubles the incidence of leukemia in the child. And over time, nuclear waste will induce epidemics of cancer, leukemia and genetic disease, and random compulsory genetic engineering. And we’re not the only species with genes, of course. It’s plants and animals. So, this is an absolute catastrophe, the likes of which the world has never seen before.

AMY GOODMAN: Let’s get George Monbiot’s response.

GEORGE MONBIOT: Yes, well, thank you, Helen, and thank you for all the work you’ve done over the years, which I think has made a fantastic contribution. But what you’re saying about the impacts of radiation just does not seem to square with the observed cancer rates amongst the populations who have been exposed—

HELEN CALDICOTT: That’s not right.

GEORGE MONBIOT:—to high levels of radiation.

HELEN CALDICOTT: George, that’s not right. George, George—

GEORGE MONBIOT: Well, can I just give you a—

HELEN CALDICOTT: That’s not right. You need to read the literature.

AMY GOODMAN: George Monbiot?

GEORGE MONBIOT: Well, I have been reading the literature. I have been reading the literature, and there’s a very extensive literature—

HELEN CALDICOTT: The medical literature?

GEORGE MONBIOT: Some of the medical literature.

HELEN CALDICOTT: Have you read the New York Academy of Sciences report?

GEORGE MONBIOT: I haven’t read the whole report; I’ve read part of it. But can I just say that—

HELEN CALDICOTT: You must read the whole report.

GEORGE MONBIOT: You know, I—sorry, Helen, would you please let me finish what I’m trying to say?

HELEN CALDICOTT: Sorry, George.

GEORGE MONBIOT: When I’ve been dealing with climate change over the past 20 years or so, I learned very quickly that you have to effectively go with the scientific consensus rather than with a few outlier papers, because to choose those outlier papers over the scientific consensus is effectively to cherry-pick or to data mine, and to get what has turns out to be a misleading view. That’s certainly been my experience with climate change.

Now, when it comes to radiation—

HELEN CALDICOTT: I agree. I agree.

GEORGE MONBIOT:—I think we’re in danger, possibly, of falling into a similar trap to the trap that climate change deniers have fallen into with their cherry-picking of the science there. For instance, I don’t think you could dismiss the U.N. Scientific Committee as being part of the nuclear industry. I don’t think you can dismiss the very large amount of data—

HELEN CALDICOTT: Yes, I could. Yes, I could.

GEORGE MONBIOT:—on the—sorry, you’re saying you would dismiss the U.N. Scientific Committee as being part of the nuclear industry?

HELEN CALDICOTT: I could, yes. Let me tell you, George—

GEORGE MONBIOT: Wow. OK, well, I’m afraid that it seems to me that—

HELEN CALDICOTT:—that the International Atomic Energy Agency—well, I’ll tell you why in a minute.

GEORGE MONBIOT: No, the U.N. Scientific Committee is what I’m talking about. But, I mean, if that is the case, then—

HELEN CALDICOTT: Which one?

GEORGE MONBIOT:—it worries me. The U.N. Scientific Committee on Atomic Radiation. It worries me, if you really do lump them in there, that we’re getting into the same sort of conspiratorial thinking that you have with climate change denial—

HELEN CALDICOTT: No.

GEORGE MONBIOT:—whereby anyone who doesn’t go along with the line of the climate change deniers, that carbon dioxide is not connected with climate change, for example, is in the hands of the carbon trading industry or something like that.

Now, you know, there is a very large body of evidence from Chernobyl, from many other nuclear incidents, from people’s exposure to elevated levels of background radiation, whether it’s radon gas coming from granite masses, whether it’s higher solar radiation because of where they live, and what we do not see is a clear relationship between those lower levels of radiation that you predict and the incidence of cancers, let alone the higher incidence of death. It’s just it’s only there in very particular cases, generally with extremely high exposures of radiation, or in specific cases like, for instance, the combination of radon exposure and smoking, which raises the incidence of lung cancer among smokers from 10 percent to 16 percent. But the radon exposure seems to have almost no impact on the level of cancers among the rest of the population. So, I just think, you know, we’ve got to be very, very careful—

HELEN CALDICOTT: George, this is wrong, George.

GEORGE MONBIOT:—about which science we trust and which we do not.

HELEN CALDICOTT: George, you must—

AMY GOODMAN: Helen Caldicott?

HELEN CALDICOTT: George, you must listen to me. I’m a pediatrician. I’m a physician, highly trained. I was on the faculty at Harvard Medical School. My specialty is cystic fibrosis, the most common genetic disease of childhood. I actually—and I’m not boasting, but I’m a very good doctor; you know, I came second in my year of medicine. I don’t say things that are inaccurate. Otherwise, I would be de-registered. I mean, doctors can’t lie.

George, there’s a huge literature on internal emitters and radiation. The New York Academy of Sciences, this report on Chernobyl is absolutely devastating. But there are now 2,600 genetic diseases described. I first learned about radiation by learning about the experiments with Drosophila fruit fly by Muller when I did first-year medicine in '56. You can produce a gene for a crooked wing that's passed on generation to generation. We will not live to see the abnormalities created by radiation from our activities now because, you know, we’ll all be dead by the time we have 20 or more generations. But it’s imperative that people understand that internal emitters cause cancer, but the incubation time for cancer is any time from two to 60 years.

George, the International Atomic Energy Agency has an unholy alliance with the WHO, World Health Organization, which says WHO cannot examine any accident related to nuclear power, etc., without the permission of the IAEA. And indeed, it didn’t examine Chernobyl. Forty percent of the European land mass is still radioactive, George. Turkish food is extremely radioactive. And we have to wait to see the cancers arising and do epidemiological studies, many of which have been done to exposed populations. George, there is no debate about this. There is no debate. I speak to doctors all the time in medical schools, in hospitals, grand rounds. We all understand this. There is no debate in the medical community.

AMY GOODMAN: Well, let me ask George Monbiot, the—

HELEN CALDICOTT: Only at the nuclear level.

AMY GOODMAN: Let me—let me ask George Monbiot—the 25th anniversary of Chernobyl is three weeks away. Scientists have documented extreme levels of radiation still there, miles and miles of dead trees, mutated birds, insects, leukemia deaths of children. Is this your understanding?

GEORGE MONBIOT: Oh, miles and miles of dead trees, I don’t believe that there’s—that’s an effect of Chernobyl. It might well be an effect of acid rain in the area, but I haven’t seen any scientific evidence suggesting miles and miles of dead trees caused by the Chernobyl erosion, or of widespread impacts amongst wildlife.

Now, as for the leukemia incidence, yes, unquestion-–well, thyroid cancer, actually, was the big one amongst children. There was some elevated incidence of leukemia amongst particularly a few of the workers at Chernobyl, but the broader impact was of thyroid cancer. And that could have been massively reduced, that incidence, A, by giving iodine pills to children, and B, by forbidding them, for a period of time, from drinking the contaminated milk. Because the authorities were so appallingly lax and didn’t do any of the—either of those basic precautions, we see a much higher rate of thyroid cancer amongst children than there ever should have been.

Now, on these questions that Helen raises, I mean, if she’s honestly saying that the World Health Organization is now part of the conspiracy and the cover-up, as well, then the mind boggles.

HELEN CALDICOTT: Yeah, I am.

GEORGE MONBIOT: You know, where does this end?

HELEN CALDICOTT: The mind does boggle.

GEORGE MONBIOT: If them and the U.N. Scientific Committee and the IAEA and—I mean, who else is involved in this conspiracy? We need to know.

AMY GOODMAN: Finally, Helen Caldicott?

HELEN CALDICOTT: Well, yes, we do. It’s the IAEA which promotes nuclear power—sorry, Amy. It’s the IAEA that promotes nuclear power, right, but says you mustn’t build bombs from your reactor. And that negotiation took place, God, several decades, quite a lot of decades, ago. And the WHO just does nothing—

GEORGE MONBIOT: And they have conspired to cover up—

HELEN CALDICOTT:—it has not examined the results—yes. This is the biggest—

GEORGE MONBIOT: They have conspired to cover up the incidence of cancer caused by radiation?

HELEN CALDICOTT:—medical conspiracy and cover-up in the history of medicine, George. Yes.

GEORGE MONBIOT: Right, so, WHO, IAEA, the U.N. Scientific Committee—

HELEN CALDICOTT: Yep.

GEORGE MONBIOT:—on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, all of them are part of the cover-up.

HELEN CALDICOTT: I don’t know about the U.N. Scientific Committee.

GEORGE MONBIOT: Well, that’s a huge—I mean, you don’t know about it?

HELEN CALDICOTT: Well, certainly the IAEA and the WHO.

GEORGE MONBIOT: I mean, this is—the U.N. Scientific Committee is the major repository of the science on this issue. You don’t know about it?

HELEN CALDICOTT: Well, yeah, no, I’ve read about it, but the main thing is that the WHO was prevented or did not examine the results from Chernobyl, and it’s ongoing and will be for generations and generations, George.

GEORGE MONBIOT: But the United Nations did. The United Nations—

HELEN CALDICOTT: And soil, 40 percent of the soil in Europe is contaminated.

GEORGE MONBIOT: The United Nations Committee did examine Chernobyl. And they have said—

HELEN CALDICOTT: Oh, yeah?

GEORGE MONBIOT:—that so far the death toll from Chernobyl amongst both workers and local people is 43. Am I—sorry, are you saying you didn’t know that they had examined this—

HELEN CALDICOTT: That’s a lie, George. That’s a lie.

GEORGE MONBIOT:—and you aren’t aware of their report?

HELEN CALDICOTT: That’s a lie.

GEORGE MONBIOT: What’s a lie?

HELEN CALDICOTT: How dare—

GEORGE MONBIOT: That they examined this—

HELEN CALDICOTT: Yes, I am.

GEORGE MONBIOT:—and they wrote a report?

HELEN CALDICOTT: How dare they say that?

AMY GOODMAN: On that—

HELEN CALDICOTT: How dare they say that?

GEORGE MONBIOT: But are you aware—are you aware of the report?

HELEN CALDICOTT: This is a total cover-up. Yes, I am.

AMY GOODMAN: We’re going to wrap, with 10 seconds of each—

HELEN CALDICOTT: I am.

AMY GOODMAN: In this wake of what has happened in Japan and on this anniversary of Chernobyl, three weeks away, I give you each 15 seconds to express your concern, as we wrap up this debate, beginning with George Monbiot.

GEORGE MONBIOT: Well, we have to use the best available science, not cherry-pick our sources, and we have to keep some perspective on this, so that we don’t see a massive rush to coal, as governments get out of nuclear as a result of what’s happened in Japan.

AMY GOODMAN: And Helen Caldicott, 15 seconds.

HELEN CALDICOTT: George, I totally agree with you about coal. I think it’s a deadly substance, and we must stop burning, à la James Hansen. But we must not go from the global warming frying pan into the nuclear fire, George. This is an obscene technology. They’ve known about it since the Manhattan Project. Seaborg, who discovered plutonium, said it’s the most dangerous substance on earth. Each reactor has 500 pounds of plutonium, lasts for half-a-million years, causing cancer after cancer.

AMY GOODMAN: We leave it there, and I thank you both for being with us.

HELEN CALDICOTT: Have you ever tried to help a child dying of leukemia, George? It’s beyond comprehension.

AMY GOODMAN: We will leave it there. Helen Caldicott, thank you so much for being with us from Boston, world-renowned anti-nuclear advocate, author and pediatrician, co-founder of Physicians for Social Responsibility. And George Monbiot, speaking to us from Britain, a reporter, correspondent, columnist for The Guardian of London.

Peter Lemkin
03-31-2011, 10:21 AM
AIEA has suggested the exclusion zone [where no one lives] should be expanded by at least another 10 Km as radioactive cesium was found at one town outside the exclusion zone at dangerous levels. It is a very dangerous radioactive product and persistent [half-life of 30 years]. Japanese Govt. has said they don't think it 'is dangerous enough' to expand zone. If they don't start covering those reactors with barium cement [which will take months and months!], the exclusion zone will soon extend over most of Japan...

Peter Lemkin
03-31-2011, 08:15 PM
The iodine levels [radioactive isotope] in the seawater near the plant has steadily been going up....but it had not been [in my opinion] worthy of mention until now. The last recording, taken 300 m from the outlet, was 10,000X the safe limit...and yesterday it was about 500X....so you can guess about tomorrow and after.... Now, it is a big ocean, BUT this is not just going into the ocean and anyway, Japanese and others eat what is in the ocean and those creatures in it are entitled not to be irradiated...as are the people of Japan! That Plant needs to be entombed ASAP. I knew it from day two and they haven't even started to plan for what will be a six month to 12 month operation, at BEST!...and quite an engineering feat!.....

Peter Lemkin
04-01-2011, 05:30 AM
Since the company that owns the nuclear plant and the Japanese Govt. have been playing ostrich, Greenpeace has taken it upon themselves to do some radiation monitoring. They've just started. At one town NW of the nuclear plant and 50Km distant they found unsafe levels of Cesium [half-life of 30 years!], meaning that town likely should be evacuated [almost surely many others, as well] and they won't be safe to return to for many decades! A very sad scenario to an already suffering Japanese population! When the Japanese People realize how they are being lied to by silence over the nuclear plant, I hope they get angry....there is NO excuse for the playing down how dangerous the situation is and has been from the first day!

Peter Lemkin
04-01-2011, 05:44 AM
Tepco, the company that owns the nuclear plant has just been caught breaking Japanese law, by NOT having most of the workers in the DAMAGED nuclear plant wearing personal dosimeters [which show the current and cumulative radiation dosages], which are required by law; the only way to know when someone should be relieved from work on health grounds; and even contain alarms, if the invisible radiation level gets too high. Talk about profits over people! Such dosimeters cost only $50-$200 each for the best ones. Wait until Tepco's investors see what cost the concrete sarcophagus will cost. I'd guess half of the price of building the plant!

Magda Hassan
04-01-2011, 08:21 AM
Peter, Peter, Peter, your thinking far too much like a compassionate law abiding person. For a corporation that $50-200 dosimeter is money wasted when it could be used towards a share dividend or management bonus. These disposable workers are not long for this world and money spent on a dosimeter is a bad investment. :smallprint:

Jan Klimkowski
04-01-2011, 09:19 PM
How much does a seppuku sword cost?

Yukio Mishima's spectre hovers in the Fukushima wasteland....

Magda Hassan
04-01-2011, 09:37 PM
It seems that seppuku is a lost Japanese tradition. I cannot think of a better opportunity for it though.

Jan Klimkowski
04-01-2011, 11:06 PM
Graphic new photos of Fukushima and analysis here (http://www.zerohedge.com/article/chris-martenson-exclusive-new-photos-fukushima-reactors).

An excerpt from the conclusion of the article:


The efforts at Fukushima are probably weeks away from even basic stabilization and we are years away from any sort of a final resolution. This crisis is going to be with all of us for a very long time. Radiation will continue to escape from the complex into the environment for weeks at best, months or years at worst.

The chief concern here is that things might still take a turn for the worse whereby radiation spikes to levels that prevent humans from getting close enough to perform meaningful operations and work on the site. If the radiation spikes high enough it will force an evacuation from the vicinity complicating every part of what has to happen next from monitoring to remediation.

The general lack of staged materials anywhere in the vicinity indicates that authorities have not yet decided on a plan of action, feeding our assessment that they are still in 'react mode' and that we are weeks away from nominal stabilization.

On Thursday we learned from the Wall Street Journal that TEPCO only had one stretcher, a satellite phone, 50 protective suits, and only enough dosimeters to give a single one to each worker group. Given this woeful level of preparation it is not surprising to see that regular fire trucks, cement trucks, and a lack of staged materials comprise much of the current damage control mix.

We don't yet know enough to conclude how much fission has spontaneously re-occurred, but we have strong suspicions that the number is higher than zero. Here we make our call for the release of more complete and timely radiation readouts and sampling results by TEPCO and Japan so that we can assess what the true risks are. The situation remains fluid and quite a lot depends now on chance and which way the wind blows.

Magda Hassan
04-01-2011, 11:29 PM
The worlds largest cement making machine is on its way to Japan from the US so it looks like they've decided on something.

Bernice Moore
04-02-2011, 12:34 PM
4 damaged Japan reactors to be scrapped

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/4-damaged-japan-reactors-scrapped-20110330-174455-871.html

Magda Hassan
04-03-2011, 03:26 AM
Doesn't make much sense to close down the 4 when no one can work at the other 2 still functioning because the whole area is a radioactive time bomb. If the residents can't live there in the surrounding area then no one should work there. The whole place needs to be de-commissioned and dismantled and cleaned up. As do all the nuclear facilities to prevent this happening again.:shock:

Magda Hassan
04-03-2011, 03:54 AM
The Fukushima meltdown in Japan was no surprise. As reported here (http://www.aolnews.com/2011/03/16/wikileaks-japan-was-warned-about-nuclear-plant-safety-cables-s/), Wikileaks has revealed that the Japanese government was warned about it three years ago. A 2008 cable from the American embassy in Tokyo says that a strong earthquake would pose a “serious problem” for Japan’s nuclear power stations. The official in the cable said that Japan’s nuclear safety guidelines were dangerously out of date, as they had only been “revised three times in the last 35 years.” The wire states that the International Atomic Energy official told a meeting of the G8’s Nuclear Safety and Security Group in Tokyo in 2008 that Japan’s safety guidelines were outdated. Japan, however, ignored the warning.
Indeed, we have evidence that the Japanese government covered up any problems. According to reports (http://www.ibtimes.com/articles/123314/20110316/japan-nuclear-safety-warnings-iaea-wikileaks-earthquake-fukushima.htm), one reporter is quoted saying: “Back in 1996 amid a reactor accident in Ibaraki province, the government never admitted that radioactive fallout had drifted over the northeastern suburbs of Tokyo. Our reporters got confirmation from monitoring stations, but the press was under a blanket order not to run any alarming news, the facts be damned.”
The tragedy we see unfolding now is the result of a massive criminal cover-up. Thousands of people have paid the price.

.
Source: Wikileaks & SOX
http://www.temasekreview.com/2011/04/03/wikileaks-the-fukushima-cover-up/

Peter Lemkin
04-03-2011, 05:35 AM
Doesn't make much sense to close down the 4 when no one can work at the other 2 still functioning because the whole area is a radioactive time bomb. If the residents can't live there in the surrounding area then no one should work there. The whole place needs to be de-commissioned and dismantled and cleaned up. As do all the nuclear facilities to prevent this happening again.:shock:

It doesn't...and for sure the locals in the exclusion zone are not going home anytime soon [say, a few years...like 15+...depending on the type of radioactive elements in the area. Few realize that at Chernobyl the other reactors [adjacent to the one that blew up] are still operational......as hard as it is to believe...so there is precedent not to give up these expensive pink elephants. People are easy for the bosses to 'give up'.

Peter Lemkin
04-03-2011, 09:03 AM
They found a 20cm crack in the containment vessels concrete shell of Reactor 2, which was leaking highly radioactive water. They poured cement into the crack, but it did not harden nor hold and the water is leaking as much as before... Now they are going to try some polymer.... It is a loosing battle, I'm afraid.

Peter Lemkin
04-05-2011, 08:37 AM
tons, likely tens of tons or hundred of tons [mums the word!] of highly radioactive water has been leaking into the ocean and the groundwater. It is said [likely a lowball figure] to be 10.000.000 X the legal limit of water into the oceans or groundwater.....and they plan to put even more highly radioactive water in the ocean soon...next days. But this they had NO CONTROL over. Sad.... It only took the Prime Minister 3 weeks to come near [not to] the Plant. Rather than start work burying it in special cement, they suggested placing a giant cloth tent over it....a joke and has already been condemned by all experts. :what:

Magda Hassan
04-09-2011, 08:14 AM
Fukushima Engineer Says He Helped Cover Up Flaw at Dai-Ichi Reactor No. 4

By Jason Clenfield - Wed Mar 23 00:54:50 GMT 2011
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/data?pid=avimage&iid=iPVwzgHBrADk
A file photograph shows employees and inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), checking a rod containing plutonium-uranium mixed oxide, known as MOX, fuel being loaded into the No. 3 reactor at Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power station. Photographer: Tomohiro Ohsumi/Bloomberg



One of the reactors in the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant may have been relying on flawed steel to hold the radiation in its core, according to an engineer who helped build its containment vessel four decades ago.
Mitsuhiko Tanaka says he helped conceal a manufacturing defect in the $250 million steel vessel installed at the Fukushima Dai-Ichi No. 4 reactor while working for a unit of Hitachi Ltd. (6501) (http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=6501:JP) in 1974. The reactor, which Tanaka has called a “time bomb,” was shut for maintenance when the March 11 earthquake triggered a 7-meter (23-foot) tsunami that disabled cooling systems at the plant, leading to explosions and radiation leaks.
“Who knows what would have happened if that reactor (http://www.tepco.co.jp/) had been running?” Tanaka, who turned his back on the nuclear industry after the Chernobyl disaster, said in an interview last week. “I have no idea if it could withstand an earthquake like this. It’s got a faulty reactor inside.”
Tanaka’s allegations, which he says he brought to the attention of Japan’s Trade Ministry in 1988 and chronicled in a book two years later called “Why Nuclear Power is Dangerous,” have resurfaced after Japan (http://topics.bloomberg.com/japan/)’s worst nuclear accident on record. The No. 4 reactor was hit by explosions and a fire that spread from adjacent units as the crisis deepened.
No Safety Problem

Hitachi spokesman Yuichi Izumisawa said the company met with Tanaka in 1988 to discuss the work he did to fix a dent in the vessel and concluded there was no safety problem. “We have not revised our view since then,” Izumisawa said.
Kenta Takahashi, an official at the Trade Ministry’s Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, said he couldn’t confirm whether the agency’s predecessor, the Agency for Natural Resources and Energy, had conducted an investigation into Tanaka’s claims. Naoki Tsunoda, a spokesman at Tokyo (http://topics.bloomberg.com/tokyo/) Electric Power Co., which owns the plant, said he couldn’t immediately comment.
Tanaka, who said he led the team that built the steel vessel, was at his apartment on Tokyo’s outskirts when Japan’s biggest earthquake on record struck off the coast on March 11, shaking buildings in the nation’s capital.
“I grabbed my wife and we just hugged,” he said. “I thought this is it: we’re dead.”
For Tanaka, the nightmare intensified the next day when a series of explosions were triggered next to the reactor that he helped build. Since then, the risks of radioactive leaks increased as workers have struggled to bring the plant under control.
Fukushima No. 4
Tanaka says the reactor pressure vessel inside Fukushima’s unit No. 4 was damaged at a Babcock-Hitachi foundry in Kure City, in Hiroshima prefecture, during the last step of a manufacturing process that took 2 1/2 years and cost tens of millions of dollars. If the mistake had been discovered, the company might have been bankrupted, he said.
Inside a blast furnace the size of a small airplane hanger the reactor pressure vessel was being treated one last time to remove welding stress. The cylinder, 20 meters tall and 6 meters in diameter, was heated to more than 600 degrees Celsius (1,112 degrees Fahrenheit), a temperature that softens metal.
Braces that were supposed to have been placed inside during the blasting were either forgotten or fell over when the cylinder was wheeled into the furnace. After the vessel cooled, workers found that its walls had warped, Tanaka said.
Warped Walls

The vessel had sagged so that its height and width differed by more than 34 millimeters, meaning it should have been scrapped, according to nuclear regulations. Rather than sacrifice years of work and risk the company’s survival, Tanaka’s boss asked him to reshape the vessel so that no-one would know it had ever been damaged. Tanaka had been working as an engineer for the company’s nuclear reactor division and was known for his programming skills.
“I saved the company billions of yen,” said Tanaka, who says he was paid a 3 million yen bonus and presented with a certificate acknowledging his “extraordinary” effort. “At the time, I felt like a hero,” he said.
Over the course of a month, Tanaka said he made a dozen nighttime trips to an International Business Machines Corp. office 20 kilometers away in Hiroshima where he used a super- computer to devise a repair.
Meanwhile, workers covered the damaged vessel with a sheet, Tanaka said. When Tokyo Electric sent a representative to check on their progress, Hitachi distracted him by wining and dining him, according to Tanaka. Rather than inspecting the part, they spent the day playing golf and soaking in a hot spring, he said.
Wining and Dining

“The guy wouldn’t have known what he was looking at anyway,” Tanaka said. “The people at the utility have no idea how the parts are made.”
After a month of computer modeling, Tanaka came up with a way to use pumpjacks to pop out the sunken wall. While it would look like nothing had ever happened, no-one knew what the effect of the repair would have on the integrity of the vessel. Thirty- six years later, that reactor pressure vessel is the key defense protecting the core of Fukushima’s No. 4 reactor.
“These procedures, as they’re described, are far from ideal, especially for a component as critical as this,” Robert Ritchie, Professor of Materials Science & Engineering at the University of California (http://topics.bloomberg.com/university-of-california/) of Berkeley, said in a phone interview. “Depending on the extent of vessel’s deformation, it could possibly lead to local cracking in some of its welds.”
Chernobyl Breakdown

Tanaka quit Babcock-Hitachi in 1977, when he was 34 years old and became a writer. A graduate of Tokyo Institute of Technology, his Japanese-language books include “Options in Complex Systems: Natural Science and Economics on the Edge of Chaos,” and a book for young adults called, “How do we Know the Earth is Moving?”
After the meltdown at Chernobyl (http://www.chernobyl.org.uk/) in 1986, Tanaka was asked to narrate a Russian movie documenting the disaster. A team of Soviet filmmakers had taken 30 hours of footage inside the plant, getting very close to the ruptured core. The movie’s director (http://www.nytimes.com/1987/05/30/world/a-soviet-film-maker-at-chernobyl-in-86-is-dead-of-radiation.html) died of radiation poisoning about a year after the filming. While watching the footage, Tanaka had a breakdown.
“All of a sudden I was sobbing and I started to think about what I’d done,” Tanaka said. “I was thinking, ‘I could be the father of a Japanese Chernobyl.’”
Two years later Tanaka says he went to the Trade Ministry to report the cover-up he’d been involved in more than a decade earlier. The government refused to investigate and Hitachi denied his accusations, he said.
“They said, if Hitachi says they didn’t do it, then there’s no problem,” Tanaka said. “Companies don’t always tell the truth.”

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-03-23/fukushima-engineer-says-he-covered-up-flaw-at-shut-reactor.html

Peter Lemkin
04-09-2011, 11:03 AM
An inspector at the plant for many years, who now lives in the USA gave an interview on Democracynow! - about the many flaws and non-working pumps, dangers, breaches of regulations, et al. he had come across, but kept silent about; as he knew he'd loose his job if he put them in the reports [doctored reports]. Can't remember if I posted it of not, but can be found on Democracy Now! There are also very old and more recent reports done in the USA on the inherent dangers of these Mark I GE reactors!

Jan Klimkowski
04-09-2011, 11:41 AM
As children, we're brought up always to tell the truth and take responsiblity for our actions.

Whistleblowers are mostly individuals who've wrestled with the knowledge of corporate or institutional malpractice for years, or even decades. Then, finally, their conscience wins, and they reveal the truth.

But whistleblowers are not rewarded or praised for doing the right thing. Rather, multinationals and governments attempt to discredit or bankrupt truth tellers, and turn them into pariahs.

This goes to the fetid sickness at the heart of C21st global market capitalism.

Peter Lemkin
04-09-2011, 02:05 PM
As children, we're brought up always to tell the truth and take responsiblity for our actions.

Whistleblowers are mostly individuals who've wrestled with the knowledge of corporate or institutional malpractice for years, or even decades. Then, finally, their conscience wins, and they reveal the truth.

But whistleblowers are not rewarded or praised for doing the right thing. Rather, multinationals and governments attempt to discredit or bankrupt truth tellers, and turn them into pariahs.

This goes to the fetid sickness at the heart of C21st global market capitalism.

I'd only add that a select group of 'whistleblowers' [who should be the most honored in a democratic society of checks and balances] are sometimes murdered - and it is even usually made to look like a 'suicide'. The only 'morality' (sic) predatory corporate capitalism knows is money/'moola'/gold/drugs/arms/exploitation/war/indentured servants/slaves and taxes for the others; NO taxes for the rich! Fuck the 1%.....maybe the top 5%.....they should be 'eliminated', ImHO non-violently, of course [to spare my poor ass from legal problems]. :finger:

Keith Millea
04-09-2011, 08:36 PM
Man,Akira Kurosawa was a visionary artist of the first degree!This clip is from his 1990 movie "Dreams".Check it out.......

From Amazon:

One of the most visionary, deeply personal works in the 60-year career of the master behind Rashomon, The Seven Samurai and Ran. Featuring eight episodes rich in imagery and insight (and casting MARTIN SCORSESE as a feisty Vincent Van Gogh), it explores the costs of war, the perils of nuclear power and especially humankind's need to harmonize with nature. You will be enchanted ... and enthralled.


http://youtu.be/z_ZxTB8mqbk

Magda Hassan
04-10-2011, 02:16 AM
Wow. Thanks for that Keith! I'd forgotten what a brilliant film maker he was and how is that for prescience? Tapping into the collective unconscious as all good artists do.

Peter Lemkin
04-11-2011, 09:33 AM
A new strong earthquake just a half-our ago cut the power to all the reactors that had had the power restored [although no cooling pumps have yet be started...and may never]. Also the water cooling of the spent fuel rod pools has had to be stopped and the plant evacuated. It is very likely that Japan will experience HUNDREDS more powerful quakes in the next weeks and months....this is normal when one gets such a huge quake as 9.2 - it takes a long time for the rocks deep below to find a 'comfortable' resting position for a few decades - until the next breakage.

Magda Hassan
04-11-2011, 10:44 AM
I heard they are about to extend the exclusion zone but I am not clear by how much. It currently is 20kms but because of the cumulative radiation it is going to be extended. Apparently milk in the US in now showing radiation levels higher than acceptable and no doubt the solution will be to redefine 'acceptable' and not to have the food products destroyed or any changes in nuclear power production. (aka agricultural and energy company profits)

Peter Lemkin
04-11-2011, 03:37 PM
I heard they are about to extend the exclusion zone but I am not clear by how much. It currently is 20kms but because of the cumulative radiation it is going to be extended. Apparently milk in the US in now showing radiation levels higher than acceptable and no doubt the solution will be to redefine 'acceptable' and not to have the food products destroyed or any changes in nuclear power production. (aka agricultural and energy company profits)

Yes, they will soon move it to at least 30Km - some foreign experts have suggested 50km....which in small Japan is a large area! No one publicly, anyway, really knows the radiation readings [levels] and species [types of radioactives] are in the area - or even at and around the plant. We get little pieces, very incomplete and the worst ones are usually retracted as 'mistakes' in reading the meters, or some such nonsense. They read out in scientific notation on a digital display that is put in memory - very hard to make a mistake about!!!!!!

As to you guess that they will just raise the 'acceptable' levels in foods....they probably will in a round-about way....by saying that it would take X years of eating/drinking Y in order to exceed the safe usage...and as the whole world will soon end - and their chances of getting killed in as a soldier in some Imperial War or a car crash or shot by the police are much greater, and anyway; who cares! The PTB don't :smileymad:

Magda Hassan
04-12-2011, 03:57 AM
Japan raises nuclear alert level to seven

Fukushima Daiichi power plant emergency is now on a par with the 1986 Chernobyl warning




Justin McCurry (http://www.guardian.co.uk/profile/justinmccurry) in Tokyo
guardian.co.uk (http://www.guardian.co.uk/), Tuesday 12 April 2011 01.54 BST http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2011/4/12/1302569590685/Fukushima-Daiichi-nuclear-007.jpg Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station where the radiation level warning has been raised to a maximum of seven. Photograph: EPA

Japan (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/japan) is to raise the nuclear alert level at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant to a maximum seven, putting the emergency on a par with the 1986 Chernobyl disaster.
Nuclear safety officials had insisted they had no plans to raise the severity of the crisis from five – the same level as the Three Mile Island accident in 1979 – according to the international nuclear and radiological event scale.
But the government came under pressure to raise the level at the plant after Japan's nuclear safety commission estimated the amount of radioactive material released from its stricken reactors reached 10,000 terabecquerels per hour for several hours following the earthquake and tsunami that devastated the country's northeast coast on 11 March. That level of radiation constitutes a major accident, according to the INES scale.
The scale, devised by the international atomic energy (http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/energy) agency, ranks nuclear and radiological accidents and incidents by their severity from one to seven.
Japan also temporarily issued tsunami warnings for parts of the north-east coast on Monday following another powerful aftershock. It is exactly a month since a magnitude-9 earthquake created huge waves that left an estimated 28,000 people dead or missing. NHK, the public broadcaster, warned of a tsunami up to 2 metres high on the coast of Ibaraki prefecture after the magnitude-7.1 quake.
Although the waves were estimated to be much smaller than those that hit on 11 March, the meteorological agency warned people in Ibaraki to evacuate to higher ground. The warnings were later lifted.
The aftershock came as the government said it was widening the evacuation zone around the plant due to high levels of accumulated radiation and fears about long-term effects on residents' health. A fire that broke out at the plant's number four reactor at 6.38am local time was extinguished, the operator, Tokyo Electric Power company (Tepco), said.
More than 14,000 people are still missing following the disaster, and 152,000 survivors are living in evacuation centres.
The prime minister, Naoto Kan, placed a message in newspapers in several countries, including Britain, China and the United States, thanking the international community for its support. Kan said the generosity shown towards Japan in its time of need demonstrated the human capacity for kizuna, or bonds of friendship, and vowed that Japan would emerge a stronger nation.
"We deeply appreciate the kizuna our friends from around the world have shown and I want to thank every nation, entity, and you personally, from the bottom of my heart," he said.
The government's chief spokesman, Yukio Edano, said the current 12-mile (20km) evacuation zone would be extended to five other communities, including the village of Iitate, which lies 25 miles from the plant.

Peter Lemkin
04-12-2011, 04:50 AM
Break out the radioactive champagne! I and many others have been saying this for a month...it took the Japanese govt. a 'while' to see the inevitable. It will end the same way as Chernobyl x 6, too. There they buried one in concrete - here all six. The only problem is that in the meantime 4-5 of those reactors could still experience complete meltdown [and huge releases] and even AFTER being put in a sarcophagus it is still too near the ocean and the water table to not continually leak radiation down and out! :pullhair: :what: Make that an EIGHT on a one to seven scale! :mexican:

There have been four new strong earthquakes in the last 48 hours. Each time, they evacuate the plant and each time slightly more damage is done and the cooling of the overheating cores and waste pools is halted. If they get one or two more very strong aftershocks [very likely], one of the six containment vessels or spent fuel pools could crack....after that....I don't even want to think....those scenarios are possible even without new earthquakes. They now expect the total minimum [!] release of radiation will equal Chernobyl....only over a longer time period. The TOTAL amount of radioactive materials in the plant that COULD be released is many thousands of times that of Chernobyl...it depends on the scenario....and still they have not started building the containment structure....amazing!

The 'party-line' in Japan and most MSM around the world is that 'only' 10% of the amount of radiation released at Chernobyl has so far [sic] been released in Japanernobyl....and if one counts to air, that is probably close [no one really knows - or are telling]...BUT if one adds in the radioactives put into the ocean it is definitely now EQUAL to Chernobyl and this will, at best, be ongoing for another year. [If they'd get going, they could likely entomb the plant in 6-8 months; if they don't get going, look at a year or more.....once they begin!] - I don't see how they will ever stop the radiation into the groundwater and sea.....maybe there is a 'fix', but it will be very expensive and quite an engineering feat!!!!

Keith Millea
04-12-2011, 06:10 PM
10 Apr 2011 A giant mass of floating debris swept out into the ocean by the Japanese tsunami could reach the West Coast in three years, researchers at the University of Hawaii are predicting. Thankyou to CBC Updates can be found there- http://www.cbc.ca/news/

http://therealnews.com/t2/component/seyret/?task=videodirectlink&id=9617

Video:

http://youtu.be/XgKc-gbJ-yk

Peter Lemkin
04-12-2011, 06:39 PM
AMY GOODMAN: Japan has raised the severity rating of its nuclear crisis to the highest level, matching the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster. The level 7 rating signifies a major nuclear accident. At a news conference today, an official from the Tokyo Electric Power Company said, quote, "The radiation leak has not stopped completely, and our concern is that it could eventually exceed Chernobyl."

For an update on the situation, we go to Tokyo. Thomas Breuer, head of the Climate and Energy Unit for Greenpeace Germany, joins us by Democracy Now! video stream. He’s part of a field team of radiation monitors in Japan.

Thomas Breuer, Greenpeace has been talking about the situation being more severe for a number of weeks now. Explain what it means for Japan to lift the crisis level from 5 to the very highest, to 7.

THOMAS BREUER: Yeah, Amy, maybe first of all, the idea from the INES scale, which was introduced after the Chernobyl accident, is exactly to inform the public in a timely manner. And Greenpeace has done calculations with scientists already three weeks ago, where we figured out that this accident is in a scale 7 accident. And we are wondering why the government of Japan needs three weeks to come to the same conclusion, especially because they must have way better data than we have. So, what it means now, they wasted three weeks of not informing the public about the real, real risks of this accident.

AMY GOODMAN: Now, though, talk about what 7 means. I mean, we’re talking about the continuing nuclear catastrophe that’s unfolding in Japan being equal to the worst nuclear disaster in history: Chernobyl.

THOMAS BREUER: So, from my point of view, it is not equal to Chernobyl, it is way worse, because we are, like, facing three reactors totally, or partly, destroyed. A fourth reactor has a problem with the spent fuel, which had a huge explosion. And when we did the calculations like three weeks ago, we figured out that, depending of course about the spread between the three reactors, each of these reactors could be rated as a INES scale 7 accident, because the INES scale does not even consider a multiple accident, what we are seeing here in Fukushima. So, that is way worse than what we’ve seen in Chernobyl. Another point there, which is very important, so in Chernobyl was more or less rural area around the reactor. But Fukushima is in a densely populated area, so millions of people are living around it. So, even that makes it worse and more difficult to manage.

AMY GOODMAN: What do you think Japan needs to do right now?

THOMAS BREUER: So, there are urgency measures. So, it is now clear that, since we did our field research, we warned the government that there are a lot of cities and villages outside the 20-kilometers evacuation zone where the radiation levels are so high that people need urgently to be evacuated, especially children and pregnant women, because they are the most vulnerable part of the population to radiation. And so, they have to do that now. They have to screen the whole Fukushima area, where there are other hot spots which need to be evacuated.

And then they have to—what they haven’t done so far—really, really explain to people who are still living there what to do, how to behave. So, we were approached from a lot of farmers during our field work, asking us whether we can come to their fields and do food testing, because they have no idea whether they still can eat the food or sell it or whatsoever. So, that’s a very difficult situation. We have been in Fukushima City. That’s a city with 340,000 inhabitants, and we found very high levels of radiation in the city all over again. But life seems to be like, on the surface, like normal life, and it has to do with the fact that the government did not put out information, how to behave, what to do. So people are really left alone with this accident, which wasn’t caused by them.

AMY GOODMAN: Thomas Breuer, you’re in Tokyo right now, but you head the Climate and Energy Unit for Greenpeace Germany. You’re speaking to me in the United States, where our president, President Obama, is really pushing a nuclear renaissance for the first time in decades, pushing for the building of nuclear power plants. Talk about the response around the world to what’s happened in Japan.

THOMAS BREUER: So, it’s not understandable how one can push for nuclear renaissance, especially if you dig into the whole industry. It’s, first of all, not compatible with democracy, because the open society, as we are living in, they cannot deal with nuclear, because they are so vulnerable to terrorism and to accidents that there will be always a clash with democracy at the end of the day. And so, Obama should look what is happening in Germany. So, Angela Merkel, even though she used to be quite pro-nuclear, as well, after the accident, she understood the real risks of nuclear power plant, and she closed down immediately eight of the 17 reactors in Germany. And I think that’s a responsible way to deal with nuclear: it has to be closed down.

AMY GOODMAN: I want to thank you, Thomas Breuer, for joining us, head of the Climate and Energy Unit for Greenpeace Germany, part of the field team of radiation monitors in Tokyo, Japan.

Christer Forslund
04-12-2011, 09:30 PM
Secret Weapons Program Inside Fukushima Nuclear Plant?
U.S.-Japan security treaty fatally delayed nuclear workers' fight against meltdown

by Yoichi Shimatsu
Global Research (http://www.globalresearch.ca/), April 12, 2011
Fourth Media (China) (http://en.m4.cn/archives/7235.html) - 2011-04-11

Confused and often conflicting reports out of Fukushima 1 nuclear plant cannot be solely the result of tsunami-caused breakdowns, bungling or miscommunication. Inexplicable delays and half-baked explanations from Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) and the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) seem to be driven by some unspoken factor.
The smoke and mirrors at Fukushima 1 seem to obscure a steady purpose, an iron will and a grim task unknown to outsiders. The most logical explanation: The nuclear industry and government agencies are scrambling to prevent the discovery of atomic-bomb research facilities hidden inside Japan's civilian nuclear power plants.
A secret nuclear weapons program is a ghost in the machine, detectable only when the system of information control momentarily lapses or breaks down. A close look must be taken at the gap between the official account and unexpected events.
Conflicting Reports
TEPCO, Japan’s nuclear power operator, initially reported three reactors were operating at the time of the March 11 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami. Then a hydrogen explosion ripped Unit 3, run on plutonium-uranium mixed oxide (or MOX). Unit 6 immediately disappeared from the list of operational reactors, as highly lethal particles of plutonium billowed out of Unit 3. Plutonium is the stuff of smaller, more easily delivered warheads.

http://en.m4.cn/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/y_shimatsu_nuke_500x279-300x167.jpg (http://en.m4.cn/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/y_shimatsu_nuke_500x279.jpg)
A fire ignited inside the damaged housing of the Unit 4 reactor, reportedly due to overheating of spent uranium fuel rods in a dry cooling pool. But the size of the fire indicates that this reactor was running hot for some purpose other than electricity generation. Its omission from the list of electricity-generating operations raises the question of whether Unit 4 was being used to enrich uranium, the first step of the process leading to extraction of weapons-grade fissionable material.
The bloom of irradiated seawater across the Pacific comprises another piece of the puzzle, because its underground source is untraceable (or, perhaps, unmentionable). The flooded labyrinth of pipes, where the bodies of two missing nuclear workers—never before disclosed to the press— were found, could well contain the answer to the mystery: a lab that none dare name.
Political Warfare
In reaction to Prime Minister Naoto Kan's demand for prompt reporting of problems, the pro-nuclear lobby has closed ranks, fencing off and freezing out the prime minister's office from vital information. A grand alliance of nuclear proponents now includes TEPCO, plant designer General Electric, METI, the former ruling Liberal Democratic Party and, by all signs, the White House.
Cabinet ministers in charge of communication and national emergencies recently lambasted METI head Banri Kaeda for acting as both nuclear promoter and regulator in charge of the now-muzzled Nuclear and Industrial Safety Commission. TEPCO struck back quickly, blaming the prime minister's helicopter fly-over for delaying venting of volatile gases and thereby causing a blast at Reactor 2. For "health reasons,” TEPCO 's president retreated to a hospital ward, cutting Kan's line of communication with the company and undermining his site visit to Fukushima 1.
Kan is furthered hampered by his feud with Democratic Party rival Ichiro Ozawa, the only potential ally with the clout to challenge the formidable pro-nuclear coalition
The head of the Liberal Democrats, which sponsored nuclear power under its nearly 54-year tenure, has just held confidential talks with U.S. Ambassador John Roos, while President Barack Obama was making statements in support of new nuclear plants across the U.S.
Cut Off From Communications
The substance of undisclosed talks between Tokyo and Washington can be surmised from disruptions to my recent phone calls to a Japanese journalist colleague. While inside the radioactive hot zone, his roaming number was disconnected, along with the mobiles of nuclear workers at Fukushima 1 who are denied phone access to the outside world. The service suspension is not due to design flaws. When helping to prepare the Tohoku crisis response plan in 1996, my effort was directed at ensuring that mobile base stations have back-up power with fast recharge.
A subsequent phone call when my colleague returned to Tokyo went dead when I mentioned "GE.” That incident occurred on the day that GE’s CEO Jeff Immelt landed in Tokyo with a pledge to rebuild the Fukushima 1 nuclear plant. Such apparent eavesdropping is only possible if national phone carrier NTT is cooperating with the signals-intercepts program of the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA).
The Manchurian Deal
The chain of events behind this vast fabrication goes back many decades.
During the Japanese militarist occupation of northeast China in the 1930s, the puppet state of Manchukuo was carved out as a fully modern economic powerhouse to support overpopulated Japan and its military machine. A high-ranking economic planner named Nobusuke Kishi worked closely with then commander of the occupying Kanto division, known to the Chinese as the Kwantung Army, General Hideki Tojo.
Close ties between the military and colonial economists led to stunning technological achievements, including the prototype of a bullet train (or Shinkansen) and inception of Japan's atomic bomb project in northern Korea. When Tojo became Japan's wartime prime minister, Kishi served as his minister of commerce and economy, planning for total war on a global scale.
After Japan's defeat in 1945, both Tojo and Kishi were found guilty as Class-A war criminals, but Kishi evaded the gallows for reasons unknown—probably his usefulness to a war-ravaged nation. The scrawny economist’s conception of a centrally managed economy provided the blueprint for MITI (Ministry of International Trade and Industry), the predecessor of METI, which created the economic miracle that transformed postwar Japan into an economic superpower.
After clawing his way into the good graces of Cold Warrior John Foster Dulles, Eisenhower's secretary of state, Kishi was elected prime minister in 1957. His protégé Yasuhiro Nakasone, the former naval officer and future prime minister, spearheaded Japan's campaign to become a nuclear power under the cover of the Atomic Energy Basic Law.
American Complicity
Kishi secretly negotiated a deal with the White House to permit the U.S. military to store atomic bombs in Okinawa and Atsugi naval air station outside Tokyo. (Marine corporal Lee Harvey Oswald served as a guard inside Atsugi's underground warhead armory.) In exchange, the U.S. gave the nod for Japan to pursue a "civilian" nuclear program.
Secret diplomacy was required due to the overwhelming sentiment of the Japanese public against nuclear power in the wake of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings. Two years ago, a text of the secret agreement was unearthed by Katsuya Okada, foreign minister in the cabinet of the first Democratic Party prime minister, Yukio Hatoyama (who served for nine months from 2009-10).
Many key details were missing from this document, which had been locked inside the Foreign Ministry archives. Retired veteran diplomat Kazuhiko Togo disclosed that the more sensitive matters were contained in brief side letters, some of which were kept in a mansion frequented by Kishi's half-brother, the late Prime Minister Eisaku Sato (who served from 1964-72). Those most important diplomatic notes, Togo added, were removed and subsequently disappeared.
These revelations were considered a major issue in Japan, yet were largely ignored by the Western media. With the Fukushima nuclear plant going up in smoke, the world is now paying the price of that journalistic neglect.
On his 1959 visit to Britain, Kishi was flown by military helicopter to the Bradwell nuclear plant in Essex. The following year, the first draft of the U.S.-Japan security was signed, despite massive peace protests in Tokyo. Within a couple of years, the British firm GEC built Japan's first nuclear reactor at Tokaimura, Ibaragi Prefecture. At the same time, just after the 1964 Tokyo Olympics, the newly unveiled Shinkansen train gliding past Mount Fuji provided the perfect rationale for nuclear-sourced electricity.
Kishi uttered the famous statement that "nuclear weapons are not expressly prohibited" under the postwar Constitution's Article 9 prohibiting war-making powers. His words were repeated two years ago by his grandson, then Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. The ongoing North Korea "crisis" served as a pretext for this third-generation progeny of the political elite to float the idea of a nuclear-armed Japan. Many Japanese journalists and intelligence experts assume the secret program has sufficiently advanced for rapid assembly of a warhead arsenal and that underground tests at sub-critical levels have been conducted with small plutonium pellets.
Sabotaging Alternative Energy
The cynical attitude of the nuclear lobby extends far into the future, strangling at birth the Japanese archipelago's only viable source of alternative energy—offshore wind power. Despite decades of research, Japan has only 5 percent of the wind energy production of China, an economy (for the moment, anyway) of comparable size. Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, a nuclear-power partner of Westinghouse, manufactures wind turbines but only for the export market.
The Siberian high-pressure zone ensures a strong and steady wind flow over northern Japan, but the region's utility companies have not taken advantage of this natural energy resource. The reason is that TEPCO, based in Tokyo and controlling the largest energy market, acts much as a shogun over the nine regional power companies and the national grid. Its deep pockets influence high bureaucrats, publishers and politicians like Tokyo Governor Shintaro Ishihara, while nuclear ambitions keep the defense contractors and generals on its side. Yet TEPCO is not quite the top dog. Its senior partner in this mega-enterprise is Kishi's brainchild, METI.
The national test site for offshore wind is unfortunately not located in windswept Hokkaido or Niigata, but farther to the southeast, in Chiba Prefecture. Findings from these tests to decide the fate of wind energy won't be released until 2015. The sponsor of that slow-moving trial project is TEPCO.
Death of Deterrence
Meanwhile in 2009, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) issued a muted warning on Japan's heightened drive for a nuclear bomb— and promptly did nothing. The White House has to turn a blind eye to the radiation streaming through American skies or risk exposure of a blatant double standard on nuclear proliferation by an ally. Besides, Washington's quiet approval for a Japanese bomb doesn't quite sit well with the memory of either Pearl Harbor or Hiroshima.
In and of itself, a nuclear deterrence capability would be neither objectionable nor illegal— in the unlikely event that the majority of Japanese voted in favor of a constitutional amendment to Article 9. Legalized possession would require safety inspections, strict controls and transparency of the sort that could have hastened the Fukushima emergency response. Covert weapons development, in contrast, is rife with problems. In the event of an emergency, like the one happening at this moment, secrecy must be enforced at all cost— even if it means countless more hibakusha, or nuclear victims.
Instead of enabling a regional deterrence system and a return to great-power status, the Manchurian deal planted the time bombs now spewing radiation around the world. The nihilism at the heart of this nuclear threat to humanity lies not inside Fukushima 1, but within the national security mindset. The specter of self-destruction can be ended only with the abrogation of the U.S.-Japan security treaty, the root cause of the secrecy that fatally delayed the nuclear workers' fight against meltdown.

Yoichi Shimatsu who is Editor-at-large with the 4th Media is a Hong Kong–based environmental writer. He is the former editor of the Japan Times Weekly. This article is first appeared in the New American Media.

Peter Lemkin
04-13-2011, 04:44 PM
AMY GOODMAN: Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan tried Tuesday to calm fears about radiation levels and food safety in the region around the heavily damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant. His comments came after Japan raised the severity rating of its nuclear crisis to the highest possible level, heightening concerns about the magnitude of the disaster.

Speaking at a news conference to mark one month since the massive earthquake and tsunami devastated the northeastern coast of the country, Japanese Prime Minister Kan said produce from the region around the Fukushima plant is safe to eat despite radiation leaks.

PRIME MINISTER NAOTO KAN: [translated] From now on, people should not fall into an extreme self-restraint mood, and they should live life as normal. To consume products from the areas that have been affected is also a way in which to support the area. We should enjoy the use of such products and support the areas that have been affected. I ask you to do this.

AMY GOODMAN: A spokesperson for the International Atomic Energy Agency said the latest food sample data indicates levels of contamination are below the limits set by domestic authorities. Denis Flory, IAEA spokesperson, also said yesterday Japan’s nuclear crisis was not comparable to Chernobyl.

DENIS FLORY: The mechanics of the accidents are totally different. One happened when a reactor was at power, and the reactor containment exploded. In Fukushima, the reactor was stopped, and the containment, even if it may be somehow leaking today—and we do not know—the containment is here. So this is a totally different accident.

AMY GOODMAN: Japanese officials said they raised the severity level to 7 because of the total release of radiation at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant, not because of a sudden deterioration in the situation. The 1986 Chernobyl disaster is the only other nuclear accident rated at the highest level, 7, on a scale developed by the International Atomic Energy Agency to assess nuclear accidents. But officials insist so far the power plant in Japan has released one-tenth as much radioactive material as Chernobyl.

To discuss the situation in Japan, as well as his latest book, we’re joined by Dr. Michio Kaku, a Japanese American physicist, a bestselling author, professor of theoretical physics at City University of New York and the City College of New York. His brand new book is Physics of the Future: How Science Will Change Daily Life by 2100.

Welcome to Democracy Now! It’s great to see you again.

DR. MICHIO KAKU: Glad to be on the show, Amy.

AMY GOODMAN: So, talk about this raising of the category level to 7, on a par with Chernobyl.

DR. MICHIO KAKU: Well, Tokyo Electric has been in denial, trying to downplay the full impact of this nuclear accident. However, there’s a formula, a mathematical formula, by which you can determine what level this accident is. This accident has already released something on the order of 50,000 trillion becquerels of radiation. You do the math. That puts it right smack in the middle of a level 7 nuclear accident. Still, less than Chernobyl. However, radiation is continuing to leak out of the reactors. The situation is not stable at all. So, you’re looking at basically a ticking time bomb. It appears stable, but the slightest disturbance—a secondary earthquake, a pipe break, evacuation of the crew at Fukushima—could set off a full-scale meltdown at three nuclear power stations, far beyond what we saw at Chernobyl.

AMY GOODMAN: Talk about exactly—I mean, as a physicist, to explain to people—exactly what has taken place in Japan at these nuclear power plants.

DR. MICHIO KAKU: Think of driving a car, and the car all of a sudden lunges out of control. You hit the brakes. The brakes don’t work. That’s because the earthquake wiped out the safety systems in the first minute of the earthquake and tsunami. Then your radiator starts to heat up and explodes. That’s the hydrogen gas explosion. And then, to make it worse, the gas tank is heating up, and all of a sudden your whole car is going to be in flames. That’s the full-scale meltdown.

So what do you do? You drive the car into a river. That’s what the utility did by putting seawater, seawater from the Pacific Ocean, in a desperate attempt to keep water on top of the core. But then, seawater has salt in it, and that gums up your radiator. And so, what do you do? You call out the local firemen. And so, now you have these Japanese samurai warriors. They know that this is potentially a suicide mission. They’re coming in with hose water—hose water—trying to keep water over the melted nuclear reactor cores. So that’s the situation now. So, when the utility says that things are stable, it’s only stable in the sense that you’re dangling from a cliff hanging by your fingernails. And as the time goes by, each fingernail starts to crack. That’s the situation now.

AMY GOODMAN: What about the food, the level of contamination of the food? They are increasingly banning food exports.

DR. MICHIO KAKU: The tragedy is, this accident has released enormous quantities of iodine, radioactive iodine-131, into the atmosphere, like what happened at Chernobyl, about 10 percent the level of Chernobyl. Iodine is water soluble. When it rains, it gets into the soil. Cows then eat the vegetation, create milk, and then it winds up in the milk. Farmers are now dumping milk right on their farms, because it’s too radioactive. Foods have to be impounded in the area.

And let’s be blunt about this: would you buy food that says "Made in Chernobyl"? And the Japanese people are also saying, "Should I buy food that says 'Made in Fukushima'?" We’re talking about the collapse of the local economy. Just because the government tries to lowball all the numbers, downplay the severity of the accident, and that’s making it much worse.

AMY GOODMAN: What do you think has to be done now? I mean, one of the biggest problems is secrecy, both with the Tokyo company that runs the plants and also the government, the constant downplaying from the beginning. And yet, there are so many people who have been evacuated, who are demanding compensation. There was just a major protest at TEPCO with the people in the area who have been evaluated—no jobs, no money—saying, "We demand compensation."

DR. MICHIO KAKU: Well, TEPCO is like the little Dutch boy. All of a sudden we have cracks in the dike. You put a finger here, you put a finger there. And all of a sudden, new leaks start to occur, and they’re overwhelmed.

I suggest that they be removed from leadership entirely and be put as consultants. An international team of top physicists and engineers should take over, with the authority to use the Japanese military. I think the Japanese military is the only organization capable of bringing this raging accident under control. And that’s what Gorbachev did in 1986. He saw this flaming nuclear power station in Chernobyl. He called out the Red Air Force. He called out helicopters, tanks, armored personnel carriers, and buried the Chernobyl reactor in 5,000 tons of cement, sand and boric acid. That’s, of course, a last ditch effort. But I think the Japanese military should be called out.

AMY GOODMAN: To do...?

DR. MICHIO KAKU: Because of the fact that the radiation levels are so great, workers can only go in for perhaps 10 minutes, 15 minutes at a time, and they get their year’s dose of radiation. You’re there for one hour, and you have radiation sickness. You vomit. Your white corpuscle count goes down. Your hair falls out. You’re there for a day, and you get a lethal amount of radiation. At Chernobyl, there were 600,000 people mobilized, each one going in for just a few minutes, dumping sand, concrete, boric acid onto the reactor site. Each one got a medal. That’s what it took to bring one raging nuclear accident under control. And I think the utility here is simply outclassed and overwhelmed.

AMY GOODMAN: And yet, these workers are in for much longer periods of time.

DR. MICHIO KAKU: That’s right. And we don’t even know how much radiation levels they’re getting, because many areas around the site have no monitors. So we don’t even know how much radiation many of these workers are getting. And that’s why I’m saying, if you have access to the military, you can have the option of sandbagging the reactor, encasing it in concrete, or at least have a reserve of troops that can go in for brief periods of times and bring this monster under control.

AMY GOODMAN: What about the evacuation zone? Is it big enough?

DR. MICHIO KAKU: It’s pathetic. The United States government has already stated 50 miles for evacuating U.S. personnel. The French government has stated that all French people should consider leaving the entire islands. And here we are with a government talking about six miles, 10 miles, 12 miles. And the people there are wondering, "What’s going on with the government? I mean, why aren’t they telling us the truth?" Radiation levels are now rising 25 miles from the site, far beyond the evacuation zone. And remember that we could see an increase in leukemia. We could see an increase in thyroid cancers. That’s the inevitable consequence of releasing enormous quantities of iodine into the environment.

AMY GOODMAN: What has to happen to the plant ultimately?

DR. MICHIO KAKU: Well, in the best-case scenario—this is the scenario devised by the utility itself—they hope to bring it under control by the end of this year. By the end of this year, they hope to have the pumps working, and the reaction is finally stabilized by the end of this year.

AMY GOODMAN: Oddly, it’s sounding a little bit like BP when they were trying to plug up the hole.

DR. MICHIO KAKU: Right.

AMY GOODMAN: "It will happen. It will happen."

DR. MICHIO KAKU: They’re literally making it up as they go along. We’re in totally uncharted territories. You get any nuclear engineering book, look at the last chapter, and this scenario is not contained in the last chapter of any nuclear engineering textbook on the planet earth. So they’re making it up as they go along. And we are the guinea pigs for this science experiment that’s taking place. Then it could take up to 10 years, up to 10 years to finally dismantle the reactor. The last stage is entombment. This is now the official recommendation of Toshiba, that they entomb the reactor over a period of many years, similar to what happened in Chernobyl.

AMY GOODMAN: Entomb it in...?

DR. MICHIO KAKU: In a gigantic slab of concrete. You’re going to have to drill underneath to make sure that the core does not melt right into the ground table. And you’re going to put 5,000 tons of concrete and sand on top of the flaming reactor.

AMY GOODMAN: Should people be concerned about any food that says "From Japan"?

DR. MICHIO KAKU: Not from Japan. But remember, in the area, the sea, we’re talking about levels that are millions of times beyond legal levels found right there. However, as you start to get out further, radiation levels drop rather considerably.

AMY GOODMAN: I wanted to talk about policy in this country. I mean, we are now seeing happening in Japan this horrific event. Japan was the target of the dawn of the Nuclear Age, right?

DR. MICHIO KAKU: Mm-hmm.

AMY GOODMAN: The U.S. dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima, Nagasaki. Your own family mirrors the history of the Nuclear Age. Can you talk just briefly about that, before we talk about current U.S. policy?

DR. MICHIO KAKU: Yeah, first of all, I have relatives in Tokyo, and they’re wondering about evacuation. In fact, some of my relatives have already evacuated from Tokyo. They have little children. And radiation has already appeared in the drinking water in Tokyo. And so, people are wondering, you know, especially for young children, for pregnant women, should they leave. People are voting with their feet now. A lot of people are voluntarily evacuating from Tokyo, because they simply don’t believe the statements of the utility, which have consistently lowballed all the estimates of radiation damage.

AMY GOODMAN: And, though, in the past, in terms of your own family’s history, your parents, being interned in the Japanese American internment camps?

DR. MICHIO KAKU: That’s right. In California, my parents were interned in the relocation camps from 1942 to 1946, four years where they were put essentially behind barbed wire and machine guns, under the supervision of the United States military.

AMY GOODMAN: And yet, you became a nuclear physicist, interestingly enough, and you worked with the people who made the atomic bombs that were dropped on Japan.

DR. MICHIO KAKU: Yeah. In fact, my high school adviser was Edward Teller, the father of the hydrogen bomb. And he arranged for me to get a scholarship to Harvard, in fact, and that began my career as a nuclear scientist. And Edward Teller, of course, wanted me to work on the Star Wars program. He put a lot of pressure and said, "Look, we’ll give you fellowships, scholarships. Go to Los Alamos National Laboratory, Livermore National Laboratory. Design hydrogen bombs." But I said no. I said, "I cannot see my expertise being used to advance the cause of war."

AMY GOODMAN: And you’ve been very outspoken when it comes to nuclear power in the United States. This, of course, has raised major issues about nuclear power plants around the world, many countries saying they’re not moving forward. President Obama is taking the opposite position. He really is very much the nuclear renaissance man. He is talking about a nuclear renaissance and has not backed off, in fact reiterated, saying this will not stop us from building the first nuclear power plants in, what, decades.

DR. MICHIO KAKU: Well, there’s something called a Faustian bargain. Faust was this mythical figure who sold his soul to the devil for unlimited power. Now, the Japanese government has thrown the dice with a Faustian bargain. Japan has very little fossil fuel reserves, no hydroelectric power to speak of, and so they went nuclear. However, in the United States, we’re now poised, at this key juncture in history, where the government has to decide whether to go to the next generation of reactors. These are the so-called gas-cooled pebble bed reactors, which are safer than the current design, but they still melt down. The proponents of this new renaissance say that you can go out to dinner and basically have a leisurely conversation even as your reactor melts down. But it still melts. That’s the bottom line.

AMY GOODMAN: And so, what do you think should happen? Do you think nuclear power plants should be built in this country?

DR. MICHIO KAKU: I think there should be a national debate, a national debate about a potential moratorium. The American people have not been given the full truth, because, for example, right north of New York City, roughly 30 miles north of where we are right now, we have the Indian Point nuclear power plant, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has now admitted that of all the reactors prone to earthquakes, the one right next to New York City is number one on that list. And the government itself, back in 1980, estimated that property damage would be on the order of about $200 billion in case of an accident, in 1980 dollars, at the Indian Point nuclear power station.

AMY GOODMAN: No private corporation could even build a nuclear power plant: you have to have the taxpayers footing the bill.

DR. MICHIO KAKU: You have to have what is called the Price-Anderson Act, having the United States government guarantee the insurance. Nobody will guarantee—nobody will sell an insurance policy for a nuclear power plant, because who can afford a $200 billion accident? That’s why the United States government has underwritten the insurance for every nuclear power plant. So the Price-Anderson Act is an act of Congress that mandates the U.S. government, the taxpayers, will underwrite the insurance, because nuclear power stations are not insurable.

AMY GOODMAN: We’re talking to Dr. Michio Kaku. We’re going to go to break, and when we come back, we want to ask him about, well, his new book, Physics of the Future: How Science Will Change Daily Life by 2100. What would be a day in the life of the future? Is it possible that, oh, the internet can be in your contact lens, that cars will drive themselves? Just what we’ll ask Dr. Kaku when we come back. Stay with us.

Magda Hassan
04-16-2011, 12:48 PM
Meet The Nuclear Gypsies (http://whowhatwhy.com/2011/04/15/meet-the-nuclear-gypsies/)

By Russ Baker (http://whowhatwhy.com/author/russ-baker/) on Apr 15, 2011
http://whowhatwhy.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/workers1.png (http://whowhatwhy.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/workers1.png)

If you read our other (http://whowhatwhy.com/2011/04/12/japan-nukes-finally-what-about-the-workers/) piece about Japanese nuclear workers, and even if you didn’t, you will find this (http://articles.latimes.com/print/1999/dec/30/news/mn-49042) of interest. It’s from the Los Angeles Times, and was published way back in 1999. Here are excerpts:

Kunio Murai was a struggling farmer from the wrong side of the tracks when he was recruited to work as a day laborer in a nuclear power plant near this farm town. The pay was triple what he could make anywhere else, and he was told that the work would be janitorial.
One day in 1970, he and a co-worker were ordered into a room to mop up a leak of radioactive cooling water. They wore ordinary rubber gloves, but no masks or additional protection. Murai recalls wrapping a cleaning cloth around a pipe that was spewing steam. They worked for two hours, and afterward the needle on Murai’s radiation meter pointed off the scale.
“I thought it was broken,” Murai said. It wasn’t. Within six months, he said, his joints swelled painfully and his teeth and hair fell out.
Murai is one of tens of thousands of people who have worked over the years as subcontractors in Japanese nuclear power plants, doing the dirty, difficult and potentially dangerous jobs shunned by regular employees.
In the wake of Japan’s worst nuclear accident, a nuclear fission reaction Sept. 30 [1999] at a uranium processing plant in Tokaimura, ugly allegations have surfaced of labor abuses, lackadaisical attitudes toward safety, inadequate worker training and lax enforcement by regulators in the country’s nuclear industry.
Workers at the JCO Co. plant in Tokaimura, about 80 miles northeast of Tokyo, were mixing uranium by hand in stainless steel buckets to save time. The ensuing nuclear reaction exposed as many as 150 people to radiation, according to the final report issued this month by Japan’s Nuclear Safety Commission. One worker died from a lethal dose of radiation, and another remains hospitalized.
Keep in mind this story was published in 1999, when Japan’s “worst nuclear accident” exposed 150 people to radiation. How far we have come….

From his hospital bed, at least one worker, a regular employee who was supposed to have undergone safety training, told investigators he had no idea that what he was doing was dangerous. But plant officials later admitted that they did know–and had created an illegal operations manual ordering the hand-mixing to save time and money.
The revelations shocked the public but did not surprise Murai, who tells horrifying tales of his brief stint in the Tsuruga nuclear power plant. And it did not surprise anti-nuclear activists, who allege that several thousand day laborers–no one knows exactly how many–continue to be recruited each year by the small subcontractors that supply manual labor for nuclear power plants.
Some allegedly are hired by shady labor brokers who drive trucks to the skid rows of Tokyo, Yokohama and Osaka, offering $100 for a day’s work. The takers are drifters, the down-and-out, or foreigners willing to do whatever it takes to earn quick yen.
Government, Union Deny Knowledge
Government and union officials say they have no knowledge of such goings-on. They insist that Japan’s nuclear power plants are clean, safe and well regulated.
But public trust in such statements had begun to erode even before the accident. Five nuclear-related accidents and mishaps and several failed cover-ups have occurred since 1995.
Again, remember—this would be just between 1995 and 1999, when this article appeared.

And officials concede that supervision has been inadequate at nuclear facilities other than power plants, such as fuel reprocessing plants and laboratories. Those facilities were presumed to be safe before the Tokaimura accident.
After the accident, Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi ordered an inspection of all such facilities, and the results made fresh and frightening headlines:25 serious violations were found at nine locations. Lapses included improper handling of radioactive material and failure to conduct proper safety training, perform required medical checkups and report radiation exposure.
The Nuclear Safety Commission later recommended that Japan abandon its long-held attitude that nuclear power is “absolutely safe” and take stringent measures to prevent future accidents.
But activists also want the government to investigate the system of subcontracting for manual labor in nuclear power facilities–a system that they allege is discriminatory and dangerous.
You will note from our other piece that the subcontracting system has remained the norm.

The elite engineers and highly skilled unionized workers at the top of the labor pyramid, who work for the blue-chip giants that build and operate Japanese nuclear power plants, are carefully monitored and protected from radiation exposure.
However, the majority of nuclear plant workers are employed by subcontractors or their subcontractors, an arrangement that allows big corporations to avoid major layoffs of their own people in hard times. Critics say this system diffuses accountability, makes it impossible to keep tabs on the health of workers and places responsibility for safety with smaller, less visible and financially weaker companies.
The workers at the bottom of the socioeconomic food chain–including those allegedly hired by the day from skid rows–receive the least safety education and the highest radiation doses.
According to data from Japan’s Nuclear Safety Commission, of the 71,376 Japanese who are employed in the nuclear power industry, 63,420, or almost 89%, work for subcontractors. It is these employees who receive more than 90% of all radiation exposure.
Moreover, the casual laborers included among those subcontractor employees have scant legal protection, activists charge. Andhistorically, they have received little or no compensation when accidents or illnesses occur.
“Nuclear labor in Japan is a human rights problem,” charged photojournalist and author Kenji Higuchi, a nuclear foe who has spent 27 years documenting alleged safety abuses. “The whole system is based on discrimination. There are a lot of people right now who are doing the same jobs as Murai-san did.
“When you go inside a nuclear power plant, it means you are going to be exposed to radiation,” he said. “You are paid to be exposed.”….
…some casual workers are beyond caring about exposure, according to Higuchi. Because day laborers are usually fired as soon as they reach their legal radiation limit, some try to conceal their true exposure; others try hiring on at other plants under false names, he said. They’ve even been given a nickname: “nuclear gypsies.”
…Murai’s story about life at the bottom of the nuclear labor pyramid shed an eerie light on industry practices that are under fresh scrutiny since the Tokaimura incident.
He recalls taking part in what amounted to radiation relay races. One by one, workers would run into a “hot” room for just five or six seconds each, turn a screw or perform another brief task and then rush back out, he said. A plant employee armed with a clipboard and a whistle made sure no one stayed in too long.
Workers were supposed to dispose of the rubber gloves used while cleaning up radiation but thought that a terrible waste. They sneaked the gloves home for their wives to use when washing dishes or working in the fields, Murai said.
“I hear things have gotten stricter since my day, but I’m not too sure,” said Murai, now 66. “When I read the newspapers about Tokaimura, I get the impression that things haven’t changed much in the last 30 years.”
Others say overall safety standards have improved–but someone still has to do the radioactive dirty work.
Murai, a burakumin, or descendant of the outcast class in Japan, said these days the hired hands in nuclear power plants are no longer farmers. Rather, he said, they include Koreans–some of whom reportedly lack proper visas and thus are in no position to quit or complain–along with Brazilian immigrants of Japanese ancestry and others living on the economic margins.
…In an unusually combative question-and-answer session in parliament in October, Okazaki grilled a Labor Ministry official about allegations made by former power plant worker Norio Hirai, who died of lung cancer in 1996.
Hirai was an engineer for a subcontractor who went inside reactors to supervise his workers. Before he died, Hirai alleged that nuclear plant workers slept through their required safety training videos; that many were so uneducated that they stripped off their masks or other protective gear when working in the fierce heat of the reactors; and that nuclear gypsies and men who already have had children were routinely given the most dangerous jobs.
The debate is not just about safety but also about the degree to which regulators have allowed the nuclear industry to operate on what amounts to the honor system. Regulators hadn’t set foot inside the uranium processing plant in Tokaimura in 10 years….
That was the view a little over a decade ago. How much have things improved, one wonders?
http://whowhatwhy.com/2011/04/15/meet-the-nuclear-gypsies/

Peter Lemkin
04-16-2011, 01:23 PM
Gives new meaning to 'Kamakazi' (for hire)....ah, corporate capitalism....the bane of humanity [while sold by the corporate capitalist public relations establishments as the 'solution']. If Corporate Capitalism and this self-demolition of the Planet and its very soul and essence by the few to the detriment of the many doesn't end soon [I'm talking here less than a decade!]...the Planet and all life on it is 'finito'...

Jan Klimkowski
04-16-2011, 07:43 PM
And this little curiosity via Zero Hedge, denied and probably not true, but....



An Odd Directive From The Chinese Ministry Of Truth: "Delete All Rumors Of Japan Elites Emigrating To Hainan Island"

Submitted by Tyler Durden on 04/15/2011 13:46 -0400

While we were scouring the latest directives disclosed by the Chinese Ministry of Truth, conveniently leaked on a weekly basis by the China Digital Times, we encountered this oddity:


State Council Information Office: Plans for Japanese to Immigrate to Hainan Island, China

April 2, 2011

From the Ninth Bureau of the State Council Information Office: All websites are asked to monitor interactive spaces and immediately delete rumors similar to the following: “Breaking news: Japanese elites discussing plan to emigrate to Hainan Island, China.”

Questions arise: why is China so focused on removing any trace of this rumor? Is it because it is false (probably not the smartest thing, as anyone disseminating it would merely discredit themselves)? Or, perhaps, because it is true?

Pushing the scales to the opinion that it could well be the latter is Bloomberg's report that following massive economic leaks well in advance of Chinese data release (most recently presented on Zero Hedge), "those responsible will be punished."

(snip)

And for those curious, here is an interesting tangent on just what Hainan Island is from Xinhua:


HAIKOU, April 10 (Xinhua) -- Hainan, an island province in southern China, is planning to develop six uninhabited islands this year, according to local official sources.

"The islands are to be developed as tourist sites," said Zhao Zhongshe, head of the Department of Ocean and Fisheries of Hainan Province, stressing that no real estate projects will be developed on the islands.

An island census carried out in the 1980s showed that China had more than 6,500 uninhabited islands, or 93.8 percent of the total number of islands. The results of an ongoing island census will be released this year.

From 2003 to 2005, a frenzy of island development swept China's coastal areas, but was later called off by the central government over conservation concerns.

On March 1 last year China promulgated the "Law on Island Protection", which allows for the development of uninhabited islands with the approval of provincial governments or the State Council.

Under the law, new development projects on uninhabited islands will be subject to strict environmental impact assessments.

However, such development has stirred controversy among those concerned about the difficulty of protecting the islands.

According to Duan Deyu, vice director of the Ocean and Fisheries Bureau of the tourist city of Sanya in Hainan Province, divers destroyed and stole the coral, and tourists spoiled the vegetation of scenic spots.

"We had inspections, but it was hard to control since there are so many tourists," Duan said.

"The uninhabited islands are scattered around and protecting them could be even harder," he added.

An unnamed official in charge of the development of the Wuzhizhou Island, one of six islands set for development, warned of economic risks for investors.

"Enough money and a thorough plan are necessary to build service facilities," he said.

http://www.zerohedge.com/article/odd-directive-chinese-ministry-truth-delete-all-rumors-japan-elites-emigrating-hainan-island

Peter Lemkin
04-17-2011, 08:57 AM
Newly released video of the damage to the reactor buildings is STUNNING and proof that this damage was being HIDDEN from the public before now! It is on the internet. If I find a url, I'll post. I saw it on Al Jazeera English. The destruction from the hydrogen explosions and all that went before is horrendous! They also mentioned that more highly radioactive water is being put in the ocean. I'm sure there continues to be lots of radioactive particles in the air, as well...but they seem to have stopped talking about them. Out of sight, out of mind.....:banghead:

Oh, yes,......almost forgot....their spokesman said they thought they'd have the facility 'under control' in about 9 months....ha ha ha ha:rofl:

Christer Forslund
04-20-2011, 07:02 PM
The Fukushima Nuclear Disaster: What Happened on "Day One"?

by Yoichi Shimatsu

http://globalresearch.ca/coverStoryPictures2/24364.jpg Global Research (http://www.globalresearch.ca/), April 16, 2011


On the first day of the Fukushima disaster, Tepco reported that reactors 1, 2 and 6 were operating at the time of the quake and tsunami, and that the other 3 reactors were empty of fuel rods for periodic maintenance. 1, 2 and 6 were designed by GE, old model Mark-1.
Then reactor 3 blows and burns, and without any correction to the first report, Tepco then says 1, 2 and 3 were operating and the others were down. No. 3, which is run on plutonium-uranium MOX fuel, was built by Toshiba. (no. 5 is also a Toshiba) Toshiba has an international partnership with Westinghouse to build nuclear plants. The leak from No.3 accounted then for the reports of leaked plutonium.
Then reactor 4 building catches on fire, due to a dry cooling pool for spent rods. No..4 is built by Hitachi, which has a partnership with GE to build nuclear plants and also currently develop a laser (plasma) separation process for plutonium extraction.
The fire is so extreme (for depleted uranium) that the reactor is damaged. This suggests that reactor 4 was also internally damaged, meaning that it was operating at time of the tsunami, in an unscheduled run for either of two purposes: offline electrical generation for some reason inside Fukushima 1; or for a controlled reaction aimed at reprocessing (neutron enrichment) of spent fuel rods to increase their fissile uranium content (prior to extraction).
Next, reactors 4 and 5 are found to be generating hydrogen gas.
H gas is produced when the fission process, which releases electrons as well as neutrons, splits water molecules, H20, into hydrogen, supercharged oxygen and some hydroxyl radicals. The presence of a gas build-up indicates that these two reactors contain fuel rods, contrary to Tepco claims. This means reactors 4 and 5 had recently conducted runs or were being prepared for operations of an undetermined (and unreported) nature.
The other technical mystery is that Tepco engineers suggested that the electric power inside the plant was knocked out by something other than the tsunami. I have pointed to this possibility early on, that the quake and control disruptions could have made the control computers vulnerable to the Stuxnet virus.
The other possibility to consider is that a high-power electromagnetic event (for example a sudden energy burst from the released of ionized gases from the de-magnetized laser-plasma process) could have knocked out all electrical systems, similar to how a neutron bomb would incapacitate power system.
Very little of this information was recorded in newspaper reports, but came as nearly inadvertent admissions during the minute-by-minute televised coverage of the disaster by NHK.
The other major mystery is the one-minute blackout of NHK World News at the mention of the fire and plant shutdown at the Onagawa nuclear plant in Miyagi Prefecture.

Yoichi Shimatsu is a frequent contributor to Global Research.
Global Research Articles by Yoichi Shimatsu (http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=listByAuthor&authorFirst=Yoichi&authorName=Shimatsu)

Keith Millea
04-25-2011, 05:10 PM
April 25, 2011
On the Danger of a Killer Earthquake in the Japanese Archipelago

The Nuclear Disaster That Could Destroy Japan ... and the World

By HIROSE TAKASHI
Translated by Doug Lummis
The nuclear power plants in Japan are ageing rapidly; like cyborgs, they are barely kept in operation by a continuous replacement of parts. And now that Japan has entered a period of earthquake activity and a major accident could happen at any time, the people live in constant state of anxiety.


Seismologists and geologists agree that, after some fifty years of seismic inactivity, with the 1995 Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake (Southern Hyogo Prefecture Earthquake), the country has entered a period of seismic activity. In 2004, the Chuetsu Earthquake hit Niigata Prefecture, doing damage to the village of Yamakoshi. Three years later, in 2007, the Chuetsu Offshore Earthquake severely damaged the nuclear reactors at Kashiwazaki-Kariwa. In 2008, there was an earthquake in Iwate and Miyagi Prefectures, causing a whole mountain to disappear completely. Then in 2009 the Hamaoka nuclear plant was put in a state of emergency by the Suruga Bay Earthquake. And now, in 2011, we have the 3/11 earthquake offshore from the northeast coast. But the period of seismic activity is expected to continue for decades. From the perspective of seismology, a space of 10 or 15 years is but a moment in time.

Because the Pacific Plate, the largest of the plates that envelop the earth, is in motion, I had predicted that there would be major earthquakes all over the world.
And as I had feared, after the Suruga Bay Earthquake of August 2009 came as a triple shock, it was followed in September and October by earthquakes off Samoa, Sumatra, and Vanuatu, of magnitudes between 7.6 and 8.2. That means three to eleven times the force of the Southern Hyogo Prefecture Earthquake.

http://www.counterpunch.org/PacPlateQuakeMap.jpg

All of these quakes occurred around the Pacific Plate as the center, and each was located at the boundary of either that plate or a plate under its influence. Then in the following year, 2010, in January there came the Haiti Earthquake, at the boundary of the Caribbean Plate, pushed by the Pacific and Coco Plates, then in February the huge 8.8 magnitude earthquake offshore from Chile. I was praying that this world scale series of earthquakes would come to an end, but the movement of the Pacific Plate shows no sign of stopping, and led in 2011 to the 3/11 Earthquake in northeastern Japan and the subsequent meltdown at the Fukushima power plant.

There are large seismic faults, capable of producing earthquakes at the 7 or 8 magnitude level, near each of Japan’s nuclear plants, including the reprocessing plant at Rokkasho. It is hard to believe that there is any nuclear plant that would not be damaged by a magnitude 8 earthquake.

A representative case is the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant itself, where it has become clear that the fault under the sea nearby also extends inland. The Rokkasho plant, where the nuclear waste (death ash) from all the nuclear plants in Japan is collected, is located on land under which the Pacific Plate and the North American Plate meet. That is, the plate that is the greatest danger to the Rokkasho plant, is now in motion deep beneath Japan.

The Rokkasho plant was originally built with the very low earthquake resistance factor of 375 gals. (Translator’s note: The gal, or galileo, is a unit used to measure peak ground acceleration during earthquakes. Unlike the scales measuring an earthquake’s general intensity, it measures actual ground motion in particular locations.) Today its resistance factor has been raised to only 450 gals, despite the fact that recently in Japan earthquakes registering over 2000 gals have been occurring one after another. Worse, the Shimokita Peninsula is an extremely fragile geologic formation that was at the bottom of the sea as recently as the sea rise of the Jomon period (the Flandrian Transgression) 5000 years ago; if an earthquake occurred there it could be completely destroyed.

The Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant is where expended nuclear fuel from all of Japan’s nuclear power plants is collected, and then reprocessed so as to separate out the plutonium, the uranium, and the remaining highly radioactive liquid waste. In short, it is the most dangerous factory in the world.

At the Rokkasho plant, 240 cubic meters of radioactive liquid waste are now stored. A failure to take care of this properly could lead to a nuclear catastrophe surpassing the meltdown of a reactor. This liquid waste continuously generates heat, and must be constantly cooled. But if an earthquake were to damage the cooling pipes or cut off the electricity, the liquid would begin to boil. According to an analysis prepared by the German nuclear industry, an explosion of this facility could expose persons within a 100 kilometer radius from the plant to radiation 10 to 100 times the lethal level, which presumably means instant death.

On April 7, just one month after the 3/11 earthquake in northeastern Japan, there was a large aftershock. At the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant the electricity was shut off. The pool containing nuclear fuel and the radioactive liquid waste were (barely) cooled down by the emergency generators, meaning that Japan was brought to the brink of destruction. But the Japanese media, as usual, paid this almost no notice.

Hirose Takashi has written a whole shelf full of books, mostly on the nuclear power industry and the military-industrial complex. Probably his best known book is Nuclear Power Plants for Tokyo in which he took the logic of the nuke promoters to its logical conclusion: if you are so sure that they're safe, why not build them in the center of the city, instead of hundreds of miles away where you lose half the electricity in the wires?

Douglas Lummis is a political scientist living in Okinawa and the author of Radical Democracy (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0801431697/counterpunchmaga). Lummis can be reached at ideaspeddler@gmail.com

http://www.counterpunch.org/

Christer Forslund
04-25-2011, 07:51 PM
Really scary!
That the nuke promotors and financial elites behind the faulty nuclear and reprocessing plants' safety do not care if the world populace, food and environment become radiated to lethal levels. (Instant death in these cases may be a blessing...)
I know that power and profits rule, and I am not surprised at these people's ruthlessness. But what I cannot possibly understand is, how they think they will be able to avoid the lethal radiation themselves!?

Magda Hassan
04-26-2011, 02:32 AM
Yes, it is scary Christer because these people are not at all rational. They have a completely different mental world and have never had to deal with reality.

Peter Lemkin
04-26-2011, 05:13 AM
Really scary!
That the nuke promotors and financial elites behind the faulty nuclear and reprocessing plants' safety do not care if the world populace, food and environment become radiated to lethal levels. (Instant death in these cases may be a blessing...)
I know that power and profits rule, and I am not surprised at these people's ruthlessness. But what I cannot possibly understand is, how they think they will be able to avoid the lethal radiation themselves!?

This same class, and in some cases the same people, feel the same about environmental pollution, toxins, destruction, global climate change, et al. The live rich and 'high on a hill' overlooking the serfs below...thinking they will avoid the common air, water, fate....etc. Denial, arrogance of power and money, the lack of any altruism, and greed - with a hefty sprinkling of other negative traits.....Such have caused the downfall of other civilizations. This one will be the final act for humans if we don't get rid of this ruling class and take over the helm ourselves....a Global mutiny or I fear the worst. Remember that some of this 'crowd' of non-thinkers even thought they could survive an all-out nuclear war and built their fallout shelters accordingly. Money and power corrupts the mind as much as the 'heart'.

Magda Hassan
04-26-2011, 11:50 AM
Something Odd Is Happening at Reactor Number 4

http://www.zerohedge.com/sites/default/files/pictures/picture-7813.jpg
Submitted by George Washington (http://www.zerohedge.com/users/george-washington) on 04/25/2011 13:39 -0400



Nuclear Power (http://www.zerohedge.com/taxonomy_vtn/term/11901)




NHK reports (http://www3.nhk.or.jp/daily/english/25_12.html?play):

The operator of the troubled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant is carefully monitoring the situation at the Number 4 spent fuel pool, where the water temperature is rising despite increased injections of cooling water.

Tokyo Electric Power Company, or TEPCO, says it will inject 210 tons of water into the pool on Monday, after finding on Sunday evening that the temperature in the pool had risen to 81 degrees Celsius.

***

On Friday, TEPCO found that the pool's temperature had reached 91 degrees, so it began injecting 2 to 3 times the amount of water.

***

The Number 4 spent fuel pool stores 1,535 fuel rods, the most at the nuclear complex.
(Bear in mind that the amount of radioactive fuel at Fukushima dwarfs Chernobyl (http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2011/03/amount-of-radioactive-fuel-at-fukushima.html).)
As I noted (http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2011/04/update-on-japans-nuclear-crisis.html) on April 2nd:

Nuclear engineer Arnie Gundersen notes that the spent fuel rods in reactor number 4 have no water, and the rods are exposed:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D6DZQzY_k2c&feature=player_embedded
In addition, the official Japanese atomic energy websiteshows (http://atmc.jp/plant/rad/?n=4) 4,250 sieverts/hour of radiation inside the containment vessel at reactor 4 ("S/C" stands for (http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=ja&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fatmc.jp%2Fplant%2Frad%2F%3Fn%3D4)su ppression chamber):
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-voGsdLdejpA/TbW6HzMZV3I/AAAAAAAAAv8/2eTZw2XHs2Q/s320/Clipboard02.jpg (http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-voGsdLdejpA/TbW6HzMZV3I/AAAAAAAAAv8/2eTZw2XHs2Q/s1600/Clipboard02.jpg)
These are very high levels of radiation. As I noted (http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2011/04/was-fukushima-reactor-damaged-in.html) on April 10:

Radiation levels were apparently about 300sieverts per hour (http://xkcd.com/radiation/) ... right after Chernobyl exploded.To be clear, the Chernobyl figure is radiation released into the environment, while the reactor 4 figure is radiation within the containment vessel. I have seen no evidence to date that reactor 4 is leaking.
This is especially odd given that reactor 4 was supposedly shut down prior to the earthquake (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-12745186) for maintenance. In other words, reactor 4 was - according to official reports - shut down, and shouldn't have very much radiation at all. Something doesn't add up.
In contrast, the radiation inside the cores of the other reactors are much lower:


Reactor 1: 0 (http://atmc.jp/plant/rad/?n=1)



Reactor 2: 26.3 (http://atmc.jp/plant/rad/?n=2)



Reactor 3: 11.1 (http://atmc.jp/plant/rad/?n=3)



Reactor 5: 0 (http://atmc.jp/plant/rad/?n=5)



Reactor 6: 0 (http://atmc.jp/plant/rad/?n=6)

Indeed, the Japanese nuclear agency prominently displays the radiation data for all of the reactors except number 4 on it's main page. Number 4 is conspicuously absent (http://atmc.jp/plant/container/?), and you have to type in the url for the correct web page to find it (http://atmc.jp/plant/rad/?n=4).
The building housing reactor 4 doesn't seem to be quite as badly damaged as those housing other reactors:

http://www.zerohedge.com/article/sites/default/files/images/user5/imageroot/bernanke/Fukushima_high_res_4-1-2011_2-46-31_PM.jpg (http://www.zerohedge.com/article/sites/default/files/images/user5/imageroot/bernanke/Fukushima_high_res_4-1-2011_2-46-31_PM.jpg)
However, a Fukushima engineer says he helped cover up acracked containment vessel (http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-03-23/fukushima-engineer-says-he-covered-up-flaw-at-shut-reactor.html) at reactor number 4 for decades.
On the other hand, the fact that no radiation is being reported in the drywell of reactor 4 (noted by "D/W" in the nuclear agency's tables) - while there it is for several of the other reactors - might imply that the containment vessel has maintained its stability.
At this point, I don't have enough information to determine why the radiation levels inside reactor 4 are so high compared to the other reactors, let alone what it means. It might mean that reactor 4 is in trouble. On the other hand, it could mean that reactor number 4 is the only reactor which still has core integrity. In other words, maybe the other reactor cores have much lower radioactive levels because most of the radiation has already leaked out.
http://www.zerohedge.com/article/something-odd-happening-reactor-number-4

Peter Lemkin
04-26-2011, 12:41 PM
Happy 25th Anniversary of Chernobyl today! Hard to say why that reactor spent fuel pool is a greater problem,......as they ain't tellin' much...but I could speculate that the cladding of zirconium has reacted and been lost; that the salt in the salt water [so long used for cooling] could have corroded metal and/or deposited out - leaving it difficult for the water to circulate; and many other things are possible. That whole plant is a literal time-bomb!....for an EVEN larger disaster than the large disaster now. NB - that level of radiation given in the article, alone, is alarming!!!

Magda Hassan
04-27-2011, 09:06 AM
Crowdsourcing Japan's radiation levels
A group of motivated individuals have come together to create a community approach to gathering radiation data in Japan.
D. Parvaz (http://english.aljazeera.net/profile/d-parvaz.html) Last Modified: 26 Apr 2011 13:44






http://english.aljazeera.net/mritems/Images/2011/4/23/2011423172833133876_20.jpgTEPCO executives bow to evacuees in Koriyama to apologise for the accident at their company's Fukushima plant [AFP]There is a certain element of helplessness to living in northeast Japan right now.
It isn't just dealing with the images
– and reality
– of the large-scale catastrophe in the wake of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami
It's not even the electrical outages, the disrupted train services or the very real fear that another big earthquake
– one as massive as the magnitude 9.0 temblor that wiped out entire coastal communities
– is imminent.
It's the fear of radiation, invisible, odourless and potentially deadly, leaking out of the damaged Fukushima Daiichi plant and entering their bodies via contaminated air, food and water.
The only way to get any peace of mind is to get accurate, timely information on radiation levels (which can also fluctuate) and therein, as the Bard would say, lies the rub, because said information is far from accessible.
http://english.aljazeera.net/mritems/imagecache/218/330/mritems/Images/2011/4/25/2011425163212364846_20.jpgTEPCO released a rather visually complicated map of radiation zones within the Daiichi plant on NHK state TV
Toshikatsu Watanabe, who lives in Koriyama, around 60km away from the damaged plant, is worried and didn't "expect he would ever be at risk".
Watanabe said he has "respect for the local government", but said the national government didn't "provide enough information".
So concerned are people about radiation that Watanabe said he feels conspicuous when he drives his car
– with its Fukushima license plates
– to neighbouring prefectures. No one says anything to him, but he knows what they're thinking: That he might live in a contaminated zone.
Further disconcerting is what Watanabe said he's observed
– people coming up from Tokyo, taking measurements and leaving.
"But they leave without sharing what they've learnt
– we don't know what they've found, they don't share the data with us," said Watanabe.
The elements of anger and mistrust (http://english.aljazeera.net/news/asia-pacific/2011/04/20114128414871401.html), aimed at the national government and the company operating the unstable nuclear plant, is wearing at the fabric of Japanese society
– one based on keeping calm and maintaining the wa (or harmony).
To that end, various groups are posting radiation measurements, but despite best intentions, the information is piecemeal and not exactly easy to understand.
Given that radiation levels 1,600 times higher than normal levels have been detected about 20km from the plant, the zone in which the Japanese government on Friday formally advised residents to leave due to threat of long-term radiation, it's clear that need for clear and plentiful information is as urgent.
More info = Better info
The disaster in Japan has kicked all sorts of activists into high gear
– volunteers helping people clear out their tsunami-battered homes, green energy proponents picketing the offices of Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO) and a bunch of DYI-ers who are roaming Japan with hand-made Geiger counters (a hand-held device used to measureradiation (http://english.aljazeera.net/indepth/spotlight/japan/2011/03/201132464127410510.html)), recording radiation levels. You read that last part correctly.
http://english.aljazeera.net/mritems/imagecache/218/330/mritems/Images/2011/3/15/2011315165716625148_20.jpg (http://english.aljazeera.net/indepth/spotlight/japan/) "We were getting frustrated with what was being reported in the media, what was being released by TEPCO, what was being released by the government," said Sean Bonner, co-founder of Safecast.org (http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1038658656/rdtnorg-radiation-detection-hardware-network-in-ja), which is currently partially self-funded, partially funded via a Kickstarter (http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1038658656/rdtnorg-radiation-detection-hardware-network-in-ja) fundraiser.
"The information was just kind of unreliable, not updated frequently, no way to fact-check it... So, we just started thinking: What happens if we go get numbers ourselves? Like, is that an option?"
Apparently so.
Out of thin air, a group of folks based in the US and Japan created a network that distributes Geiger counters to teams of people who record radiation levels in a consistent manner and upload it all to the Safecast site.
Mapped out with radiation readings gathered from other sources, Bonner said Safecast hopes to "paint a more reliable picture of what was going on".
Safecast currently has around 30 Geiger counters out in the field, they have ordered the parts to build another 300, and Bonner said their plan is to have 600 units collecting data within six months.
While he wishes for a shorter timeline, the fact is, Geiger counters are in demand at the moment.
"If we wanted to buy 600 right this minute, we couldn't do it."
Real and present danger
Perhaps the Safecast project might sound a little crazy and ill-advised (a ragtag group of techies zigzagging around the area around a nuclear disaster some have compared to Chernobyl). But the outcome is pretty empowering.
Bonner said that one of the members of HackerSpace (http://www.tokyohackerspace.org/en), a collective involved with Safecast, has family just outside the initial evacuation zone in Fukushima Prefecture.
"They were told that the their area was safe, and so the guys from Tokyo HackerSpace took a Geiger counter and drove up there," said Bonner.
"And they're farmers, organic farmers, and they're in this area that they were told was okay, but the numbers were off the charts
– they were high. And then 10 days later, that area was evacuated as well."
Watanabe, himself in the advertising business, also said that he appreciates the additional data for that very reason.
http://english.aljazeera.net/mritems/imagecache/218/330/mritems/Images/2011/4/25/2011425174729263987_20.jpgSafecast measures radiation on Geiger counters - this one taken at a school 60 km away from the nuclear plant
"The farmers are very worried about their crops
– they want to sell produce and get the economy going, but currently, because there's no data or no system to check, they can't export their goods the way they used to."
Another highly vulnerable group are pregnant women, such as Rie Knowles, who lives in Tokyo. Told she should not drink tap water
– at least for a time
– and not much else, Knowles, who was in her 26th week of pregnancy when the earthquake hit, was left to seek information hither and thither.
"Most of the information I received was from TV and web discussion boards," said Knowles.
"There was also a lot of keitai (cellphone) e-mail from friends circulating rumours. We started to notice that there was bad information going around that way after about 2 days, but by then the TV information had improved."
But then, information reported was also confusing, and most people, including Knowles, who were not sure how worried they should be when they heard that radiation levels in a particular area was 10 times the normal levels.
The general sense people have is that "the information we are given is not the whole picture. Many times we see TEPCO say 'there is no evidence of X', only to find out later that it is because they have not done any checking for X," said Knowles.
In her 32nd week of pregnancy at the time of this interview, Knowles said she's checking Safecast for radiation readings allows her to "relax a little", although she's still avoiding vegetables and milk while sticking to bottled water, which remains in short supply.
The power of the crowd
While Safecast takes pains to make clear that it in no way is trying to undermine the efforts of the Japanese government in terms of trying to keep a handle on radiation levels, it's also quite clear that if all was well, their project would not be needed.
"The measurements that the government gives, we don't know what they measure or how it's measured, if you don't have that information, it's very difficult to put it into context," said Pieter Franken, the Japan representative for Safecast.
"We don't even know if they're measuring inside or outside the building."
Franken also points out that many of the experts offering analysis on the topic of radiation seem to give contradictory information.
"It's a highly politicised topic," said Franken.
Yet, people need to know if where they're living and what they're eating is safe. While Fukushima Prefecture is doing what it can
– giving hourly updates for 35 different points of the prefecture, Franken points out that there are around 800 elementary schools in the prefecture.
"The idea is to use the power of the crowd to get lots of data points," said Franken.
"The quality will sort itself out, as we get a much bigger sample size."
http://english.aljazeera.net/news/asia/2011/04/201142317359479927.html

Ed Jewett
04-27-2011, 05:07 PM
Independent scientist Leuren Moret, whose 2004 landmark article in the Japan Times [see http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/fl20040523x2.html unmasked lies and distortions by government and company officials that led to the construction of nuclear power plants in seismically dangerous areas, has declared in an exclusive 65-minute video interview [ see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5WxmeOqYtB0&feature=player_embedded ] with Alfred Lambremont Webre that the “Japan earthquake and “accidents” at the Fukushima’s 6 nuclear power plant units starting March 11, 2011 are in fact deliberate acts of tectonic nuclear warfare, carried out against the populations and ecology of Japan and the nations of the Northern Hemisphere, including the U.S., Canada, and Mexico.

You can read a summary of the Alfred Lambremont Webre’s interview with Lauren Moret by clicking here.

http://aircrap.org/scientist-leuren-moret-japan-earthquake-nuclear-accident-tectonic-nuclear-warfare/331159/

In parallel: http://truth11.com/2011/03/24/haarp-japan-scientist-leuren-moret-japan-earthquake-and-nuclear-“accident”-are-tectonic-nuclear-warfare-video-japan-not-natural-earthquake-initiated-by-external-energy/

See also especially http://www.whale.to/a/moret_h.html which is an extended grouping of links.

http://www.suesupriano.com/audio/LeurenMoret.mp3

Ed Jewett
04-29-2011, 03:49 AM
Chernobyl: Consequences of the catastrophe 25 years later
28-04-2011

by Janette D. Sherman, M.D., and Alexey V. Yablokov, Ph.D.

Editor’s note: The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists asked Dr. Sherman, recognized worldwide for her expertise on Chernobyl, to write this article last year, then rejected it just before deadline, probably considering it too alarming. In it, she reports the widespread expectation of another nuclear power plant failure and the catastrophic consequences. Now, a few months later, the world commemorates the 25th anniversary of Chernobyl while watching the Fukushima meltdown.


http://therearenosunglasses.wordpress.com/2011/04/28/chernobyl-consequences-of-the-catastrophe-25-years-later/

Jan Klimkowski
04-30-2011, 09:16 PM
So, what's really going on?


Radiation adviser to Kan to quit over gov't nuke crisis response

TOKYO (Kyodo) -- An adviser to Prime Minister Naoto Kan on the nuclear crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant told the prime minister's office Friday he will resign in protest over what he called the government's impromptu handling of the crisis.

"The government has belittled laws and taken measures only for the present moment, resulting in delays in bringing the situation under control," Toshiso Kosako, professor on antiradiation safety measures at the University of Tokyo's graduate school, told a news conference.

After the March 11 quake and tsunami triggered the country's worst nuclear accident, Kosako assumed the post on March 16 with the duty of advising Kan on matters related to nuclear power plants and radiation.

It is extremely rare for an intellectual adviser appointed by the prime minister to resign in protest at measures the government has taken.

He told the news conference at the Diet building it is problematic for the government to have delayed the release of forecasts on the spread of radiation from the Fukushima plant, done by the Nuclear Safety Technology Center's computer system, called the System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information, or SPEEDI.

He also blasted the government for hiking the upper limit for emergency workers seeking to bring the crippled plant under control to 250 millisieverts from 100 millisieverts after the crisis broke out.

"The prime minister's office and administrative organizations have made impromptu policy decisions, like playing a whack-a-mole game, ignoring proper procedures," the radiation expert said.

He also urged the government to stiffen guidelines on upper limits on radiation levels the education ministry recently announced as allowable levels for primary school grounds in Fukushima Prefecture, where the radiation-leaking plant is located.

The guidelines announced by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology "are inconsistent with internationally commonsensical figures and they were determined by the administration to serve its interests," he said.

(Mainichi Japan) April 30, 2011

http://mdn.mainichi.jp/mdnnews/news/20110430p2g00m0dm018000c.html

Magda Hassan
05-01-2011, 05:51 AM
A vote of no confidence in the government.

Peter Lemkin
05-01-2011, 08:13 AM
50 uS/hr as seen on the meter above a few posts at 60km is a very high level for that distance! Radiation can be very patchy, but it is a very ominous sign!!!! The Japanese officials are not informing the Public with the facts. I hear that some have taken it upon themselves to go around, take radiation readings and are posting them on a few websites; trying to create a radiation map. Radiation meters in Japan are worth more than gold and almost impossible to obtain now.....not surprisingly. If I lived there, I'd want two.

Jan Klimkowski
05-01-2011, 05:41 PM
Meanwhile, the Bank of Japan is printing at a ridiculous and, of course, completely unsustainable and unrepayable, rate.

Via Zero Hedge (http://www.zerohedge.com/article/japan-resumes-hyprintspeed-part-1-look-bojs-current-and-future-quantitative-easing):


While it will not surprise anyone that Japan, which for the past 3 decades has been a monetary policy basket case caught in what bankers like calling a deflationary spiral (yet which others like Sean Corrigan merely define as prices re-indexing to a fair value absent endless cheap credit crutches), has constantly had to resort to a record loose monetary policy coupled with endless episodes of quantitative easing, some may not know that over the past month Japan has seen its current account balance swell by $250 billion, or nearly half the entire Fed QE2 monetization mandate. And as the BOJ continues to disclose the full extent of the Japanese economic devastation following March 11, we are confident that very soon the most recent episode of Japanese “printing” will surpass the $600 billion that the Fed is injecting into the US economy (in addition to the roughly $250 billion in Treasury bonds monetized by the BOJ each year): an amount roughly 5 times greater than America's when expressed as a ratio of GDP. It is thus no surprise then that Bernanke does not seem too concerned with the purported end of QE – after all money printing is merely moving from developed world point A to developed world point B. And thanks to monetary linkages of “globalization” all this brand new money will once again find its way into speculative assets, and thus, Fed mandate #3 favorite - Russell 2000. Below we provide a closer look at what exactly the current and future, Japanese QEasing will look like.


The latest projections from the Japanese Finance Ministry regarding the fiscal year which started on April 1 make for sobering reading. They say that Japan’s “public” (funded) debt will probably rise by 5.8 percent this year - to 997.7 TRILLION Yen ($US 12.2 TRILLION at current exchange rates). Should these projections be even slightly on the optimistic side - and government financial projections always are - then Japan could easily be looking at a public debt of 1,000 TRILLION Yen by March 31, 2012.

There is another way of expressing 1,000 TRILLION. It is the same as ONE QUADRILLION.

The sheer magnitude of these numbers has long been a talking point for the watchers of international finance. Now, they are becoming very nervous indeed. The OECD has recently “urged” the Japanese government to “do something” about their deficits, especially in the wake of the earthquake disaster. Noting that Japanese sovereign debt is about to hit 204 percent of GDP, they suggested that Japan’s current sales tax be “at least” doubled from its present 5 percent to 10 percent. The Japanese Foreign Ministry politely declined to comment on this suggestion, contenting themselves with assuring the OECD that - “We will continue to work to maintain and secure trust in Japanese government bonds.”

At this, a line from Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead comes to mind: "Eternity's a terrible thought. I mean, where's it all going to end?" While this has been mostly a rhetorical question over the ages, G7 central planners are set to provide a definitive answer very soon.

(and people worry about the "bubble" in precious metals)

http://www.zerohedge.com/article/japan-resumes-hyprintspeed-part-2-here-comes-one-quadrillion

Jan Klimkowski
05-01-2011, 06:31 PM
The article below claims to be a translation of comments by Michio Ishikawa, who is "a strong proponent for the nuclear power generation and the nuclear industry", made on Japanese TV.

If correct, and combined with the comments from the advisor to the Japanese PM (in post #125above), it suggests that Japanese nuclear insiders know that the situation at Fukushima is far more dangerous than is being openly acknowledged, that TEPCO's current measures cannot contain the radiation, and that a catastrophe is imminent unless Japan effectively adopts a war footing to "bury" the Fukushima contamination.


Saturday, April 30, 2011
#Fukushima I Nuke Plant: Ishikawa of JNTI Talks about Reactor Core Conditions

More on 77-year-old Michio Ishikawa of the Japan Nuclear Technology Institute on the situation at Fukushima I Nuke Plant, as he appeared on Asahi TV on April 29.

A Todai as-hole though he may be, I started to like this guy as I watched. He didn't mince his words, and said what they are doing at Fukushima I Nuke Plant is not working. That surprised some, including the host of the show, as Ishikawa is known as a strong proponent for the nuclear power generation and the nuclear industry.

I watched the segment (video No.2 out of 11) where he discussed the situation at Fukushima I Nuke Plant, particularly about the condition of the reactor core.

Here's what I'd add to the snippets on my previous post. (My summary translation of what Mr. Ishikawa said, not literal; my comment in square bracket):

About TEPCO's "roadmap:

"I believe what they are trying to achieve after 9 months is to cool the reactor cores and solidify them so that no radioactive materials can escape. But they are just doing peripheral tricks like water entombment and nitrogen gas injection. Nitrogen gas, it's dangerous, by the way.

"What they must do is to cool the reactor cores, and there's no way around it. It has to be done somehow."

About the condition of the reactor cores:

"I believe the fuel rods are completely melted. They may already have escaped the pressure vessel. Yes, they say 55% or 30%, but I believe they are all melted down. When the fuel rods melt, they melt from the middle part on down.

(Showing the diagram) "I think the temperature inside the melted core is 2000 degrees to 2000 and several hundred degrees Celsius. A crust has formed on the surface where the water hits. Decay heat is 2000 to 3000 kilowatts, and through the cracks on the crust the radioactive materials (mostly noble gas and iodine) are escaping into the air.

"Volatile gas has almost all escaped from the reactor by now.

"The water [inside the pressure vessel] is highly contaminated with uranium, plutonium, cesium, cobalt, in the concentration we've never seen before.

"My old colleague contacted me and shared his calculation with me. At the decay heat of 2000 kilowatt... There's a substance called cobalt 60. Highly radioactive, needs 1 to 1.5 meter thick shields. It kills people at 1000 curies. He calculated that there are 10 million curies of cobalt-60 in the reactor core. If 10% of cobalt-60 in the core dissolve into water, it's 1 million curies."

[He's an old-timer so he's used to curie instead of becquerel as a unit. 1 curie equals 3.7 x 10^10 becquerels (37,000,000,000 becquerels or 37 gigabecquerels).
10 million curies equals 370,000 terabecquerels, and 1 million curies equals 37,000 terabecquerels. I used this conversion table. Tell me I'm wrong! Cobalt-60 alone would make a Level 7 disaster...]

"They (TEPCO) want to circulate this highly contaminated water to cool the reactor core. Even if they are able to set up the circulation system, it will be a very difficult task to shield the radiation. It will be a very difficult work to build the system, but it has to be done.

"It is imperative to know the current condition of the reactor cores. It is my assumption [that the cores have melted], but wait one day, and we have water more contaminated with radioactive materials. This is a war, and we need to build a "bridgehead" at the reactor itself instead of fooling around with the turbine buildings or transporting contaminated water."

[As Ishikawa explains, a notable opponent of nuclear power, Tetsunari Iida (executive director of the Institute of Sustainable Energy Policy and Kyoto University graduate majoring in nuclear science) nods in deep agreement.]

About "war" at Fukushima I Nuke Plant:

"Take the debris clean-up job for example. They are picking up the debris and putting them in containers, as if this is the peacetime normal operation. This is a war. They should dig a hole somewhere and bury the radioactive debris and clean up later. What's important is to clear the site, using the emergency measures. Build a bridgehead to the reactor.

"The line of command is not clear, whether it is the government, TEPCO, or Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency.

"Look squarely at the reactors and find out the true situation. [Trying to do something with] the turbine buildings is nothing but a caricature [a joke, a manga, a diversion]."

The show's host says "But wait a minute, Mr. Ishikawa, you are a proponent of nuclear power and we expected to hear from you that everything is going well at Fukushima..."

Mr. Ishikawa answers, "Well, if I'm allowed to tell a lie..."

Now, Mr. Tetsunari Iida speaks, agreeing to Mr. Ishikawa's "war" analogy:

"I totally agree with Mr. Ishikawa's assessment of the plant, and that this is a war. The government simply orders TEPCO to "do it". But it is like the Imperial General Headquarters (大本営) on the eve of the Sea of Japan Naval Battle during the Russo-Japanese War [in 1905] ordering merchant ship TEPCO to attack [the imperial Russian navy].

"The government should appoint a commander. TEPCO has a limit as a private business. No one knows what to do. We have to seek the advice from the best and the brightest in the world."

Mr. Hasegawa of Chunichi Shinbun jumps in, and says "We took the numbers from the government like 30% core melt as true, and went from there. But then Mr. Ishikawa says it's a total melt."

Then, Kohei Otsuka, the Vice Minister of Health and Welfare and politician from the ruling party (DPJ), sitting right next to Mr. Ishikawa, butts in, and warns everyone:

"Since none of us knows for sure the condition of the reactor cores, we shouldn't speculate on a national TV."

Mr. Hasegawa overrides the politician, and says "The real problem is that what no one knows is presented to us every day as if it is a fact, like 30% core melt in the chart."

Hahahahahahahahaha.

I wish Mr. Ishikawa had punched the light-weight politician in the face. At least he should have laughed at him.

http://ex-skf.blogspot.com/2011/04/fukushima-i-nuke-plant-ishikawa-of-jnti.html

Magda Hassan
05-10-2011, 10:52 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dxbm7iJTT8U
Visually, Reactor No. 4 'leaning to the right' --4 reactors all still emitting 'significant amounts of radiation into the environment' --Radioactive sludge in sewage system in nearby city 10 May 2011 In a release of information tonight, the Japanese government has confirmed that work was started yesterday to 'shore up the structure of the building,' and 'specifically the upper floor.' Spent fuel pool is kept in Reactor No. 4. Fuel rods from three to four reactors are stored in No. 4, and 'this part of the building is beginning to lean.' Because of the explosion of Reactor No. 3, there are some questions about the structural integrity of the building of Reactor No. 4. (Video, RT interview with Dr. Robert Jacobs, Hiroshima Peace Institute)

Peter Lemkin
05-11-2011, 05:33 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dxbm7iJTT8U
Visually, Reactor No. 4 'leaning to the right' --4 reactors all still emitting 'significant amounts of radiation into the environment' --Radioactive sludge in sewage system in nearby city 10 May 2011 In a release of information tonight, the Japanese government has confirmed that work was started yesterday to 'shore up the structure of the building,' and 'specifically the upper floor.' Spent fuel pool is kept in Reactor No. 4. Fuel rods from three to four reactors are stored in No. 4, and 'this part of the building is beginning to lean.' Because of the explosion of Reactor No. 3, there are some questions about the structural integrity of the building of Reactor No. 4. (Video, RT interview with Dr. Robert Jacobs, Hiroshima Peace Institute)

An interesting development.....yes, potentially the most dangerous building - as it has, by far, the most nuclear material in it. Sadly, the construction 'technique' in the Mark I GE reactor buildings was to put the 'spent' fuel rods in tanks of water ABOVE the reactors [near the top of the building]....so if it tilts or falls over, it is this tank [containing all the spent fuel rods from all six reactors for all the years of operation] that will come a 'tumblin' down or at best leak the cooling water, with all of its highly radioactive substances in it. This monster is far from dead!...

Ed Jewett
05-13-2011, 12:47 AM
FUKUSHIMA REACTOR 1: FULL MELTDOWN, REACTOR VESSEL BREACHED

May 13th, 2011

Via: Reuters:
http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/05/12/us-japan-nuclear-reactor-idUSTRE74B1H520110512

One of the reactors at Japan’s crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant has a hole in its main vessel following a meltdown of fuel rods, leading to a leakage of radioactive water, its operator said on Thursday.

The disclosure by Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO) is the latest indication that the disaster was worse than previously disclosed, making it more difficult to stabilize the plant.

Based on the amount of water that is remaining around the partially melted and collapsed fuel, Matsumoto estimated that the pressure vessel had developed a hole of several centimeters in diameter.

The finding makes it likely that at one point in the immediate wake of the disaster the 4-meter-high stack of uranium-rich rods at the core of the reactor had been entirely exposed to the air, he said. Boiling water reactors like those at Fukushima rely on water as both a coolant and a barrier to radiation.

U.S. nuclear experts said that the company may have to build a concrete wall around the unit because of the breach, and that this could now take years.
“If it is assumed the fuel did melt through the reactor, then the most likely solution is to encapsulate the entire unit. This may include constructing a concrete wall around the unit and building a protective cover over it,” W. Gene Corley, senior vice president of CTL Group in Skokie, Illinois, said on Thursday.
“Because of the high radiation that would be present if this has happened, the construction will take many months and may stretch into years,” Corley said.
TEPCO should consider digging a trench around reactors 1-3 all the way down to the bedrock, which is about 50 feet below the surface, said Arnie Gundersen, Chief Engineer at Fairewinds Associates Inc of Burlington, Vermont, who once worked on reactors of similar design to the Fukushima plant.

He said this should be filled with zeolite, which can absorb radioactive cesium to stop more poisons from leaking into the groundwater around the plant.

“TEPCO seems to be going backwards in getting the situation under control and things may well be slowly eroding with all the units having problems,” said Tom Clements with Friends of the Earth, a U.S.-based environmental group.

“At this point, TEPCO still finds itself in unchartered waters and is not able to carry out any plan to get the situation under control,” he said.
Posted in Atrocities, Collapse, Energy, Environment |

http://cryptogon.com/?p=22313

Ed Jewett
05-13-2011, 02:08 AM
Norwegian Institute for Air Research: Radiation Forecasts on the ‘Zardoz’ Subdomain

May 13th, 2011
Via: Dutchsinse YouTube Channel:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=haMePBnkJhY&feature=player_embedded#at=166

(watch at full screen if possible)

http://cryptogon.com/?p=22317

Ed Jewett
05-13-2011, 02:14 AM
The Fukushima Nuclear Disaster in Perspective

by Dr. Helen Caldicott

http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=24730

r. Helen Caldicott's March 18th press conference in Montreal, sponsored by the Centre for Research non Globalization (CRG)

Our thanks to Felton Davis for the transcription from the GRTV Video recording and for the annotations.


This press conference organized by Globla Research was held in the context of Helen Caldicott's public lecture to Montreal on March 18, 2011.

First I want to present this report, produced by the New York Academy of Sciences, a report on Chernobyl. It can be downloaded.(2) They translated 5,000 articles from Russian for the first time into English. It seems that nearly a million people have already died as a result of Chernobyl, despite what the WH0(3) says and the IAEA.(4) This is one of the most monstrous cover-ups in the history of medicine. Because everybody should know about this.

Then we extrapolate through to Japan. Japan is by orders of magnitude many times worse than Chernobyl. Never in my life did I think that six nuclear reactors would be at risk.(5) I knew that three GE engineers who helped design these Mark I GE reactors, resigned because they knew they were dangerous.(6)

So Japan built them on an earthquake fault. The reactors partially withstood the earthquake, but the external electricity supply was cut off, and the electricity supplies the cooling water, a million gallons a minute, to each of those six reactors. Without the cooling water, the water [level] falls, and the rods are so hot they melt, like at Three Mile Island, and at Chernobyl.

So the emergency diesel generators, which are as large as a house, got destroyed by the tsunami, so there is no way to keep the water circulating in the reactors.(7) Also, on the roofs of the reactors, not within the containment vessel, are cooling pools. Every year they remove about thirty tons of the most radioactive rods that you can possibly imagine.(8) Each one is twelve feet long and half an inch thick. It gives out so much radiation, that if you stand next to it for a couple of minutes, you'll die. Not drop dead. Remember Litvinenko, the Russian, who got poisoned by polonium?(9) You'll die like that, with your hair falling out, and bleeding with massive infection, like AIDS patients die.

And [the spent fuel rods] are thermally hot, so they have to be put in a big pool, and continually cooled. The pool has really no roof.

There have been three hydrogen explosions, blowing off the roof of the building, not the containment vessel of the core, but the roof. And exposing the cooling pool.(10) Two of the cooling pools are dry. They have no water in them. Meaning that the nuclear fuel rods are covered with a material called zirconium. When zirconium is exposed to air, it burns, it ignites. Two of the cooling pools at this moment are burning. In the cooling pools are many times, like 10 to 20 times more radiation than in each reactor core. In each reactor core is as much long-lived radiation as would be produced by a thousand Hiroshima-sized bombs. We are dealing with diabolical energy.

E=MC2 is the energy that blows up nuclear bombs. Einstein said nuclear power is a hell of a way to boil water.(11) Because that is all nuclear power is used for, to boil water through the massive heat, turn it into steam, and turn a turbine which generates electricity.

Now when you fission uranium, 200 new elements are formed, all of which are much more poisonous to the body than the original uranium.(12) Although uranium is pretty poisonous. America used it in Fallujah, and in Baghdad. And in Fallujah, 80 per cent of the babies being born are grossly deformed.(13) They're being born without brains, single eyes, no arms... The doctors have told the women to stop having babies. The incidence of childhood cancer has gone up about twelve times. This is genocide -- it's a nuclear war being conducted in Iraq. The uranium that they're using lasts more than 4.5 billion years. So we're contaminating the cradle of civilization. "The coalition of the willing!"

In the nuclear power plants, however, there is a huge amount of radiation: two hundred elements. Some last seconds, some last millions of years. Radioactive iodine lasts six weeks, causes thyroid cancer. That's why people are saying, "Better take potassium iodide," because that blocks the thyroid uptake of radioactive iodine, which later can cause thyroid cancer.

In Chernobyl, over 20,000 people have developed thyroid cancer.(14) They have their thyroids out, and they will die unless they take thyroid replacement every day, like a diabetic has to take insulin.
Strontium-90 will get out, it lasts for 600 years. It goes to the bone, where it causes bone cancer or leukemia. Cesium lasts for 600 years -- it's all over Europe. 40 per cent of Europe is still radioactive. Turkish food is extremely radioactive. Do not buy Turkish dried apricots, or Turkish hazelnuts. The Turks were so cross with the Russians, they sent all their radioactive tea over to Russia after Chernobyl.(15)

Forty per cent of Europe is still radioactive. Farms in Britain, their lambs are so full of cesium they can't sell them. Don’t eat European food.

But that's nothing compared to what's happening now. One of the most deadly [nuclear byproducts] is plutonium, named after Pluto, god of the underworld. One millionth of a gram, if you inhale it, would give you cancer. Hypothetically, one pound of plutonium if evenly distributed could give everyone on earth cancer. Each reactor has 250 kilograms of plutonium in it. You only need 2.5 kilograms to make an atomic bomb, because plutonium is what they make bombs with.

So any country that has a reactor, works with your uranium. You [Canada] are the biggest exporter of uranium in the world.(16) Canada sells two things: it sells wheat for life, and uranium for death. Plutonium is going to get out and spread all over the northern hemisphere. It's already heading towards North America now.

Radioactive iodine, plus strontium, plus cesium, plus tritium, and I could go on and on and on. When it rains, downs come fallout, and it concentrates in food. If it gets into the sea, the algae concentrate it, hundreds of times. And the crustaceans concentrate it, hundreds of times. And then the little fish, then the big fish, then us.(17)

Because we stand on the apex of the food chain. You can't taste these radioactive food elements, you can't see them, you can't smell them. They're silent. When you get them inside your body, you don't suddenly drop dead of cancer, it takes five to sixty years to get your cancer, and when you feel a lump in your breast, it doesn't say, "I was made by some strontium-90 in a piece of fish you ate twenty years ago."

All radiation is damaging. It's cumulative -- each dose you get adds to your risk of getting cancer. The americium is more dangerous than plutonium -- I could go on and on. Depends if it rains if you're going to get it or not. If it rains and the radiation comes down, don't grow food, and don't eat the food, and I mean don't eat it for 600 years.

Radioactive waste from nuclear power is going to be buried, I hear, next to Lake Ontario. It's going to leak, last for millions of years, it's going to get into the water, and into the food chains. Radioactive waste will induce epidemics of cancer, leukemia, and genetic disease for the rest of time. This is the greatest public health hazard the world has ever witnessed, apart from the threat every day of nuclear war.

Einstein said "the splitting of the atom changed everything, save man's mode of thinking" -- very profound -- "and thus we drift toward unparalleled catastrophe." We are arrogant, we have a lot of hubris, and I think the reptilian mid-brain of some men's brains is pathological.(18)

We are in a situation where we have harnessed the energy of the sun. It is totally out of control. And there's simply nothing we can do about it.

NOTES

1) Helen Caldicott is the founder of Physicians for Social Responsibility, and is the author of "The New Nuclear Danger" (The New Press, 2002).

2) "Chernobyl: Consequences of the Catastrophe For the People and the Environment," Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
http://www.nyas.org/publications/annals/Detail.aspx?cid=f3f3bd16-51ba-4d7b-a086-753f44b3bfc1

3) "Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accident," World Health Organization. http://www-ns.iaea.org/appraisals/chernobyl.asp

4) "Consequences of the Chernobyl Nuclear Accident," International Atomic Energy Agency. http://www-ns.iaea.org/appraisals/chernobyl.asp

5) For a general description of the complex, including cross-sections of the six reactors, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fukushima_I_nuclear_accidents

6) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GE_Three
Excerpt: On February 2, 1976, Gregory C. Minor, Richard B. Hubbard, and Dale G. Bridenbaugh "blew the whistle" on safety problems at nuclear power plants. The three engineers gained the attention of journalists and their disclosures about the threats of nuclear power had a significant impact. They timed their statements to coincide with their resignations from responsible positions in General Electric's nuclear energy division, and later established themselves as consultants on the nuclear power industry for state governments, federal agencies, and overseas governments.

7) "Japanese Scramble to Avert Meltdowns as Nuclear Crisis Deepens After Quake," New York Times, March 12, 2011, By HIROKO TABUCHI and MATTHEW L. WALD

8) The design manual for General Electric boiling water reactors was posted as a PDF document on the "What Really Happened" website, and can be downloaded at: http://whatreallyhappened.com/content/ge-manual-bwr6-reactor-design-and-operation

9) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poisoning_of_Alexander_Litvinenko
Excerpt: Alexander Litvinenko was a former officer of the Russian Federal Security Service, FSB and KGB, who escaped prosecution in Russia and received political asylum in the United Kingdom. He wrote two books, "Blowing up Russia: Terror from within" and "Lubyanka Criminal Group", where he accused the Russian secret services of staging Russian apartment bombings and other terrorism acts to bring Vladimir Putin to power. On 1 November 2006, Litvinenko suddenly fell ill and was hospitalized. He died three weeks later, becoming the first confirmed victim of lethal polonium-210-induced acute radiation syndrome. According to doctors, "Litvinenko's murder represents an ominous landmark: the beginning of an era of nuclear terrorism". Litvinenko's allegations about the misdeeds of the FSB and his public deathbed accusations that Russian president Vladimir Putin were behind his unusual malady resulted in worldwide media coverage.

10) "Greater Danger Lies in Spent Fuel Than in Reactors,"
Keith Bradsher & Hiroko Tabuchi, NY Times, March 17, 2011
www.nytimes.com/2011/03/18/world/asia/18spent.html

"Radiation Spread Seen; Frantic Repairs Go On,"
David Sanger & William J. Broad, NY Times, March 17, 2011
www.nytimes.com/2011/03/18/world/asia/18intel.html

"U.S. Sees Array of New Threats at Japan’s Nuclear Plant,"
James Glanz & William J. Broad, NY Times, April 6, 2011
www.nytimes.com/2011/04/06/world/asia/06nuclear.html

"Focus on preventing explosions at Japan nuke plant,"
Mari Yamaguchi, Associated Press, April 6, 2011
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110406/ap_on_bi_ge/as_japan_earthquake_654

11) http://wisequotes.org/nuclear-power-is-one-hell-of-a-way-to-boil-water

12) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decay_product

13) "US Accused of Using Poison Gases in Fallujah,"
Democracy Now, Monday, November 29th, 2004
http://www.democracynow.org/2004/11/29/u_s_accused_of_using_poison

"Evidence of Extensive War Crimes, Unprecedented
in the annals of legal history," Niloufer Bhagwat,
Global Research, December 11, 2004
http://globalresearch.ca/articles/BHA412A.html

"Depleted Uranium Weapons: Dead Babies in Iraq and Afghanistan Are No Joke," by Dave Lindorff, Global Research, October 20, 2009
http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=15744

"The consequences of a US war crime:
Cancer rate in Fallujah worse than Hiroshima,"
Tom Eley, World Socialist, July 23, 2010
http://www.wsws.org/articles/2010/jul2010/fall-j23.shtml

"Research Links Rise in Fallujah Birth Defects and Cancers to US Assault," Martin Chulov, The Guardian/UK, December 31, 2010
http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2010/12/31

14) "Chernobyl's Continuing Thyroid Impact,"
By Mary Shomon, December 15, 2003
http://thyroid.about.com/cs/nuclearexposure/a/chernob.htm

15) "Authorities lied on impact of Chernobyl in Turkey,"
Greenpeace Report
http://www.blackraiser.com/cherno.htm

16) WISE Report on the Worldwide Uranium Market
http://www.wise-uranium.org/umkt.html

"Why is Uranium Important to Canada?"
Canadian Nuclear Association,
http://www.cna.ca/english/pdf/nuclearfacts/04-NuclearFacts-uranium.pdf

17) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bioaccumulation

18) http://www.crystalinks.com/reptilianbrain.html

Ed Jewett
05-13-2011, 03:15 AM
THURSDAY, MAY 12, 2011

Simulation Shows High Levels of Radiation Hitting the West in May

The Norwegian Institute for Air Research (Nilo) ran models and forecasts of the radioactive fallout from the Japanese nuclear accident for some time. Nilo has stopped providing such forecasts to the public.

However, Alexander Higgins discovered an internal page of Nilo's website showing high levels of radioactive iodine 131:

(Click for larger image). [See below.]

Because this comes from an internal - rather than publicly-released - portion of Nilo's website, it cannot be confirmed that these are real readings, as opposed to some sort of fictitious simulation. In other words, I can't tell if this is bad news ... or some Norwegian scientist's video game.

But given that the readings show high levels of radiation hitting much of the West this month, that the EPA has suspended all but routine radiation monitoring, that American states aren't really monitoring, that Canada has drastically slashed the amount of monitoring it is doing, and that the situation in Japan is worse than the Japanese have previously admitted, I had to post this information ... with appropriate caveats.

http://zardoz.nilu.no/%7Eflexpart/fpinteractive/plots/tracer_h_2019.gif



http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2011/05/simulation-shows-high-levels-of.html

Jonathan Mark
05-13-2011, 07:40 PM
Flyby News (http://www.flybynews.com/)
Editor - Jonathan Mark
13 May, 2011 - Overbearing Critical Breaking News - Fukushima (http://www.flybynews.com/cgi-local/newspro/viewnews.cgi?newsid1305295678,1584,)

Editor's Notes: The latest news on the meltdown from Japan nuclear disaster is suppressed by the overwhelming policies destroying our world. Please take action to help stop new nuclear power development. But, also, to reverse such a collapse we are confronting, the events of September 11, 2001 must resurface to expose the cover-up and worse crimes against humanity.



CRITICAL BREAKING NEWS

12 May 2011 - BBC News - Asia-Pacific
Setbacks at Japan nuclear plant (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-13374153)

Take Action - Million FAX March Action Page
Stop All New Nuclear Power Development (http://www.peaceteam.net/action/pnum1077.php)

In first 3 minutes, watch
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Video clip produced by Robert Bowman (http://thepatriots.us/)

RememberBuilding7.org (http://rememberbuilding7.org/)

April, 2009 - The Open Chemical Physics Journal
Active Thermitic Material Discovered in Dust (http://www.bentham-open.org/pages/content.php?TOCPJ/2009/00000002/00000001/7TOCPJ.SGM)
from the 9/11 World Trade Center Catastrophe (http://www.bentham-open.org/pages/content.php?TOCPJ/2009/00000002/00000001/7TOCPJ.SGM)

Press Release ~ Scholars for 9/11 Truth and Justice (http://www.stj911.org/press_releases/ActiveThermiticMaterial.html)

10 May 2011 - 911blogger - Prof. Steven Jones
Responses to questions regarding thermite, nanothermite (http://911blogger.com/news/2011-05-10/responses-questions-regarding-thermite-nanothermite-and-conventional-explosives-used-wtc-destruction)
and conventional explosives used in the WTC destruction. (http://911blogger.com/news/2011-05-10/responses-questions-regarding-thermite-nanothermite-and-conventional-explosives-used-wtc-destruction)

24 January, 2011 - Rock Creek Free Press (http://rockcreekfreepress.com/) - Lynn Margulis
Two Hit, Three Down, The Biggest Lie (http://rockcreekfreepress.tumblr.com/post/353434420/two-hit-three-down-the-biggest-lie)
National Academy of Science member and
Distinguished Professor endorses David
Ray Griffin exposing truth of 9/11.

18 April 2011 - NoLiesRadio - Kevin Barrett
David Ray Griffin is back! (http://truthjihadradio.blogspot.com/2011/04/david-ray-griffin-is-back.html)
Radio program archived here! (http://noliesradio.org/archives/category/archived-shows/kevin-barrett-show)

04 May 2011 - InfoWars - Steve Pieczenik (http://www.stevepieczenik.com/home.html)
Government Insider: Bin Laden (http://www.infowars.com/top-us-government-insider-bin-laden-died-in-2001-911-a-false-flag/)
Died In 2001, 9/11 A False Flag (http://www.infowars.com/top-us-government-insider-bin-laden-died-in-2001-911-a-false-flag/)

02 May 2011 - Global Research - Larry Chin
Obama's "Big Lie": White House Propaganda (http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=24594)
and the "Death" of Osama bin Laden (http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=24594)

02 May 2011 - AP - 911blogger
Destruction of 9/11 Evidence Continues; (http://911blogger.com/news/2011-05-02/destruction-911-evidence-continues-bin-laden-body-dumped-sea)
Bin Laden Body Dumped at Sea (http://911blogger.com/news/2011-05-02/destruction-911-evidence-continues-bin-laden-body-dumped-sea)

2009 - Google Books - David Ray Griffin
Osama bin Laden: dead or alive? (http://books.google.com/books?id=Xb9v0ucRJAEC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Osama+bin+laden+griffin&source=bl&ots=_oor6qTkWQ&sig=i7AVmdKY8mNXikHtnDZdvDBUjvM&hl=en&ei=pI2-TerVMaPY0QH12PnQBQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CCIQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=dead&f=false)

25 April 2011 - The Guardian - Common Dreams
WIKILEAKS Lift Lid on (http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2011/04/25-1)
Gitmo's Nefarious History (http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2011/04/25-1)

27 April 2011 - Cageprisoners - Andy Worthington
The Hidden Horrors of WikiLeaks' Guantánamo Files (http://www.andyworthington.co.uk/2011/04/27/the-hidden-horrors-of-wikileaks-guantanamo-files/)

25 April 2011 - Veterans for Peace - Press Release
Obama Declares Manning Guilty Before Trial (http://www.veteransforpeace.org/news_detail.php?idx=61)

28 April 2011 - Democracy Now - Ray McGovern
Petraeus Will Expand Pro-War (http://www.democracynow.org/2011/4/28/former_cia_analyst_ray_mcgovern_petraeus)
Agenda as New CIA Director (http://www.democracynow.org/2011/4/28/former_cia_analyst_ray_mcgovern_petraeus)

05 May 2011 - WordPress - Flyby News
9/11 Whistleblower * DRG * Bahrain non-Human Rights (http://flybynews.wordpress.com/2011/05/05/david-griffin-bahrain-physicians-human-rights/)

Space for Peace & September 11 (http://www.flybynews.com/cgi-local/newspro/viewnews.cgi?newsid1247687889,9783,)
Connecting dots to democracy or to genocide

03 May 2011 - AP - Rashard Mendenhall
NFL Star Sparks 9/11 Demolition Controversy (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110503/ap_on_sp_fo_ne/fbn_steelers_mendenhall_3)

"We'll never know what really happened.
I just have a hard time believing a plane
could take a skyscraper down demolition style."

1,495 Architects and Engineers (http://www.ae911truth.org/)
Call for New 9/11 Investigation (http://www.ae911truth.org/)
28 May 2009 - KMPH Fox 26 - WeAreChange
Richard Gage - TV Interview - Fresno, CA (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oO2yT0uBQbM)

10 May 2011 - 911blogger - Prof. Steven Jones
Responses to questions regarding thermite, nanothermite (http://911blogger.com/news/2011-05-10/responses-questions-regarding-thermite-nanothermite-and-conventional-explosives-used-wtc-destruction)
and conventional explosives used in the WTC destruction. (http://911blogger.com/news/2011-05-10/responses-questions-regarding-thermite-nanothermite-and-conventional-explosives-used-wtc-destruction)

Flyby News updated resources:
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Peter Lemkin
05-13-2011, 08:03 PM
The above post goes a bit 'wide' on the thread topic, methinks....if well meaning. Anyone following my and others reports on what has been going 'down' at the nuclear plant will not be surprised at the sudden admission by the Japanese 'authorities' that a partial meltdown had taken place in at least one reactor....[more likely in at least 3 of them!!!]. The situation remains dire [in the short and medium term]...and deadly [mostly in the long-term]. The piece by Caldecott really sums it all up, IMHO.

Peter Lemkin
05-14-2011, 07:23 AM
One of the workers who was recently in the building surveying the damage, collapsed, was taken to hospital and there died. The company is saying it is not related to radiation exposure.....and I certainly can not say....but if it is not, I'd be very surprised and find it a very odd 'coincidence'!

Magda Hassan
05-17-2011, 10:21 AM
TEPCO admits nuclear meltdown occurred at Fukushima reactor 16 hours after quake

Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) admitted for the first time on May 15 that most of the fuel in one of its nuclear reactors at the Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant had melted only about 16 hours after the March 11 earthquake struck a wide swath of northeastern Japan and triggered a devastating tsunami.
According to TEPCO, the operator of the crippled nuclear power plant, the emergency condenser designed to cool the steam inside the pressure vessel of the No. 1 reactor was working properly shortly after the magnitude-9.0 earthquake, but it lost its functions around 3:30 p.m. on March 11 when tsunami waves hit the reactor.
Based on provisional analysis of data on the reactor, the utility concluded that the water level in the pressure vessel began to drop rapidly immediately after the tsunami, and the top of the fuel began to be exposed above the water around 6 p.m. Around 7:30 p.m., the fuel was fully exposed above the water surface and overheated for more than 10 hours. At about 9 p.m., the temperature in the reactor core rose to 2,800 degrees Celsius, the melting point for fuel. At approximately 7:50 p.m., the upper part of the fuel started melting, and at around 6:50 a.m. on March 12, a meltdown occurred.
On the reason why it took over two months after the earthquake to reveal the information, TEPCO said it had only been able to start obtaining detailed data on the temperature and pressure in the reactor for analysis in early May.
Junichiro Matsumoto, a senior TEPCO official, said, "Because there is similar damage to the fuel rods at the No. 2 and 3 reactors, the bottoms of their pressure vessels could also have been damaged." He said the utility would carry out similar analysis on the two reactors.
Hiroaki Koide, professor of nuclear safety engineering at Kyoto University, was critical of TEPCO.
"They could have assumed that when the loss of power made it impossible to cool down the reactor, it would soon lead to a meltdown of the core. TEPCO's persistent explanation that the damage to the fuel had been limited turned out to be wrong," he said.

http://mdn.mainichi.jp/image/icon_Japan.gifClick here for the original Japanese story (http://mainichi.jp/select/jiken/news/20110516ddm001040053000c.html)
(Mainichi Japan) May 16, 2011

Peter Lemkin
05-17-2011, 03:21 PM
TEPCO admits nuclear meltdown occurred at Fukushima reactor 16 hours after quake

Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) admitted for the first time on May 15 that most of the fuel in one of its nuclear reactors at the Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant had melted only about 16 hours after the March 11 earthquake struck a wide swath of northeastern Japan and triggered a devastating tsunami.
According to TEPCO, the operator of the crippled nuclear power plant, the emergency condenser designed to cool the steam inside the pressure vessel of the No. 1 reactor was working properly shortly after the magnitude-9.0 earthquake, but it lost its functions around 3:30 p.m. on March 11 when tsunami waves hit the reactor.
Based on provisional analysis of data on the reactor, the utility concluded that the water level in the pressure vessel began to drop rapidly immediately after the tsunami, and the top of the fuel began to be exposed above the water around 6 p.m. Around 7:30 p.m., the fuel was fully exposed above the water surface and overheated for more than 10 hours. At about 9 p.m., the temperature in the reactor core rose to 2,800 degrees Celsius, the melting point for fuel. At approximately 7:50 p.m., the upper part of the fuel started melting, and at around 6:50 a.m. on March 12, a meltdown occurred.
On the reason why it took over two months after the earthquake to reveal the information, TEPCO said it had only been able to start obtaining detailed data on the temperature and pressure in the reactor for analysis in early May.
Junichiro Matsumoto, a senior TEPCO official, said, "Because there is similar damage to the fuel rods at the No. 2 and 3 reactors, the bottoms of their pressure vessels could also have been damaged." He said the utility would carry out similar analysis on the two reactors.
Hiroaki Koide, professor of nuclear safety engineering at Kyoto University, was critical of TEPCO.
"They could have assumed that when the loss of power made it impossible to cool down the reactor, it would soon lead to a meltdown of the core. TEPCO's persistent explanation that the damage to the fuel had been limited turned out to be wrong," he said.

http://mdn.mainichi.jp/image/icon_Japan.gifClick here for the original Japanese story (http://mainichi.jp/select/jiken/news/20110516ddm001040053000c.html)
(Mainichi Japan) May 16, 2011

Not saying as much as I could about the bullshit that they didn't know at the time [two months ago!...when others outside of Japan knew!!!], what we are talking about here, now is really a Chernobyl on steroids. Due to the luck (sic) that there was no major explosion, as at Chernobyl, the radiation will leak out more slowly...but the total amount of radiation is hundreds or thousands of times that of Chernobyl. They need to start entombing the whole think ASAP! There is NO other way.....NONE!

Jan Klimkowski
05-22-2011, 06:21 PM
Dr Michio Ishikawa, pro-nuclear scientist and former head of the Japan Nuclear Technology Institute, has been speaking again (http://www.gengikyo.jp/english/shokai/special_4_articl.htm).

He describes some of the potentially catastrophic consequences of the flooding of the reactors with sea water, the almost unimaginable amount of radioactivity contaminating the Fukushima water, and stresses the need for urgent, international action:


My previous column in this series explained my estimation of the current status of the reactor core and the issue of radiation discharge into the environment.Today, I am going to discuss a major headache of the situation, i.e. water contaminated with a high level of radiation.Gas (containing radioactive materials) which continues to be released from the melted reactor core is cooled and becomes mixed in with cooling water.The level of contamination is still rising as we speak.

According to estimation by a group of experts who formerly worked at the nation's pioneering nuclear organization, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), the three nuclear reactors damaged in the recent disaster contain the amount of radioactivity equivalent to over one billion curies of cobalt-60, if you would excuse me for the use of old unit of measurement.Say just 1% of that gets mixed in and the cooling water would have 10 million curies of radioactivity.This is a horrifically large amount.

Cobalt 60 is widely used as radiation sources.A typical unit containing 10,000 – 50,000 curies of radioactivity is encased in a chamber surrounded with walls measuring about 1meter thick in concrete.In the old days, radiation education used to teach students that the strength of 1 curie of radiation from cobalt 60 is approximately 1 roentgen in 1-meter distance.It was an easy way of having a grasp on the strength of radioactivity.

Exposure to 700 rem of radiation (equivalent to receiving 700 roentgen of radiation for one hour) in a short period of time would almost certainly kill a person.Exposure to approximately one tenth of that or 50 rem of radiation would give a person noticeable effects, whereas exposure to 10 rem or below, I was taught, would have no adverse health effects.That is why the duration of work in a radioactive environment used to be calculated based on the measured amount of radiation indicated by the maximum exposure of about half that figure or 5 rem.

With this perspective, one would realize that ten million curies of radiation is something beyond comprehension.It is like saying to a poor person who is trying to get by with ten yen (ten curies) that he must come up with ten million yen.First-generation experts from JAERI as they are, they are showing hesitation about re-circulating the massive amount of contaminated water to cool the reactors.

Even if we manage to build a core cooling facility using the water, how would we establish radiation shields?Radiation exposure would become a serious problem unless the facility is shielded solidly.Once contaminated water is fed into the system, the radiation dose of all piping will rise, denying human access.Failure is not an option.

Another issue is corrosion.The reactors were doused with seawater for approximately 2 weeks.Judging from the amount of evaporation, around 3,000 to 4,000 tons of seawater must have been injected per reactor unit.The amount of salt contained in the seawater would total around 100 tons per unit.

This means nuclear fuel and an equal amount of salt are mixed together in the reactor core.I have absolutely no idea how such massive amount of salt would react with the reactor core, and what materials such reaction would produce.

The group of former JAERI experts is concerned about salt-aided progression of corrosion on pipes and other facilities.Stainless steel and other quality materials used at nuclear power plants corrode with chlorine, and develop cracks called stress corrosion cracking inside.Magnesium chloride in seawater is said to aggravate such cracks.

There is no need to elaborate what would happen if cracks develop at the reactor and cooling equipment.What's worse, corrosion at existing facilities could leak the highly contaminated water to the external environment.

These points the experts highlight are correct, and we should all take note.Yet, hearing these factors and throwing your hands in the air would only make the operation to cool down the melted cores and its schedule announced the other day un-executable, leaving the discharge of radiation unattended.We must never give up.We must remember that those factors that have been pointed out include elements of speculation that may or may not reflect reality.

In working our way toward the goal, it is important to firstly verify the current state of the reactor cores and contaminated water.We should build and set up an operation base and bridgehead at the reactor buildings and start gathering expert knowledge from in and outside the nation.This step is now being taken on site, although it could have started sooner.

Once we establish the current situation, there is always a way to find a solution for it.The solution should be implemented under international cooperation, which should, in turn, reinforce the world's preparedness against nuclear disasters.That is what the world wants.The international community is carefully observing Japan's next steps.Meeting this expectation is our nation's mission in response to the support the rest of the world has given Fukushima in the face of this tragedy.I believe taking such steps will lead to the future of nuclear energy in Japan.

Peter Lemkin
05-22-2011, 07:03 PM
To sum it up....the situation is just at the brink of world-class disaster!!! Some sensed that from day three - when the failure of all cooling systems was clear. Somehow, they still officially talk the talk of getting it all under control. From what is already known, it is actually amazing it is not already thousands of times worse [trust me, it is horrible!]...but that scenario is just waiting to happen....any day now...:gossip: Physics happens....and at that nuclear plant it won't be pretty what happens [already has, and soon will.....] 10,000,000 Curies is nothing to laugh about!...and I think that is a VERY, VERY conservative estimate!!! [Hiroshima released about 2-3 million Curies]

Keith Millea
05-22-2011, 10:08 PM
Look what's coming our way.........:dance:

Published on Sunday, May 22, 2011 by the Associated Press (http://www.philly.com/philly/news/pennsylvania/122402799.html)

Going Backwards: Small 'Neighborhood Nukes' Envisioned


PITTSBURGH, PA - Two U.S. representatives from Pennsylvania are advocating that the federal government back a new generation of miniature nuclear reactors that could power neighborhoods.

http://www.commondreams.org/sites/commondreams.org/files/imagecache/headline_image/article_images/ap-1000_2.jpg

Coming to a neighborhood near you? A Westinghouse mini-nuclear reactor. http://www.ap1000.westinghousenuclear.com (http://www.ap1000.westinghousenuclear.com/) Reps. Jason Altmire, a Democrat, and Tim Murphy, a Republican, announced Friday at the Western Pennsylvania headquarters of Westinghouse that their proposal calls for construction by 2021 of two small nuclear reactors, both funded partially by the Department of Energy. The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette said the plan was part of their efforts to give Western Pennsylvania a role in energy legislation expected from Congress this year.

Westinghouse has designed a small modular reactor that would shrink nuclear operations to one capsule about 90 feet tall, would not need to be near a large body of water for cooling, and could be within miles of an industrial plant, military base, or neighborhood to be powered, officials said.

The seven-month-old project is still in the "nursery" stages of research and development, chief executive officer Aris Candris said, but Westinghouse envisions the plants as something that can be put anywhere, like a windmill.

Altmire introduced the measure last year to no avail, but he said higher gasoline prices had improved the environment for energy legislation. Scrutiny of the nuclear industry has intensified, however, since a March 11 earthquake triggered a tsunami that knocked out cooling systems at Japan's Fukushima Dai-ichi plant, causing the world's worst nuclear crisis since Chernobyl in 1986.

"You can't pretend Japan didn't happen," Altmire said, but he added that the smaller reactors would use the same safety mechanisms as the company's larger ones, including a passive cooling system that can douse overheated reactors with water stored inside the chamber.

Within hours of Friday's announcement, however, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued a statement calling on Westinghouse to respond to technical issues that the agency said it had found in the design of the company's flagship AP1000 reactor, such as the design of the reactor's shield building and some pressure expected within the containment. Westinghouse said in a statement that it would continue to work with the commission, but that none of the issues was "safety-significant.

© 2011 Associated Press

http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2011/05/22-2

Ed Jewett
05-22-2011, 11:33 PM
http://ex-skf.blogspot.com/2011/05/radioactive-sewage-sludge-and-slag-in.html

Maybe something to bookmark...

"ABOUT MY COVERAGE OF JAPAN EARTHQUAKE OF MARCH 11

I am Japanese, and I not only read Japanese news sources for information on earthquake and the Fukushima Nuke Plant but also watch press conferences via the Internet when I can and summarize my findings, adding my observations."

the web site features English and Japanese text

Peter Lemkin
05-23-2011, 05:07 AM
http://ex-skf.blogspot.com/2011/05/radioactive-sewage-sludge-and-slag-in.html

Maybe something to bookmark...

"ABOUT MY COVERAGE OF JAPAN EARTHQUAKE OF MARCH 11

I am Japanese, and I not only read Japanese news sources for information on earthquake and the Fukushima Nuke Plant but also watch press conferences via the Internet when I can and summarize my findings, adding my observations."

the web site features English and Japanese text


According to the Tokyo Metropolitan government, 170,000 becquerels per kilogram radiation was detected in the sewage slag sample taken on March 25 at Tobu Sludge Plant, a sewage treatment facility in Koto-ku. The samples taken at two additional facilities also showed radiation over 100,000 becquerels per kilogram. The slag has already been recycled into cement and other construction materials. In comparison, the sewage slag from Koriyama City in Fukushima measured 334,000 becquerels per kilogram, and Koto-ku is 225 kilometers away from Fukushima I Nuke Plant.

This [above] and even more radioactive sewage slag mentioned on that website is ENORMOUSLY radioactive! A becquerel = one nuclear disintegration per second. Some of the water and materials at the plant would, however, be thousands to millions of times that....some billions of times more.

While it is not detailed, I'm presuming this is the normal end product of sewage waste - after processing and drying. [i.e. normal waste water, when concentrated in Japan is highly radioactive, even far from the plant!] Such materials should NOT be recycled, but put in hazardous waste repositories!

Keith Millea
05-23-2011, 06:50 PM
This is 10 days old,but gives a good overall picture of the situation.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xqs-fh79suI&feature=player_detailpage

Peter Lemkin
05-23-2011, 07:56 PM
Look what's coming our way.........:dance:

Published on Sunday, May 22, 2011 by the Associated Press (http://www.philly.com/philly/news/pennsylvania/122402799.html)

Going Backwards: Small 'Neighborhood Nukes' Envisioned



They have even smaller ones....they call them basement nuclear reactors [for a high rise or hospital, etc]. Miniaturization is not the issue. The ones used in subs are very small and powerful. Safety is the issue!

And, the more there are, the more can fail.....

Peter Lemkin
05-24-2011, 07:20 AM
Today, for the first time, TEPCO admitted there have been three [3!] meltdowns in reactors 1,2, and 3!.....no surpise to me; but they have been trying to keep it secret all along. Meaning: Things are as bad as the worst predictions and will get worse [not better] as time goes on!.....

Peter Lemkin
05-24-2011, 07:30 PM
Just learned that TEPCO didn't suddenly 'just happen to spill the beans'....there are [from today] a team of experts from the IAEA at the plant to give an international and hopefully impartial evaluation....they simply couldn't hide the lies another day....:spy: :mexican:

Keith Millea
05-26-2011, 02:55 PM
Published on Thursday, May 26, 2011 by Reuters (http://www.reuters.com/)

New Leak Feared at Stricken Japan Nuclear Plant

by Kiyoshi Takenaka and Yoko Nishikawa


TOKYO - Radioactive water appears to be leaking from a waste disposal building at Japan's Fukushima nuclear complex, operator Tokyo Electric Power said on Thursday, in a new setback to the battle to contain radiation from the crippled power plant.

The disclosure by Tepco raises the stakes in a race to complete by next month a system to decontaminate a massive pool of radioactive water at the site that critics see as a growing risk to both the nearby Pacific and groundwater.

A magnitude 9.0 earthquake and the massive tsunami that followed killed about 24,000 people and knocked out the Fukushima plant on March 11, triggering the world's worst nuclear accident since Chernobyl.

The crisis, which has displaced some 80,000 residents from around the plant, prompted a review of Japan's energy policy and growing calls for efforts to step up health monitoring for a crisis now in its 11th week.

Experts from the International Atomic Energy Agency began an inspection on Thursday of equipment damaged by the tsunami at a second nuclear plant, the Tokai complex about 120 km (75 miles) north of Tokyo, as part of an investigation prompted by the Fukushima accident.

A poll by the Asahi newspaper published on Thursday showed that 42 percent of Japanese people opposed nuclear power, up from 18 percent before the disaster.
The survey underscored the public's deepening concerns about nuclear safety and criticism of the way the government and Tepco initially responded to the crisis and how they appeared to have been repeatedly slow in admitting the gravity of the situation.


Although many outside experts had concluded that uranium fuel in three Fukushima reactors had melted down within days of the crisis, Tepco only announced that conclusion this week.

"We have to take seriously the criticism that we haven't done enough to provide and circulate information," Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said at a news conference. "But we have never covered up information that we had."
POSSIBLE LEAK

The effort to regain control of the plant relies on pumping massive quantities of water to cool the three reactors that suffered meltdowns and storing the contaminated water in an improvised storage facility. Tepco officials said, however, that the water level in the storage facility had dropped, suggesting a leak.

Environmental groups have focussed on the threat to sea and ground water from the accident. Greenpeace said earlier this month it had collected samples of fish, seaweed and shellfish along the Fukushima coast that showed radiation levels above Japanese safety limits.

Residents of the town of Futaba, forced to evacuate along with others inside a 20-kilometre (12-mile) zone around the plant, were allowed to return briefly to their homes on Wednesday.

A day earlier, residents of the nearby town of Minami Soma had been allowed back to their homes for a two-hour visit wearing hooded white protective suits, masks and goggles.

Video shot by a couple returning home and broadcast on Japanese television showed a ghost town with weeds overrunning a garden and a stray dog barking in the distance.

"It didn't even feel like my own home," one woman told Nippon Television. "I thought I was prepared for that, but I wasn't."

(Additional reporting by Shinichi Saoshiro; Writing by Kevin Krolicki; Editing by Tomasz Janowski and Alex Richardson)

© 2011 Reuters

http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2011/05/26-1

Peter Lemkin
05-26-2011, 04:33 PM
Seaweed tested quite a long distance from where the water is dumped out of the Tepco plant was found to have 50x the maximum acceptable level of radiation [and many sea animals and even Japanese humans eat seaweed!]......the ocean is a very large space and even enormous amounts of radiation will be diluted in it; but at the same time whatever radiation is put in it is going somewhere and through bioaccumulation and bioconcentration will be much more likely to get into living systems than in the nonliving sediments and water......we are in so many ways killing the Planet for the profit and blind sightedness of a few greedy persons......:loco:

Magda Hassan
06-01-2011, 11:12 AM
Who Will Take the Radioactive Rods from Fukushima?

By Yoichi Shimatsu

URL of this article: www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=25064 (http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?llr=o8b4necab&et=1105759788476&s=793&e=001MoZe_d3TenYUu3wfdN7KtVueINuYdswYIEduVAw2QYPkf VDm4mCesyBm4OLWJVXN8sHl-M6d4FhuO_G0maYfEn2i5o2Rf9z0z97ufqhzw-NYWrxI12xLiAhJgLjFHI_EGH-7NGsvQ8_ToECZjAaDZkKvaNdSG5YsKA1Lztl2CWE=)

Global Research (http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?llr=o8b4necab&et=1105759788476&s=793&e=001MoZe_d3TenYM_Ds9kZRjnqtkvZ3JVC7cK7MD6Vq66pUqU X7RvApEJEO-4MHVBtVy8kLqsLHUPn0GNXhuS7FjjpnYOzeDuRtzx9QzF9bhO3 br7FuA-sscfw==), May 31, 2011
4th Media Beijing (http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?llr=o8b4necab&et=1105759788476&s=793&e=001MoZe_d3Tenbk4DW7siFTE4xs-DL98uWzvNP_dFMg8hUNY5XV0ER6LrxkERRRQlz1F-J_p8xSjp9VmjqPHqqj78Btt9z9SfQHni6fEtsOaZQSVcPg5YKA Tzjsp1KX-SyD) - 2011-05-30

The decommissioning of the Fukushima 1 nuclear plant is delayed by a single problem: Where to dispose of the uranium fuel rods? Many of those rods are extremely radioactive and partially melted, and some contain highly lethal plutonium.
Besides the fissile fuel inside the plant's six reactors, more than 7 tons of spent rods have to be removed to a permanent storage site before workers can bury the Fukushima facility under concrete. The rods cannot be permanently stored in Japan because the country's new waste storage centers on the northeast tip of Honshu are built on unsuitable land. The floors of the Rokkasho reprocessing facility and Mutsu storage unit are cracked from uneven sinking into the boggy soil.
Entombment of the rods inside the Fukushima 1 reactors carries enormous risks because the footing of landfill cannot support the weight of the fuel rods in addition to the reactors and cooling water inside the planned concrete containment walls. The less reactive spent fuel would have to be kept inside air-cooled dry casks. The powerful earthquakes that frequently strike the Tohoku region will eventually undermine the foundations, causing radioactive wastewater to pour unstoppably into the Pacific Ocean. The rods must therefore go to another country.
American Bad Faith
Under the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), signed by Japan in 1970, Washington's negotiators stipulated that used nuclear fuel from Japanese reactors must by law be shipped to the United States for storage or reprocessing to prevent the development of an atomic bomb. Washington has been unable to fulfill its treaty obligations to Tokyo due to the public outcry against the proposed Yucca Mountain storage facility near Las Vegas.
A panel convened by the Obama administration has just recommended the set up of a network of storage sites across the United States, a controversy certain to revive the anti-nuclear sentiments during the upcoming election campaign. The American nuclear industry has its own stockpile of more than 60,000 tons of spent fuel - not counting waste from reactors used for military and research purposes - leaving no space for Fukushima's rods inside the Nevada disposal site, if indeed it is ever opened.
To Continental Asia
The Tokyo Electric Power Company (Tepco) has allocated 1 trillion yen ($12 billion) in funds for nuclear waste disposal. Areva, the French nuclear monopoly, has teamed up with Tepco to find an overseas storage site. So far, the Tepco-Areva team have quietly contacted three Asian countries - Kazakhstan, China and Mongolia -- to set up a center for "reprocessing", a euphemism for nuclear dump site.
Among the threesome, China was the top choice for the Japanese nuclear establishment, which has confidence in Beijing's ability to safeguard nuclear secrets from its citizenry and even from the top leaders. Japan's space agency, which keeps 24-hour satellite observation over every nuclear-related facility in China, possesses the entire record of radiation leaks there. Since Beijing withholds this sort of data from the public, the Japanese side felt it had the necessary leverage in talks with Chinese nuclear officials.
Though the nuclear-sector bureaucrats were initially eager to receive bundles of yen, the proposal was blown away by the salt craze that swept over China. Within a couple of weeks of the Fukushima meltdowns, millions of shoppers emptied supermarket shelves on rumors that iodized salt could prevent radiation-caused thyroid cancer. The Chinese public is rightfully fearful of health-related scandals after discoveries of melamine in milk, growth hormones in pork, pesticides in vegetables, antibiotics in fish and now radioactive fallout over farmland.
A nuclear disposal deal would require trucks loaded with radioactive cargo to roll through a densely populated port, perhaps Tianjin or Ningbo, in the dead of night. There is no way that secret shipments wouldn't be spotted by locals with smart phones, triggering a mass exodus from every city, town and village along the route to the dumping grounds in China's far west. Thus, the skittishness of the ordinary Chinese citizen knocked out the easiest of nefarious plans.
Principle of Industrial Recovery
A more logical choice for overseas storage is in the sparsely populated countries that supply uranium ore to Japan, particularly Australia and Canada. As exporters of uranium, Canberra and Ottawa are ultimately responsible for storage of the nuclear waste under the legal principle of industrial recovery.
The practice of industrial recovery is already well-established in the consumer electronics and household appliances sectors where manufacturers are required by an increasing number of countries to take back and recycle used television sets, computers and refrigerators.
Under the principle, uranium mining giants like Rio Tinto and CAMECO would be required to take back depleted uranium. The cost of waste storage would then be factored into the export price for uranium ore. The added cost is passed along to utility companies and ultimately the consumer through a higher electricity rate. If the market refuses to bear the higher price for uranium as compared with other fuels, then nuclear power will go the way of the steam engine.
Australian and Canadian politicians are bound to opportunistically oppose the return of depleted uranium since any shipments from Fukushima would be met by a massive turnout of "not-in-my-backyard" protesters. The only way for Tokyo to convince the local politicos to go along quietly is by threatening to publish an online list of the bribe-takers in parliament who had earlier backed uranium mining on behalf of the Japanese interests.
Nuclear's Cost-Efficiency
The question then arise whether nuclear power, when long-term storage fees are included, is competitive with investment in renewable energy such as wind, solar, hydro and tidal resources. Renewable energy probably has the edge since they don't create waste. Natural gas remains the undisputed price beater wherever it is available in abundance. In a free market without hidden subsidies, nuclear is probably doomed.
In a lapse of professionalism, the International Atomic Energy Commission (IAEA) has never seriously addressed nuclear-waste disposal as an industrywide issue. Based on the ration of spent rods to reactor fuel inside U.S. nuclear facilities, there are close to 200,000 metric tons of high-level nuclear waste at the 453 civilian nuclear-energy plants worldwide. Yet not a single permanent storage site has ever been opened anywhere.
The Fukushima 1 dilemma shows that the issues of cost-efficiency and technological viability can no longer be deferred or ignored. Ratings agencies report that Tepco's outstanding debt has soared beyond $90 billion, meaning that it cannot cover future costs of storing spent rods from its Kashiwazaki and Fukushima 2 nuclear plants. The Japanese government's debt has soared to 200 percent of GDP. Neither entity can afford the rising cost of nuclear power.
The inability of Tepco or the government to pay for nuclear waste disposal puts the financial liability squarely on its partner companies and suppliers, including GE, Toshiba, Hitachi, Kajima Construction and especially the sources of the uranium, CAMECO and Rio Tinto and the governments of Canada and Australia. A fundamental rule of both capitalism and civil law is that somebody has to pay.
Last Stop
Since Australia and Canada aren't in any hurry to take back the radioactive leftovers, that leaves Japan and treaty-partner United States with only one option for quick disposal- Mongolia.
Ulan Bator accepts open-pit mining for coal and copper, which are nothing but gigantic toxic sites, so why not take the melted-down nuclear rods? Its GDP, ranked 136 among the world's economies, is estimated to be $5.8 billion in 2010. Thus, $12 billion is an unimaginable sum for one more hole in the ground.
Not that Mongolia would get the entirety of the budget, since the nuclear cargo would have to transit through the Russian Far East. Unlike the health-conscious Chinese, the population of Nakhodka or Vladivostok are used to playing fast-and-loose with radioactive materials and vodka.
Even if the mafia that runs the Russian transport industry were to demand a disproportionate cut, Mongolia's 3 million inhabitants would be overjoyed at gaining about $2,000 each, more than the average annual income, that is if the money is divided evenly after the costs of building the dump.
Realistically, the Mongolian people are unlikely to receive a penny, since the money will go into a trust fund for maintenance costs. That's because $12 billion spread over the half-life of uranium - 700 million years - is equivalent to $17 in annual rent. That doesn't even cover kibble bits for the watchdog on duty, much less the cooling system. Not that anyone will be counting since by the time uranium decays to a safe level, fossils will be the sole remnant of human life on Earth.
Illusory, shortsighted greed will surely triumph in Mongolia, and that leaves a question of moral accountability for the rest of us. Will the world community feel remorse for dumping its nuclear mess onto an ancient culture that invented boiled mutton, fermented mare's milk and Genghis Khan? For guilt-ridden diplomats from Tokyo and Washington wheedling the dirty deal in Ulan Bator, here's the rebuttal: Did the national hero, the Great Khan, ever shed any tears or feel pangs of guilt? There's no need for soul-searching. A solution is at hand.
Yoichi Shimatsu, former editor of the Japan Times Weekly, is a Hong Kong-based environmental writer and also Editor-at-large at the 4th Media, China.

Jan Klimkowski
06-01-2011, 05:12 PM
Mongolia it is then..... :plane: :spy: :panic:

Just avoid the mutton stew and yak milk....

Peter Lemkin
06-01-2011, 05:25 PM
Mongolia it is then..... :plane: :spy: :panic:

Just avoid the mutton stew and yak milk....

Point of information - it this inner or outer Mongolia?! :wirlitzer:

Ed Jewett
06-04-2011, 02:36 AM
http://therearenosunglasses.wordpress.com/2011/06/03/was-fukushima-stuxnet-attack/


Was Fukushima Stuxnet Attack?
3/06/2011
[Just prior to the Fukushima quake/tsunami, Japan offered to enrich uranium for Iran. Was the nuclear meltdown revenge for this?]

Ed Jewett
06-04-2011, 03:25 AM
See also the Levenda-esque post at The Twelfth Bough:

http://twelfthbough.blogspot.com/2011/05/projecting-business-as-usual.html

Magda Hassan
06-04-2011, 11:21 AM
http://therearenosunglasses.wordpress.com/2011/06/03/was-fukushima-stuxnet-attack/


Was Fukushima Stuxnet Attack?
3/06/2011
[Just prior to the Fukushima quake/tsunami, Japan offered to enrich uranium for Iran. Was the nuclear meltdown revenge for this?]
This was brought up early in the event. Stuxnet had been found in Japan late last year and it is entirely feasible that there was some compromisation of the Fukushima (and others) system prior to the earthquake and tsunami. This may have been a designed payback or just a result of chaos and circumstances.

Peter Lemkin
06-04-2011, 11:29 AM
http://therearenosunglasses.wordpress.com/2011/06/03/was-fukushima-stuxnet-attack/


Was Fukushima Stuxnet Attack?
3/06/2011
[Just prior to the Fukushima quake/tsunami, Japan offered to enrich uranium for Iran. Was the nuclear meltdown revenge for this?]
This was brought up early in the event. Stuxnet had been found in Japan late last year and it is entirely feasible that there was some compromisation of the Fukushima (and others) system prior to the earthquake and tsunami. This may have been a designed payback or just a result of chaos and circumstances.

I find this scenario doubtful. I'm against nuclear power, generally and this reactor type specifically. What happened here was mostly due [if not entirely due - on the immediate term] to the tsunami [with the earthquake a distant second]. No one has control over earthquakes of this magnitude [though I know some like to imagine the omnipotence of the Deep Political State's Military prowess and gadgets]. Even if [and there is no such evidence yet] that these reactors had had a computer virus just before or during the quake/tsunami, it wouldn't have made much difference. It is not the computer controls which are causing the problems now...just the physics of the fuel rods which have been severed from their normal [flawed] control and cooling mechanisms - physically.

Magda Hassan
06-04-2011, 11:40 AM
I agree Peter. There seems to be enough trouble running nuclear power plant in ideal circumstances let alone disaster scenarios. However, two things. I thought there was indications that the original damage was now thought to be caused by the quake and the tsunami was just more shit on top of that to deal with. Secondly, didn't they seem to be having some sort of computer operational problems that they were unable to find a cause for? Or could this also be from the quake and tsunami damage?

Peter Lemkin
06-04-2011, 11:58 AM
I agree Peter. There seems to be enough trouble running nuclear power plant in ideal circumstances let alone disaster scenarios. However, two things. I thought there was indications that the original damage was now thought to be caused by the quake and the tsunami was just more shit on top of that to deal with. Secondly, didn't they seem to be having some sort of computer operational problems that they were unable to find a cause for? Or could this also be from the quake and tsunami damage?

I had not heard that...though it could have been so, but that would not have made a difference - given the quake. Had there not been a quake and tsunami and they were having control problems, that would be a different story. Any control or cooling they manage from this point on will be very simple jerry-rigged and not computer controlled. Mostly they now need to move the fuel somewhere and then bury the buildings. The normal control mechanisms just are destroyed - by things other than computer control, as I understand it. They've had a giant earthquake and tsunami; followed by hydrogen explosions caused by overheating of the zirconium cladding on the fuel rods - with the subsequent leak and melting of the fuel rods. They have been cooling my cement pumps, fire trucks and now just simple motors pumping new fresh water lines. Nothing else is working and the fuel rods are so destroyed they won't ride up and down [which is how they are controlled]. The energy in the earthquake would be possible to calculate; but would be such an enormous amount of energy as to rule out human triggered, IMHO. While i have no doubt the dirty little boys with their dirty little toys have tried to created earthquakes and who knows what else; I've seen no evidence they have that technology and certainly would only be able to create the smallest of such.....this was HUGE. I'd guess a billion times the energy of all the nukes on the Planet.

Magda Hassan
06-05-2011, 01:36 AM
Dr Helen Caldicott says that the Fukushima nuclear disaster has the potential to make Japan “uninhabitable”, yet the mainstream media in Australia continue to ignore the crisis. Managing editor David Donovan (http://www.independentaustralia.net/2011/about/about-david-donovan/) reports.

Yesterday – the same day Germany announced it would close all its nuclear plants (http://www.bellevision.com/index.php?action=celebrity_watch&type=950) because of Fukushima, and dangerous levels of radiation were reported (http://www.taiwannews.com.tw/etn/news_content.php?id=1612650) in Japanese clean-up workers – Independent Australia did a straw poll of 50 random people at a metropolitan shopping centre in Queensland. Each of them was asked: “were you aware that there had been a nuclear meltdown at Fukushima in Japan”. Almost all of these respondents recognised the name Fukushima but only 4 of the 50 – a mere 8 per cent – said they had heard of any meltdown.
This rough poll points to deficiencies in popular media reporting in Australia of what some say has the potential to become the most devastating man-made disaster the world has ever known.
That may sound like an alarming claim, so let’s look at the facts.

THE CATACLYSM

In the wake of the March earthquake and tsunami, on March 15, Independent Australia reported (http://www.independentaustralia.net/2011/2011/international/caldicott-japan-may-spell-end-of-nuclear-industry-worldwide/):

“Yesterday, Japan’s nuclear agency attempted to calm fears by ranking the incident as a Category 4 nuclear accident, below the 1979 Three Mile Island partial meltdown in the US and well below the Chernobyl meltdown and explosion 25 years ago which rated top of the scale at seven.”

As also reported then, experts in Australia, including Dr Ziggy Switkowski, along with the Japanese nuclear power plant operator Tepco, tried hard then to dispel public fears about the severity of the disaster. By March 25, however, the category had been upgraded above Three Mile Island to a level 6 (http://www.zerohedge.com/article/fukushima-raised-level-6-ines-scale-now-officially-more-serious-3-mile-island). Then on April 13, as Tepco struggled to contain the fires burning at the reactor, it was reluctantly given the top rating of 7 (http://www.marketskeptics.com/2011/04/fukushima-crisis-upgraded-to-level-7-while-radiation-experts-warn-about-radioactive-bananas.html) by the Japanese authorities, which classed it as a “major accident”, equal to Chernobyl though officials still maintained the disaster was not as severe since there had not, apparently, been a melt-down.
Fast forward a month to May 13, and people’s suspicions and fears were realised when Tepco admitted there had, in fact, been a meltdown in Reactor One. Not only that, but reports began circulating that Tepco had been aware of the meltdown since the very earliest days of the accident.
http://www.independentaustralia.net/Wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/Fukushima-nuclear-power-plant-explosion-300x225.jpg (http://uu47tog.blogspot.com/2011/05/fukushima-nuclear-power-plant-before.html)Fukushima nuclear power plant explosion

On May 18, the Financial Times (http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/8b6c7cce-8168-11e0-9c83-00144feabdc0.html#axzz1NpS4cKgt) reported the following about the escalating situation:

“In the first days after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station began spewing radiation in mid-March, the plant’s operator and Japanese safety regulators studiously avoided the word “meltdown”.

Yes, they said, uranium fuel rods in the tsunami-hit facility’s reactors might have been damaged after cooling systems failed. But the official view was that the rods were still mostly intact (http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/7feb0aaa-4d3d-11e0-85e4-00144feab49a.html#axzz1MVFfAnm2) – and radioactive material was safely contained inside their zirconium sheaths.

Now, a little over two months later, new information on the state of Fukushima Daiichi’s three overheated reactors is making the m-word impossible to avoid. Fuel inside the cores, it is now understood, melted far more quickly and extensively than was initially believed – disintegrating just a few hours after the tsunami knocked out the plants electricity and cooling systems.”

And, not only had there been a meltdown in reactor 1 but, in fact, there had been meltdowns in two other reactors as well:

Tokyo Electric Power, Fukushima’s operator, says there may be little left of the rods at all – just clumps of uranium at the bottom of the reactors’ innermost steel containers. Some of the melted fuel may have leaked into the concrete vessels that form the next layer of protective containment, making for a meltdown by even the narrowest industry standards.

On Wednesday Naoto Kan, prime minister, said Tepco was working on the assumption that some fuel from Fukushima Daiichi’s No 1 reactor core had leaked out. On Monday Haruki Madarame, chairman of the Nuclear Safety Commission, said: “Our understanding is that the No 2 reactor melted down. We surmise that the No 3 reactor is in the same situation.” The darkening picture of conditions inside the cores – which has emerged since Tepco began sending workers into the reactor buildings for the first time last week – has added to doubts about whether Tepco and the government disclosed all they knew in the early days of the crisis.

The Financial Times went on to say that the Japanese Government was maintaining its line that Fukushima had only leaked 10 per cent of the radiation of Chernobyl.
This claim must now be held in grave doubt. Former nuclear industry engineer and executive Arnie Gunderson described the ground water contamination at Fukushima as “the worst in human history”. Dr Vivian Norris (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/vivian-norris-de-montaigu), writing in the Huffington Post (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/vivian-norris-de-montaigu/deadly-silence-on-fukushi_b_859241.html), described his findings:


Gundersen is in touch with senior members of the Japanese nuclear establishment.…I will summarize some of Gunderson’s very disturbing and important information here:

1. There was a hydrogen explosion and it was a detonation not a deflagration, in other words the fire burned up not burned down.

2. A frame by frame analysis shows a flame which confirms that the fuel pool is burning as a result of an explosion which started as a hydrogen explosion but that could not have lifted the fuel into the air so there must have been a violent explosion at the bottom of the fuel pool. But more data is needed.

3. Gunderson speaks about past criticalities in other nuclear reactors around the world, and I fin d it odd we are not hearing about these and how they can teach us about what is going on now at Fukushima.

4. Radioactive water is being pumped out and ground water is contaminated so there must be a leak or leaks and this disaster is in no way contained. There will be contamination for a long time to come and this ground water contamination is moving inland. One town is reporting radioactive sewage sludge from ground water or rainwater.

5. The Greenpeace ship Rainbow water has requested the Japanese government to test the waters near Japan and Japan has refused this independent data request. The EPA has also shut down all inspection centers and is NOT inspecting fish. (Why the silence?)

Professor Christopher Busby from the European Committee on Radiation Risks says Fukushima’s highly radioactive gases and liquids continue to be released into the environment unabated. Prof. Busby noted that higher than normal levels of radioactivity had, along with Tokyo, been reported in the US as well in Europe and the UK. He suggested that we are likely to see at least 400,000 cases of cancer as a result of Fukushima.

“It is a global situation now,” said Prof. Busby, “and the situation continues to worsen.”

“Of course it’s time for the Japanese government to take control. But having said that, it’s very hard to know how you could take control of the situation. The situation is essentially out of control.”


CALDICOTT: JAPAN MAY BECOME UNINHABITABLE FOREVER

So far the plume of radioactivity from Fukushima has mainly been blowing out to sea. The concern expressed by many is about what happens if the prevailing winds turn around, as they are expected to do, and begin to blow southwards towards Tokyo.
Dr Vivian Norris, quoting Arnie Gunderson again:

What is highly disturbing is that the main reason Japan does not appear to be as bad a Chernobyl is that the wind was blowing out to sea and not for the most part towards land. But all this has done is spread the cancers out into the worldwide population as opposed to concentrating it all in Japan. It will be very difficult to tell, as it was in France, Scandinavia and other places where the Chernobyl cloud travelled in the days following the disaster.

Speaking exclusively to Independent Australia, prominent anti-nuclear campaigner Dr Helen Caldicott raised two grim and shocking scenarios about what foreseeably could happen next in this developing emergency.

“If there is a very big aftershock, as there very well could be, Reactor 4 will probably collapse along with other buildings. This would create a Chernobyl type catastrophe which, combined with a change in the wind – so its blowing the radiation to the South instead of out to sea as it is at the moment – could make almost all of Japan – including Tokyo –uninhabitable forever.”

“The second possible scenario is that there could be hydrogen explosion blowing one of the reactors apart also creating a Chernobyl type event. This, combined with the wind change mentioned would create the same result—an uninhabitable Japan.”


MEDIA SILENCE

Fukushima may end up being one of the worst disaster the world has seen, we are yet to know its full impact as Japanese authorities struggle to contain the fallout. Yet, if you weren’t reading Independent Australia (http://www.independentaustralia.net/2011/2011/media-2/fukushima-meltdown-cover-up-whos-watching-the-watchers/), listening closely to a small handful of other Australian media sources, such as Crikey (http://www.crikey.com.au/), or Mark Willacy (http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2011/05/30/3231088.htm?section=justin) on ABC radio, or reading the international press, it is likely that you would have missed the meltdown and would have no comprehension about the full scale of the disaster. In other words, the vast majority of Australians who get their news from newspapers or commercial television or radio have no idea about the severity of the Fukushima nuclear disaster, or the danger to human health posed by this ongoing crisis.
Something similar is going on in Japan and the US. In Japan, the nuclear industry has been actively promoted by the Government since inception in the interests of Japanese nuclear security. The nuclear regulator is almost entirely made up for former Tepco employees and is described as being almost an arm of the power company. Criticism of nuclear power has long been strongly suppressed in Japan.
http://www.independentaustralia.net/Wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/Media-Silence_1e2e0-300x297.jpg (http://www.independentaustralia.net/Wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/Media-Silence_1e2e0.jpg)Dr Norris again:

[Japanese journalist] Uesugi also notes that at TEPCO press conferences, which are now being held at company headquarters, foreign correspondents and Japanese freelancers regularly ask probing questions while mainstream journalists simply record and report company statements reiterating that the situation is basically under control and there is nothing to worry about. One reason for this, Uesugi suggests, is that TEPCO, a giant media sponsor, has an annual 20 billion yen advertising budget. “The media keeps defending the information from TEPCO!” “The Japanese media today is no different from the wartime propaganda media that kept repeating to the very end that ‘Japan is winning the war against America,’” Uesugi exclaimed.

Clearly, there is a concerted effort by Japanese authorities to downplay the significance of the disaster to ensure the future sustainability of the nuclear power industry. But what about the similar silence in the US?
Dr Norris says the issue should be front page news everywhere:

“Why is this not on the front page of every single newspaper in the world? Why are official agencies not measuring from many places around the world and reporting on what is going on in terms of contamination every single day since this disaster happened? Radioactivity has been being released now for almost two full months! Even small amounts when released continuously, and in fact especially continuous exposure to small amounts of radioactivity, can cause all kinds of increases in cancers.”

In the US and Japan, where the nuclear industry is a powerful lobby group, perhaps it is understandable that the nuclear industry have managed to suppress information about this devastating crisis. But here in Australia, where we have no nuclear power industry? The reality is that Australia, with its huge natural reserves of uranium and strong mining industry, is deeply entrenched in the nuclear cabal. Independent Australia has reported (http://www.independentaustralia.net/2011/2011/politics/australia-open-for-nuclear-sewage-business/) before about plans for the world’s nuclear waste to be shipped to Australia and the fact this agreement with the US was actively suppressed by the Australian media, perhaps because some media proprietors have strong vested interests in the nuclear industry. It seems that Australia’s overly concentrated media industry (http://www.independentaustralia.net/2011/2011/democracy/concentrated-media-ownership-a-crisis-for-democracy/) is not only a crisis for our democracy, but can potentially even threaten our children’s health.
Dr Caldicott said that the media here are failing in their duty to the people of Australia.
“The media need to be brought down to Earth,” said Dr Caldicott.
“President Jefferson said an informed democracy will make reasonable decisions.”
“The media are failing to inform, so the people can’t make reasonable decisions.”

http://www.independentaustralia.net/2011/media-2/fukushima-meltdown-caldicott-says-japan-may-become-uninhabitable-media-silent/

Ed Jewett
06-05-2011, 02:37 AM
Maggie, another request. I had the pleasure of meeting Helen Caldicott in person decades ago though Physicians for Social Responsibility. If you see her, she deserves a planet's worth of hugs.

Magda Hassan
06-05-2011, 02:48 AM
Maggie, another request. I had the pleasure of meeting Helen Caldicott in person decades ago though Physicians for Social Responsibility. If you see her, she deserves a planet's worth of hugs.
Yes! She is fantastic. Totally dedicated to the cause. Golden.

Peter Lemkin
06-05-2011, 03:53 AM
I'll second or third that about Dr. Helen Caldecott! To me it is so sad and amazing that she is virtually unknown - worldwide - except among dedicated people who worry about human interventions destroying the environment and Peace.

Good article, Maggie. Sad, but true. Imagine trying to resettle all of the Japanese!!! They don't all have to leave - yet!....but if they don't do something drastic quick and stop the cover up, they could get to that point. In fact, due to all the secrecy, it hard to know how much radiation has been and what the minimum now is that will be released. It is however much more than 10% of Chernobyl, I think all independent nuclear scientists admit. At least half to the same amount, SO FAR....with more coming - lots more. Much to most seems to have gone into the groundwater and the ocean, but even that is not well known due to the secrecy of TEPCO and the Japanese Govt. I expect one can watch the exclusion zone slowly grow and grow. Tokyo is not that far away..... America has some of the exact same model reactors also near cities and a few sitting directly on earthquake faults. It is only a matter of time, and few know but radiation makes the steel and other metals used in reactors brittle - the main reason that nuclear power plants have a limited lifetime. As the metal becomes brittle with age of bombardment by radiation, the chances of a meltdown and/or catastrophic event increase greatly, with age.

Keith Millea
06-05-2011, 04:41 PM
Dr Norris says the issue should be front page news everywhere:

“Why is this not on the front page of every single newspaper in the world? Why are official agencies not measuring from many places around the world and reporting on what is going on in terms of contamination every single day since this disaster happened? Radioactivity has been being released now for almost two full months! Even small amounts when released continuously, and in fact especially continuous exposure to small amounts of radioactivity, can cause all kinds of increases in cancers.”



This is such a profound statement.The total blackout of news here in the US is mind blowing.Nobody here is talking about this awful situation.Even among my friends,I'm a solo voice of awareness,and bringer of bad tidings.Hell,when these people say the radiation is blowing out to sea,what they mean is that it comes straight over to here.We are just ending our rainy season,and I've pretty much stayed inside just to stay out of the rain because I'm rather paranoid.:loco:

Dr.Caldicott(whom I've seen lecture),confirms what I have thought from the beginning of this disaster.Namely,Japan just might end up an uninhabited former great country.

Wake me from this nightmare :damncomputer:

Peter Lemkin
06-05-2011, 07:33 PM
While the 'authorities' in Japan would have one believe they are slowly 'getting the reactors under control'....it now comes out today that the radiation levels LEAKING OUT of the plant are higher today than at any time, thus far. Way to go, team!!!:D

Ed Jewett
06-05-2011, 08:22 PM
One party at another location on this 'net says that we should not worry... that the Japanese have a good deal of experience with radiation injury. angryfire

Dawn Meredith
06-05-2011, 09:33 PM
Maggie, another request. I had the pleasure of meeting Helen Caldicott in person decades ago though Physicians for Social Responsibility. If you see her, she deserves a planet's worth of hugs.
Yes! She is fantastic. Totally dedicated to the cause. Golden.


I have admired her for decades. She knows her stuff. This is very very scary.

Dawn

Ed Jewett
06-06-2011, 03:35 AM
Leuren Moret - Coverup -- California Northwest and BC Canada under radiation as high as Japan (85 minutes)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zL3M3kvgI0&feature=player_embedded#at=19


So is there independent corroboration, and who is this Leuren Moret? Is she credible?

Ed Jewett
06-06-2011, 04:40 AM
Plutonium found outside Fukushima plant
Minute amounts of plutonium have been detected for the first time in soil outside the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant.

Shinzo Kimura of Hokkaido University collected the roadside samples in Okumamachi, some 1.7 kilometers west of the front gate of the power station. They were taken during filming by NHK on April 21st, one day before the area was designated as an exclusion zone.

Professor Masayoshi Yamamoto and researchers at a Kanazawa University laboratory analyzed the samples and found minute amounts of 3 kinds of plutonium.

The samples of plutonium-239 and 240 make up a total of 0.078 becquerels per kilogram.

This is close to the amount produced by past atomic bomb tests.

NHK World

http://www3.nhk.or.jp/daily/english/05_21.html

Peter Lemkin
06-06-2011, 05:45 AM
One party at another location on this 'net says that we should not worry... that the Japanese have a good deal of experience with radiation injury. angryfire

Well, one can't deny that the Japanese have more experience with dealing with radiation-induced injury than anyone else; but that is a total non sequitur. Looks, sadly, like they are about to add to their great body of 'experience' once again. They seem to be the laboratory for radiation 'experiments'.

Magda Hassan
06-06-2011, 08:19 AM
Yes, the peaceful atom strikes again.... :nuke:

Keith Millea
06-06-2011, 02:18 PM
Leuren Moret - Coverup -- California Northwest and BC Canada under radiation as high as Japan (85 minutes)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zL3M3kvgI0&feature=player_embedded#at=19


So is there independent corroboration, and who is this Leuren Moret? Is she credible?



Ed:
Interesting find.Leuren Moret has the credentials,but imo she fails the credibility test.When people start spouting that every disaster is some false flag event,I run!Sorry,but Fukushima was not a false flag,just as Katrina was not.But,I do at least give her credit for talking about the radiation issue and blackout on the NW coast.

A Bio can be found below:

Leuren Moret Biography: Independent Scientist; Expert Witness at the Tokyo International Tribunal for War Crimes in Afghanistan; Expert Witness on HAARP & Environmental Warfare




http://exopolitics.blogs.com/.a/6a00d8341c73dd53ef0120a9443bdb970b-320wi (http://exopolitics.blogs.com/.a/6a00d8341c73dd53ef0120a9443bdb970b-pi) Leuren Moret was an Expert Witness at the International Criminal Tribunal For Afghanistan At Tokyo. She is an independent scientist and international expert on radiation and public health issues. She is on the organizing committee of the World Committee on Radiation Risk, an organization of independent radiation specialists, including members of the Radiation Committee in the EU parliament, the European Committee on Radiation Risk. She has been an environmental commissioner for the City of Berkeley. Ms. Moret earned her BS in geology at U.C. Davis in 1968 and her MA in Near Eastern studies from U.C. Berkeley in 1978. She has completed all but her dissertation for a PhD in the geosciences at U.C. Davis. She has traveled and conducted scientific research in 42 countries. She contributed to a scientific report on depleted uranium for the United Nations sub commission investigating the illegality of depleted uranium munitions. Marion Fulk, a former Manhattan Project scientist and retired insider at the Livermore Lab, who is an expert on radioactive fallout and rainout, has trained her on radiation issues.


Leuren Moret has conducted research concerning the impact on the health of the environment and global public health from atmospheric testing, nuclear power plants, and depleted uranium. She has helped collect and measure radiation in 6000 baby teeth from children living around nuclear power plants, and helped The State of Louisiana (USA) pass the first state depleted uranium bill for mandatory testing of soldiers.

Articles she wrote on DU were translated into Indian languages to increase awareness. Her article "Depleted Uranium: The Trojan Horse of Nuclear War" in the June 2004 WORLD AFFAIRS JOURNAL was translated at the request of the Kremlin for distribution throughout the Russian government. The LONE STAR ICONOCLAST, hometown newspaper of President Bush, interviewed her for a series of interviews, "What is depleted uranium?", which are now attached to US Congressman McDermott's 2005 depleted uranium bill HR 2410 in the US Congress. The newspaper did a second issue, March 1, 2006, titled "Have DU Will Travel". Her City of Berkeley 2003 resolution banning weapons in space was followed by a Space Preservation Treaty Resolution adopted by seven sister cities in British Columbia, Canada, contributing to Prime Minister Paul Martin's decision in February 2005 to abandon his secret agreement with President Bush to allow NMD in Canada.

Her research on divestment of pension funds from US weapons manufacturers was discussed on a Vancouver radio station in April 2005. The interview helped to make divestment, of $4.6 billion (in 251 US weapons manufacturers) in British Columbia (BC) pension funds, an issue for the May 2005 election platform in BC.

Leuren Moret is a Livermore nuclear weapons lab whistleblower, an Environmental Commissioner in the City of Berkeley, and testifies as a depleted uranium expert in the new documentary film BEYOND TREASON.

HAARP & Environmental warfare articles and radio programs with
Leuren Moret: http://exopolitics.blogs.com/peaceinspace/

Leuren Moret Testimony: http://www.mindfully.org/Nucs/2003/Leuren-Moret-ICT13dec03.htm

http://exopolitics.blogs.com/peaceinspace/2010/03/leuren-moret-biography-independent-scientist-expert-witness-at-the-tokyo-international-tribunal-for-war-crimes-in-afghanist.html

Ed Jewett
06-06-2011, 05:40 PM
Fukushima Predicted: Regulatory Commission was Warned for Years
by grtv
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) held a special ACRS meeting Thursday May 26, 2011 on the current status of Fukushima.

Arnie Gundersen was invited to speak for 5 minutes concerning the lessons learned from the Fukushima accident as it pertains to the 23 Mark 1 Boiling Water Reactors (BWR's) in the US and containment integrity.

Mr. Gundersen was the first engineer to brief the NRC on the implication of Main Steam Isolation Valve (MSIV) Leakage in 1974, and he has been studying containment integrity since 1972. The NRC has constantly maintained in all of its calculations and reviews that there is zero probability of a containment leaking.

For more than six years, in testimony and in correspondence with the NRC, Mr. Gundersen has disputed the NRC's stand that containment systems simply do not and cannot leak. The events at Fukushima have proven that Gundersen was correct. The explosions at Fukushima show that Mark 1 containments will lose their integrity and release huge amounts of radiation, as Mr. Gundersen has been telling the NRC for many years.

Video at link:
http://tv.globalresearch.ca/2011/06/fukushima-predicted-regulatory-commission-was-warned-years

Ed Jewett
06-06-2011, 11:53 PM
MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2011

Japan Finally Admits TOTAL Meltdown at 3 Nuclear Reactors Within Hours of Earthquake ... And More Than DOUBLES Estimate of Radiation Released After Accident


For months, Tepco and Japanese officials refused to admit that there had been any meltdowns at Fukushima.

Then they said there were meltdowns at reactors 1, 2 and 3 ... but they might have only been partial meltdowns.

Finally, today, they admitted the obvious: there were total meltdowns at all 3 reactors. As CNN reports:

Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant experienced full meltdowns at three reactors in the wake of an earthquake and tsunami in March, the country's Nuclear Emergency Response Headquarters said Monday.

The nuclear group's new evaluation, released Monday, goes further than previous statements in describing the extent of the damage caused by an earthquake and tsunami on March 11.

***

Reactors 1, 2 and 3 experienced a full meltdown, it said.

***

But Tokyo Electric [on May 24th] released a second possible scenario for reactors 2 and 3, one that estimated a full meltdown did not occur. In that scenario, the company estimated the fuel rods may have broken but may not have completely melted.

***

Temperature data showed the two reactors had cooled substantially in the more than two months since the incident, Tokyo Electric said in May.

***

Tokyo Electric avoided using the term "meltdown," and says it was keeping the remnants of the core cool. But U.S. experts interviewed by CNN after the company's announcement in May said that while it may have been containing the situation, the damage had already been done.

"On the basis of what they showed, if there's not fuel left in the core, I don't know what it is other than a complete meltdown," said Gary Was, a University of Michigan nuclear engineering professor and CNN consultant. And given the damage reported at the other units, "It's hard to imagine the scenarios can differ that much for those reactors."

As the Japan Times reports today, the Japanese Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency has "more than doubled its estimate of the radioactive material ejected into the air in the early days of the Fukushima nuclear crisis".

Japan Times also notes that plutonium has been found in soil outside of the nuclear complex - about 1.7 kilometers from the front gate of Fukushima. However, the plutonium probably came from the so-called "hydrogen explosions", which hopefully won't happen again. (However, nuclear expert Arnie Gundersen believes that at least some of the explosions were caused by nuclear reactions in the fuel pools.)

While it is tempting to believe that the worst of the crisis is over, some of the reactors are more radioactive than ever, and nuclear chain reactions may still be occurring.

And it's not just the reactors themselves.

Remember that - when the spent fuel rods stored onsite within the reactor buildings are included - the amount of radioactive fuel at Fukushima dwarfs Chernobyl.

For background, see this.

Multiple embedded links, as usual, at
http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2011/06/japan-finally-admits-total-meltdowns-at.html

Keith Millea
06-07-2011, 06:55 PM
I just found this talk about radiation on the Arnie Gundersen site.It's a month old,but is still very useful information.Check it out.


http://vimeo.com/23186557

http://www.fairewinds.com/

Keith Millea
06-09-2011, 07:38 PM
Arnie Gundersen on CNN.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=bXhNDgRkrd0

Ed Jewett
06-09-2011, 07:43 PM
The Real Dangers of Nuclear Power and Nuclear War
by grtv
Dr. Helen Caldicott: Conference on THE NUCLEAR DANGER: Nuclear War and Nuclear Power

Montreal. March 18, 2011

Sponsored by the Centre for Research on Globalization

Part 2: http://youtu.be/v9LK9LB0FNU
Part 3: http://youtu.be/xtb7uX2icKg
Part 4: http://youtu.be/YJC5WSrOz2U
Part 5: http://youtu.be/C-iTYFnsnqM
Part 6: http://youtu.be/83mzk9fkj1c
Part 7: http://youtu.be/3TN4n6ja4EE

The single most articulate and passionate advocate of citizen action to remedy the nuclear and environmental crises, Dr Helen Caldicott, has devoted the last 38 years to an international campaign to educate the public about the medical hazards of the nuclear age and the necessary changes in human behavior to stop environmental destruction.

In the words of Dr. Caldicott, "When I first heard about the reactor damage at the Fukushima Daiichi plant in Japan, I knew the prognosis: If any of the containment vessels or fuel pools exploded, it would mean millions of new cases of cancer in the Northern Hemisphere.

Many advocates of nuclear power would deny this. During the 25th anniversary last week of the Chernobyl disaster, some commentators asserted that few people died in the aftermath, and that there have been relatively few genetic abnormalities in survivors' offspring. It's an easy leap from there to arguments about the safety of nuclear energy compared to alternatives like coal, and optimistic predictions about the health of the people living near Fukushima.

But this is dangerously ill informed and short-sighted; if anyone knows better, it's doctors like me."

For more information:
http://www.helencaldicott.com/

Filmed and edited by Jorge Zegarra

http://tv.globalresearch.ca/2011/06/real-dangers-nuclear-power-and-nuclear-war

Ed Jewett
06-09-2011, 07:47 PM
Fukushima escalates to worse-case possibility --Japan has suggested the situation at the Fukushima nuclear plant has gone beyond a meltdown into a worst-case melt-through.

08 Jun 2011 (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
http://www.abc.net.au/lateline/content/2011/s3239276.htm

For the first time Japan has suggested the situation at the Fukushima nuclear plant has gone beyond a meltdown. Japan says that nuclear fuel in three reactors has possibly melted through the pressure vessels and accumulated in the outer containment vessels. Japanese media report this melt-through is far worse than a core meltdown and the worst possibility in a nuclear accident.

http://www.legitgov.org/Fukushima-escalates-worse-case-possibility

Keith Millea
06-09-2011, 08:16 PM
Ed:

I just watched part 1 of Dr. Caldicotts presentation.I didn't find it anywhere in your post,so I'll add it here.Excellent find........

Part 1:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q0EJkzG2mcY&feature=player_detailpage

Ed Jewett
06-09-2011, 09:21 PM
Ed:

I just watched part 1 of Dr. Caldicotts presentation.I didn't find it anywhere in your post,so I'll add it here.Excellent find........

Part 1:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q0EJkzG2mcY&feature=player_detailpage

Thank you, Keith. (https://deeppoliticsforum.com/forums/showthread.php?3087-Team-Chemistry)

Ed Jewett
06-11-2011, 01:25 AM
FRIDAY, JUNE 10, 2011

Physician and Epidemiologist Say 35% Spike in Infant Mortality in Northwest Cities Since Meltdown Might Be the Result of Fallout from Fukushima


As I've previously noted, infants are much more vulnerable to radiation than adults. And see this.

However, radiation safety standards are set based on the assumption that everyone exposed is a healthy man in his 20s.

Now, a physician (Janette D. Sherman, M. D.) and epidemiologist (Joseph Mangano) have penned a short but horrifying essay asking whether a spike in infant deaths in the Northwest are due to Fukushima:

The recent CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report indicates that eight cities in the northwest U.S. (Boise ID, Seattle WA, Portland OR, plus the northern California cities of Santa Cruz, Sacramento, San Francisco, San Jose, and Berkeley) reported the following data on deaths among those younger than one year of age:

4 weeks ending March 19, 2011 - 37 deaths (avg. 9.25 per week)
10 weeks ending May 28, 2011 - 125 deaths (avg.12.50 per week)

This amounts to an increase of 35% (the total for the entire U.S. rose about 2.3%), and is statistically significant. Of further significance is that those dates include the four weeks before and the ten weeks after the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant disaster. In 2001 the infant mortality was 6.834 per 1000 live births, increasing to 6.845 in 2007. All years from 2002 to 2007 were higher than the 2001 rate.

***

Data from Chernobyl, which exploded 25 years ago, clearly shows increased numbers of sick and weak newborns and increased numbers of deaths in the unborn and newborns, especially soon after the meltdown. These occurred in Europe as well as the former Soviet Union. Similar findings are also seen in wildlife living in areas with increased radioactive fallout levels.
(Chernobyl – Consequences of the Catastrophe for People and the Environment, Alexeiy V. Yablokov, Vasily B. Nesterenko, and Alexey V. Nesterenko. Consulting Editor: Janette D. Sherman-Nevinger. New York Academy of Sciences, 2009.)

Levels of radioisotopes were measured in children who had died in the Minsk area that had received Chernobyl fallout. The cardiac findings were the same as those seen in test animals that had been administered Cs-137. Bandashevsky, Y. I, Pathology of Incorporated Ionizing Radiation, Belarus Technical University, Minsk. 136 pp., 1999. For his pioneering work, Prof. Bandashevsky was arrested in 2001 and imprisoned for five years of an eight year sentence.

***

Why should we care if there may be is a link between Fukushima and the death of children? Because we need to measure the actual levels of isotopes in the environment and in the bodies of people exposed to determine if the fallout is killing our most vulnerable. The research is not technically difficult – the political and economic barriers may be greater. Bandshevsky and others did it and confirmed the connection. The information is available in the Chernobyl book. (Previously cited.)

The biological findings of Chernobyl cannot be ignored: isotope incorporation will determine the future of all life on earth – animal, fish, bird, plant and human. It is crucial to know this information if we are to avoid further catastrophic damage.

http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2011/06/physician-and-epidemiologist-say-35.html

Peter Lemkin
06-11-2011, 04:12 AM
It seems a little early for such effects to be seen in such a far away location NW of NA, unless someone is grossly underestimating the amounts of radiation drifting East [the general direction of wind patterns on the Planet due to Earth's spin]. While fetuses and very young are more susceptible due to the larger % of dividing cells [which are more vulnerable to radiation], it is still hard to imagine such an effect would be felt yet. It maybe due to local factors - or an artifact. Time will tell. The sad thing about the radiation at Fukashima is that much [not all] of what is leading out will eventually spread worldwide in rings of contamination - the worst being nearest the plant and the next worst outside that, etc.; however, no place will be totally untouched and there is NO safe level of radiation. There also is no place and no person who doesn't get exposed to some naturally; more with X-rays, CT and all the human abuse of nuclear energy and nukes, etc. Adding to this growing burden with nuclear power plants that are poorly designed and on earthquake prone areas is insane....as some are starting to figure out. Lets hope enough figure it out - in time!

Jan Klimkowski
06-11-2011, 12:13 PM
It seems a little early for such effects to be seen in such a far away location NW of NA, unless someone is grossly underestimating the amounts of radiation drifting East [the general direction of wind patterns on the Planet due to Earth's spin]. While fetuses and very young are more susceptible due to the larger % of dividing cells [which are more vulnerable to radiation], it is still hard to imagine such an effect would be felt yet.

Peter - agreed.

In addition, the raw epidemiological figure based on a relatively small statistical sample would need to be analyzed much further before any statistically significant rise could be attributed to radioactive particles.

Indeed, ideally, it would be important to know the cause of death of each infant in the sample, and compare that expanded analysis with - at a minimum - epidemiological analyses for each of the last ten years.

Peter Lemkin
06-12-2011, 04:07 AM
JUAN GONZALEZ: Almost three months after the earthquake and tsunami that triggered a nuclear disaster in Japan, government officials say they may evacuate more towns affected by radiation. New monitoring data shows "hot spots" of elevated contamination farther away from the stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

The new hot spots were announced after authorities conceded on Monday the crisis at the stricken nuclear power facility was far more severe than they had previously admitted. Japan’s Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency more than doubled its estimate for the amount of radiation that leaked from the plant in the first week of the disaster in March. The agency has also admitted for the first time that full nuclear meltdowns occurred at three of the plant’s reactors.

A recent law school graduate, Takanori Eto, is the first to file a lawsuit against the Japanese government over its handling of the crisis.

TAKANORI ETO: [translated] There are dangers inherent in the government’s nuclear policy. From the very beginning, there were also mistakes made. We also found out that, even after the accident, the Japanese government was unable to properly protect its people. So I decided, rather than remain silent, I needed to bring to light these lapses in judgment in a lawsuit.

AMY GOODMAN: That was Takanori Eto, the first person to sue the Japanese government over its handling of the nuclear disaster.

The New York Times reports harsh economic conditions are driving laborers to Fukushima for work at the plant despite the dangers. Earlier this week, a robot sent into the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power facility detected the highest levels of radiation since the onset of the crisis. A nuclear review by the U.S. power industry, convened this week, is weighing safety upgrades at domestic plants in the wake of Japan’s reactor crisis.

To discuss the state of nuclear power plants in Japan and the United States, we’re joined in Washington, D.C., by Robert Alvarez, former senior policy adviser to the U.S. Secretary of Energy, now a senior scholar at the Institute for Policy Studies. We’re also joined in Tokyo by Aileen Mioko Smith, executive director of the group Green Action.

We welcome you both to Democracy Now! Bob Alvarez, start off by talking about what we know at this point and the fact that just this week we’re hearing there were three nuclear meltdowns. What does this mean?

ROBERT ALVAREZ: Well, I think it means that the accident was much more prompt and severe, and its radiological consequences are going to be—unfold in a more serious way. As you mentioned earlier, the contamination of land nearby, or not so nearby, is proving to be quite extensive. The reports that I’ve seen suggest that land contamination, in terms of areas that are technically uninhabitable because of cesium-137 contamination, is roughly 600 square kilometers, or about 17 times the size of Manhattan Island.

JUAN GONZALEZ: And Aileen Mioko Smith, the reaction of the public to this increased contamination much further on than the exclusion zone, although it’s in hot spots—what has been the reaction to the government’s failure to make this clear early on?

AILEEN MIOKO SMITH: Well, there’s incredible concern, especially among parents in Fukushima prefecture. But now spreading is concern among parents in Tokyo, which is quite a far way from Fukushima. Mainly, what’s been happening is that citizens have been monitoring. And after they find high levels, they demand that the local authorities and the government look at those contaminated areas, and then the government looks, and it is contaminated. So it’s very much citizen-oriented. There are people going in all the time. There are radiation monitors all over. Parents are measuring. Mothers are measuring. University professors on weekends are measuring.

AMY GOODMAN: And a new study is being done by the prefecture, Aileen?

AILEEN MIOKO SMITH: Yes, we’re very concerned that a health study is starting at the end of this month. This is concerning the effects of the Fukushima residents, on the prefectural citizens. It’s headed by a Dr. Shunichi Yamashita, who’s at the Atomic Bomb Research Institute. He’s the radiological health safety risk management adviser for the prefecture. He’s widely shown on national TV. He speaks widely in the prefecture, always saying there’s absolutely no concern with the levels of radiation in Fukushima. He says that mothers, even mothers exposed to 100 millisieverts, pregnant mothers, will not have any effect, health effect. Remember the number 100. Compared to that, the Soviet Union required a mandatory evacuation during Chernobyl at five millisieverts. This doctor is quoted as saying, "The effects of radiation do not come to people that are happy and laughing. They come to people that are weak-spirited, that brood and fret." This is a direct quote. And he’s heading the study. And so, the citizens in Fukushima are very concerned.

AMY GOODMAN: Bob Alvarez, you’ve come out with a new report. What are your main findings?

ROBERT ALVAREZ: Well, my report dealt with the vulnerabilities and hazards of stored spent fuel at U.S. reactors in the United States. The United States shares similar designs, reactor designs, as the Japanese reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi station. And if you watched the accident unfold at the Daiichi station, the explosions basically showed you that the spent fuel pools were exposed to the open sky. We, in the United States, are currently storing on the order of three to four, five times more radioactivity in our pools than in Japan, and that the amount of radioactivity that we are storing in unsafe, vulnerable pools constitutes the largest concentrations of radioactivity on the planet.

In 2008, my colleagues and I issued a report, an in-depth study, following the 9/11 attacks. We became very concerned about the vulnerability of these pools after those attacks, and we pointed out that if somebody or something were to cause the water to drain, it would lead to a catastrophic radiological fire that could render an area uninhabitable far greater than that created by Chernobyl. Chernobyl created an area that’s currently uninhabitable that’s approximately the size of half of the state of New Jersey.

The fact of the matter is, is that we don’t have a final resting place for these wastes. We’ve been trying to find a disposal site for these wastes for the last 55 years. And the reality is that these wastes are going to continue to accumulate at U.S. sites, and the reactor operators are going to continue to squeeze spent fuel into pools that have nowhere near the level of protection of reactors. I mean, these pools are contained in structures that you would find at car dealerships or big box stores. And, for example, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission does not require the pools to have backup diesel generators if they lose offsite power. It’s very important to keep the pools cool, and they do pose some very, very serious risks. They are, in my opinion, the most serious vulnerability of nuclear power that we have in the United States.

JUAN GONZALEZ: But what are the alternatives, given the fact, obviously, that the United States government, like several other governments around the world, are determined to continue to expand the use of nuclear power? What are the alternatives for storing the spent fuel?

ROBERT ALVAREZ: Well, I think that there are different—there’s a big difference between plans and reality. I think that the expansion of nuclear power in this country, if it occurs at all, is going to be rather modest and minor. We have to be concerned about the 104 reactors that are operating and the generation of that material, and that we should be doing what Germany did 25 years ago, which is to thin out the pools, use them for the original purpose they were intended, which is to allow the spent fuel to cool off for several years, and then to place the spent fuel into dry, hardened storage modules. And this significantly reduces the hazards of these spent fuel pools.

AMY GOODMAN: You say that what is recommended for expansion in the United States is relatively minor, Bob Alvarez, but I think many were shocked that President Obama has been pushing for something that presidents haven’t pushed for for decades. I mean, the last nuclear power plant in this country built, what, some 30, 40 years ago. I mean, Juan, you’ve written about President Obama, before he was president, getting a good deal of support from the nuclear industry, and he never said he wasn’t going to push for this, but they’ve been rather quiet about it right now, since the catastrophe in Japan.

ROBERT ALVAREZ: Well, I think a lot of this is rhetorical. I think that—I look at it as the equivalent of throwing nuclear candy at political supporters, or even political enemies who you’re trying to win over. The fact of the matter is, is that nuclear power is not going to have a chance in this country, at all, unless it has unfettered access to the United States Treasury. This is not going to happen. The House, for example, recently enacted the appropriations legislation for fiscal year 2012 and totally spurned Obama’s request to expand loan guarantee authority. In other words, the U.S. government would guarantee the loans, but the loans themselves would come out of the U.S. Treasury. I don’t think that the Congress right now has the stomach to open up the Treasury for reactors that are going to cost on the order of $10 billion apiece.

You also have to keep in mind that while he has been vocally supportive of nuclear power and has done things like try to seek expanded loan guarantee authority, he’s also pulled the rug out from under the nuclear industry by canceling the Yucca Mountain disposal site. And so, I think that we have to sort out, as we do with a lot of things the President does, the difference between what he says and what happens.

JUAN GONZALEZ: Aileen Mioko Smith, I’d like to get back to the disaster in Japan for a moment. Greenpeace has been reporting that the contamination levels—dangerous contamination levels in the ocean go out as—they found it as far as 50 miles out from the shore. What has been happening with the fishing industry in Japan and the reaction to the possible contamination of huge swaths of the ocean off the coast?

AILEEN MIOKO SMITH: Yes, the ocean contamination is very serious. There are estimates that it’s 10 times the release that was—that compared to Chernobyl into the Baltic Sea. So it’s very serious. And the National Fisheries Association came out very early on after the accident demanding the closure of all nuclear power plants in Japan. This is an incredible statement, because the industry has never been concerned about nuclear power before. Just right now, TEPCO is—the amount of contaminated water on site is building and building, and there’s intention to dump more. And the industry is opposing it right now.

AMY GOODMAN: Bob Alvarez, can you talk about this contamination of the oceans?

ROBERT ALVAREZ: Yes. As you know, the Japanese government, in its report to the IAEA, said it had underestimated the amount of radioactivity released to the atmosphere during the first week and that it amounts to roughly 40 million curies of radioactivity. What they failed to mention is that they discharged an equally large amount into the ocean, about 20 million curies, and that the—what they’re counting here is the radioactive iodine and radioactive cesium.

Radioactive cesium is of most concern because it has a half-life of 30 years, it gives off potentially dangerous external penetrating radiation, and it is absorbed into the food chain and other biota as if it were potassium. So as it goes up the food chain, it accumulates, and by the time it reaches people who consume this food, the levels are higher than they originally were when they entered the environment. There is a stretch of ocean floor offshore from the reactor site that’s about 300 kilometers wide—I don’t recall, several kilometers—300 kilometers long, rather, and several kilometers wide of cesium-137. That’s a very, very serious concern because of the fact that this is really a fundamental element of the aquatic food chain for the food supply for the country of Japan.

AMY GOODMAN: Aileen Mioko Smith, can you talk about the changing of what is considered acceptable radiation limits at the schools?

AILEEN MIOKO SMITH: Yes. There’s been a big fight. The Fukushima residents, the parents, came down in busloads to Tokyo on March—excuse me, May 23rd and met with the Ministry of Education. The whole building was encircled by people, completely encircled, and these negotiations went on inside the building. It was very intense. And the parents made the ministry say that they would aim for returning to back down to the one millisievert standard as much as possible, compared to the twentyfold increase that they were allowing in Fukushima prefecture for the children. These levels that they have been allowing, it’s officially still in place. They’re huge levels. Twenty millisieverts is much higher than what triggers a radiation-controlled area inside nuclear power plants. For example, in Japan, workers have been recognized for compensation, getting leukemia or whatever, as low as five, a little bit over five millisieverts. And this standard for children is fourfold that annually. Anyway, we demanded that it be brought down as close to one. They agreed. And then it turns out that what they’re saying is, just during the time they’re a school, they can reach that maximum one. So, of course, you know, a child’s life is at school, going to and from school, etc., so the government is still allowing very high levels for children.

JUAN GONZALEZ: Bob Alvarez, I’d like to ask you about this problem that the public confronts of governments misrepresenting, or sometimes actually lying, to the public in terms—when these major disasters occur. I mean, going back, from Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, most recently the BP spill in the Gulf, or the collapse of the Twin Towers and the health effects for the public, and now here we have in Japan—the tendency of government always to withhold information that they immediately have from the public. Doesn’t this eventually lead to just general mistrust of people to what the government is saying in these disasters?

ROBERT ALVAREZ: Oh, yes, of course. I think the nuclear industries, particularly in the United States and elsewhere, Russia, Japan, have a very long history of withholding information and misleading the public about the hazards of their activities. And in this country, it went on for many years, and during the open-air bomb testing program, for example. The nuclear industry enjoys this rather unique status because of its origins in the nuclear weapons program and that it’s a system that has been fostered under conditions of secrecy, isolation and privilege, and they do not consider it in their interest to be candid with the public. I used to work in the Energy Department for six years and was a former, I guess you would say, nuclear insider. And the mindset that I encountered there was that they—the people who were reluctant to reveal candid information about the nature of the hazards from these activities—was that we can’t scare people, scaring people is worse than telling them the truth. And I think that that’s a fundamental—a fundamentally wrongheaded assumption.

AMY GOODMAN: Bob Alvarez, how do you respond to the U.S. nuclear industry saying it doesn’t expect any health problems among Japanese people as a result of the nuclear accident?

ROBERT ALVAREZ: I just think that’s arm waving. It’s public relations arm waving, because we won’t know what the full truth will be for decades to come. We do know that based on past accidents, such as Chernobyl, such as the experience we’ve had with our nuclear workers in this country over the last 50 years, is that there is bound to be a significant increase in the risk of cancer, and most likely other diseases.

AMY GOODMAN: And you say Japan is equal to or worse than Chernobyl, the Fukushima Daiichi plant?

ROBERT ALVAREZ: That’s correct, because if—the Soviet Union and Russia basically have claimed that about 50 million curies of radioactivity were released to the environment—this is roughly comparable to what the Japanese government has currently admitted—and that this site continues to release significant amount of radiation in the atmosphere, nowhere near as large as it did during the first week or two, but it’s still quite significant.

The other issue here is the workers on the site. I was astounded to learn that some 5,000 workers have positive evidence of internal exposure to radioactive materials. This is a huge number of people to be exposed over such a short period of time. In the U.S. nuclear weapons program, which operated at a sort of a brisk pace for nearly 50 years, this is roughly comparable to what all workers at nuclear weapons sites during that period were recorded to have received from internal exposures. I think that the impact on the workforce, the emergency responders, is going—is something we need to watch very closely, because that’s going to give us some important clues of what we might expect in terms of the health consequences to the public.

JUAN GONZALEZ: And yet, Aileen Mioko Smith, some of the reports that we’ve had here, the news reports, say that there’s no trouble recruiting people to go and work on the cleanup because of, obviously, the high pay that they’re offering and also the economic dislocation that occurred as a result of the tsunami and of the nuclear accident itself.

AILEEN MIOKO SMITH: Yes, that’s correct. And we’re very concerned for the health of the workers. And as Bob Alvarez pointed out, now the knowledge that so many workers have received internal exposure, this is also a concern for the public, and citizens are very concerned about that. The Japanese government refuses to recognize any potential internal exposure of the residents of Fukushima. We’ve been addressing this about the children. Citizens have demanded whole body counts—a few have actually been able to get them—at the Atomic Bomb Research Institute, and are refused the results. They’re just told, "No problem." They don’t—aren’t given the data. And they’re demanding that the data be released. So that is a great concern.

And the other thing I want to point out is this is still an ongoing accident. That issue about the spent fuel pool that Bob Alvarez addressed on the U.S., at Fukushima, as you know, Unit 4 is there with that exposed spent fuel pool. We’re concerned about possible aftershocks. There are people that are still living 12 miles outside of the radius of the plant. They’re only hot spots that have been evacuated outside of that larger area of 20, 30 kilometers. And that’s why we’re demanding evacuation, and the demand has now become very clear, and we’re pushing for that to happen, especially for pregnant women and young children.

AMY GOODMAN: Bob Alvarez, nuclear power globally—the U.S. says it’s moving forward. But Germany, Angela Merkel has been forced to turn back on that, and they say they’re not going to move forward with nuclear power plants. Same with Switzerland. Saudi Arabia says they’re going to build 30 new nuclear power plants?

ROBERT ALVAREZ: Well, as I said, plans and statements and announcements oftentime are different from what actually happens. The fact of the matter in the United States is that we no longer have any companies or capabilities or infrastructure to build nuclear reactors. We have to depend on nations such as Japan and France to do that. Japan is the—right now the only producer of forgings for reactor vessels. Nuclear engineers in this country are almost like Confederate war veterans; there are very few actual U.S. citizens who go to college to become nuclear engineers, because it’s considered a dead-end occupation. So, we don’t really have the infrastructure. The skilled knowledge base that we need to have any significant expansion of nuclear power is not there.

And I think that the Fukushima accident has really had a major body blow to the world nuclear industry. You have to understand that Japan, with its 54 reactors, represents the third-largest number of reactors of a country in the world. They’re number three. And for Japan now to announce that it’s going to shut down its reactors by next spring, albeit perhaps for temporary reasons, is a major signal to other countries who either have a large reactor fleet or those who are contemplating building more.

I think Saudi Arabia’s desire to have 30 reactors is something that’s not necessarily going to be easily achievable, because of the fact that the United States serves essentially as a gatekeeper for any such deal of that nature. I think that Saudi Arabia is looking to establish a nuclear infrastructure in order to allow it to have the capability down the road to have nuclear weapons. Building 30 reactors in Saudi Arabia, in a country which really doesn’t have much water to speak of—and reactors are extremely water-intensive—doesn’t make a lot of sense. And then if you look at the price tag for building these reactors in a place like Saudi Arabia, you’re looking at an expenditure of somewhere between three to five trillion dollars to do this. So I think some of this—some of these announcements and plans are just what they are, announcements and plans.

AMY GOODMAN: And finally, on Vermont, because it could become the first legislature in the country to shut down a nuclear power plant, the Vermont Yankee plant, but Entergy, the owner, is fighting hard, trying to sue them to stop them from doing this. The comparison of Vermont Yankee to the Fukushima plant?

ROBERT ALVAREZ: Well, the Vermont Yankee plant is a General Electric boiling water Mark 1 reactor, which is the exact same design as those at the Fukushima Daiichi site. It has more radioactivity in its spent fuel than all of the spent fuel rods at the four troubled reactors, wrecked reactors, at Fukushima. It’s 42 years old. And this is a reactor which—I think whose time has come to close. It should not be looked upon as just an ATM machine for a multi-tiered holding company that makes sure that it can make as much money as possible. You know, this reactor was purchased for pennies on the dollar. And companies like Entergy, who operate in these deregulated environments, are loath to do things that would require significant safety upgrades. For example, if the state required them to build cooling towers and comply with the Clean Air Act and to really build new modern ones, I think the capital expenses alone would drive Entergy to shut down that reactor. So, I think that the battle lines are drawn there, and I think that we’re going to see an increasing battle between states who appear to be on a collision course with the federal government over the future of nuclear power.

AMY GOODMAN: We want to thank you very much for being with us, Robert Alvarez—

ROBERT ALVAREZ: Thank you.

AMY GOODMAN:—former senior policy adviser to U.S. Secretary of Energy, now a senior scholar at the Institute for Policy Studies. His new report is called "Spent Nuclear Fuel Pools in the US: Reducing the Deadly Risks of Storage." We’ll link to that at democracynow.org. And Aileen Mioko Smith, thank you so much for being with us again, this time from Tokyo. She is executive director of the group Green Action.

Keith Millea
06-13-2011, 06:28 PM
http://vimeo.com/25002205

Magda Hassan
06-13-2011, 10:06 PM
Italy had scrapped their nuclear plants after Chernobyl but the powers that be had alwys intended to bring it back and in recent years the nuclear lobby had been working hard to make it a reality. So, the referendum was already in place. But then there was Fukushima. They also had a vote on water privitisation which was also rejected. Viva Italia! With both Germany and Italy rejecting nuclear there is a good chance to implement it all over Europe.

Italy’s Voters Scrap Nuclear Energy!


by Tina Gerhardt (http://www.commondreams.org/author/tina-gerhardt)
Berlin, Germany – As polls closed today in Italy, voters had turned out in droves to scrap nuclear energy and water privatization.
http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5069/5817406521_9731f0c42f_m.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/fabx2-00/5817406521/)
Thus far, the 50% hurdle required for the voter turnout to count had been cleared. The latest count put the quorum at 57%.
Polling stations closed at Monday at 3:00 pm and elections results are anticipated by the end of the day.
Nuclear energy was one of four items on the ballot: the others include water privatization (two questions); and whether or not government officials must appear in court when they face criminal trials.
Following the Chernobyl disaster in 1987, Italy decided to shut down its four nuclear power plants. The last operating plant closed in 1990. Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi reversed this decision in 2008.
After the Fukushima disaster, Berlusconi announced a one-year moratorium on his plans for new nuclear power plants. Yet he intended to rekindle Italy’s nuclear energy program in 2014.
The outcome of this weekend’s referendum sends a further crushing message to Berlusconi, who most recently lost heavily in regional elections in late May.
It also sends a strong signal to the nuclear energy industry as Italy joins Switzerland and Germany in shelving plans for nuclear energy. The role of the people – either in voting as in Italy or in demonstrating as in Switzerland and Germany – was in each country critical to bring pressure on their governments.
After anti-nuclear demonstrations in May, Switzerland decided to shelve plans to continue nuclear energy.
Switzerland’s five existing reactors will remain in operation until the end of their lifespan with the last one being decommissioned in 2034. Nuclear energy provides about 40% of Switzerland’s current energy, which Switzerland states will be met by increased renewable energy.
Switzerland is not alone in its decision to phase out nuclear energy. On May 30, German Chancellor Angela Merkel announced that Germany would phase out all nuclear energy by the end of 2022, after more than 100,000 had protested nuclear energy in over 20 cities across Germany.
Germany will achieve this goal by increasing efficiency of buildings (for example, by renovating buildings with insulation in walls and double glazing windows);and by ramping up renewable energy.
While some doubt whether Germany’s energy needs can be met by renewable energy sources, numerous studies suggest that it is entirely feasible, including the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research - http://www.pik-potsdam.de/news/press-releases/der-atomausstieg-ist-bezahlbar-2013-die-energiewende-aber-braucht-einen-kraftakt-en



In March, the EU published its “Roadmap for Moving to a Competitive Low-Carbon Economy by 2050,” http://ec.europa.eu/clima/policies/roadmap/index_en.htm, outlining how the EU could reduce its greenhouse gas emissions 80 to 95% by 2050 based on 1990 levels. Renewable energy will form a large part of the EU’s new low carbon economy.
In order to ramp up this low carbon grid, the EU identified three key factors: improving energy efficiency; investing in the energy market to create a zero carbon infrastructure (for example, by investing in the development of renewable energy, such wind and solar); and by ensuring continent-wide electricity grid interconnections.
The EU added, “We also call attention to the IPCC’s recent report on Renewable Energy. Renewable is available and it is affordable, so we need to implement and use it, because it reduces greenhouse gas emissions.”
Last month, the UN’s scientific body, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), released a study finding that 80% of the world’s energy needs could be met through renewable energy sources by 2050. http://srren.ipcc-wg3.de/report
Later this month, June 28-29, the first European regulatory conference will take place to discuss safety regulations and also the challenges the nuclear industry in Europe will face over the next 10 years.

Ed Jewett
06-15-2011, 02:37 AM
Japanese Schools Asked to Map Fallout Contamination

June 14th, 2011

Via: Reuters: http://ca.news.yahoo.com/radiation-hotspots-hinder-japan-response-nuclear-crisis-082919551.html

Fukushima is estimated to have released just 15 percent of the radiation at Chernobyl, but a complicated software modeling system created by the government to predict where the radiation would drift proved useless.

Under pressure to provide a more accurate picture of the contamination, the Ministry of Education has promised to complete a detailed survey of the evacuated area by October.

Since last week, local governments have been enlisted to provide daily reports of radiation.

More than 1,000 public schools in Fukushima were equipped with dosimeters in late May and teachers were asked to record hourly radiation readings to help create a contamination map.

But some experts say even these added steps are far from enough. “We need a new and more comprehensive system for monitoring radiation,” said Takumi Gotoh, a Nagoya-based cancer specialist. “The system that exists now is not sufficient.”

Posted in Atrocities, Collapse, Energy, Environment, Health, Infrastructure, Perception Management

http://cryptogon.com/?p=22983

*** *** **** *&*&

Fukushima: 34,000 Children to Wear Radiation Dosimeters Around the Clock for Three Months

June 14th, 2011

This is a giant, open air radiation experiment. Human subjects, in vivo, in situ.

Government issued dosimeters? Oh sure. I wonder what will happen to the data…


Via: AFP: http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5hTcfz3z7V1EoAW09WHVP8ztRG6Zg?docId=CNG.eca0b deb0626fbbd85f544eeaf144943.4e1


Japan’s Fukushima city said on Tuesday it would hand radiation dosimeters to 34,000 children to gauge their exposure from the crippled nuclear power plant about 60 kilometres (40 miles) away.

The city will hand the measuring devices to all children aged between four and 15 for three months from September so that they can wear them around the clock, an official at the city’s education board told AFP.

The city is outside the government’s 20-kilometre (12-mile) evacuation and no-go zone around the tsunami-hit Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, but many residents are concerned about radiation, he said.

“There have been fixed-spot radiation measurements but parents and citizens are concerned about individual exposure,” said the official.

“We also believe the distribution of dosimeters will help ease parents’ worries if they confirm their children’s exposure does not pose health risks.”

He added that radiation in the city had been below the official threshold for health risks, and said the children’s dosimeters would be read out once a month to assess cumulative radiation exposure.

Posted in Atrocities, Collapse, Energy, Environment, Health, Infrastructure, Perception Management

http://cryptogon.com/?p=22985

Jan Klimkowski
06-15-2011, 05:43 PM
More than 1,000 public schools in Fukushima were equipped with dosimeters in late May and teachers were asked to record hourly radiation readings to help create a contamination map.


Japan’s Fukushima city said on Tuesday it would hand radiation dosimeters to 34,000 children to gauge their exposure from the crippled nuclear power plant about 60 kilometres (40 miles) away.

The city will hand the measuring devices to all children aged between four and 15 for three months from September so that they can wear them around the clock, an official at the city’s education board told AFP.

And for this summer's school project, the Japanese state has volunteered you all as:

Jan Klimkowski
06-15-2011, 06:44 PM
And now for something completely different...

For the American version of this story, substitute yakuza with Volkland Security contractor (and forget about handouts of free food).


Japanese underworld tries to cash in on tsunami clean-up

The yakuza is turning its attention from helping disaster victims to winning contracts for the massive rebuilding effort

Justin McCurry in Tokyo guardian.co.uk (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jun/15/yakuza-swaps-charity-for-reconstruction), Wednesday 15 June 2011 14.44 BST

In the aftermath of the devastating March tsunami, Japan's underworld made a rare display of philanthropy, handing out emergency supplies to survivors, sometimes days before aid agencies arrived.

Three months later, however, the yakuza appears to have dispensed with largesse and is instead hoping to cash in on the daunting clean-up effort in dozens of ruined towns and villages.

The government and police fear they are losing the battle to prevent crime syndicates from winning lucrative contracts to remove millions of tonnes of debris left in the tsunami's wake, including contaminated rubble near the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant that many firms are reluctant to handle.

The disaster created almost 24m tonnes of debris in the three hardest-hit prefectures, Fukushima, Miyagi and Iwate, according to the environment ministry. So far, just over 5m tonnes – or 22% – has been removed.

Those lining up to profit from the clearance operation, which is expected to take three years, include homegrown gangs and Chinese crime syndicates, according to the June edition of Sentaku, a respected political and economic affairs magazine.

The magazine recounts the story of a leading Chinese gangster who, accompanied by a national politician, visited the mayor of Minamisoma – a town near Fukushima Daiichi, where a partial evacuation order is in place – hoping to win contracts to remove radioactive waste that, according to police, could have ended up at disposal sites in China.

The man, named in the article as Mr X, had reportedly ingratiated himself with the local authorities by handing out free food to people living in evacuation centres.

The mayor had no knowledge of the man's underworld connections, the magazine said.

"If they help citizens, it's hard for the police to say anything bad," said Tomohiko Suzuki, a journalist who has written several books on the Japanese underworld.

"The yakuza are trying to position themselves to gain contracts for their construction companies for the massive rebuilding that will come."

An unnamed senior gangster countered in the Weekly Taishuu magazine: "It takes too long for the arm of the government to reach out here so it's important to do it now. Our honest sentiment right now is to be of some use to people."

In the days after the tsunami, the wealthiest yakuza gangs reportedly sent dozens of trucks loaded with water, nappies, instant noodles, blankets and other supplies worth an estimated half a million dollars to the stricken region.

The race to profit from the operation to remove what is left of wrecked buildings and gain a share of the reconstruction budget is expected to intensify in the coming months.

Officials have said that the removal of debris should come under central government control, and the names of "antisocial" individuals have been forwarded to local authorities.

But given the sheer quantity of debris, and the manpower required to remove and dispose of it, few believe Japan's most powerful yakuza gangs will be kept out altogether.

The police's job has been complicated by the emergence of yakuza front companies that, without time-consuming investigations, are impossible to distinguish from legitimate businesses.

As Sentaku notes: "It appears to be an uphill battle to prevent the yakuza and other crime syndicates from benefiting from the multitrillion-yen reconstruction projects."

Traditionally, construction has been a dependable well of cash from which the yakuza, with an estimated nationwide membership of 80,000, has supped long and often.

"The nexus of massive construction projects, bureaucrats, politicians, businessmen and yakuza are as revealing about Japan as they are about Italy and Russia," Jeff Kingston, director of Asian studies at Temple University in Tokyo, wrote in his recent book, Contemporary Japan.

"In Japan, the yakuza cut on construction projects is estimated at 3%, a vast sum that keeps them afloat, given that during the 1990s the public works budget was on par with the US Pentagon's budget and remains quite high despite huge cutbacks."

It is not the first time the yakuza has revealed its usually well-hidden philanthropic side.

After the western port city of Kobe was struck by an earthquake in January 1995, members of the locally based Yamaguchi-gumi, Japan's biggest crime syndicate, were among the first to hand out food and water to survivors.

Albert Doyle
06-24-2011, 03:55 PM
The attention span shelf life of this story is fading however the hot particles are sinking in.

Keith Millea
06-24-2011, 04:38 PM
The attention span shelf life of this story is fading however the hot particles are sinking in.

That's right........


Published on Friday, June 24, 2011 by PR Watch (http://prwatch.org/news/2011/06/10851/what-happened-media-coverage-fukushima)

What Happened to Media Coverage of Fukushima?

by Anne Landman (http://www.commondreams.org/author/anne-landman)

While the U.S. media has been occupied with Anthony Weiner, the Republican presidential candidates and Bristol Palin's memoir, coverage of Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster has practially fallen off the map. Poor mainstream media coverage of Japan's now months-long struggle to gain control over the Fukushima disaster has deprived Americans of crucial information about the risks of nuclear power following natural disasters. After a few weeks of covering the early aftermath of Japan's earthquake and tsunami, the U.S. media moved on, leaving behind the crisis at Fukushima which continues to unfold. U.S. politicians, like Rep. Joe Barton (http://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/Rep-Barton-Reaffirms-Commitment--118538784.html) of Texas, have made disappointing (http://www.prwatch.org/node/10509) and misleading statements about the relative safety of nuclear power and have vowed to stick by our nuclear program, while other countries, like Germany (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/may/30/germany-pledges-nuclear-shutdown-2022) and Italy (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702303714704576383452729642270.html), have taken serious steps to address the obvious risks of nuclear power -- risks that the Fukushima disaster made painfully evident, at least to the rest of the world.
Problems Multiply

News outlets in other countries have been paying attention to Fukushima, though, and a relative few in this country have as well. A June 16, 2011 Al Jazeera English article titled, "Fukushima: It's much worse than you think," (http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2011/06/16-4) quotes a high-level former nuclear industry executive, Arnold Gunderson, who called Fukushima nohting less than "the biggest industrial catastrophe in the history of mankind." Twenty nuclear cores have been exposed at Fukushima, Gunderson points out, saying that, along with the site's many spent-fuel pools, gives Fukushima 20 times the release potential of Chernobyl.

Efforts to bring problems at Fukushima under control are not going well, either. Japanese authorities only just recently admitted (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jun/08/fukushima-nuclear-plant-melt-through) that nuclear fuel in the three damaged Fukushima reactors has likely burned through the vessels holding it, a scenario called "melt-through", that is even more serious than a core meltdown. Months of spraying seawater on the plant's three melted-down fuel cores -- and the spent fuel stored on site -- to try and cool them has produced 26 million of gallons of radioactive wastewater, and no place to put it.

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5029/5605797881_53a720a940_m.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/sandocap/5605797881/)

After a struggle, the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), finally managed to put in place a system to filter radioactive particles out of the wastewater, but it broke down soon after it started operating.

A filter that was supposed to last a month plugged up with radioactive material after just five hours, indicating there is more radioactive material in the water than previously believed. Meanwhile, TEPCO is running out of space to store the radioactive water, and may be forced to again dump contaminated water into the Pacific Ocean. TEPCO already dumped some water into the ocean weeks ago, amid protests from fisherman, other countries and environmental organizations. And even if TEPCO does successfully filter the contaminated water and manage to bring its radioactivity down to acceptable levels, the utility will still have to deal with the pile of radioactive sludge (http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/asia-pacific/at-stricken-japanese-nuclear-plant-water-is-the-biggest-worry/2011/05/31/AGLe01HH_story.html) the process will produce. The plan they've come up with to deal with the sludge is to seal it in drums and discard it into the ocean, which may cause even more problems. Greenpeace has already found levels of radiation exceeding legal limits in seaweed and shellfish samples gathered more than 12 miles away from the plant. The high levels of radiation in the samples indicate that leaks from the plant are bigger than TEPCO has revealed so far.

The cascade of other problems caused by the Fukushima disaster include the costs of relocating residents from the affected area around the plant, compensating people for the loss of their homes and belongings, and a drop-off in global sales of goods and products exported from Japan due to fear of radioactive contamination.
Domestic Nuclear Worries

For Americans who think "out of sight, out of mind" or "it can't happen here" when it comes to Fukishima and its ramifications, think again. Janette Sherman, M.D. (http://janettesherman.com/about/), an internal medicine specialist, and Joseph Magano, an epidemiologist with the Radiation and Public Health Project research group, noticed a 35% jump in infant mortality in eight northwestern U.S. cities located within 500 miles of the Pacific coast since the Fukushima meltdown. They wrote an essay (http://www.counterpunch.org/sherman06102011.html), published by CounterPunch, suggesting there may be a link between the statistic and the Fukushima disaster. They cited similar problems with infant mortality among people who were exposed to nuclear fallout from Chernobyl. Sherman and Magano urge that steps be taken to measure the levels of radioactive isotopes in the environment of the Pacific northwest, and in the bodies of people in these areas, to determine if nuclear fallout from Fukushima could, in fact, be related to the spike in infant mortality.

Tensions are also rising over two U.S. nuclear reactors in Nebraska located on the banks of the Missouri River, which is now at flood stage. On June 20, the Omaha, Nebraska World Herald reported (http://www.omaha.com/article/20110620/NEWS01/706209922) that flood waters from the Missouri River came within 18 inches of forcing the Cooper Nuclear Station near Brownville, Nebraska, to shut down. Officials are poised to shut down the Cooper plant when river reaches a level of 902 feet above sea level. The plant is 903 feet above sea level. The Fort Calhoun Nuclear Plant, 20 miles north of Omaha, issued a "Notification of Unusual Event" to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission on June 6 due to local flooding. That plant is currently shut down for refueling, but will not restart because of the flooding. Compounding worries over these two plants is a shortage of sand (http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/06/20/sand-shortage-causes-concern-for-flood-fighters/) needed to fill massive numbers of sandbags to hold off Missouri River floodwaters. One ton of sand makes just 60 sandbags, and hundreds of thousands of sandbags are needed to help save towns along the river from flooding. Sand is obtained from dredging the riverbed -- and the companies that sell sand can't dredge the river while it is flooding. These plants are already in a risky situation, and the flooding in Nebraska could easily be worsened just by a summer afternoon cloudburst.

Global Support for Nuclear Power Drops; Some U.S. Reactors on Borrowed Time

Polls reveal that global support for nuclear power has nosedived in the wake of the Fukushima disaster. A survey (http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/06/22/us-energy-nuclear-poll-idUSTRE75L4BY20110622) of over 19,000 people in 24 countries showed that three quarters of people now think nuclear power will soon be obsolete. Three countries still show support for nuclear power: the U.S., India and Poland.

The relative safety of nuclear power in the U.S. is tenuous, despite what some politicians have claimed. A big problem is that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Nuclear_Regulatory_Commission) (NRC) has been working with the nuclear power industry to keep our country's reactors operating within safety standards, but they've been doing it by either weakening those standards, or not enforcing them at all. A year-long investigation by the Associated Press (AP) revealed (http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=137291169) that the NRC has acted appallingly, extending licenses for dozens of aging U.S. nuclear plants despite their having multiple problems, like rusted pipes, broken seals, failed cables and leaking valves.

When such problems are found, the NRC will weaken the standards to help the plants meet them instead of ordering them to be repaired to meet current standards. The nuclear industry argues that the standards they are violating are "unnecessarily conservative," and in response, the NRC simply loosens the standards. Just last year, for example, the NRC weakened the safety margin for acceptable radiation damage to nuclear reactor vessels -- for the second time. Through public record requests to the NRC, the AP obtained photographs of badly rusted valves, holes eaten into the tops of reactor vessels, severe rust in pipes carrying essential water supplies, peeling walls, actively leaking water pipes and other problems found among the nation's fleet of aging nuclear reactors.
The Take Away

Fukushima has been a wake up call about the dangers of nuclear power, and some countries are heeding the information. But it seems the U.S. is still sleeping when it comes to this issue. Light-to-absent coverage of TEPCO's struggles to bring Fukushima under control, legislators who insist on acting favorably towards the nuclear power industry despite the deteriorated state of our current reactor fleet and an ineffective Nuclear Regulatory Commission have all contributed to a bad combination of a dangerous situation and a complacent American public on this issue.

Maybe now that the latest scandal in Washington has subsided, public and media attention will return to this crucial issue, and the U.S. will turn its attention to tackling some of the truly serious problems posed by a continuing reliance on nuclear power.

© 2011 Center for Media & Democracy

http://www.commondreams.org/view/2011/06/24-0

Keith Millea
07-03-2011, 05:33 PM
A short clip from Arnie Gunderson:


http://vimeo.com/25879103

Ed Jewett
07-04-2011, 01:29 AM
SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2011

Fukushima Cover Up Unravels

As I've repeatedly noted, the Japanese government, other governments and nuclear companies have covered up the extent of the Fukushima crisis.

Asia Pacific Journal reports:

Japan’s leading business journal Toyo Keizai has published an article by Hokkaido Cancer Center director Nishio Masamichi, a radiation treatment specialist.

***

Nishio originally called for “calm” in the days after the accident. Now, he argues, that as the gravity of the situation at the plant has become more clear, the specter of long-term radiation exposure must be reckoned with.

***

Former Minister for Internal Affairs Haraguchi Kazuhiro has alleged that radiation monitoring station data was actually three decimal places greater than the numbers released to the public. If this is true, it constitutes a “national crime”, in Nishio’s words.
The Atlantic points out:
The reason for official reluctance to admit that the earthquake did direct structural damage to reactor one is obvious. Katsunobu Onda, author of TEPCO: The Dark Empire ... who sounded the alarm about the firm in his 2007 book explains it this way: “If TEPCO and the government of Japan admit an earthquake can do direct damage to the reactor, this raises suspicions about the safety of every reactor they run. They are using a number of antiquated reactors that have the same systematic problems, the same wear and tear on the piping.”

***

Oddly enough, while TEPCO later insisted that the cause of the meltdown was the tsunami knocking out emergency power systems, at the 7:47 p.m. TEPCO press conference the same day, the spokesman in response to questions from the press about the cooling systems stated that the emergency water circulation equipment and reactor core isolation time cooling systems would work even without electricity.

***

On May 15, TEPCO went some way toward admitting at least some of these claims in a report called “Reactor Core Status of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Unit One.” The report said there might have been pre-tsunami damage to key facilities including pipes. “This means that assurances from the industry in Japan and overseas that the reactors were robust is now blown apart,” said Shaun Burnie, an independent nuclear waste consultant. “It raises fundamental questions on all reactors in high seismic risk areas.”

***

Eyewitness testimony and TEPCO’S own data indicates that the damage [done to the plant by the quake] was significant. All of this despite the fact that shaking experienced at the plant during the quake was within it’s approved design specifications.
The Wall Street Journal writes:
A former nuclear adviser to Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan blasted the government’s continuing handling of the crisis, and predicted further revelations of radiation threats to the public in the coming months.

In his first media interview since resigning his post in protest in April, Toshiso Kosako, one of the country’s leading experts on radiation safety, said Mr. Kan’s government has been slow to test for possible dangers in the sea and to fish and has understated certain radiation dangers to minimize what it will have to spend to clean up contamination.

And while there have been scattered reports already of food contamination—of tea leaves and spinach, for example—Mr. Kosako said there will be broader, more disturbing discoveries later this year, especially as rice, Japan’s staple, is harvested.

“Come the harvest season in the fall, there will be a chaos,” Mr. Kosako said. “Among the rice harvested, there will certainly be some radiation contamination—though I don’t know at what levels—setting off a scandal. If people stop buying rice from Tohoku, . . . we’ll have a tricky problem.”
British Shenanigans

It's not just the Japanese. As the Guardian notes:
British government officials approached nuclear companies to draw up a co-ordinated public relations strategy to play down the Fukushima nuclear accident just two days after the earthquake and tsunami in Japan and before the extent of the radiation leak was known.

Internal emails seen by the Guardian show how the business and energy departments worked closely behind the scenes with the multinational companies EDF Energy, Areva and Westinghouse...

Officials stressed the importance of preventing the incident from undermining public support for nuclear power.

***

The Conservative MP Zac Goldsmith, who sits on the Commons environmental audit committee, condemned the extent of co-ordination between the government and nuclear companies that the emails appear to reveal.

***

The official suggested that if companies sent in their comments, they could be incorporated into briefs to ministers and government statements. "We need to all be working from the same material to get the message through to the media and the public.

***

The office for nuclear development invited companies to attend a meeting at the NIA's headquarters in London. The aim was "to discuss a joint communications and engagement strategy aimed at ensuring we maintain confidence among the British public on the safety of nuclear power stations and nuclear new-build policy in light of recent events at the Fukushima nuclear power plant".

Other documents released by the government's safety watchdog, the office for nuclear regulation, reveal that the text of an announcement on 5 April about the impact of Fukushima on the new nuclear programme was privately cleared with nuclear industry representatives at a meeting the previous week. According to one former regulator, who preferred not to be named, the degree of collusion was "truly shocking".

The Guardian reports in a second article:
The release of 80 emails showing that in the days after the Fukushima accident not one but two government departments were working with nuclear companies to spin one of the biggest industrial catastrophes of the last 50 years, even as people were dying and a vast area was being made uninhabitable, is shocking.

***

What the emails shows is a weak government, captured by a powerful industry colluding to at least misinform and very probably lie to the public and the media.

***

To argue that the radiation was being released deliberately and was “all part of the safety systems to control and manage a situation” is Orwellian.
And - as the Guardian notes in a third article - the collusion between the British government and nuclear companies is leading to political fallout:
“This deliberate and (sadly) very effective attempt to ‘calm’ the reporting of the true story of Fukushima is a terrible betrayal of liberal values. In my view it is not acceptable that a Liberal Democrat cabinet minister presides over a department deeply involved in a blatant conspiracy designed to manipulate the truth in order to protect corporate interests”. -Andy Myles, Liberal Democrat party’s former chief executive in Scotland

“These emails corroborate my own impression that there has been a strange silence in the UK following the Fukushima disaster … in the UK, new nuclear sites have been announced before the results of the Europe-wide review of nuclear safety has been completed. Today’s news strengthens the case for the government to halt new nuclear plans until an independent and transparent review has been conducted.” -Fiona Hall, leader of the Liberal Democrats in the European parliament

http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2011/07/fukushima-cover-up-unravels.html

Jan Klimkowski
07-06-2011, 09:13 PM
AP IMPACT: NRC and industry rewrite nuke history

JEFF DONN, AP National Writer
Published Tuesday, June 28, 2011

ROCKVILLE, Md. (AP) — When commercial nuclear power was getting its start in the 1960s and 1970s, industry and regulators stated unequivocally that reactors were designed only to operate for 40 years. Now they tell another story — insisting that the units were built with no inherent life span, and can run for up to a century, an Associated Press investigation shows.

By rewriting history, plant owners are making it easier to extend the lives of dozens of reactors in a relicensing process that resembles nothing more than an elaborate rubber stamp.

As part of a yearlong investigation of aging issues at the nation's nuclear power plants, the AP found that the relicensing process often lacks fully independent safety reviews. Records show that paperwork of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission sometimes matches word-for-word the language used in a plant operator's application.

Also, the relicensing process relies heavily on such paperwork, with very little onsite inspection and verification.

And under relicensing rules, tighter standards are not required to compensate for decades of wear and tear.

So far, 66 of 104 reactors have been granted license renewals. Most of the 20-year extensions have been granted with scant public attention. And the NRC has yet to reject a single application to extend an original license. The process has been so routine that many in the industry are already planning for additional license extensions, which could push the plants to operate for 80 years, and then 100.

Regulators and industry now contend that the 40-year limit was chosen for economic reasons and to satisfy antitrust concerns, not for safety issues. They contend that a nuclear plant has no technical limit on its life.

But an AP review of historical records, along with interviews with engineers who helped develop nuclear power, shows just the opposite: Reactors were made to last only 40 years. Period.

The record also shows that a design limitation on operating life was an accepted truism.

In 1982, D. Clark Gibbs, chairman of the licensing and safety committee of an early industry group, wrote to the NRC that "most nuclear power plants, including those operating, under construction or planned for the future, are designed for a duty cycle which corresponds to a 40-year life."

And three years later, when Illinois Power Co. sought a license for its Clinton station, utility official D.W. Wilson told the NRC on behalf of his company's nuclear licensing department that "all safety margins were established with the understanding of the limitations that are imposed by a 40-year design life."

This is a long and important article. It continues here (http://m.knoxnews.com/news/2011/jun/28/ap-impact-nrc-and-industry-rewrite-nuke-history/).

Peter Lemkin
07-09-2011, 07:57 AM
Radiation Coverups Confirmed: Los Alamos, Fort Calhoun, Fukushima, TSA (http://www.corbettreport.com/sunday-update-20110703/)

Welcome. This is James Corbett of The Corbett Report with your Sunday Update from the Centre for Research on Globalization at globalresearch.ca on this 3rd day of July, 2011. And now for the real news.

A series of disasters, potential disasters, bad news and worrying studies over the course of the past week have brought public attention back to the issue of radiation and its attendant health risks, and further exposed how governmental agencies that are supposed to protect the public have in fact knowingly put the public at risk and even colluded with the very industries they are supposed to be “regulating.”

Last Sunday, a wildfire started in New Mexico that grew to a 162 square mile inferno and came within 50 feet of the grounds of the Los Alamos National Laboratory that was the birthplace of the atomic bomb. The site is an historical testing ground for nuclear weapons and a storage area for about 20,000 barrels of nuclear waste. The disaster exposed the remarkable fact that this nuclear waste was stored not in a secure containment facility, or even in a solid building, but in a “fabric-type building” that would be quickly consumed by the fires.

In addition to the risk of the nuclear waste burning up in the fire and sending radioactive materials into the atmosphere, Joni Arends of the Concerned Citizens for Nuclear Safety has pointed out that the fire could stir up the nuclear-contaminated soil on lab property where nuclear experiments have long been conducted. In either event, harmful radiation could pass into the jet stream to be distributed across the United States and beyond.

As a recent report from the Alliance for Nuclear Accountability documented, the site has been the disposal ground for some 18 million cubic feet of radioactive and chemical solid wastes since 1943, as well as 899,000 curies of so-called transuranic waste, including plutonium. Liquid wastes from the plant were discharged into the canyons, initially with little treatment whatsoever.

Winds have now shifted the fire away from the facility and initial air samples from the inferno have indicated there has so far been no catastrophic release of radiation in the area, but it is unclear why no basic precautions were in place to secure the nuclear waste at the facility prior to the fire or what such measures, if any, are being contemplated in the wake of this emergency.

Also last Sunday, flood waters from the Missouri River reached the containment buildings of the Fort Calhoun Nuclear Station. A levee protecting the site’s electrical transformers gave way and the plant was forced to switch on emergency generators in order to continue cooling the nuclear reactor.

Although officials are maintaining that the plant is still functioning and is not in meltdown, the incident has raised serious questions about the facility and its preparedness for just such an event. Just last October, nuclear regulators warned that the Fort Calhoun plant “failed to maintain procedures for combating a significant flood” and newly released documents reveal workers were still scrambling to plug holes where flood water could potentially get into the facility as late as last week.

It is unclear what, if any, punitive actions the plant’s operator will face for their negligence, or if the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is even concerned. Commission director Gregory Jaczsko said last week that “all the plants in the U.S. have been been designed to deal with historically the largest possible floods,” seeming to imply that the Fort Calhoun situation was not dangerous by definition and that the NRC had full faith in the plant despite its documented safety violations.

This is in line with an AP investigation last month that found that American federal nuclear regulators have been working with the nuclear industry to ensure that reactors passed safety inspections by repeatedly lowering safety standards for the plants or failing to enforce existing standards. The investigation showed that a myriad of documented problems at nuclear power plants across the country, from failed cables and busted seals to broken nozzles, dented containers and rusty pipes, were routinely resolved by claiming that existing safety standards were too conservative. When valves were found to be leaking, for instance, the standards were simply changed to allow for more leakage, in some cases 20 times the original limit.

Meanwhile in Japan, where three of the reactors at the troubled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant have been confirmed to have been in full meltdown since the very first days of the tsunami-induced disaster, the first series of health checks of area residents are already revealing suprising and troubling results about radiation exposure in the area. Tests of 15 Fukushima residents between the ages of 4 and 77 have revealed radioactive cesium and iodine in their urine.

[video]

The tests also indicate that residents have been exposed to between 1 / 5 to 3 / 4 of their yearly allowable radiation dose in just two months.

Now, documents are beginning to surface confirming what many have been alleging since the start of this crisis: that governments the world over have been conspiring with the nuclear energy industry to downplay the significance and ramifications of the Fukushima disaster.

Just last week, emails released under the Freedom of Inforrmation Act show how the Departments of Business and Energy in the UK government were coordinating their response to the Japanese disaster with companies like EDF Energy, Areva and Westinghouse to ensure the accident did not interfere with plans to build a new generation of nuclear power plants in Britain.

The emails reveal how the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills was emailing the nuclear firms on the 13th of March, as the crisis was still unfolding, to assure them that “radiation released has been controlled – the reactor has been protected,” a surprisingly definitive description of the events at Fukushima that have now been shown to have been categorically wrong, as reactor 1 had in fact melted down in the first 16 hours of the disaster, with 2 and 3 also melting down in the following days.

They also show how the BIS intimated that comments from the nuclear industry would be worked into the departments briefs to ministers and government statements: “We need to all be working from the same material to get the message through to the media and the public.”

In other radiation-related news, an entirely different set of emails among government officials obtained under the Freedom of Information Act last week reveal that the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the very same organization that has refused to release the data that its model for the collapse of World Trade Center 7 was based on because it would “jeopardize public safety,” has accused the Department of Homeland Security of lying about its findings on the safety of the full body scanners being used in airport screening by the TSA.

The email reveals how NIST rebuked DHS head Janet Napolitano for claiming in a USA Today op-ed that:

“AIT machines are safe, efficient, and protect passenger privacy. They have been independently evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration, the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, who have all affirmed their safety.”

According to the email, however, NIST was angry at this mischaracterization of their work, pointing out that “NIST does not do product testing. [And] NIST did not test AIT machines for safety.”

As it turns out, not only did Napolitano lie about NIST’s certification of the scanner safety, but she also lied about the Johns Hopkins backing of her position. An internal document produced by Johns Hopkins for the DHS shows that far from “affirming the safety” of the technology, the University in fact warned that the scanners as designed produces an area around the machine that exceeds the general public dose limit for radiation exposure.

Napolitano’s op-ed was widely criticized at the time because Dr. Michael Love, the head of an X-ray lab at Johns Hopkins warned just two days before the op-ed was published that “statistically someone is going to get skin cancer from these X-rays.”

Keith Millea
07-20-2011, 04:00 PM
A new update from Fairewinds.


http://vimeo.com/26651670

Peter Lemkin
07-20-2011, 04:41 PM
People have short memories, and the MSM / Propaganda Matrix make sure it is enforced. Were this not true, we wouldn't be in the fucking mess we are on Environmental, Political, Ethical, Financial, Peace, Rights, Freedom, Class and other issues.

Most people are trained not to think independently, and not to retain what little they think about / learn about...and never, never to see patterns endlessly repeating. :shutup:

Magda Hassan
07-23-2011, 08:39 AM
Gov't to allow use of less-demanding radiation detector for beef

http://mdn.mainichi.jp/mdnnews/news/images/20110712p2g00m0dm008000p_size5.jpg Prefectural officials interview livestock farmers after radioactive cesium was detected in cattle raised in Minamisoma, Fukushima Prefecture, on July 10. (Mainichi)

TOKYO (Kyodo) -- The government is set to allow inspection of beef for radiation contamination using more widely available, less-demanding detectors as it prepares to impose broader beef cattle screening to contain the widening food scare, government officials said Friday.
The decision comes when there is a limited number of regularly used equipment, called a germanium semiconductor detector, available to monitor radioactive materials in beef from all cattle in areas where straw containing radioactive cesium above the government-set limit has been found.
Detailed inspection will continued to be required near the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant after the government ordered to screen all cattle shipped from Fukushima Prefecture.
The government is under pressure to step up its measures to contain the beef scare as fears of radiation taint spreads from vegetables and seafood to livestock products, scaring consumers away from beef and causing the meat's wholesale prices to drop.
The government is considering setting a more stringent safety limit for inspection with the lighter version of detectors and requiring a detailed check for beef screened out by the initial monitoring.
The equipment for quick inspection is about one-tenth the cost of more than 20 million yen of the germanium semiconductor detector and takes one hour or less to gauge radioactive materials, against hours of the conventional device.
More than 1,600 cattle suspected of being fed contaminated rice straw have been shipped, reaching all but Okinawa Prefecture.

(Mainichi Japan) July 23, 2011

Peter Lemkin
07-23-2011, 01:56 PM
If they just take the batteries out of the detectors this will create a cloud field reducing the pesky little nuclear particles [alpha, beta and gamma] to zero - its guaranteed~

Magda Hassan
07-25-2011, 01:14 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rVuGwc9dlhQ&feature=player_embedded#at=43
On the 19th of July 2011, people in Fukushima had a meeting with government officals from Tokyo to demand that the government evacuate people promptly in Fukushima and provide financial and logistical support for them. Also, they brought urine of children to the meeting and demanded that the government
test it.

Jan Klimkowski
07-25-2011, 09:50 AM
On the 19th of July 2011, people in Fukushima had a meeting with government officals from Tokyo to demand that the government evacuate people promptly in Fukushima and provide financial and logistical support for them. Also, they brought urine of children to the meeting and demanded that the government test it.

Fascinating snippet of life on the ground in Fukushima, with the Tokyo bureaucrats quite literally fleeing from ordinary people asking reasonable questions, and refusing to test the urine of local children.

Japan has a strong culture of deference and obedience to authority. That deference and obedience is breaking down as a direct result of government lies and contempt for their people.

Jan Klimkowski
08-01-2011, 06:54 PM
And still it belchs...


Tepco Says Highest Radiation Detected at Fukushima Dai-Ichi

Bloomberg. Aug. 1 (Bloomberg) --

Tokyo Electric Power Co., operator of Japan's crippled Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear plant, said it detected the highest radiation to date at the site.

Geiger counters, used to detect radioactivity, registered more than 10 sieverts an hour, the highest reading the devices are able to record, Junichi Matsumoto, a general manager at the utility, said today. The measurements were taken at the base of the main ventilation stack for reactors No. 1 and No. 2

More at link (http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/g/a/2011/07/31/bloomberg1376-LP8WWK6JTSEJ01-5PIJEFGJ36KM50OK194CMKAJ22.DTL).

Peter Lemkin
08-01-2011, 08:01 PM
Ahhhhh........10 Seiverts/hr. is a HUGE dose.....and cumulative for those who live, eat, breathe, drink, sleep, work and exist there - whether fighting the plant's collapses, or just having the misfortune of living there.....first the quake, then the tsunami, then the radiation leaks and now......all of the above, with the Big Lies.

Magda Hassan
08-02-2011, 12:58 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wt1p-tftdaU&feature=player_embedded
Please click on "cc" button to show English subtitles. Journalists Takashi Hirose and Shojiro Akashi announced at a press conference on July 15 that they had pressed criminal charges against 32 people including TEPCO management, Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, and Fukushima's Radiation Health Risk Advisors including Shunichi Yamashita.

17 people are charged with "bodily injury through negligence in the conduct of occupation", including Dr. Shunichi Yamashita, Fukushima's Radiation Health Risk Advisor, Ms. Shizuyo Kusumi, member of Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan and specialist in radiation
biology, and Mr. Yoshiaki Takagi, Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, and some other specialists in radiation.

15 people are charged with "death through negligence in the conduct of occupation", including Chairman Katsumata and Ex-President Shimizu from TEPCO, and Dr. Haruki Madarame, Nuclear Safety Commission Chief.

If you want to know more about Dr. Shunichi Yamashita and how they did "brainwashing" in Fukushima, please visit EX-SKF blogposts: http://ex-skf.blogspot.com/search/label/Shunichi%20Yamashita

Tanslation by Ex-SKF blog and captioning by tokyobrowntabby.

Peter Lemkin
08-02-2011, 03:52 PM
And still it belchs...


Tepco Says Highest Radiation Detected at Fukushima Dai-Ichi

Bloomberg. Aug. 1 (Bloomberg) --

Tokyo Electric Power Co., operator of Japan's crippled Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear plant, said it detected the highest radiation to date at the site.

Geiger counters, used to detect radioactivity, registered more than 10 sieverts an hour, the highest reading the devices are able to record, Junichi Matsumoto, a general manager at the utility, said today. The measurements were taken at the base of the main ventilation stack for reactors No. 1 and No. 2

More at link (http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/g/a/2011/07/31/bloomberg1376-LP8WWK6JTSEJ01-5PIJEFGJ36KM50OK194CMKAJ22.DTL).

Way to GO JAPAN, TEPCO, et al!......Highest radiation levels to date...you certainly have things well under control :rofl: In fact, they don't even know [or apparently care] why the levels are now higher than ever before...certainly a sign of continued meltdown and containment vessel degradation.It has NO place to go, but into the environment and is spreading rather faster to distant places than had been thought. Meat now several hundred Km from the plant is contaminated, as is the air, water, soil, and people, animals, more......congratulations on the Hiroshima/Nagasaki simulation in miniature :joystick: Maybe could make some money with a radioactive theme park run by Disney...has possibilities....:what:

Jan Klimkowski
08-02-2011, 09:14 PM
More on the deadly radiation levels at Fukushima:


Lethal levels of radiation detected at Fukushima

Pockets of lethal levels of radiation have been detected at Japan's crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in a fresh reminder of the risks faced by workers battling to contain the worst nuclear accident since Chernobyl.

4:09PM BST (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/japan/8677351/Lethal-levels-of-radiation-detected-at-Fukushima.html)02 Aug 2011

Plant operator Tokyo Electric Power (Tepco) reported on Monday that radiation exceeding 10 sieverts (10,000 millisieverts) per hour was found at the bottom of a ventilation stack standing between two reactors.

On Tuesday Tepco said it found another spot on the ventilation stack itself where radiation exceeded 10 sieverts per hour, a level that could lead to incapacitation or death after just several seconds of exposure.

The company used equipment to measure radiation from a distance and was unable to ascertain the exact level because the device's maximum reading is 10 sieverts.

While Tepco said the readings would not hinder its goal of stabilising the Fukushima reactors by January, experts warned that worker safety could be at risk if the operator prioritised hitting the deadline over radiation risks.

"Radiation leakage at the plant may have been contained or slowed but it has not been sealed off completely. The utility is likely to continue finding these spots of high radiation," said Kenji Sumita, a professor at Osaka University who specialises in nuclear engineering.

"Considering this, recovery work at the plant should not be rushed to meet schedules and goals as that could put workers in harm's way. We are past the immediate crisis phase and some delays should be permissible."

Workers at Daiichi are only allowed to be exposed to 250 millisieverts of radiation per year.

Tepco, which provides power to Tokyo and neighbouring areas, said it had not detected a sharp rise in overall radiation levels at the compound.

"The high dose was discovered in an area that doesn't hamper recovery efforts at the plant," Tepco spokesman Junichi Matsumoto told reporters on Tuesday.

Although it is still investigating the matter, Tepco said the spots of high radiation could stem from debris left behind by emergency venting conducted days after the March 11 earthquake and tsunami that crippled the plant.

Peter Lemkin
08-02-2011, 10:31 PM
Workers at Daiichi are only allowed to be exposed to 250 millisieverts of radiation per year. Not to worry....so they get 4 x their yearly dose in an hour......hey, these are the men who made the movie Godzilla!...they can take it! No problems...and if the radiation keeps getting stronger, and the capacity of the meters has been matched, well, we can just sacrifice them as was done at Chernobyl.....ten minutes per week [and they still died like flies....]. What someone there seems to not grasp is they have a very big problem that is not going to go away until someone first admits there is a big problem; and then immediately takes drastic action to deal with it on both a short-term and permanent basis. For now, they MUST bury that entire 8 reactor plant as was done at Chernobyl in a sarcophagus. Long-term, Japan has to think about a non-nuclear future...as does the rest of the Planet. The nuclear industry is trying to minimize the whole thing....as they are wont to. They also played down Minimata Bay in Japan [chromium poisoning] and even declared there was no 'radiation sickeness from the atomic bombs'. The one reporter who wrote about it was blackballed and essentially removed from investigative reporting on any newspaper/magazine at the time. The truth will set you free [often free from a paycheck].

Magda Hassan
08-06-2011, 08:34 AM
City resorts to secret dumping to deal with piles of radioactive dirt

August 05, 2011

FUKUSHIMA--Deep in the mountains, a 4-ton dump truck unloads burlap bags that land with a thud in a hole shaped like a swimming pool 25 meters long and more than 2 meters deep.

Another dump truck soon arrives, also filled with burlap bags.

The two male workers in the first truck wash off the tires and then rumble off.

The Fukushima city government has not made this place known to the public, even to residents living near the area. That's because it is the dumping site for huge amounts of radioactive sludge and dirt collected by city residents cleaning up and decontaminating their neighborhoods.

"(If we did make the site public), garbage from other residents might come flooding in," a Fukushima city official said, emphasizing that the disposal site is only "temporary."

The Asahi Shimbun was not the only witness to this secret dumping operation. A 74-year-old man who lives near the site with six family members, including his two grandchildren, said he has seen many dump trucks coming and going.

"I am strongly opposed to them bringing such a large amount of radioactivity-contaminated dirt here," he said. "Even if authorities say it is a 'temporary' dumpsite, can they tell what they will do next?"

The answer, for now, is "no."

Municipal officials say they are also frustrated because the central government has made no decision on a final disposal site for the contaminated sludge and dirt.

The Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency's decontamination manual released in July says municipalities can bury such waste if radioactivity levels are 8,000 becquerels or less per kilogram. But the manual does not mention final disposal sites.

"We are aware of the need to show our policy," a NISA official said. However, the agency does not appear to be close to deciding on where the contaminated waste will end up.

That delay has led to the secrecy among municipal officials.

"It would be difficult to gain the consent of residents when we try to secure a waste disposal site," a Fukushima municipal official said. "The national government does not mention anything about how we can specifically cope with the situation under such circumstances."

The situation is expected to worsen.

The site where the dump trucks buried the burlap bags on July 28 was about 8 kilometers from the final collection point in Fukushima city. On that day, the first dump truck was filled with bags of radioactive dirt in just 20 minutes.

Fukushima Prefecture is encouraging citizens to rid their neighborhoods of radioactive substances that spewed during the accident at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant. It offers subsidies of up to 500,000 yen ($6,370) per neighborhood association for that purpose.

But as the clean-up efforts increase, the radioactive sludge and dirt pile up.

At 6 a.m. on July 24, as many as 3,753 residents and cleaning company workers in Fukushima city's Watari district started clearing gutters and ditches of radioactive dirt.

The district, located opposite the Fukushima Prefectural Office across the Abukumagawa river, has recorded higher levels of radioactivity than most other parts of the city.

The volunteers used shovels to put the unwanted dirt into burlap bags.

One woman in her 60s involved in the effort complained, "Tokyo residents benefit from the nuclear power plant, but we're forced to clean gutters because of the radioactive fallout."

After four hours of cleaning, 5,853 bags of dirt were piled high. Radiation levels dropped to half in some areas, an official said.

The 67-year-old leader of the neighborhood association glanced at a dosimeter and said, "As we had feared, the figure has passed the (permissible) level."

It was 9.9 microsieverts of radiation, the maximum measurement of the dosimeter.

One resident asked the neighborhood association leader where the bags would go.

"I asked that to a city official once," the leader said. "I was told not to ask this particular question since it's not that simple."

(This article was written by Noriyoshi Otsuki and Satoru Murata.)
http://ajw.asahi.com/article/0311disaster/fukushima/AJ201108055290

Jan Klimkowski
08-06-2011, 10:27 AM
The Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency's decontamination manual released in July says municipalities can bury such waste if radioactivity levels are 8,000 becquerels or less per kilogram. But the manual does not mention final disposal sites.

"We are aware of the need to show our policy," a NISA official said. However, the agency does not appear to be close to deciding on where the contaminated waste will end up.

That delay has led to the secrecy among municipal officials.

"It would be difficult to gain the consent of residents when we try to secure a waste disposal site," a Fukushima municipal official said. "The national government does not mention anything about how we can specifically cope with the situation under such circumstances."

The Japanese people need to abandon their deference to authority and start stopping this shit.

Unless they want large swathes of their largest island to become a Forbidden Zone.

Peter Lemkin
08-06-2011, 11:52 AM
The Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency's decontamination manual released in July says municipalities can bury such waste if radioactivity levels are 8,000 becquerels or less per kilogram. But the manual does not mention final disposal sites.

"We are aware of the need to show our policy," a NISA official said. However, the agency does not appear to be close to deciding on where the contaminated waste will end up.

That delay has led to the secrecy among municipal officials.

"It would be difficult to gain the consent of residents when we try to secure a waste disposal site," a Fukushima municipal official said. "The national government does not mention anything about how we can specifically cope with the situation under such circumstances."

The Japanese people need to abandon their deference to authority and start stopping this shit.

Unless they want large swathes of their largest island to become a Forbidden Zone.

Buying topsoil, etc. is not even a temporary solution - and there is no permanent one for it. One can slightly alleviate the imminent dose by scraping off the top layers of soil and putting them in mines, etc....but there is a constant 'rain' on new radioactive particles coming by air, wind, water, animals and other means. Look very bad for Japan...small island...large population....lots of radiation....enough for everyone there to have lethal dose, I'm afraid...unless they try some radical and quick thinking outside of their tea-ceremony boxes.

Magda Hassan
08-13-2011, 03:58 AM
Nuclear safety: A dangerous veil of secrecy
Who can the public trust on nuclear safety - the anti-nuclear camp, the nuclear lobby or academics funded by the latter?
D. Parvaz Last Modified: 11 Aug 2011 13:09
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Anti-nuclear rallies marking the attack on Hiroshima don't distinguish between nuclear energy and weapons [Reuters]
There are battles being fought on two fronts in the five months since a massive earthquake and tsunami damaged the Daiichi nuclear power plant in Fukushima, Japan.

On one front, there is the fight to repair the plant, operated by the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) and to contain the extent of contamination caused by the damage. On the other is the public’s fight to extract information from the Japanese government, TEPCO and nuclear experts worldwide.

The latter battle has yielded serious official humiliation, resulting high-profile resignations, scandals, and promises of reform in Japan’s energy industry whereas the latter has so far resulted in a storm of anger and mistrust.

Even most academic nuclear experts, seen by many as the middle ground between the anti-nuclear activists and nuclear lobby itself, were reluctant to say what was happening: That in Fukushima, a community of farms, schools and fishing ports, was experiencing a full-tilt meltdown, and that, as Al Jazeera reported in June, that the accident had most likely caused more radioactive contamination than Chernobyl.


Read more of our coverage of Japan's disasters
As recently as early August, those seeking information on the real extent of the damage at the Daiichi plant and on the extent of radioactive contamination have mostly been reassured by the nuclear community that there’s no need to worry.

This is worrying because while both anti-nuclear activists and the nuclear lobby both have openly stated biases, academics and researchers are seen as the middle ground - a place to get accurate, unbiased information.

David Biello, the energy and climate editor at Scientific American Online, said that trying to get clear information on a scenario such as the Daiichi disaster is tough.

“There's a lot of secrecy that can surround nuclear power because some of the same processes can be involved in generating electricity that can also be involved in developing a weapon, so there's a kind of a veil of secrecy that gets dropped over this stuff, that can also obscure the truth” said Biello.

"So, for example in Fukushima, it was pretty apparent that a total meltdown had occurred just based on what they were experiencing there ... but nobody in a position of authority was willing to say that."

A high-stakes game

There’s no denying that there’s a lot of money - and power - riding on the nuclear industry.

The money trail can be tough to follow - Westinghouse, Duke Energy and the Nuclear Energy Institute (a "policy organisation" for the nuclear industry with 350 companies, including TEPCO, on its roster) did not respond to requests for information on funding research and chairs at universities.

But most of the funding for nuclear research does not come directly from the nuclear lobby, said M.V. Ramana, a researcher at Princeton University specialising in the nuclear industry and climate change. Most research is funded by governments, who get donations - from the lobby (via candidates, political parties or otherwise).

The Center for Responsive Politics - a non-partisan, non-profit elections watchdog group – noted that even as many lobbying groups slowed their spending the first quarter of the year, the Nuclear industry "appears to be ratcheting up its lobbying" increasing its multi-million dollar spending.

"In the United States, a lot of the money doesn’t come directly from the nuclear industry, but actually comes from the Department of Energy (DOE). And the DOE has a very close relationship with the industry, and they sort of try to advance the industry’s interest," said Ramana. Indeed, nuclear engineering falls under the "Major Areas of Research" with the DOE, which also has nuclear weapons under its rubric.

The DOE's 2012 fiscal year budge request to the US Congress for nuclear energy programmes was $755m.

"So those people who get funding from that….it’s not like they (researchers) want to lie, but there’s a certain amount of, shall we say, ideological commitment to nuclear power, as well as a certain amount of self-censorship." It comes down to worrying how their next application for funding might be viewed, he said.

Kathleen Sullivan, an anti-nuclear specialist and disarmament education consultant with the United Nations Office of Disarmament Affairs, said it's not surprising that research critical of the nuclear energy and weapons isn't coming out of universities and departments that participate in nuclear research and development.


Naoto Kan, Japan's prime minister, vowed to challenge the "myth of safety" of nuclear power [Reuters]
"It (the influence) of the nuclear lobby could vary from institution to institution," said Sullivan. "If you look at the history of nuclear weapons manufacturing in the United States, you can see that a lot of research was influenced perverted, construed in a certain direction."

Sullivan points to the DOE-managed Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory at the University of California in Berkley (where some of the research for the first atomic bomb was done) as an example of how intertwined academia and government-funded nuclear science are.

The situation really isn’t much different in the field of nuclear energy, said Sullivan.

"It's all part and parcel to itself."

Of course this isn’t unique to the nuclear industry – all energy lobbies fund research one way or another. But the consequences of self-censorship when it comes to the potential downsides of nuclear energy are far more dire, than, say, for wind power.

"For nuclear physics to proceed, the only people interested in funding it are pro-nuclear folks, whether that be industry or government," said Biello. "So if you're involved in that area you've already got a bias in favour of that technology … if you study hammers, suddenly hammers seem to be the solution to everything."

And should they find results unfavourable to the industry, Ramana said they would "dress it up in various ways by saying 'Oh, there’s a very slim chance of this, and here are some safety measure we recommend,' and then the industry will say, 'Yeah,yeah, we’re incorporating all of that.'"

Ramana, for the record, said that while he's against nuclear weapons, he doesn't have a moral position on nuclear power except to say that as a cost-benefit issue, the costs outweigh the benefits, and that "in that sense, expanding nuclear power isn't a good idea."

But generally speaking, he said that nuclear researchers have a stake in reassuring the pubic that nothing bad is happening.

"'How is this going to affect the future of nuclear power?'That’s the first thought that came into their heads," said Ramana, adding, "They basically want to ensure that people will keep constructing nuclear power plants."

For instance, a May report by MIT’s Center For Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems (where TEPCO funds a chair) points out that while the Daiichi disaster has resulted in "calls for cancellation of nuclear construction projects and reassessments of plant license extensions" which might "lead to a global slow-down of the nuclear enterprise," that "the lessons to be drawn from the Fukushima accident are different."

Among the report's closing thoughts are concerns that "Decision-making in the immediate aftermath of a major crisis is often influenced by emotion," and whether"an accident like Fukushima, which is so far beyond design basis, really warrant a major overhaul of current nuclear safety regulations and practises?"

"If so," wonder the authors, "When is safe safe enough? Where do we draw the line?"

The Japanese public, it seems, would like some answers to those very questions, albeit from a different perspective.

Kazuo Hizumi, a Tokyo-based human rights lawyer, is among those pushing for openness. He is also an editor at News for the People in Japan, a news site advocating for transparency from the government and from TEPCO.

With contradicting information and lack of clear coverage on safety and contamination issues, many have taken to measuring radiation levels with their own Geiger counters.

"They do not know how to do it," he said of some of the community groups and individuals who have taken to measure contamination levels in the air, soil and food.

"But mothers are worried about their children so much and Japanese government has to consider their worries."

A report released in July by Human Rights Now highlights the need for immediately accessible information on health and safety in areas where people have been affected by the disaster, including Fukushima, especially on the issues of contaminated food and evacuation plans.

A 'nuclear priesthood'

Biello describes the nuclear industry is a relatively small, exclusive club.

"The interplay between academia and also the military and industry is very tight. It's a small community...they have their little club and they can go about their business without anyone looking over their shoulder. "

This might explain how, as the Associated Press reported in June, that the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission was "working closely with the nuclear power industry to keep the nationalise ageing reactors operating within standards or simply failing to enforce them."

However, with this exclusivity comes a culture of secrecy – "a nuclear priesthood," said Biello, which makes it very difficult to parse out a straightforward answer in the very technical and highly politicised field.

"You have the proponents, who believe that it is the technological salvation for our problems, whether that's energy, poverty, climate change or whatever else. And then you have opponents who think that it's literally the worst thing that ever happened and should be immediately shut back up in a box and buried somewhere," said Biello, who includes "professors of nuclear engineering and Greenpeace activists" as passionate opponents on the nuclear subject.

In fact, one is hard pressed to find a media report quoting a nuclear scientist at any major university sounding the alarms on the risks of contamination in Fukushima.

Doing so has largely been the work of anti-nuclear activists (who have an admitted bias against the technology) and independent scientists employed by think tanks, few of whom responded to requests for interviews.

Even anthropologists who study the behaviour of those working in the nuclear power industry, refused to comment on the culture of secrecy that surrounds it.

The situation is much the same in Japan, said Hizumi, with "only a few who give people true information."

So, one's best bet, said Biello, is to try and "triangulate the truth" - to take "a dose" from anti-nuclear activists, another from pro-nuclear lobbyists and throw that in with a little bit of engineering and that'll get you closer to the truth.

"Take what everybody is saying with a grain of salt."

Nobody likes bad news

Since World War II, the process of secrecy – the readiness to invoke "national security" - has been a pillar of the nuclear establishment…that establishment, acting on the false assumption that "secrets" can be hidden from the curious and knowledgeable, has successfully insisted that there are answers which cannot be given and even questions which cannot be asked.

The net effect is to stifle debate about the fundamental of nuclear policy. Concerned citizens dare not ask certain questions, and many begin to feel that these matters which only a few initiated experts are entitled to discuss.

If the above sounds like a post-Fukushima statement, it is not. It was written by Howard Morland for the November 1979 issue of The Progressive magazine focusing on the hydrogen bomb as well as the risks of nuclear energy.

The US government - citing national security concerns - took the magazine to court in order to prevent the issue from being published, but ultimately relented during the appeals process when it became clear that the information The Progressive wanted to publish was already public knowledge and that pursuing the ban might put the court in the position of deeming the Atomic Energy Act as counter to First Amendment rights (freedom of speech) and therefore unconstitutional in its use of prior restraint to censor the press.


"Exciting Nuclear Land" is part of the Japanese school curriculum
But, of course, that's in the US, although a similar mechanism is at work in Japan, where a recently created task force aims to "cleanse" the media of reportage that casts an unfavourable light on the nuclear industry (they refer to this information as "inaccurate" or a result of "mischief."

The government has even go so far as to accept bids from companies that specialise in scouring the Internet to monitor the Internet for reports, Tweets and blogs that are critical of its handling of the Daiichi disaster, which has presented a unique challenge to the lobby there.

Hizumi said that the move to police online content on the disaster has upset the Japanese pubic and that the president of the Japan Federation of Bar Associations has openly criticised the policy.

"The public fully trusted the Japanese Government," said Hizumi. But the absence of "true information" has massively diminished that trust, as, he said, has the public's faith that TEPCO would be open about the potential dangers of a nuclear accident.

But Japan's government has a history of slow response to TEPCO's cover-ups. In 1989, that Kei Sugaoka, a nuclear energy at General Electric who inspected and repaired plants in Japan and elsewhere, said he spotted cracks in steam dryers and a "misplacement" or 180 degrees in one dryer unit. He noticed that the position of the dryer was later omitted from the inspection record's data sheet.

Sugaoka told a Japanese networkthat TEPCO had instructed him to "erase" the flaws, but he ultimately wrote a whistleblowing letter to METI, which resulted in the temporary 17 TEPCO reactors, including ones at the plant in Fukushima.

"I guess, just, you know, they're not being open to the public. They should be more open to the public," said Sugaoka.

"Everything is always kept a secret."

But the Japanese nuclear lobby has been quite active in shaping how people see nuclear energy. The country's Ministry of Education, together with the Natural Resources Ministry (of of two agencies under Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry - METI - overseeing nuclear policies) even provides schools with a nuclear energy information curriculum.

These worksheets - or education supplements - are used to inform children about the benefits of nuclear energy over fossil fuels.

Fukushima = Chernobyl?

Depending on who you believe, either Fukushima is another Chernobyl – in terms of the severity of the accident and risks of contamination – or it’s nothing like the 1986 disaster.

There’s reason to believe that at least in one respect, Fukushima can’t and won’t be another Chernobyl, at least due to the fact that the former has occurred in the age of the Internet whereas the latter took place in the considerably quaint 80s, when a car phone the size of a brick was considered the height of communications technology to most.

"It (a successful cover up) is definitely a danger in terms of Fukushima, and we'll see what happens. All you have to do is look at the first couple of weeks after Chernobyl to see the kind of cover up," said Biello.

"I mean the Soviet Union didn't even admit that anything was happening for a while, even though everybody was noticing these radiation spikes and all these other problems. The Soviet Union was not admitting that they were experiencing this catastrophic nuclear failure... in Japan, there's a consistent desire, or kind of a habit, of downplaying these accidents, when they happen. It's not as bad as it may seem, we haven't had a full meltdown."

Fast forward to 2011, when video clips of each puff of smoke out of the Daiichi plant make it around the world in seconds, news updates are available around the clock, activists post radiation readings on maps in multiple languages and Google Translate picks up the slack in translating every last Tweet on the subject coming out of Japan.

In short, it will be a heck of a lot harder to keep a lid on things than it was 25 years ago.
http://english.aljazeera.net/indepth/features/2011/08/2011877118599802.html

Ed Jewett
08-13-2011, 04:35 AM
CounterPunch [ http://www.counterpunch.org/ ] has established that in the eight weeks after the nuclear disaster at the Fukushima complex in Japan on March 11, infant mortality in 19 U.S. cities increased by 35 per cent.

In the course of this review, conducted by CounterPunch's statistical consultant, Pierre Sprey, it also became clear that the Environmental Protection Agency's monitoring system, known as RadNet, is hopelessly inadequate to assess the effect on U.S. public health of a nuclear accident either overseas or here in the Homeland. EPA's routine sampling is laughable, with sampling frequency and geographic coverage that are hopeless for tracking radiation exposures of concern to public health. EPA's extra sampling following disasters like Three Mile Island or Fukushima can, at best, identify only a tiny fraction of the significant touchdowns of the concentrated radiation plumes from an accident site.

Sprey selected 19 cities showing evidence of being near a plume touchdown within 20 days of the Fukushima disaster: Portland, Seattle, Spokane, Tacoma, Boise, Santa Cruz, Sacramento, San Francisco, San Jose, Berkeley, Long Beach, Las Vegas, Ogden, Salt Lake City, Colorado Springs, Denver and, surprisingly, three cities in Florida - St. Petersburg, Tampa and Jacksonville.

Sprey found that, when compared to 2010, infant mortality in the 19-city sample increased by a statistically significant 35 per cent. He also notes that the EPA RadNet samples are so sparse in time and space - days or weeks apart and often hundreds and hundreds of miles between monitoring sites - that the vast majority of actual plume touchdowns across the country almost certainly remained undetected.

Read Sprey’s full and deeply disturbing survey. (Requires subscription)
http://www.easycartsecure.com/CounterPunch/Annual_Subscriptions.html

Jan Klimkowski
08-14-2011, 05:38 PM
Long, detailed and deeply concerning investigative piece by David McNeill and Jake Adelstein.

Excerpts below, full article here (http://www.counterpunch.org/mcneill08122011.html).


August 12 - 14, 2011

The Fukushima Daiichi Reactors Were in Meltdown After the Earthquake, But Before the Tsunami Hit

TEPCO's Darkest Secret

By DAVID McNEILL and JAKE ADELSTEIN

It is one of the mysteries of Japan’s ongoing nuclear crisis: How much damage did the March 11 earthquake do to the Fukushima Daiichi reactors before the tsunami hit? The stakes are high: If the quake structurally compromised the plant and the safety of its nuclear fuel, then every other similar reactor in Japan will have to be reviewed and possibly shut down. With virtually all of Japan’s 54 reactors either offline (35) or scheduled for shutdown by next April, the issue of structural safety looms over the decision to restart every one in the months and years after.

The key question for operator Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO) and its regulators to answer is this: How much damage was inflicted on the Daiichi plant before the first tsunami reached the plant roughly 40 minutes after the earthquake? TEPCO and the Japanese government are hardly reliable adjudicators in this controversy. “There has been no meltdown,” top government spokesman Edano Yukio famously repeated in the days after March 11. “It was an unforeseeable disaster,” Tepco’s then President Shimizu Masataka improbably said later. As we now know, meltdown was already occurring even as Edano spoke. And far from being unforeseeable, the disaster had been repeatedly forewarned.

Throughout the months of lies and misinformation, one story has stuck: “The earthquake knocked out the plant’s electric power, halting cooling to its six reactors. The tsunami – a unique, one-off event - then washed out the plant’s back-up generators, shutting down all cooling and starting the chain of events that would cause the world’s first triple meltdown. That line has now become gospel at TEPCO. “We had no idea that a tsunami was coming,” said Murata Yasuki, head of public relations for the now ruined facility. “It came completely out of the blue” (nemimi ni mizu datta). Safety checks have since focused heavily on future damage from tsunamis.But what if recirculation pipes and cooling pipes burst, snapped, leaked, and broke completely after the earthquake -- before the tidal wave reached the facilities and before the electricity went out? This would surprise few people familiar with the nearly 40-year-old reactor one, the grandfather of the nuclear reactors still operating in Japan.

Problems with the fractured, deteriorating, poorly repaired pipes and the cooling system had been pointed out for years. In 2002, whistleblower allegations that TEPCO had deliberately falsified safety records came to light and the company was forced to shut down all of its reactors and inspect them, including the Fukushima Daiichi Power Plant. Sugaoka Kei, a General Electric on-site inspector first notified Japan’s nuclear watchdog, Nuclear Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) in June of 2000. The government of Japan took two years to address the problem, then colluded in covering it up -- and gave the name of the whistleblower to TEPCO.


(snip)

At 9:51 pm, under CEO orders, the inside of the reactor building was declared a no-entry zone. Around 11 pm, radiation levels for the inside of the turbine building, which was next door to the reactor reached levels of 0.5 to 1.2 mSv per hour.

The meltdown was already underway.

Oddly enough, while TEPCO later insisted that the cause of the meltdown was the tsunami knocking out emergency power systems, at the 7:47 pm TEPCO press conference the same day, the spokesman, in response to questions from the press about the cooling systems, stated that the emergency water circulation equipment and reactor core isolation time cooling systems would work even without electricity. The emergency water circulation system (IC) did in fact start working before the power loss and continue working after the power was lost as well.

Sometime between 4 and 6 am, on May 12, Yoshida Masao, the plant manager decided it was time to pump seawater into the reactor core and notified TEPCO. Seawater was not pumped in until hours after a hydrogen explosion occurred, roughly 8:00 pm that day. By then, it was probably already too late.

On May 15, TEPCO went some way toward admitting at least some of these claims in a report called “Reactor Core Status of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Unit One.” The report said there was pre-tsunami damage to key facilities including pipes. “This means that assurances from the industry in Japan and overseas that the reactors were robust is now blown apart,” said Shaun Burnie, an independent nuclear waste consultant. “It raises fundamental questions on all reactors in high seismic risk areas.”

As Burnie points out, TEPCO also admitted massive fuel melt --16 hours after loss of coolant, and 7-8 hours before the explosion in unit 1. “Since they must have known all this -- their decision to flood with massive water volumes would guarantee massive additional contamination - including leaks to the ocean.”

No one knows exactly how much damage was done to the plant by the quake, or if this damage alone would account for the meltdown. However, eyewitness testimony and TEPCO’S own data indicates that the damage was significant. All of this despite the fact that shaking experienced at the plant during the quake was within it’s approved design specifications. Says Hasuike:

“What really happened at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant to cause a meltdown? TEPCO (Tokyo Electric Power Company) and the government of Japan have provided many explanations. They don’t make sense. The one thing they haven’t provided is the truth. It’s time that they did.”

David McNeill writes for The Independent, The Irish Times and The Chronicle of Higher Education. He is an Asia-Pacific Journal coordinator.

Jake Adelstein worked primarily as a police reporter for The Yomiuri newspaper from April 1993 to November 2005; he was the first foreigner to write in Japanese for a national newspaper. He now runs the website www.japansubculture.com, writes for Japanese periodicals and The Atlantic Wire, and does risk management consulting for foreign firms in Japan. He is the author of Tokyo Vice: An American Reporter on the Police Beat in Japan.

This article appears in The Asia-Pacific Journal Vol 9, Issue 32 No 2, August 8, 2011.

Peter Lemkin
08-22-2011, 04:41 PM
The Japanese Govt. gave a subtle and semi-official/semi-unofficial announcement today...to as yet undefined persons in as yet undefined towns and villages in the area immediately around the nuclear plant. The message, however, was clear....it would be several DECADES before some willl be allowed to return to live there, due to the amount and the persistence [long half-lives] of the radioactive nuclei there [and still 'a comin']. I truly feel sorry for the poor schnooks who just happened to have the bad luck of the draw of living nearby. They will be lucky if they are allowed to return to get all their things and live in a box somewhere else....until the decades pass, and they can return 'home' without worry! :what:

Jan Klimkowski
08-22-2011, 09:04 PM
Peter - yes. More detail here (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/aug/22/japan-nuclear-disaster-radiation-levels):


Fukushima disaster: residents may never return to radiation-hit homes

Japanese government will admit for first time that radiation levels will be too high to allow many evacuees to return home

Justin McCurry, in Tokyo guardian.co.uk, Monday 22 August 2011 17.22 BST

Residents who lived close to the damaged Fukushima nuclear plant are to be told their homes may be uninhabitable for decades, according to Japanese media reports.

The Japanese prime minister, Naoto Kan, is expected to visit the area at the weekend to tell evacuees they will not be able to return to their homes, even if the operation to stabilise the plant's stricken reactors by January is successful.

Kan's announcement will be the first time officials have publicly recognised that radiation damage to areas near the plant could make them too dangerous to live in for at least a generation, effectively meaning that some residents will never return to them.

A Japanese government source is quoted in local media as saying the area could be off-limits for "several decades". New data has revealed unsafe levels of radiation outside the 12-mile exclusion zone, increasing the likeliness that entire towns will remain unfit for habitation.

The exclusion zone was imposed after a series of hydrogen explosions at the plant following the earthquake and tsunami in March.

The government had planned to lift the evacuation order and allow 80,000 people back into their homes inside the exclusion zone once the reactors had been brought under control. Several thousand others living in random hotspots outside the zone have also had to relocate.

However, in a report issued over the weekend the science ministry projected that radiation accumulated over one year at 22 of 50 tested sites inside the exclusion zone would easily exceed 100 millisieverts, five times higher than the safe level advised by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. "We can't rule out the possibility that there will be some areas where it will be hard for residents to return to their homes for a long time," said Yukio Edano, chief cabinet secretaryand face of the government during the disaster. "We are very sorry."

Edano refused to say which areas were on the no-go list or how long they would remain uninhabitable, adding that a decision would be made after more radiation tests have been conducted.

The government has yet to decide how to compensate the tens of thousands of residents and business owners who will be forced to start new lives elsewhere. The state has hinted that it may buy or rent land from residents in unsafe areas, although it has not ruled out trying to decontaminate them.

Futaba and Okuma, towns less than two miles from the Fukushima plant, are expected to be among those on the blacklist. The annual cumulative radiation dose in one district of Okuma was estimated at 508 millisieverts, which experts believe is high enough to increase the risk of cancer. More than 300 households from the two towns will be allowed to return briefly to their homes next week to collect belongings. It will be the first time residents have visited their homes since the meltdown.

The plant's operator, Tokyo Electric Power, is working to bring the three crippled reactors and four overheating spent fuel pools to a safe state known as "cold shutdown" by mid-January.

Last week the company estimated that leaks from all three reactors had dropped significantly over the past month.

But signs of progress at the plant have been tempered by widespread contamination of soil, trees, roads and farmland.

Experts say that while health risks can be lowered by measures including the removal of layers of topsoil, vulnerable groups such as pregnant women and children should avoid even minimal exposure.

"Any exposure would pose a health risk, no matter how small," Hiroaki Koide, a radiation specialist at Kyoto University, told Associated Press. "There is no dose that we should call safe."

Any government admission that residents will not be able to return to their homes will be closely monitored in Japan.

Suspicions persist that the authorities privately acknowledged this situation several months ago. In April, Kenichi Matsumoto, a senior adviser to the cabinet, quoted Kan as saying that people would not be able to live near the plant for "10 to 20 years". Matsumoto later claimed to have made the remark himself.

Keith Millea
08-23-2011, 05:09 PM
Update from Fairewinds:


http://vimeo.com/28014740

Keith Millea
08-30-2011, 08:30 PM
Another short update:


http://vimeo.com/28222223

http://www.fairewinds.com

Magda Hassan
09-16-2011, 01:38 PM
TEPCO quietly paid 40 billion yen to areas near nuclear plants
2011/09/16




http://www.asahicom.jp/english/images/TKY201109150394.jpgThe Mutsu city government office building that was purchased with donations from Tokyo Electric Power Co. The building, which used to be a shopping center, has a total floor space of about 18,000 square meters. (Takuya Kitazawa)

Tokyo Electric Power Co. has been handing out about 2 billion yen (about $26 million) a year in unpublicized payments to local governments near its nuclear facilities, sources said Sept. 14.
Though the large sums in taxes and public grants paid by the firm to local communities are public knowledge, the full scale of its additional, anonymous giving has not previously been revealed.
It total, over the past 20 years, the company spent more than 40 billion yen on payments known internally as "funds to deal with local communities."
One TEPCO executive said: "We paid the donations because we wanted to obtain the understanding of local governments on the construction of nuclear power plants. (We did not disclose the amounts of the donations because) we wanted to avoid criticism that we had collusive relations with local authorities."
According to several TEPCO executives, the electric power company earmarked 1 billion yen to 2 billion yen at the start of each fiscal year for the payments. When necessary, that amount would be increased during the year, raising the average annual spending between 1990 and 2010 to more than 2 billion yen. That was in addition to the money flowing into local coffers from nuclear fuel taxes and grants mandated under the three laws on electric sources.
TEPCO would first screen requests from heads of local governments and others for the payments, and then forward the proposals to its board of directors for approval.
The company would often ask local governments not to reveal it as the source of the payments and would give money without specifying how it should be used, allowing local officials to use it freely.
The sum given to each local government was mainly decided on the basis of the amount of electricity generated in the nuclear power plants of each prefecture. When very large payments were due to a particular local government, TEPCO would divide it over several years.
Local governments receiving donations from TEPCO included the Fukushima prefectural government and the governments of the four municipalities where the Fukushima No. 1 and No. 2 nuclear power plants are located.
Payments were also made to the Niigata prefectural government and two municipalities hosting the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power plant, as well as the Aomori prefectural authorities and the city government of Mutsu, where a TEPCO-affiliated company planned to construct an intermediate storage facility for spent nuclear fuel.
Of a total of 34.7 billion yen identified as having been paid for the construction of public facilities, 19.9 billion yen went to local governments in Fukushima Prefecture, 13 billion yen went to authorities in Niigata Prefecture, and 1.8 billion yen went to Mutsu.
One TEPCO executive also said some local administrations had asked for money to cover budget deficits.
"We were not able to reject the requests because we had made those donations normal events," the executive said, adding, "The responsibility weighed heavily on us."
In exceptional cases, TEPCO disclosed donations for particularly expensive facilities. Fukushima Prefecture's 13-billion-yen "J Village" soccer facility and park improvements in Kashiwazaki city and Kariwa village in Niigata Prefecture worth 10 billion yen were funded by the company.
But the general approach was secretive.
A TEPCO public relations official said: "We refrain from disclosing each donation. We have disclosed the amounts of donations when the recipients have wanted to disclose them, or when the donations were made for large-scale projects."
A former executive of the Aomori prefectural government said: "We welcomed anonymous donations because we were able to use them freely."
The Mutsu city government purchased a shopping center building and turned it into a municipal government office building in 2006. Of the total cost of 2.8 billion yen, 1.2 billion yen was paid by donations from TEPCO.
According to former city government executives, the city had to move because of the age of its previous building, but could not pay for the relocation itself because of serious fiscal problems.
TEPCO was initially reluctant to pay, saying funding the relocation did not meet the donations' official purpose of revitalizing local communities. However, the Mutsu city government pressed the point, saying the city government office was used by local people. TEPCO eventually accepted the request.
The fact that TEPCO provided the funding was only revealed after city assembly members blocked passage of the budget plan and insisted on transparency.
In Aomori Prefecture, the Federation of Electric Power Companies donated a total of 17 billion yen to prefectural government-affiliated organizations during the period from 1989 and 2009. Of that amount, about 5 billion yen was shouldered by TEPCO.
The municipal government of Naraha, Fukushima Prefecture, where the Fukushima No. 2 nuclear power plant is located, received a donation of 1 billion yen from TEPCO in fiscal 2007 to pay for the construction of a combined kindergarten and nursery school.
"We were not able to cover all of the construction costs, so we asked TEPCO for donations," a Naraha municipal government official said.
Shuji Shimizu, vice president of Fukushima University, said: "One of the reasons for enactment of the three laws on electric sources was that it is not good to be securing places for the construction of nuclear power plants by using dubious donations. It is obvious that the huge donations by electric power companies are related to nuclear power plants. If local governments depend on those donations, their finances will be forced to depend on nuclear power plants more and more."
Haruyuki Matsuyama, a certified public accountant active in uncovering the finances of public organizations, said: "I feel that donations by electric power companies are a kind of bribe. The donations are used to conciliate local communities. They are apparently different from genuine donations that do not seek a return. The operations of administrations must be based on information disclosure. Anonymous donations imply that both electric power companies and local governments regard the donations as dubious."
(This article was written by Takashi Ichida, Kamome Fujimori, Takuya Kitazawa, Hiroyoshi Itabashi and Yo Noguchi.)
http://www.asahi.com/english/TKY201109150395.html

Magda Hassan
09-19-2011, 02:04 PM
By MALCOLM FOSTER, Associated Press
TOKYO (AP) -- Chanting "Sayonara nuclear power" and waving banners, tens of thousands of people marched in central Tokyo on Monday to call on Japan's government to abandon atomic energy in the wake of the Fukushima nuclear accident.
The demonstration underscores how deeply a Japanese public long accustomed to nuclear power has been affected by the March 11 crisis, when a tsunami caused core meltdowns at three reactors at the Fukushima Dai-ichi complex.

The disaster – the worst nuclear accident since Chernobyl – saw radiation spewed across a wide part of northeastern Japan, forcing the evacuation of some 100,000 people who lived near the plant and raising fears of contamination in everything from fruit and vegetables to fish and water.
"Radiation is scary," said Nami Noji, a 43-year-old mother who came to the protest on this national holiday with her four children, ages 8-14. "There's a lot of uncertainty about the safety of food, and I want the future to be safe for my kids."
Police estimated the crowd at 20,000 people, while organizers said there were three times that many people.
In addition to fears of radiation, the Japanese public and corporate world have had to put up with electricity shortages amid the sweltering summer heat after more than 30 of Japan's 54 nuclear reactors were idled over the summer to undergo inspections.
Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda, who took office earlier this month, has said Japan will restart reactors that clear safety checks. But he has also said the country should reduce its reliance on atomic energy over the long-term and explore alternative sources of energy. He has not spelled out any specific goals.

Before the disaster, this earthquake-prone country derived 30 percent of its electricity from nuclear power. Yet Japan is also a resource-poor nation, making it a difficult, time-consuming process for it to come up with viable alternative forms of energy.
Mari Joh, a 64-year-old woman who traveled from Hitachi city to collect signatures for a petition to shut down the Tokai Dai-ni nuclear plant not far from her home, acknowledged that shifting the country's energy sources could take 20 years.
"But if the government doesn't act decisively now to set a new course, we'll just continue with the status quo," she said Monday. "I want to use natural energy, like solar, wind and biomass."
Before the march, the protesters gathered in Meiji Park to hear speakers address the crowd, including one woman from Fukushima prefecture, Reiko Muto, who described herself as a "hibakusha," an emotionally laden term for survivors of the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
Those evacuated from around the plant remain uncertain about when, if ever, they will be able to return to their homes.
An AP-GfK poll showed that 55 percent of Japanese want to reduce the number of nuclear reactors in the country, while 35 percent would like to leave the number about the same. Four percent want an increase while 3 percent want to eliminate them entirely.
The poll, which surveyed 1,000 adults between July 29 and Aug. 10, had a margin of error of plus or minus 3.8 percentage points.
Author Kenzaburo Oe, who won the Nobel literature prize in 1994 and has campaigned for pacifist and anti-nuclear causes, also addressed the crowd. He and musician Ryuichi Sakamoto, who composed the score to the movie "The Last Emperor," were among the event's supporters.
(This version CORRECTS spelling of nuclear plant's name in second paragraph.)

Photos here (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/09/19/nuclear-power-protests-tokyo-japan_n_969385.html?1316434753&ncid=edlinkusaolp00000008#s365133&title=Japan_Anti_Nuclear)

Jan Klimkowski
09-21-2011, 08:51 PM
Typhoon Roke heads towards Japan's tsunami-hit areas

Storm leaves four dead in central region as 130mph winds threaten to cause damage at Fukushima nuclear plants

Justin McCurry in Tokyo guardian.co.uk, Wednesday 21 September 2011 14.30 BST

More here (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/sep/21/typhoon-roke-hits-japan).

Peter Lemkin
09-26-2011, 12:31 PM
Radioactive Rice "Far Exceeding" Safe Levels Found in Japan
by Chikako Mogi

TOKYO - Japan found the first case of rice with radioactive materials far exceeding a government-set level for a preliminary test of pre-harvested crop, requiring thorough inspection of the rice to be harvested from the region, the farm ministry said late on Friday.

A rice field is seen in Soma, about 40 km (25 miles) north of the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, in Fukushima prefecture, September 10, 2011. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
The ministry said radioactive caesium of 500 becquerels per kg was found in a sample of the pre-harvested rice in Nihonmatsu city, in Fukushima Prefecture, 56 km (35 miles) west of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant which was crippled by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, triggering the world's worst nuclear disaster in 25 years.

The ministry said the Fukushima Prefecture will expand the inspection spots nearly ten-fold to around 300 areas.

It is the first case in Japan of rice containing radioactive caesium exceeding 200 becquerels per kg, a level which requires further thorough testing of the area for the harvested rice.

The government introduced inspection guidelines in August, with preliminary tests followed by more before approving shipments.

If preliminary tests found rice to contain radioactive caesium levels of 200 becquerels per kg or more, the crop will be tested more thoroughly before approvals are made for shipments.

If the level of caesium in rice exceeded the government-imposed cap of 500 becquerels per kg, shipments from locally produced rice will be halted.

So far, no rice crop has been banned for shipments.

If the follow-up tests of rice harvested from Nihonmatsu city find radioactive materials exceeding the government-imposed cap, it would deal a huge blow to Japan.

The country has been struggling to regain public trust in the safety of nuclear power so it can resume operations of nuclear reactors to supply energy as well as food safety after wide-ranging products from water to vegetables were found with radiation contamination.

Magda Hassan
09-28-2011, 05:04 AM
http://i.bnet.com/blogs/radiation.png (http://i.bnet.com/blogs/radiation.png)In June, Japanese map publisher Zenrin plotted radioactive contamination data from independent scientists and local governments.

By David Worthington (http://www.smartplanet.com/search?q=david+worthington) | September 27, 2011,
Airline disasters, nuclear meltdowns, and war have something in common: information about what really occurred trickles out over the ensuing months and years. Blogger Lucas W. Hixson haspublished (http://news.lucaswhitefieldhixson.com/2011/09/enformable-september-26th-2011.html) a trove of Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) internal e-mails from a successful Freedom of Information Act request, which reveal what the government knew and when.
The e-mails are from the period between March 11 through March 15, when the reactors are actively melting down (http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/intelligent-energy/nuclear-meltdowns-nearly-made-northern-japan-uninhabitable/6902). Another blogger from the politically progressive Web site Daily Kos provideddetailed summaries (http://www.dailykos.com/story/2011/09/27/1020754/-Fukushima-Docs:-I-Feel-Like-Crying?via=spotlight) of the correspondence.
Among the key findings were that the NRC was crafting its public relations strategy to address any domestic concerns, aided German utilities to keep reactors online, as well as a realization of the gravity of the incident, punctuated with remarks such as, “I feel like crying,” and “I will be no closer than 140 miles to the plant.”
It also includes the Tokyo Electric Power Company’s (TEPCO) blasé response to the NRC’s urgent requests to help. “For the time being, we feel we grasp well the situation,” A TEPCO official wrote in an e-mail. The NRC fully grasped (http://www.dailykos.com/story/2011/09/23/1019711/-Fukushima-Docs:-NOT-A-DRILL?via=blog_598858) the gravity of the situation despite what TEPCO was saying.
Other U.S. government agencies including the Environmental Protection Agency, FEMA, and the Department of Homeland Security were actively assessing the threat of radiation exposure in the mainland United States. The NRC publicly downplayed the threat.
Hixson has also reported Japan’s Environment Ministry’s recent finding that 28 million cubic meters (http://enformable.com/2011/09/28-million-cubic-meters-of-hot-soil-in-fukushima-ministry-aims-to-set-storage-site-guidelines-13-of-one-of-japans-largest-prefectures-contaminated/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Enformable+%28Enformable%29)o f radiation contaminated soil may have to be removed from the Fukushima prefecture, affecting a zone over 13 percent of the prefecture’s area - even as the government is allowing some people to return (http://www.abc.net.au/worldtoday/content/2011/s3326669.htm) to their homes.
Knowing this, the Japanese government has taken steps to comprehensively monitor rice crops (http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/intelligent-energy/japanese-rice-crops-threatened-by-radiation/7830)(some has tested positive (http://jotzoom.com/japanese-rice-tests-positive-for-radioactive-cesium/1699/)) for radiative contaminates, and suspended (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/07/17/radiation-beef-japan_n_901006.html) beef shipments from theFukushima region during July. Rice straw cows absorbed unsafe levels of cesium through their feed stocks.
Crops such as rice and grains quickly absorb radiation, potentially making dairy products and produce for human consumption.
At least 18 of the prefectural governments most acutely affected by radioactive fallout (http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/intelligent-energy/elevated-radiation-levels-widespread-in-eastern-japan/7160) from theFukushima Daiichi (http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/intelligent-energy/nuclear-meltdowns-nearly-made-northern-japan-uninhabitable/6902) nuclear disaster last spring are running tests (http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/nn20110802a2.html) to gauge the safety of local food supplies. The areas produce nearly half of the nation’s rice crops, Reuters reported (http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/08/01/us-japan-rice-idUSTRE7701VY20110801).
In August, Children living in communities adjacent to the meltdowns (http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/intelligent-energy/nuclear-meltdowns-nearly-made-northern-japan-uninhabitable/6902) have registered (http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-08-19/thyroid-radiation-exposure-found-in-children-near-tepco-plant.html) low-levels of radioactive exposure.
http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/intelligent-energy/what-the-nrc-really-knew-about-fukushima/9180

Peter Lemkin
09-28-2011, 07:41 AM
I might note that 5 microSeiverts/hr is a HUGE dose of radiation [the most intense red zones]; but the zones in yellow, light green-blue and light blue are also HUGE doses. those in darker blue are Large and unacceptable/dangerous dosages. Those areas on the map not colored in between those that are are unmeasured - not non-radioactive and one can interpolate their color approximately. What a mess...and the radiation is STILL pouring out...despite the fact that most believe it has somehow been stopped. It has NOT. What this shows is the entire NE section of Japan poisoned by radiation - and spreading - as it has been recorded in Tokyo and beyond. It will spread via wind, rain, rivers and man-made transport of food and other products moved from that area. Well past the total radiation of Chernobyl and more concentrated locally - although also spreading world-wide. :thumbsdown:

Ed Jewett
09-30-2011, 10:27 PM
Japan: Kan Considered Evacuation of Tokyo in Wake Nuclear Disaster, but Feared Chaos and Collapse of the State (http://cryptogon.com/?p=25219)September 30th, 2011Via: ABC (http://www.abc.net.au/news/2011-09-19/kan-reveals-tokyo-evacuation-plans/2905474/?site=melbourne):
Japan’s former prime minister Naoto Kan has revealed he contemplated evacuating as many as 30 million people from Tokyo and surrounding areas during the Fukushima nuclear disaster.
Speaking to Japan’s Kyodo News, Mr Kan, who was prime minister during the nuclear crisis, said evacuations on such a scale may have led to Japan being unable to function.
Mr Kan has since resigned from the prime ministership and can now speak more openly about the crisis.
He said he asked experts for “simulations of the worst case scenario” at the Fukushima nuclear plant.
He said the experts explained that people living 200 to 250 kilometres from the plant would have to be evacuated.
He said he contemplated the chaos that would have ensued if such a measure had been taken.
”It was a crucial moment when I wasn’t sure whether Japan could continue to function as a state,” he said.
”I felt that the risk was at its highest during the first 10 days [after the disaster struck].”
Mr Kan also said there were no effective safeguards in place because ”we had never foreseen a situation in which a quake, tsunami and a nuclear plant accident would occur at the same time.”
Posted in Atrocities (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=18), Collapse (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=19), Energy (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=17), Environment (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=16), Health (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=25), Infrastructure (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=21),Perception Management (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=7), Social Engineering (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=10)

Ed Jewett
09-30-2011, 10:31 PM
A Japanese Response to Nuclear Disaster: The Smartphone that Measures Radiation (http://cryptogon.com/?p=25203)September 30th, 2011Via: Telegraph (http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/danielledemetriou/100108232/a-japanese-response-to-nuclear-disaster-a-smartphone-that-measures-radiation/):
A mobile phone that doubles as a radiation detector? If there is one country that can pull off (and sell) such a device, it’s Japan. A leading Japanese telecommunications company will unveil a smartphone next week that also acts as a radiation dosimeter to help users detect potential contamination.
In Japan, it’s a timely invention – and a reflection of just how seriously businesses are taking the anti-nuclear mood sweeping the country as the worst atomic crisis since Chernobyl rumbles on. More than six months may have passed since the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, but the nation’s concerns surrounding potential radiation contamination are now reaching fever pitch.
Posted in Environment (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=16), Health (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=25), Technology (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=12)

Ed Jewett
10-05-2011, 05:51 AM
Is US Trying To Arm Japan with Nuclear Arsenal? (http://therearenosunglasses.wordpress.com/2011/10/04/is-us-trying-arm-japan-with-nuclear-arsenal/)
4102011[SEE: Was Fukushima Stuxnet Attack? (http://therearenosunglasses.wordpress.com/2011/10/04/2011/06/03/was-fukushima-stuxnet-attack/)]
Secret US-Israeli Nuke Transfers Led To Fukushima Blasts (http://rense.com/general94/secbb.htm)By Yoichi Shimatsu
A Rense World Exclusive
Copyright 2001 – All Rights Reserved
Sixteen tons and what you get is a nuclear catastrophe. The explosions that rocked the Fukushima No.1 nuclear plant were more powerful than the combustion of hydrogen gas, as claimed by the Tokyo Electric Power Company. The actual cause of the blasts, according to intelligence sources in Washington, was nuclear fission of. warhead cores illegally taken from America’s sole nuclear-weapons assembly facility. Evaporation in the cooling pools used for spent fuel rods led to the detonation of stored weapons-grade plutonium and uranium.
The facts about clandestine American and Israeli support for Japan’s nuclear armament are being suppressed in the biggest official cover-up in recent history. The timeline of events indicates the theft from America’s strategic arsenal was authorized at the highest level under a three-way deal between the Bush-Cheney team, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and Elhud Olmert’s government in Tel Aviv.
Tokyo’s Strangelove
In early 2007, Vice President Dick Cheney flew to Tokyo with his closest aides. Newspaper editorials noted the secrecy surrounding his visit – no press conferences, no handshakes with ordinary folks and, as diplomatic cables suggest, no briefing for U.S. Embassy staffers in Tokyo.
Cheney snubbed Defense Minister Fumio Kyuma, who was shut out of confidential talks. The pretext was his criticism of President George Bush for claiming Iraq possessed weapons of mass destruction. The more immediate concern was that the defense minister might disclose bilateral secrets to the Pentagon. The Joint Chiefs of Staff were sure to oppose White House approval of Japan’s nuclear program.
An unannounced reason for Cheney’s visit was to promote a quadrilateral alliance in the Asia-Pacific region. The four cornerstones – the US, Japan, Australia and India – were being called on to contain and confront China and its allies North Korea and Russia.. From a Japanese perspective, this grand alliance was flawed by asymmetry: The three adversaries were nuclear powers, while the U.S. was the only one in the Quad group.
To further his own nuclear ambitions, Abe was playing the Russian card. As mentioned in a U.S. Embassy cable (dated 9/22), the Yomiuri Shimbun gave top play to this challenge to the White House : “It was learned yesterday that the government and domestic utility companies have entered final talks with Russia in order to relegate uranium enrichment for use at nuclear power facilities to Atomprom, the state-owned nuclear monopoly.” If Washington refused to accept a nuclear-armed Japan, Tokyo would turn to Moscow.
Since the Liberal Democratic Party selected him as prime minister in September 2006, the hawkish Abe repeatedly called for Japan to move beyond the postwar formula of a strictly defensive posture and non-nuclear principles. Advocacy of a nuclear-armed Japan arose from his family tradition. His grandfather Nobusuke Kishi nurtured the wartime atomic bomb project and, as postwar prime minister, enacted the civilian nuclear program. His father Shintaro Abe, a former foreign minister, had played the Russian card in the 1980s, sponsoring the Russo-Japan College, run by the Aum Shinrikyo sect (a front for foreign intelligence), to recruit weapons scientists from a collapsing Soviet Union.
The chief obstacle to American acceptance of a nuclear-armed Japan was the Pentagon, where Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima remain as iconic symbols justifying American military supremacy.The only feasible channel for bilateral transfers then was through the civilian-run Department of Energy (DoE), which supervises the production of nuclear weapons.
Camp David Go-Ahead
The deal was sealed on Abe’s subsequent visit to Washington. Wary of the eavesdropping that led to Richard Nixon’s fall from grace, Bush preferred the privacy afforded at Camp David. There, in a rustic lodge on April 27, Bush and Abe huddled for 45 minutes. What transpired has never been revealed, not even in vague outline.
As his Russian card suggested, Abe was shopping for enriched uranium. At 99.9 percent purity, American-made uranium and plutonium is the world’s finest nuclear material. The lack of mineral contaminants means that it cannot be traced back to its origin. In contrast, material from Chinese and Russian labs can be identified by impurities introduced during the enrichment process.
Abe has wide knowledge of esoteric technologies. His first job in the early 1980s was as a manager at Kobe Steel. One of the researchers there was astrophysicist Hideo Murai, who adapted Soviet electromagnetic technology to “cold mold” steel. Murai later became chief scientist for the Aum Shinrikyo sect, which recruited Soviet weapons technicians under the program initiated by Abe’s father. After entering government service, Abe was posted to the U.S. branch of JETRO (Japan External Trade Organization). Its New York offices hosted computers used to crack databases at the Pentagon and major defense contractors to pilfer advanced technology. The hacker team was led by Tokyo University’s top gamer, who had been recruited into Aum.
After the Tokyo subway gassing in 1995, Abe distanced himself from his father’s Frankenstein cult with a publics-relations campaign. Fast forward a dozen years and Abe is at Camp David. After the successful talks with Bush, Abe flew to India to sell Cheney’s quadrilateral pact to a Delhi skeptical about a new Cold War. Presumably, Cheney fulfilled his end of the deal. Soon thereafter Hurricane Katrina struck, wiping away the Abe visit from the public memory.
The Texas Job
BWXT Pantex, America’s nuclear warhead facility, sprawls over 16,000 acres of the Texas Panhandle outside Amarillo. Run by the DoE and Babcock & Wilson, the site also serves as a storage facility for warheads past their expiration date. The 1989 shutdown of Rocky Flats, under community pressure in Colorado, forced the removal of those nuclear stockpiles to Pantex. Security clearances are required to enter since it is an obvious target for would-be nuclear thieves.
In June 2004, a server at the Albuquerque office of the National Nuclear Security System was hacked. Personal information and security-clearance data for 11 federal employees and 177 contractors at Pantex were lifted. NNSA did not inform Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman or his deputy Clay Sell until three months after the security breach, indicating investigators suspected an inside job.
While Bush and Abe met at Camp David, 500 unionized security guards at Pantex launched a 45-day strike. Scabs were hired, but many failed to pass the entry exam, according to the Inspector General’s office at DoE. The IG report cited witnesses who said: “BWXT officials gave passing grades to some replacement guards even though they actually flunked tests,” and “contractor officials gave correct answers to those that failed the tests.” Although the scene was nearly as comical as the heist in “Ocean’s Eleven”, Pantex is not some Vegas casino. At stake was nuclear Armageddon.
At an opportune moment during the two-month strike, trucks loaded with warhead cores rolled out of the gates. Some 16 metric tons of nuclear cores packed in caskets were hauled away in refrigerated containers to prevent fission. At the port of Houston, the dangerous cargo was loaded aboard vessels operated by an Israeli state-owned shipping line. The radioactive material was detected by port inspector Roland Carnaby, a private contractor working under the federal program to interdict weapons of mass destruction.
The intelligence community is still buzzing about his shooting death. On April 29, 2008, Houston police officers pursued Carnaby on a highway chase and gunned him down. His port monitoring contract was later awarded to the Israel-based security firm NICE (Neptune Intelligence Computer Engineering), owned by former Israeli Defense Force officers.
Throughout the Pantex caper, from the data theft to smuggling operation, Bush and Cheney’s point man for nuclear issues was DoE Deputy Director Clay Sell, a lawyer born in Amarillo and former aide to Panhandle district Congressman Mac Thornberry. Sell served on the Bush-Cheney transition team and became the top adviser to the President on nuclear issues. At DoE, Sell was directly in charge of the U.S. nuclear weapons complex, which includes 17 national laboratories and the Pantex plant. (Another alarm bell: Sell was also staff director for the Senate Energy subcommittee under the late Sen. Ted Stevens of Alaska, who died in a 2010 plane crash.)
An Israeli Double-Cross
The nuclear shipments to Japan required a third-party cutout for plausible deniability by the White House. Israel acted less like an agent and more like a broker in demanding additional payment from Tokyo, according to intelligence sources. Adding injury to insult, the Israelis skimmed off the newer warhead cores for their own arsenal and delivered older ones. Since deteriorated cores require enrichment, the Japanese were furious and demanded a refund, which the Israelis refused. Tokyo had no recourse since by late 2008 principals Abe had resigned the previous autumn and Bush was a lame duck.
The Japanese nuclear developers, under the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, had no choice but to enrich the uranium cores at Fukushima No.1, a location remote enough to evade detection by nonproliferation inspectors. Hitachi and GE had developed a laser extraction process for plutonium, which requires vast amounts of electrical power. This meant one reactor had to make unscheduled runs, as was the case when the March earthquake struck.
Tokyo dealt a slap on the wrist to Tel Aviv by backing Palestinian rights at the UN. Not to be bullied, the Israeli secret service launched the Stuxnet virus against Japan’s nuclear facilities.
Firewalls kept Stuxnet at bay until the Tohoku earthquake. The seismic activity felled an electricity tower behind Reactor 6. The power cut disrupted the control system, momentarily taking down the firewall. As the computer came online again, Stuxnet infiltrated to shut down the back-up generators. During the 20-minute interval between quake and tsunami, the pumps and valves at Fukushima No.1 were immobilized, exposing the turbine rooms to flood damage.
The flow of coolant water into the storage pools ceased, quickening evaporation. Fission of the overheated cores led to blasts and mushroom-clouds. Residents in mountaintop Iitate village overlooking the seaside plant saw plumes of smoke and could “taste the metal” in their throats.
Guilty as Charged
The Tohoku earthquake and tsunami were powerful enough to damage
Fukushima No.1. The natural disaster, however, was vastly amplified by two external factors: release of the Stuxnet virus, which shut down control systems in the critical 20 minutes prior to the tsunami; and presence of weapons-grade nuclear materials that devastated the nuclear facility and contaminated the entire region.
Of the three parties involved, which bears the greatest guilt? All three are guilty of mass murder, injury and destruction of property on a regional scale, and as such are liable for criminal prosecution and damages under international law and in each respective jurisdiction.
The White House, specifically Bush, Cheney and their co-conspirators in the DoE, hold responsibility for ordering the illegal removal and shipment of warheads without safeguards.
The state of Israel is implicated in theft from U.S. strategic stockpiles, fraud and extortion against the Japanese government, and a computer attack against critical infrastructure with deadly consequences, tantamount to an act of war.
Prime Minister Abe and his Economy Ministry sourced weapons-grade nuclear material in violation of constitutional law and in reckless disregard of the risks of unregulated storage, enrichment and extraction. Had Abe not requested enriched uranium and plutonium in the first place, the other parties would not now be implicated. Japan, thus, bears the onus of the crime.
The International Criminal Court has sufficient grounds for taking up a case that involves the health of millions of people in Japan, Canada, the United States, Russia, the Koreas, Mongolia, China and possibly the entire Northern Hemisphere. The Fukushima disaster is more than an human-rights charge against a petty dictator, it is a crime against humanity on par with the indictments at the Nuremberg and Tokyo tribunals. Failure to prosecute is complicity.
If there is a silver lining to every dark cloud, it’s that the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami saved the world from even greater folly by halting the drive to World War III.
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Ed Jewett
10-05-2011, 06:15 AM
Japan Update: the Post-Tsunami LandscapePosted by karl johnson on Sep 28, 2011
Related program: Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami Rebuilding


http://architectureforhumanity.org/updates/2011-09-28-japan-update-the-post-tsunami-landscape (http://architectureforhumanity.org/programs/tohoku-earthquake-and-tsunami-rebuilding)

Magda Hassan
10-23-2011, 01:06 PM
Breaking News: 669 Bq/kg Cesium from animal planktonPosted by Mochizuki on October 14th, 2011 · 4 Comments (http://fukushima-diary.com/2011/10/breaking-news-669bqkg-cesium-from-animal-plankton/#comments)
“In July” Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology measured669 Bq/Kg of cesium from animal plankton.
It includes cesium 134 and 137. The plankton was taken at 3km from the coast of Iwaki shi.
Not to mention, it is from Fukushima because the half life time of cesium 134 is only 2 years.
According to the official pro-nuc organization “IAEA”‘s report (http://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/TRS422_web.pdf),
Concentration factor is:
Animal plankton 40
Fish 100
Marine animal 400
Fish therefore is likely to be about 1672.5 Bq/Kg.
If a sea lion has WBC test, he/she will be 6,690 Bq/Kg.
This is how we would be.
Now even the Japanese “safety” limit of fish is 500 Bq/kg.
In the sea, there is nothing left to eat.
http://fukushima-diary.com/2011/10/breaking-news-669bqkg-cesium-from-animal-plankton/

Peter Lemkin
11-02-2011, 08:36 AM
Something suspicious and new is happening...and I can't tell you what.

Japan nuclear crisis: Xenon detected at Fukushima plant
By Roland Buerk
BBC News, Tokyo

Officials are not yet sure if the readings pose a problem

A radioactive gas has been detected at Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant, the facility's operator says.

Tepco said xenon had been found in reactor two, which was previously thought to be near a stable shutdown.

There has been no increase in temperature or pressure, but the discovery may indicate a problem with the reactor.

Boric acid - used to suppress nuclear reactions - has been injected as a precaution.

Ever since the meltdowns in March triggered by the huge earthquake and tsunami, engineers have been working to bring the Fukushima reactors under control.

The government and Tepco - the Tokyo Electric Power Company - have said they are on track to achieve a stable shutdown by the end of the year.

But now they have found what could be a problem - radioactive xenon gas detected in a filter in reactor two.

Since it has a short half-life, it indicates a possibility of resumed nuclear fission in recent days.

Tepco says the temperature of the reactor, which has been below boiling point, has not increased, indicating any reaction would be small.

It is not ruling out a false reading but boric acid, which suppresses fission, was injected into the reactor overnight.

Meanwhile, elsewhere in Japan a reactor has been switched on for the first time since the disaster.

Safety fears mean local authorities have been refusing permission for restarts after routine maintenance.

Ed Jewett
11-02-2011, 07:41 PM
Fission Detected at Damaged Fukushima Atomic Power Plant (http://cryptogon.com/?p=25810)November 2nd, 2011Via: Bloomberg (http://news.businessweek.com/article.asp?documentKey=1376-LU10Q56KLVS101-25B42PBBAAGTL9H5JPAVA41NPT):
Tokyo Electric Power Co. detected signs of nuclear fission at its crippled Fukushima atomic power plant, raising the risk of increased radiation emissions. No increase in radiation was found at the site and the situation is under control, officials said.
The company, known as Tepco, began spraying boric acid on the No. 2 reactor at 2:48 a.m. Japan time to prevent accidental chain reactions, according to an e-mailed statement today. The detection of xenon, which is associated with nuclear fission, was confirmed today by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency, the country’s atomic regulator said.
“Given the signs, it’s certain that fission is occurring,” Junichi Matsumoto, a general manager at Tepco who regularly talks to the media, told reporters in Tokyo today. There’s been no large-scale or sustained criticality and no increase in radiation, he said.
Fission taking place in the reactor can lead to increases in radiation emissions and raises concerns about further leaks after another radioactive hot spot was discovered in Tokyo on Oct. 29. It’s possible there are similar reactions occurring in the No. 1 and No. 3 reactors, the other cores damaged at the station, Matsumoto said.
“Melted fuel in the No. 2 reactor may have undergone a sustained process of nuclear fission or re-criticality,” Tetsuo Ito, the head of Kinki University’s Atomic Energy Research Institute, said by phone. “The nuclear fission should be containable by injecting boron into the reactor to absorb neutrons.”
Posted in Atrocities (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=18), Collapse (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=19), Energy (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=17), Environment (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=16), Health (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=25), Infrastructure (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=21)

Carsten Wiethoff
11-06-2011, 06:56 PM
IEEE Spectrum has a special report about Fukushima.

http://spectrum.ieee.org/energy/nuclear/24-hours-at-fukushima/0
(http://spectrum.ieee.org/energy/nuclear/24-hours-at-fukushima/0)
Some Quote:


At 3:27 p.m. the first tsunami wave surged into the man-made harbor protecting Fukushima Dai-ichi, rushing past a tidal gauge that measured a water height of 4 meters above normal. At 3:35 another set of much higher waves rolled in and obliterated the gauge. The water rushed over the seawalls and swept toward the plant. It smashed into the seawater pumps used in the heat-removal systems, then burst open the large doors on the turbine buildings and submerged power panels that controlled the operation of pumps, valves, and other equipment. Weeks later, TEPCO employees would measure the water stains on the buildings and estimate the monstrous tsunami's height at 14 meters.
In the basements of turbine and reactor buildings, 6 of the 12 diesel generators shuddered to a halt as the floodwaters inundated them. Five other generators cut out when their power distribution panels were drenched. Only one generator, on the first floor of a building near unit 6, kept going; unlike the others, all of its equipment was above the water line. Reactor 6 and its sister unit, reactor 5, would weather the crisis without serious damage, thanks in part to that generator.
The rest of Fukushima Dai-ichi now faced a cataclysmic scenario that nuclear power plant operators have long feared but never experienced: a complete station blackout.



Also interesting:
http://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/industrial-robots/fukushima-robot-operator-diaries

Magda Hassan
11-12-2011, 01:10 AM
Fukushima: They Knew (http://www.gregpalast.com/completely-and-utterly-fail-in-an-earthquake/)
Thursday, November 10, 2011
"Completely and Utterly Fail in an Earthquake"
The Fukushima story you didn't hear on CNN
by Greg Palast
for FreePress.org (http://freepress.org/)
I've seen a lot of sick stuff in my career, but this was sick on a new level.
Here was the handwritten log kept by a senior engineer at the nuclear power plant:
http://www.gregpalast.com/images/fuk_sendout_1.pngWiesel was very upset. He seemed very nervous. Very agitated. . . . In fact, the plant was riddled with problems that, no way on earth, could stand an earth- quake. The team of engineers sent in to inspect found that most of these components could "completely and utterly fail" during an earthquake.
"Utterly fail during an earthquake." And here in Japan was the quake and here is the utter failure.
The warning was in what the investigations team called The Notebook, which I'm not supposed to have. Good thing I've kept a copy anyway, because the file cabinets went down with my office building ....
WORLD TRADE CENTER TOWER 1, FIFTY-SECOND FLOOR
NEW YORK, 1986
[This is an excerpt in FreePress.org from Vultures' Picnic: In Pursuit of Petroleum Pigs, Power Pirates and High-Finance Fraudsters, to be released this Monday. Click here (http://www.gregpalast.com/vulturespicnic) to get the videos and the book (http://www.gregpalast.com/vulturespicnic/?page=ORDER).]
Two senior nuclear plant engineers were spilling out their souls and files on our huge conference table, blowing away my government investigations team with the inside stuff about the construction of the Shoreham, New York, power station.
The meeting was secret. Very secret. Their courage could destroy their careers: No engineering firm wants to hire a snitch, even one who has saved thousands of lives. They could lose their jobs; they could lose everything. They did. That’s what happens. Have a nice day.
On March 12 this year, as I watched Fukushima melt, I knew: the "SQ" had been faked. Anderson Cooper said it would all be OK. He'd flown to Japan, to suck up the radiation and official company bullshit. The horror show was not the fault of Tokyo Electric, he said, because the plant was built to withstand only an 8.0 earthquake on the Richter scale, and this was 9.0. Anderson must have been in the gym when they handed out the facts. The 9.0 shake was in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, 90 miles away. It was barely a tenth of that power at Fukushima.
I was ready to vomit. Because I knew who had designed the plant, who had built it and whom Tokyo Electric Power was having rebuild it: Shaw Construction. The latest alias of Stone & Webster, the designated builder for every one of the four new nuclear plants that the Obama Administration has approved for billions in federal studies.
But I had The Notebook, the diaries of the earthquake inspector for the company. I'd squirreled it out sometime before the Trade Center went down. I shouldn't have done that. Too bad.
All field engineers keep a diary. Gordon Dick, a supervisor, wasn’t sup- posed to show his to us. I asked him to show it to us and, reluctantly, he directed me to these notes about the “SQ” tests.
http://www.gregpalast.com/images/fuk_sendout_2.pngSQ is nuclear-speak for “Seismic Qualification.” A seismically qualified nuclear plant won’t melt down if you shake it. A “seismic event” can be an earthquake or a Christmas present from Al Qaeda. You can’t run a nuclear reactor in the USA or Europe or Japan without certified SQ.
This much is clear from his notebook: This nuclear plant will melt down in an earthquake. The plant dismally failed to meet the Seismic I (shaking) standards required by U.S. and international rules.
Here’s what we learned: Dick’s subordinate at the nuclear plant, Robert Wiesel, conducted the standard seismic review. Wiesel flunked his company. No good. Dick then ordered Wiesel to change his report to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, change it from failed to passed. Dick didn’t want to make Wiesel do it, but Dick was under the gun himself, acting on direct command from corporate chiefs. From The Notebook:

Wiesel was very upset. He seemed very nervous. Very agitated. [He said,] “I believe these are bad results and I believe it’s reportable,” and then he took the volume of federal regulations from the shelf and went to section 50.55(e), which describes reportable deficiencies at a nuclear plant and [they] read the section together, with Wiesel pointing to the appropriate paragraphs that federal law clearly required [them and the company] to report the Category II, Seismic I deficiencies.
Wiesel then expressed his concern that he was afraid that if he [Wiesel] reported the deficiencies, he would be fired, but that if he didn’t report the deficiencies, he would be breaking a federal law. . . .
The law is clear. It is a crime not to report a safety failure. I could imagine Wiesel standing there with that big, thick rule book in his hands, The Law. It must have been heavy. So was his paycheck. He weighed the choices: Break the law, possibly a jail-time crime, or keep his job.
What did Wiesel do? What would you do?
Why the hell would his company make this man walk the line? Why did they put the gun to his head, to make him conceal mortal danger? It was the money. It’s always the money. Fixing the seismic problem would have cost the plant’s owner half a billion dollars easy. A guy from corporate told Dick, “Bob is a good man. He’ll do what’s right. Don’t worry about Bob.”
That is, they thought Bob would save his job and career rather than rat out the company to the feds.
But I think we should all worry about Bob. The company he worked for, Stone & Webster Engineering, built or designed about a third of the nuclear plants in the United States.
From the fifty-second floor we could look at the Statue of Liberty. She didn’t look back.
***
Greg Palast is the author of Vultures' Picnic (http://www.gregpalast.com/vulturespicnic/): In Pursuit of Petroleum Pigs, Power Pirates and High-Finance Carnivores, which will be released on November 14 by Penguin USA.

Jan Klimkowski
11-13-2011, 07:40 PM
This passage can read as a parable:


Two senior nuclear plant engineers were spilling out their souls and files on our huge conference table, blowing away my government investigations team with the inside stuff about the construction of the Shoreham, New York, power station.
The meeting was secret. Very secret. Their courage could destroy their careers: No engineering firm wants to hire a snitch, even one who has saved thousands of lives. They could lose their jobs; they could lose everything. They did. That’s what happens. Have a nice day.
On March 12 this year, as I watched Fukushima melt, I knew: the "SQ" had been faked. Anderson Cooper said it would all be OK. He'd flown to Japan, to suck up the radiation and official company bullshit. The horror show was not the fault of Tokyo Electric, he said, because the plant was built to withstand only an 8.0 earthquake on the Richter scale, and this was 9.0. Anderson must have been in the gym when they handed out the facts. The 9.0 shake was in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, 90 miles away. It was barely a tenth of that power at Fukushima.
I was ready to vomit. Because I knew who had designed the plant, who had built it and whom Tokyo Electric Power was having rebuild it: Shaw Construction. The latest alias of Stone & Webster, the designated builder for every one of the four new nuclear plants that the Obama Administration has approved for billions in federal studies.

A parable of the corruption of ordinary men, and the calamitous consequences of greed, fear and cowardice.

Ed Jewett
11-14-2011, 01:39 AM
Engineers Knew Fukushima Might Be Unsafe, But Covered It Up … And Now the Extreme Vulnerability of NEW U.S. Plants Is Being Covered Up

Posted on November 12, 2011 (http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2011/11/engineers-knew-fukushima-might-be-unsafe-but-covered-it-up-and-now-the-extreme-vulnerabilty-of-new-u-s-plants-is-being-covered-up.html) by WashingtonsBlog (http://www.washingtonsblog.com/author/washingtonsblog)
Engineers and Scientists Knew Fukushima Might Be Unsafe

Preface:The current nuclear reactor design was chosen – not because it was safe – but because it worked on navy submarines (http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2011/06/nuclear-reactor-design-chosen-not-because-it-was-safe-but-because-it-worked-on-navy-submarines.html). And governments have been covering up nuclear meltdowns for 50 years (http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2011/03/governments-have-been-covering-up-nuclear-meltdowns-for-fifty-years-to-protect-the-nuclear-power-industry.html).
BBC reporter Greg Palast reports – based on a first-hand interview of a senior engineer for the corporation which built the Fukushima nuclear plants, and a review of engineers’ field diaries – thatthe engineers who built the Fukushima nuclear plants knew their design would fail in an earthquake (http://www.gregpalast.com/completely-and-utterly-fail-in-an-earthquake/):
The plant was riddled with problems that, no way on earth, could stand an earth- quake. The team of engineers sent in to inspect found that most of these components could “completely and utterly fail” during an earthquake.

That quote is about the Shoreham, New York, power station, not Fukushima. But Palast claims that:
(1) the company fraudulently changed the seismic report to pretend the plant was earthquake-safe;
and
(2) the exact same thing was done at Fukushima.

As I noted (http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2011/03/japanese-seismologist-in-2004-on-risk-of-nuclear-accident-its-like-a-kamikaze-terrorist-wrapped-in-bombs-just-waiting-to-explode.html) in March:
In 2004, Leuren Moret warned (http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/fl20040523x2.html) in the Japan Times of the exact type of nuclear catastrophe that Japan is now experiencing:
Of all the places in all the world where no one in their right mind would build scores of nuclear power plants, Japan would be pretty near the top of the list.
***
Japan sits on top of four tectonic plates, at the edge of the subduction zone, and is in one of the most tectonically active regions of the world.
***
Many of those reactors have been negligently sited on active faults, particularly in the subduction zone along the Pacific coast, where major earthquakes of magnitude 7-8 or more on the Richter scale occur frequently. The periodicity of major earthquakes in Japan is less than 10 years. There is almost no geologic setting in the world more dangerous for nuclear power than Japan — the third-ranked country in the world for nuclear reactors.
“I think the situation right now is very scary,” says Katsuhiko Ishibashi, a seismologist and professor at Kobe University. “It’s like a kamikaze terrorist wrapped in bombs just waiting to explode.”
***
On July 7 last year, the same day of my visit to Hamaoka, Ishibashi warned of the danger of an earthquake-induced nuclear disaster, not only to Japan but globally, at an International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics conference held in Sapporo. He said: “The seismic designs of nuclear facilities are based on standards that are too old from the viewpoint of modern seismology and are insufficient. The authorities must admit the possibility that an earthquake-nuclear disaster could happen and weigh the risks objectively.”
***
I realized that Japan has no real nuclear-disaster plan in the event that an earthquake damaged a reactor’s water-cooling system and triggered a reactor meltdown.
Additionally, but not even mentioned by ERC officials, there is an extreme danger of an earthquake causing a loss of water coolant in the pools where spent fuel rods are kept. As reported last year in the journal Science and Global Security, based on a 2001 study by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, if the heat-removing function of those pools is seriously compromised — by, for example, the water in them draining out — and the fuel rods heat up enough to combust, the radiation inside them will then be released into the atmosphere. This may create a nuclear disaster even greater than Chernobyl.
***
It is not a question of whether or not a nuclear disaster will occur in Japan; it is a question of when it will occur.

As the US Geological Survey notes (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/world/historical_country.php#japan), Japan has had many earthquakes, including:

1891 10 27 – Mino-Owari, Japan – M 8.0 Fatalities 7,273
1896 06 15 – Sanriku, Japan – M 8.5 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/world/events/1896_06_15.php) Fatalities 27,000
1911 06 15 – Ryukyu Islands, Japan – M 8.1 Fatalities 12
1923 09 01 – Kanto (Kwanto), Japan – M 7.9 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/world/events/1923_09_01.php) Fatalities 143,000 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/world/most_destructive.php)
1927 03 07 – Tango, Japan – M 7.6 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/world/events/1927_03_07.php) Fatalities 3,020
1933 03 02 – Sanriku, Japan – M 8.4 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/world/events/1933_03_02.php) Fatalities 2,990
1943 09 10 – Tottori, Japan – M 7.4 Fatalities 1,190
1944 12 07 – Tonankai, Japan – M 8.1 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/world/events/1944_12_07.php) Fatalities 1,223
1945 01 12 – Mikawa, Japan – M 7.1 Fatalities 1,961
1946 12 20 – Nankaido, Japan – M 8.1 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/world/events/1946_12_20.php) Fatalities 1,330
1948 06 28 – Fukui, Japan – M 7.3 Fatalities 3,769
1952 03 04 – Hokkaido, Japan region – M 8.1 Fatalities 31
1964 06 16 – Niigata, Japan – M 7.5 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/world/events/1964_06_16.php) Fatalities 26
1968 05 16 – Off the East Coast of Honshu, Japan – M 8.2 Fatalities 47
1995 01 16 – Kobe, Japan – M 6.9 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/world/events/1995_01_16.php) Fatalities 5,502
2000 10 06 – Western Honshu, Japan – M 6.7 (http://neic.usgs.gov/neis/eq_depot/2000/eq_001006/)
2003 05 26 – Near the East Coast of Honshu, Japan – M 7.0 (http://neic.usgs.gov/neis/eq_depot/2003/eq_030526_0924/)
2003 09 25 – Hokkaido, Japan Region – M 8.3 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2003/uszdap/)
2003 10 08 – Hokkaido, Japan Region – M 6.7 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2003/uszrai/)
2003 10 31 – Off the East Coast of Honshu, Japan – M 7.0
2004 05 29 – Off the East Coast of Honshu, Japan – M 6.5 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2004/usjbbh/)
2004 09 05 – Near the South Coast of Western Honshu, Japan – M 7.2 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2004/usnaah/)
2004 09 05 – Near the South Coast of Honshu, Japan – M 7.4 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2004/usnaav/)
2004 09 06 – Near the South Coast of Honshu, Japan – M 6.6 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2004/usnbbp/)
2004 10 23 – Near the West Coast of Honshu, Japan – M 6.6 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2004/uspyal/) Fatalities 40
2004 11 28 – Hokkaido, Japan Region – M 7.0 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2004/usrjap/)
2004 12 06 – Hokkaido, Japan Region – M 6.8 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2004/usrsas/)
2005 03 20 – Kyushu, Japan – M 6.6 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2005/usvwac/) Fatalities 1
2005 07 23 – Near the South Coast of Honshu, Japan – M 5.9 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2005/usawas/)
2005 08 16 – Near the East Coast of Honshu, Japan – M 7.2 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2005/usbvae/)
2005 10 19 – Near the East Coast of Honshu, Japan – M 6.3 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2005/usejaq/)
2005 11 14 – Off the East Coast of Honshu, Japan – M 7.0 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2005/usfkbr/)
2005 12 02 – Near the East Coast of Honshu, Japan – M 6.5 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2005/usgdan/)
2006 06 11 – Kyushu, Japan – M 6.3 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2006/usnvbf/)
2007 03 25 – Near the West Coast of Honshu,Japan – M 6.7 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2007/us2007aiae/) Fatalities 1
2007 07 16 – Near the west coast of Honshu, Japan – M 6.6 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2007/us2007ewac/) Fatalities 9
2008 05 07 – Near the East Coast of Honshu, Japan – M 6.8 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2008/us2008rtbu/)
2008 06 13 – Eastern Honshu, Japan – M 6.9 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2008/us2008tfdp/) Fatalities 13
2008 07 23 – Eastern Honshu, Japan – M 6.8 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2008/us2008uva4/) Fatalities 1
2008 09 11 – Hokkaido, Japan region – M 6.8 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2008/us2008wvag/)
2009 08 09 – Near the South Coast of Honshu, Japan – M 7.1 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2009/us2009kcaz/)
2009 08 10 – Near the South Coast of Honshu, Japan – M 6.1 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2009/us2009kdb4/) Fatalities 1
2009 08 12 – Izu Islands, Japan region – M 6.6 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2009/us2009kfcp/)
2009 08 17 – Southwestern Ryukyu Islands, Japan – M 6.7 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2009/us2009kjcq/)
2009 10 30 – Ryukyu Islands, Japan – M 6.8 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2009/us2009njal/)
2011 03 11 – Near the East Coast of Honshu, Japan – M 9.0 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2011/usc0001xgp/) Fatalities 10,019
Yet (http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2011/03/fire-at-reactor-number-4.html):

Japanese engineer Masashi Goto, who helped design the containment vessel for Fukushima’s reactor core, says the design was not enough to withstand earthquakesor tsunamis.

Indeed, Reuters points out (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/42325085/ns/world_news-asiapacific/#slice-2) today:
[A] review of company and regulatory records shows that Japan and its largest utility repeatedly downplayed dangers and ignored warnings — including a 2007 tsunami study from Tokyo Electric Power Co’s seniorsafety engineer.
***
In other words, Tokyo Electric scientists realized as early as 2007 that it was quite possible a giant wave would overwhelm the sea walls and other defenses at Fukushima by surpassing engineering assumptions behind the plant’s design that date back to the 1960s.
***
Despite the projection by its own safety engineers that the older assumptions might be mistaken, … “There are no legal requirements to re-evaluate site related (safety) features periodically,” the Japanese government said in a response to questions from the United Nations nuclear watchdog, the International Atomic Energy Agency, in 2008.


***
In addition, years before Fukushima engineer Mitsuhiko Tanaka blew the whistle (http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-03-23/fukushima-engineer-says-he-covered-up-flaw-at-shut-reactor.html) on the fact that Tepco covered up a defective containment vessel, the above-quoted Japan Times article blew the whistle:
Yoichi Kikuchi, a Japanese nuclear engineer who also became a whistle-blower, has told me personally of many safety problems at Japan’s nuclear power plants, such as cracks in pipes in the cooling system from vibrations in the reactor. He said the electric companies are “gambling in a dangerous game to increase profits and decrease government oversight.”
[Kei Sugaoka, a Japanese-American senior field engineer who worked for General Electric in the United States, who previously blew the whistle on Tepco's failure to inform the government of defects at the reactors] agreed, saying, “The scariest thing, on top of all the other problems, is that all nuclear power plants are aging, causing a deterioration of piping and joints which are always exposed to strong radiation and heat.”


U.S. Plants Unsafe As Well


As Palast notes, the Shoreham power station could very well fail in an earthquake.
And as I pointed out (http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2011/03/japanese-seismologist-in-2004-on-risk-of-nuclear-accident-its-like-a-kamikaze-terrorist-wrapped-in-bombs-just-waiting-to-explode.html) in my March article:
As MSNBC notes, there are 23 virtually-identical reactors (http://openchannel.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2011/03/13/6256121-general-electric-designed-reactors-in-fukushima-have-23-sisters-in-us) in the U.S. to the leaking Fukushima reactors.
As McClatchy notes (http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2011/03/17/110645/us-nuclear-plants-store-more-spent.html#ixzz1GvbcKY6v), American reactors hold much more spent fuel than the Japanese reactors (the amount of radioactive fuel at Fukushima – in turn – dwarfs Chernobyl (http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2011/03/amount-of-radioactive-fuel-at-fukushima.html)):
U.S. nuclear plants use the same sort of pools to cool spent nuclear-fuel rods as the ones now in danger of spewing radiation at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi plant, only the U.S. pools hold much more nuclear material.


***
The Japanese plant’s pools are far from capacity, but still contain an enormous amount of radioactivity, Lyman said. A typical U.S. nuclear plant would have about 10 times as much fuel in its pools, he said.

And yet the nuclear industry and American government are poo-poohing the danger. As McClatchy notes:
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission reaffirmed its position that the U.S. pools are operated safely.

The Nation notes (http://www.thenation.com/article/159234/fukushimas-spent-fuel-rods-pose-grave-danger):
Aileen Mioko Smith, director of Green Action Kyoto, met Fukushima plant and government officials in August 2010. “At the plant they seemed to dismiss our concerns about spent fuel pools,” said Mioko Smith. “At the prefecture, they were very worried but had no plan for how to deal with it.”
Remarkably, that is the norm—both in Japan and in the United States. Spent fuel pools at Fukushima are not equipped with backup water-circulation systems or backup generators for the water-circulation system they do have.
The exact same design flaw is in place at Vermont Yankee, a nuclear plant of the same GE design as the Fukushima reactors. At Fukushima each reactor has between 60 and 83 tons of spent fuel rods stored next to them. Vermont Yankee has a staggering 690 tons of spent fuel rods on site.
Nuclear safety activists in the United States have long known of these problems and have sought repeatedly to have them addressed. At least get backup generators for the pools, they implored. But at every turn the industry has pushed back, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has consistently ruled in favor of plant owners over local communities.
After 9/11 the issue of spent fuel rods again had momentary traction. Numerous citizen groups petitioned and pressured the NRC for enhanced protections of the pools. But the NRC deemed “the possibility of a terrorist attack…speculative and simply too far removed from the natural or expected consequences of agency action.” So nothing was done—not even the provision of backup water-circulation systems or emergency power-generation systems.

Similarly, Pro Publica points out (http://www.propublica.org/article/status-of-spent-nuclear-fuel-in-question-at-crippled-japanese-power-plant):
Opponents of nuclear power have warned for years that if these pools drain, either by accident or terrorist attack, it could lead to a fire and a catastrophic release of radiation.
***
The nuclear industry says fears about the storage pools at U.S. plants are overblown because the pools are protected and, even if fuel is exposed to the air, the chance of a fire is incredibly small.
***
“People should be very concerned because the NRC [Nuclear Regulatory Commission] has acknowledged that spent fuel pools that are not located inside the containment have the potential to cause catastrophic accidents,” said Diane Curran, a lawyer who has represented environmental groups and governments in challenges to fuel storage plans.
“These are not high-probability accidents,” Curran said, “but we have seen how low-probability accidents can happen.”
After the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, Congress asked the National Academies to study the vulnerability of spent fuel to a terrorist attack.
The resulting 2005 report, “Safety and Security of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage (http://www8.nationalacademies.org/onpinews/newsitem.aspx?RecordID=11263) ,” concluded that “an attack which partially or completely drains a plant’s spent fuel pool might be capable of starting a high-temperature fire that could release large quantities of radioactive material into the environment.”
The report found that the vulnerability of the spent fuel to fire depends on how old it is and how it is stored. As the fuel ages, it cools, so it becomes less susceptible to a fire.
“The industry standard is that fuel that is older than five years can be dry-stored,” said Kevin Crowley, director of the nuclear and radiation board for the National Research Council, part of National Academies.
The report recommended that the nuclear industry take steps to decrease the vulnerability of the storage pools to fire. Some of those steps are classified, Crowley said. But he said others, like making sure there were fire hoses or spray systems above the pools, were pretty simple.
***
The nuclear industry disagreed with the national academy about the vulnerability of the spent fuel to a fire.

So a Fukushima-type disaster was inevitable … and will be inevitable in the U.S. as well, unless steps are taken to make the plants safer.

Engineers Pretend Fukushima Never Happened


Nuclear engineer Arnie Gundersen noted yesterday that new US plant designs are very near being licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission without any Fukushima modifications:

[see embedded 17-minute Vimeo video at http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2011/11/engineers-knew-fukushima-might-be-unsafe-but-covered-it-up-and-now-the-extreme-vulnerabilty-of-new-u-s-plants-is-being-covered-up.html ]


Indeed, Palast notes that the same company that designed the failed Fukushima plants, and the vulnerable Shoreham facility is:
the designated builder for every one of the four new nuclear plants that the Obama Administration has approved for billions in federal studies.


Post (http://www.shareaholic.com/api/share/?title=Engineers+Knew+Fukushima+Might+Be+Unsafe%2C +But+Covered+It+Up+...+And+Now+the+Extreme+Vulnera bility+of+NEW+U.S.+Plants+Is+Being+Covered+Up&link=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.washingtonsblog.com%2F2011%2 F11%2Fengineers-knew-fukushima-might-be-unsafe-but-covered-it-up-and-now-the-extreme-vulnerabilty-of-new-u-s-plants-is-being-covered-up.html&notes=%0D%0AEngineers%20and%20Scientists%20Knew%20 Fukushima%20Might%20Be%20Unsafe%0D%0APreface%3A%20 The%20current%20nuclear%20reactor%20design%20was%2 0chosen%20%E2%80%93%20not%20because%20it%20was%20s afe%20%E2%80%93%20but%20because%20it%20worked%20on %20navy%20submarines.%20%20And%20governments%20hav e%20been%20covering%20up%20nuclear%20meltdowns%20f or%2050%20years.BBC%20reporter%20Greg%20Palast%20r eports%20-%20based%20o&short_link=&shortener=google&shortener_key=&v=1&apitype=1&apikey=8afa39428933be41f8afdb8ea21a495c&source=Shareaholic-Publishers&template=&service=5&ctype=)

Peter Lemkin
12-16-2011, 09:06 AM
Prime Minister has just officially declared a cold shut down* at the reactor - and all is safe...go back to sleep [and don't believe it!] :popworm: He also said he hoped the residents would soon return. What a joke......maybe their grand children will. Maybe not. They don't even have a realistic plan at 'decomissioning' [burial under lead, boron and concrete somewhere]. He mentioned a figure of one Trillion Yen. I doubt it can be done for less than ten times that.....and it will take 30 years or so....by a plan that is not even imagined yet. Any new earthquake, pipe break due to radiation brittleness, tsunami or other such could re-start a full-scale disaster over that 30 year period. I wish them luck...they will need it! Not to mention the assumed 5-10x Chernobyl radiation already released, their so-called shutdown does NOT mean the end of radiation leakage...at BEST, it means a reduced amount, only. How they EVER plan to remove the top layer of soil [2-5 m] etc. over an enormous area - and where to put it - is beyond me [and beyond them, frankly]. Maybe they can just sell the whole plant and all the contaminated buildings and area on ebay.

*a cold shut down has a precise definition in an intact reactor. There is NO definition for a damaged one, like these...so they are mis-using the term as a PR exercise.

A great poster child for the nuclear industry who will do their best to make it disappear from everyone's mind. Rotsa Ruck!

Magda Hassan
12-16-2011, 10:27 AM
Yes, I agree Peter. Everything i am reading from scientists is telling me things are far from settled or over. :nuke:

Peter Lemkin
12-16-2011, 05:39 PM
Yes, I agree Peter. Everything i am reading from scientists is telling me things are far from settled or over. :nuke:

Hey, maybe OZ would like to get paid to dump it in some large [LARGE] hole in the outback!? I'm sure Helen Caldecott would be all for that!:mexican::mexican:

Magda Hassan
12-17-2011, 01:32 AM
Dr Helen Caldicott (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dr-Helen-Caldicott/102772801940)



Operating on their frighteningly successful premise that "if you say enough times, people will believe you," officials in Japan announce the damaged, dangerous, Fukushima reactors to be "stable," implying the accident is over. That this is far from the truth is known by many, but that doesn't mean it's ok to stay silent about this serious inaccuracy. The accident has been and will remain ongoing for the forseeable future. Radiation continues to leak into the atmosphere, the groundwater, and the ocean. People remain at risk, workers are knowingly endangered, buildings are unstable, and the real condition of the reactors is unknown. What they are announcing is the best guess of a smart computer, a guess based soley on what it entered in, not the real life scenario.
"...whether the cleanup effort is moving ahead is dubious, according to an undercover report by freelance reporter Tomohiko Suzuki. Mr. Suzuki worked at the Fukushima No. 1 site for a month as a general laborer while documenting a long list of substandard practices and unsafe behavior by companies involved in cleanup at the plant. He charges that "absolutely no progress is being made" toward resolving the Fukushima crisis..."


Skeptics cast doubt on Fukushima status, even as Japan declares nuclear reactors 'stable' Japan's government declared that the damaged reactors from the Fukushima disaster were 'stable.' Not everyone is convinced.
By Arthur Bright (http://www.csmonitor.com/About/Contact-Us-Feedback), Correspondent / December 16, 2011
Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda speaks during a press conference at his official residence in Tokyo on Friday. Noda told a government nuclear emergency meeting that 'The reactors have reached a state of cold shutdown' and are 'stable,' reports Reuters.
Hiro Komae/AP

[/URL]



The Japanese government announced that the Fukushima nuclear (http://www.csmonitor.com/var/ezflow_site/storage/images/media/images2/1216-japan-nuclear-reactors-stable/11249456-1-eng-US/1216-Japan-Nuclear-reactors-stable_full_600.jpg) complex, heavily damaged by the March 11 tsunami in the world's worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl (http://www.csmonitor.com/tags/topic/Chernobyl), is now stable. But serious doubts remain about Fukushima (http://www.csmonitor.com/tags/topic/Fukushima)'s status, as officials remain unable to confirm the status of the reactors' fuel and an undercover report impugns the clean-up efforts' efficacy.


Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda (http://www.csmonitor.com/tags/topic/Yoshihiko+Noda) told a government nuclear emergency meeting that "The reactors have reached a state of cold shutdown" and are "stable," reports Reuters (http://www.csmonitor.com/tags/topic/Reuters+Group+plc). Mr. Noda and his environment and nuclear crisis minister, Goshi Hosono, both said that the situation at the plant is under control (http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/12/16/japan-nuclear-idUSL3E7NG02P20111216), though the clean-up may still take decades. The Tokyo Electric Power Co. (http://www.csmonitor.com/tags/topic/Tokyo+Electric+Power+Co.+Inc.) (TEPCO), which operates the reactor and has been leading the clean-up, had been attempting to achieve cold shutdown before the end of the year.
The state of "cold shutdown" means that the water used to cool the nuclear fuel rods in the reactors is at a temperature below boiling, thereby preventing the fuel rods from overheating and emitting excessive radiation. The Japan Times (http://www.csmonitor.com/tags/topic/The+Japan+Times+Ltd.) reports that government officials said that the temperatures of the lower portions of the rods' containment vessels measure 38.9 degrees C in reactor 1, 67.5 degrees in reactor 2, and 57.4 degrees in reactor 3. "If the authorities are correct (http://www.japantimes.co.jp/text/nn20111216x1.html) and cooling of the reactors is stable, it would be an important milestone in ending the world's worst nuclear accident since the 1986 Chernobyl crisis," writes the Times.
RELATED PHOTO GALLERY: Fukushima survivors (http://www.csmonitor.com/CSM-Photo-Galleries/In-Pictures/Japan-survivors)

But the Times adds that skeptics worry that the readings would be inaccurate if the melted fuel rods punctured their containment vessels and fell to the bottoms of the outer containment tanks. TEPCO has not been able to take direct measurements of the temperatures at the bottoms of the containment vessels, and the site is still too radioactive for the fuel rods' status to be visually confirmed.
Even if the reactor is under control, the cleanup could still take 30 years, and the problems remain "immense (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204336104577096281099680526.html)," writes The Wall Street Journal (http://www.csmonitor.com/tags/topic/The+Wall+Street+Journal).

Indeed, there can be few firm declarations about the plant's status. Daiichi's reactors are littered with debris. Many measurement and control systems are on the blink. Radiation levels are too high for people to get close to the reactors, leaving engineers and scientists to make important judgments using computer simulations, scattered bits of data and guesses.
And whether the cleanup effort is moving ahead is dubious, according to an undercover report by freelance reporter Tomohiko Suzuki. Mr. Suzuki worked at the Fukushima No. 1 site for a month as a general laborer while documenting a long list of substandard practices and unsafe behavior by companies involved in cleanup at the plant. He charges that "absolutely no progress is being made (http://mdn.mainichi.jp/mdnnews/news/20111216p2a00m0na002000c.html)" toward resolving the Fukushima crisis, reports the Mainichi Daily News (http://www.csmonitor.com/tags/topic/Mainichi+Newspapers+Co.).


...Despite there being no concrete data on the state of the reactor cores, claims by the government and TEPCO that the disaster is under control and that the reactors are on-schedule for a cold shutdown by the year's end have promoted a breakneck work schedule, leading to shoddy repairs and habitual disregard for worker safety, he said. ...


"Working at Fukushima is equivalent to being given an order to die," Suzuki quoted one nuclear-related company source as saying. He says plant workers regularly manipulate their radiation readings by reversing their dosimeters or putting them in their socks, giving them an extra 10 to 30 minutes on-site before they reach their daily dosage limit. In extreme cases, Suzuki said, workers even leave the radiation meters in their dormitories.
He added that the companies overseeing the work never order the workers to take these measures, but rather assign projects to be completed within time periods impossible to meet without manipulation of the safety tools. He added that daily radiation screenings are "essentially an act," as the detector is passed too quickly over each worker to get an accurate reading, and "the line to the buzzer that is supposed to sound when there's a problem has been cut."
Suzuki also says that inter-corporate secrecy and competition is undermining the repair effort, as "Reactor makers Toshiba (http://www.csmonitor.com/tags/topic/Toshiba+Corporation) and Hitachi (http://www.csmonitor.com/tags/topic/Hitachi+Ltd.) [brought in to help resolve the crisis] each have their own technology, and they don't talk to each other. Toshiba doesn't tell Hitachi what it's doing, and Hitachi doesn't tell Toshiba what it's doing."
The Yomiuri Shimbun (http://www.csmonitor.com/tags/topic/Yomiuri+Shimbun) reports that former Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama (http://www.csmonitor.com/tags/topic/Yukio+Hatoyama), in an article he co-wrote with Tomoyuki Taira for British science journal Nature (http://www.csmonitor.com/tags/topic/Nature+Publishing+Group), called for the government to take over the Fukushima No. 1 power plant (http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/dy/national/T111215005428.htm). Mr. Hatoyama criticized TEPCO for providing the government only limited information on the status of the nuclear site, and said there needed to be a broad investigation of what went wrong. As such, the plant "must be nationalized so that information can be gathered openly," he argues.
Roger Cashmore, chairman of Britain (http://www.csmonitor.com/tags/topic/United+Kingdom)'s Atomic Energy Authority, expressed similar criticism of TEPCO to Voice of America (http://www.csmonitor.com/tags/topic/Voice+of+America), though he said the Japanese government (http://www.voanews.com/english/news/Japans-2011-Nuclear-Crisis-Will-Extend-for-Years-135721808.html) also deserved blame for failure to share information about the disaster. "Transparency is the word. One has got to be completely open about all of this and make sure that shortcuts and things like this can't be taken," said Mr. Cashmore. "People, I think, in retrospect have become very concerned about the regulatory system that existed in Japan (http://www.csmonitor.com/tags/topic/Japan)."

[url]http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Global-News/2011/1216/Skeptics-cast-doubt-on-Fukushima-status-even-as-Japan-declares-nuclear-reactors-stable/%28page%29/2

Magda Hassan
12-17-2011, 01:40 AM
Yes, I agree Peter. Everything i am reading from scientists is telling me things are far from settled or over. :nuke:

Hey, maybe OZ would like to get paid to dump it in some large [LARGE] hole in the outback!? I'm sure Helen Caldecott would be all for that!:mexican::mexican:

No doubt we have been requested to do just that and since we sell the uranium we are under some obligation also. And what is a bit more radioactivity since the UK dropped their atomic bombs all over the desert. Unoccupied except for a few aboriginals....and kangaroos...

Peter Lemkin
12-17-2011, 08:59 AM
Yes, I agree Peter. Everything i am reading from scientists is telling me things are far from settled or over. :nuke:

Hey, maybe OZ would like to get paid to dump it in some large [LARGE] hole in the outback!? I'm sure Helen Caldecott would be all for that!:mexican::mexican:

No doubt we have been requested to do just that and since we sell the uranium we are under some obligation also. And what is a bit more radioactivity since the UK dropped their atomic bombs all over the desert. Unoccupied except for a few aboriginals....and kangaroos...

Thanks for the Caldecott post. She knows her stuff and the nuclear industry hates her!

See, logical to put the nuclear materials back in the hole it came out of.....with the minor note that it has been concentrated by a factor of several tens of thousands or more and is now fissionable....only one natural fissionable deposit was once discovered in Congo, I believe...but I digress..... radioactive kangaroos and aboriginals could be a tourist attraction - watching them glow in the dark.....

Magda Hassan
12-26-2011, 07:19 AM
Yakuza's Debtors Forced to Work at Fukushima Daiichi? (http://www.xinhua.jp/socioeconomy/politics_economics_society/287325/) 26 Dec 2011 According to a book recently published by Tomohiko Suzuki, a freelance journalist who went undercover as a laborer at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant for two months this year, people who were unable to repay loans from yakuza gangs were forced to work at the site as a means of repaying their debts. Tokyo Electric issued a refutal, calling the claim that organized crime would be allowed to influence the recruitment process "groundless". With the assistance of a particular organization, Suzuki was able to get employment at Fukushima Daiichi during July and August of this year, until his identity was discovered.
http://www.xinhua.jp/socioeconomy/politics_economics_society/287325/
http://translate.googleusercontent.com/translate_c?hl=en&rurl=translate.google.com&tl=en&u=http://www.xinhua.jp/socioeconomy/politics_economics_society/287325/&usg=ALkJrhjK_lYnD3g2SYrPrbj353OQEnZO3w
Japanese freelance journalist infiltrated an interview conducted over two months as a primary task in the first post-accident TEPCO Fukushima Sung Joo = [Xinhua], in his book recently published by Mr. T. Suzuki, "the gang can repay debt have worked in nuclear power plant accident site to take over the deceased, "and exposed. TEPCO about it just "information that the gang is involved in recruitment of workers is unfounded," has been denied.

Suzuki in July and August by the agency of the company and served as the first workers in the primary. He said in his book "gang is playing a major role in the primary work is involved to be fed 10% of the workers" are said.

TEPCO spokesman for the response, "TEPCO has eliminated the anti-social forces, employment of workers made it clear that properly between" the official said.

(Yuki Onda translation / editing translations bud noted)

Lauren Johnson
01-09-2012, 05:33 PM
http://fairewinds.com/content/arnold-gundersen-fresh-report-fukushima

Seamus Coogan
01-09-2012, 07:23 PM
http://fairewinds.com/content/arnold-gundersen-fresh-report-fukushima

That puts my little spat with herr Fetzer into some perspective Lauren, Cheers. Oh I do hope you are enjoying the sport by the way.

Lauren Johnson
01-09-2012, 10:28 PM
http://fairewinds.com/content/arnold-gundersen-fresh-report-fukushima

That puts my little spat with herr Fetzer into some perspective Lauren, Cheers. Oh I do hope you are enjoying the sport by the way.

I guess so. It makes me hope that Arnold Gundersen is as mistaken as Mr. Fetzer. I told my wife to gorge herself on salmon this year. She says if she could she would eat salmon 7 days/week.

Ed Jewett
01-10-2012, 02:40 AM
Arnold Gundersen: Fukushima Update (http://cryptogon.com/?p=26860)January 9th, 2012This is Dr. Helen Caldicott interviewing Arnold Gundersen. The audio is fromFairwinds Associates on December 26, 2011 (http://fairewinds.com/content/arnold-gundersen-fresh-report-fukushima).
Hint: This is very grim.
Related: Dr. Helen Caldicott (http://www.helencaldicott.com/)
Posted in Atrocities (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=18), Collapse (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=19), Economy (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=8), Energy (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=17), Environment (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=16), Health (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=25),Infrastructure (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=21), Perception Management (http://cryptogon.com/?cat=7)

Keith Millea
01-14-2012, 09:28 PM
Arnold Gunderson on what to expect in 2012


http://vimeo.com/34349565

Peter Lemkin
01-25-2012, 03:22 PM
"The Atomic States of America": Exploring a Nation’s Struggle with Nuclear Power

Nuclear power has drawn wide support from both sides of the aisle, with both Republicans and Democrats advancing a pro-nuclear agenda even in the aftermath of last year’s Fukushima disaster in Japan. We speak with Sheena Joyce, co-director of the new documentary "The Atomic States of America," which is featured at 2012 Sundance Film Festival. We’re also joined by Kelly McMasters, whose book "Welcome to Shirley: A Memoir from an Atomic Town" inspired the film. Joyce says, "We used Kelly’s book and the town of Shirley as kind of a springboard into the issue, to just talk to people really on both sides, but mainly to speak to the people in reactor communities... We wanted to seek an intelligent dialogue." [includes rush transcript]

AMY GOODMAN: We’re broadcasting from Park City, Utah, home of the Sundance Film Festival, the nation’s largest festival for independent cinema. Today we’re talking about nuclear power. Why? Well, the corporate media brings out debate when the establishment in Washington is divided—Democrats debating Republicans. That scope of debate, they bring us. But what happens when the majority of Democrats and Republicans in Congress, and the president, as well, agree? You’re not going to get much coverage of the issue. And that’s the story of nuclear power today. Just two years ago, President Obama gave his State of the Union address and was applauded on both sides of the aisle when he said this.

We’re broadcasting from Park City, Utah, and we’re about to go to a clip of President Obama speaking two years ago at the State of the Union address, when he addressed the issue of nuclear renaissance.


PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: [But to create more of these clean energy jobs, we need more production,] more efficiency, more incentives. And that means building a new generation of safe, clean nuclear power plants in this country, because the nation that leads the clean energy economy will be the nation that leads the global economy, and America must be that nation.


AMY GOODMAN: That was President Obama in 2010 giving his State of the Union address. And that is a clip of a new movie that premiered at the Sundance Film Festival called The Atomic States of America. It’s directed by Sheena Joyce and Don Argott. And Sheena Joyce is joining us now.

The film is based on a book called Welcome to Shirley by a Shirley resident, Kelly McMasters. That’s Shirley, Long Island, New York. And Kelly joins us today.

Kelly, let’s start out with, well, why you wrote your book. What is it about Shirley, Long Island? Most people have never heard of the place.

KELLY McMASTERS: That’s true. It’s a service town to the Hamptons, and it’s on the South Shore of Long Island, a kind of little, blue-collar, hardscrabble town that is actually blessed with some beautiful landscape. We’re right along the ocean, and we have a gorgeous wildlife refuge, which I grew up right next to. I moved there when I was four, and I had a pretty bucolic childhood. The community was small and tightly knit, and we had just a really wonderful experience. What we didn’t realize, what most of us didn’t realize, is just north of us, hidden by the Pine Barrens, was the Brookhaven National Laboratory. And we—it happened to be located on top of the sole source drinking water aquifer for three million people, including the people of Shirley, and there were three nuclear reactors there, and all three leaked.

AMY GOODMAN: I want to go to the beginning of the film, which is Kelly McMasters describing growing up in Shirley.


KELLY McMASTERS: Part of me wishes that I could go back and unwrite this story. Of course, I could unwrite my story, but I can’t unwrite the story of what happened in my home town. My family moved to Shirley, Long Island, in 1981. I had a pretty amazing childhood in a small community with a strong sense of neighborhood and solidarity. In about fourth grade, that was the first time that a neighbor got sick and wound up dying. Over the years after that, more and more people got sick, and suddenly that became more the norm.


AMY GOODMAN: That’s an excerpt of The Atomic States of America, that’s directed by Sheena Joyce. Sheena, well, we just heard what Kelly had to say about Shirley. Why you took this book and made a film about it?

SHEENA JOYCE: Well, my co-director Don Argott and I had been given Kelly’s book, and we fell in love with it. We fell in love with her voice, and we fell in love with Shirley, and we fell in love with Kelly. And it happened at a time when we were hearing about this nuclear renaissance. And it also happened at a time when we were hearing about these federal loan guarantees to restart our nation’s nuclear fleet. And we kept hearing, you know, these buzzwords about the nuclear renaissance and nuclear being, you know, clean and safe and green. And we just asked—started asking questions. What is nuclear? Is it safe? And do we need it?

AMY GOODMAN: So, for one minute, I mean, we’re not talking about a Republican president like President Bush. If he had tried to restart nuclear power after decades, a new nuclear power plant—one hasn’t been built in more than 30 years—I don’t think he could have. People would have risen up. But when President Obama announced that he would begin nuclear power plants, the rebuilding of them and the federal loan guarantees, well, he got a bipartisan—he got bipartisan applause. And that’s not something that happens very much in Washington today.

SHEENA JOYCE: It’s true. It’s true.

AMY GOODMAN: So, you look at, well, the atomic states of America.

SHEENA JOYCE: We do, and we used Kelly’s book and the town of Shirley as kind of a springboard into the issue, to just talk to people, you know, really on both sides, but mainly to speak to the people in reactor communities. And it’s certainly not an activist piece. We’re definitely critical, but we just kind of wanted to seek an intelligent dialogue about whether or not man can responsibly harness the atom. And we started in Shirley, but then we traveled to reactor communities all over the country.

AMY GOODMAN: Let’s go back in time, perhaps to the most significant reason why nuclear power plants have not been built in this country for more than 30 years, and that’s Three Mile Island. In this clip, we meet Eric Epstein, chair of the Three Mile Island Alert, explaining how the people in his home town never really questioned the nuclear power plant in town, or just outside of town, Three Mile Island.


ERIC EPSTEIN: [singing] Didn’t want to know you, but I had to love you. La da-da, da-da da-da, da-da da di di di di di.

You’d be less than honest if you didn’t say that this community was strongly supportive of nuclear power. This is meant to be disrespectful. This is not Birkenstock Berkeley. This is not liberal Boston. This is Bible Belt Pennsylvania. In fact, let me just back up. We never really questioned nuclear power. That decision was made for us in the '50s and ’60s. "We're going to go down this path."

God, I feel like I’m in a Rob Reiner movie.

My dad would drive me down to the plant, and we’d see these big clouds billowing out. And he would assure me that they were benign. You know, I believed my dad. My dad believed the industry. I just thought this was a wonderful, magical technology that had come to rescue us. I mean, energy independence, security independence. We thought it could warm homes at a price too cheap to meter. Everybody bet the house on atomic energy. All of a sudden, all these things came into question on March 28th, 1979.

EMERGENCY ANNOUNCEMENT: Could I have your attention, please? There has been a state of emergency declared on Three Mile Island.


AMY GOODMAN: That’s Eric Epstein, chair of Three Mile Island Alert, in the film The Atomic States of America. Sheena Joyce, the director of that film, sitting with us at Sundance Film Festival, tell us more about him and about what happened.

SHEENA JOYCE: Eric was a jackpot for us. He’s an amazing character. He’s a warm, funny man. And he grew up right outside of Three Mile Island. And as you had mentioned before, you know, he never really questioned nuclear power. It was something that his community was proud of. And he grew up in a place that never questioned what they were being told by, you know, the local government, by the president, by the people at the utility company. And it wasn’t until the accident occurred and things started to go wrong and the people, you know, started asking tough questions and not getting the answers that they deserved, that he became really active in the issue. And he’s been chair of Three Mile Island Alert, and he’s a community advocate, I would say, more than he’s an activist. And that’s something that you find in our film, is just regular people who start asking questions. They’re these unintentional activists. They don’t, you know, seek out to make this their—you know, their life force, their cause, but they do so by necessity.

AMY GOODMAN: We’ll come back to Sheena Joyce, co-director of Atomic States of America, and Kelly McMasters, author of Welcome to Shirley: A Memoir from an Atomic Town, in a minute.

[break]

AMY GOODMAN: We’re broadcasting from the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah, the largest festival of independent cinema in the United States, as we continue with our conversation with Sheena Joyce, the director of the film Atomic States of America, and Kelly McMasters, author of Welcome to Shirley: A Memoir from an Atomic Town.

AMY GOODMAN: When I first started in radio, one of the first documentaries I did was looking at the Shoreham nuclear power plant and the Three Mile Island disaster, because a number of people from Three Mile Island went to Shoreham, Long Island, to warn people: "Don’t let this nuclear power plant go online." And when people succeeded in preventing the Shoreham nuclear power plant from going full power, I think most people in this country thought nuclear power was dead, at least on Long Island.

KELLY McMASTERS: Right.

AMY GOODMAN: But Kelly McMasters, talk about this plant you just referred to, the Brookhaven National Lab plant, how it is that that was sort of, if you will, under the radar.

KELLY McMASTERS: It was very under the radar. And even the people in my town, who worked mostly service jobs there, didn’t quite get what was going on there. Because it was a federal laboratory and because it is enclosed in these Pine Barrens, you literally can’t see it. It’s on an old Army base, and you can’t—you have no access to it.

AMY GOODMAN: I mean, it’s not providing electricity for the people of Long Island.

KELLY McMASTERS: No, no. And it has won, you know, Nobel Prizes in physics, and it’s done some fantastic medical research. But since 1955, it’s also been leaking and having a really detrimental effect on the neighborhoods around it. It was actually when Shoreham became sort of a focal point of the island, and people realized—you know, we were all saying, "We don’t want nuclear power on the island," A, because it’s an island. There’s no way off if something happens. We are all on a sole source drinking water aquifer, so if something goes into the water, then it hits everybody, all three million people on the island. Once they started saying, "We don’t want nuclear on the island," and then they heard, "Wait, we already have it on the island?" and then all the picketers sort of moved from Shoreham over to the lab.

AMY GOODMAN: I want to go back to The Atomic States of America, a remarkable film that has premiered at the Sundance Film Festival. In this clip, you, Kelly, and a local resident introduce us to Carlton Road, which is nicknamed "Death Row" because so many sick people live there.


KELLY McMASTERS: So right now we’re standing on Carlton, the street that was nicknamed "Death Row." Pretty much almost every house on this street had somebody who was sick with cancer or something else. People started realizing that they weren’t the only sick ones. Their neighbors were sick, as well.

RANDY SNELL: We would meet in people’s basements and their kitchens, and we’d talk about what we found. And, you know, we’d do research, and somebody would find something.

KELLY McMASTERS: All signs seemed to point to what was beyond this barbed-wire fence.

RANDY SNELL: These are all rhabdomyosarcoma cases. A is my daughter. Shirley, here, all the other cases are all within the confines of real close to the Brookhaven National Laboratory. I knew there was a laboratory at Brookhaven. But I pictured this as a bunch of guys in white coats with test tubes, heating them up and, you know, doing whatever type of experiments.

REPORTER: The Brookhaven National laboratory conducts sophisticated nuclear experiments, producing an enormous amount of deadly waste.

RANDY SNELL: The only research I had said that my daughter’s cancer was caused by low-level radiation. And Brookhaven National Laboratory was the only source of that.

REPORTER: The lab sits atop the primary underground water supply for 1.3 million residents of New York’s Long Island.

ROBERT CASEY: It’s certainly not a risk to people outside the lab.

RANDY SNELL: What was explained to me is that "We’re the scientific minds out here. We know what we’re doing. And you need to trust us that we wouldn’t do anything to intentionally harm you."


AMY GOODMAN: That’s a clip from a new film called The Atomic States of America. Go further with "Death Row."

KELLY McMASTERS: Well, what was amazing for me when I first watched the film was to see how similar the reactor communities were. In my community, what happened was people were suffering alone in their own houses, and then they would realize, oh, my neighbor is sick, and my other neighbor is sick, and they started meeting in each other’s basements. And something very iconic in the Long Island fight against cancer are these hand-drawn maps that mostly women suffering with breast cancer would start making when they looked at all of their neighbors who were also ill.

AMY GOODMAN: In Long Island, one in nine women suffer from breast cancer?

KELLY McMASTERS: That’s actually—that was the original number back in, I believe, the '80s. And now I think the numbers are one in six or one in seven. So, it is—there's a group called One in Nine, which was one of the first breast cancer advocacy groups. But it’s amazing that even in the time that that group—I mean, the group still exists—the numbers have really jumped. And it was wild for me to watch the film and see, in all of these other reactor communities, that same iconic image of these hand-drawn maps that people, who just are everyday people—they know something is wrong in their community. They’re not sure. They’re not politicians. They’re not scientists. They don’t know how to combat it. So what do they do? They go home, and they drew a map. And over and over, we saw that.

AMY GOODMAN: Introduce us to the Snells.

KELLY McMASTERS: Randy Snell was a bank manager in Manorville, which is right near—it’s a sister town to Shirley. It’s right near the Brookhaven National Laboratory. And his daughter became very ill with rhabdomyosarcoma, which is a soft tissue cancer. And when they were going to—

AMY GOODMAN: She was how old?

KELLY McMASTERS: She was four.

SHEENA JOYCE: Three.

KELLY McMASTERS: Three, yeah. And they—

AMY GOODMAN: A little, beautiful kid.

KELLY McMASTERS: Oh, yes. And he would go to the hospital with her. And all of a sudden, all of the parents realized how many of the kids had rhabdomyosarcoma. And one of the doctors mentioned low-dose radiation as being a possible reason for his little girl’s cancer.

AMY GOODMAN: I mean, this is a remarkably rare cancer—

KELLY McMASTERS: Incredibly.

AMY GOODMAN: —in the United States.

KELLY McMASTERS: Yes, yes. And he went home and thought, how—you know, what kind—where was my daughter exposed to radiation? And then he realized the national—you know, Brookhaven National Laboratory was right in his backyard. And that’s when he started running the numbers. And he came up with more than 22 kids in this small, compact area. It’s supposed to be, I think, one in four million, and just statistically bizarre that this would—there were two kids on one block who had rhabdomyosarcoma. And so, he started really being vocal about it.

And what is fascinating to me, when I interviewed him for my book, was the reaction. Instead of people, his neighbors, rallying, he—you know, some neighbors would approach him in his driveway and say, "Will you just be quiet? You’re going to make our house value go down." And instead of rallying behind him, they said, "Be quiet." And it’s really a terrible story of simply, I think, fear, more than anything, because the neighbors, of course, don’t want to bring that into their own house, and they think they can close their door to it.

AMY GOODMAN: Now, you’re a journalist. In fact, you taught one of our producers at Columbia Journalism School.

KELLY McMASTERS: Right.

AMY GOODMAN: So, of course, you went to Brookhaven, right? The National Lab.

KELLY McMASTERS: Yes.

AMY GOODMAN: To get their response.

KELLY McMASTERS: Mm-hmm. It was pretty limited. In fact, in one of my later chapters in the book, I outline my one visit where I was sitting down with one of the representatives, and it was the one time that someone—it seemed like they were almost saying, "Yes, we could have been a better neighbor." And the PR representative immediately said, "This is all off the record," where my recorder was out. Everybody knew why I was there. And the meeting was ended. I was guaranteed a week of access, and I was given basically three days. And so, after that first morning, I think after they saw the questions that I was asking, I was basically not given much access.

But I did get into their library, and that’s where a lot of the documentation from my book came from. They have a very—it’s technically a public library, except nobody can actually get into it. And I spent hours and hours there, photocopying all of their internal documents related to a lot of the spills and leaks and things like that, so—and just the kind of community public relations documents that were discussing how to handle the community, in terms of telling them—you know, they really diagnosed the community in terms of what they could get away with, in terms of, you know, how much to tell us and how much not to tell us.

And at the meetings where they would address—you know, the scientists and the public relations people would address the—once the information about the leaks came out, and these meetings would be held with the community, and the scientists would make fun of them for not being able to pronounce some of what was leaking, like strontium or tritium, and they would laugh at them. And that arrogance—

AMY GOODMAN: At the residents.

KELLY McMASTERS: Yes. And that arrogance was very similar to what Eric spoke about after Three Mile Island. "Why do you need to know this?"

AMY GOODMAN: And yet, the questioning, the activism, the journalism, shut the last nuclear power plant of Brookhaven. Explain when that happened and how it happened.

KELLY McMASTERS: Well, it was sort of a surprise. They, of course, said—it was closed temporarily in the midst of the activism. Technically, it was decommissioned because there wasn’t any more use for it. That’s the official reason. But it seemed very obvious that the uproar had something to do with it, and the leaks.

AMY GOODMAN: Sheena, the latest news out of Vermont is that the state wanted to close the nuclear power plant, with the full support of Governor Shumlin, who had been a state legislator from the area of Vermont Yankee, first was a supporter, but now the state has wanted to shut it down, and the legislature voted for this.

SHEENA JOYCE:

AMY GOODMAN: But a court has prevented it from happening.

SHEENA JOYCE: Right.

AMY GOODMAN: Prevented a democratic government from closing down an entity of a private corporation.

SHEENA JOYCE: Right. And it’s an interesting case for, I think, for Indian Point, which is one of the places featured in our film.

AMY GOODMAN: Indian Point.

SHEENA JOYCE: Which is up for relicensing right now.

AMY GOODMAN: In New York.

SHEENA JOYCE: That’s correct. And in a similar situation, the governor there would like it to be closed and is facing resistance.

AMY GOODMAN: And so, it’s sending a real message, this court case.

SHEENA JOYCE: It certainly is.

AMY GOODMAN: You have a great clip in the film of David Letterman saying he wants Indian Point shut down.

SHEENA JOYCE: That’s right. Let’s see what kind of pull he has, and maybe he could do more than the governor. We’ll see.

AMY GOODMAN: And talk about the other nuclear power plants and communities that you cover.

SHEENA JOYCE: Another community that we go to is Braidwood in Illinois, which has a very similar story to Shirley, Long island. And as Kelly mentioned, one thing that was eerie to us is, as we went from town to town speaking to people, there were these unlikely activists, there were these, you know, moms and dads and grandmoms who were noticing that all of their neighbors were getting sick and would meet in each other’s basements and kitchens and start to draw a map. And it all kind of starts with dots on a map. And it was eerie to us how the story kept repeating, and also how people were so, you know, necessarily, busy and focused on their own communities, they almost don’t have the chance to lift their heads up and look around and see that there are other people in other parts of this country dealing with the same thing.

AMY GOODMAN: I want to go to the latest nuclear catastrophe, which was Fukushima, and ask you how that happening in the midst of your filming changed your view of things. But let’s go to the clip in this film where we meet Paul Gallay, president of Riverkeeper, a group that’s been actively lobbying to close the Indian Point nuclear power plant in Buchanan, New York, talking about the Fukushima disaster and how it reignited the debate over the aging plant.


PAUL GALLAY: March 23rd. It is March 23rd, isn’t it? The days are all kind of blending together right now. It’s almost two weeks after the disaster in Japan. The news continues to get worse over there. We’re sitting here in New York, and there are stories coming out every time you turn around about Indian Point. Could it happen here? What are the risks?

DAVID LETTERMAN: Nuclear power—I don’t want Indian Point. I live down the street, and it’s like in a cul-de-sac, and I’m just down the—I don’t want that anymore. How can—how we get them to take that away?

PAUL GALLAY: For 10 years, Riverkeeper has been watching Indian Point from the standpoint of safety.

MICHIO KAKU: In fact, even one NRC official said that if we had a chance to relicense that reactor, knowing today, we probably would not license that reactor.

DAVID LETTERMAN: Not license, yeah, yeah. That’s not—that’s, as the kids say, a no-brainer.

PAUL GALLAY: Before the Japan earthquakes, people were not paying attention to the risk of accident, risk of radiation release. Now they are.


AMY GOODMAN: That’s an excerpt from the remarkable documentary called The Atomic States of America, which is co-directed by Sheena Joyce and Don Argott. Sheena is with us now. Sheena, talk about Fukushima happening in the midst of you finalizing this documentary.

SHEENA JOYCE: Well, it was certainly unreal for us. We were actually on our way to South by Southwest Film Festival with another film that we had. And Don and I are also a couple, and we were packing. And we saw, you know, the crawl come across the TV first that there was an earthquake in Japan. And my cousin lived in Tokyo at the time. So, immediately, it was—you know, you think worrying about your family and what was going on.

And then we had heard that there were nuclear reactors that had gone offline. And then, suddenly, you know, our stomachs flipped, and our whole story changed. And we knew that not only, you know, would life be different for so many people on March 12th, but that our film would have to change entirely. So we kind of remade the film on March 12th. It really did—it reframed our film. It reframed the dialogue in this country. And it changed our characters. So, we had this new perspective.

And I think what’s worth mentioning, speaking again of eerie, is the last question that I would ask in every interview, no matter what side of the fence the person I was speaking to was on, I would say, "Well, what do you think it’s going to take to make a change? What do you think it’s going to—you know, what would it take for people to start paying attention to this issue?" And every single person, particularly, you know, no the anti side, would say, "I hate to say it, it’s not a—it’s going to be an accident, and it’s not a question of 'if,' it’s a question of 'where, when and what will it look like.'"

AMY GOODMAN: And people on the pro-nuclear side, did they say the same thing?

SHEENA JOYCE: They did not say the same thing. They—

AMY GOODMAN: But did you find people changing after Fukushima at all, or just hardening their positions?

SHEENA JOYCE: You know, it’s interesting. I think that there are some people who were interested in restarting a new generation of nuclear reactors. They certainly are not for keeping, you know, the old reactors. But even the pro-nuclear people who are interested in this new wave of generators may have changed their minds.

AMY GOODMAN: Do you think it’s changed the conversation in the United States around nuclear power? Has it in any way raised questions about this nuclear renaissance that President Obama is hailing?

SHEENA JOYCE: I think, for the people who live in reactor communities, it has. I’m not so sure about the rest of the country. I guess we’ll see. And I’m hoping—you know, as I said in the beginning, our goal with this film was just to ask questions and to try and spark a dialogue. And hopefully, you know, we can help that.

AMY GOODMAN: Finally, Kelly McMasters, you don’t live in Shirley anymore.

KELLY McMASTERS: I don’t. But in a way, I always will, and so will everyone else, as long as we have these reactors online.

AMY GOODMAN: That was Kelly McMasters, author of Welcome to Shirley: A Memoir from an Atomic Town, and Sheena Joyce, director of The Atomic States of America. The documentary premiered here at the Sundance Film Festival.

Christer Forslund
02-08-2012, 08:43 PM
Rising temperatures at Fukushima raise questions over stability of nuclear plant (http://www.legitgov.org/Rising-temperatures-Fukushima-raise-questions-over-stability-nuclear-plant) February 8, 2012 by legitgov
Rising temperatures at Fukushima raise questions over stability of nuclear plant (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/feb/08/fukushima-rising-temperatures-stability-nuclear-reactor) --The amount of cooling water being injected into No 2 reactor is increased after temperature soars to over 73C 07 Feb 2012 Workers at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant say they are regaining control of a reactor after its temperature rose dramatically this week, casting doubt on government claims that the facility has been stabilised. The plant's operator, Tokyo Electric Power [Tepco] was forced to increase the amount of cooling water being injected into the No 2 reactor after its temperature soared to 73.3C earlier this week. By Tuesday night, the temperature had dropped to 68.5C at the bottom of the reactor's containment vessel, where molten fuel is believed to have accumulated after three of Fukushima Daiichi's six reactors suffered meltdown. Tepco Injects Boric Acid Into Reactor as Temperatures Rise (http://www.legitgov.org/Tepco-Injects-Boric-Acid-Reactor-Temperatures-Rise) February 8, 2012 by legitgov
Tepco Injects Boric Acid Into Reactor as Temperatures Rise (http://www.businessweek.com/news/2012-02-07/tepco-injects-boric-acid-into-reactor-as-temperatures-rise.html) 07 Feb 2012 Tokyo Electric Power Co. injected boric acid into a reactor at its crippled Fukushima nuclear plant to prevent an accidental chain reaction known as re-criticality after temperatures rose in the past week. The temperature of the No. 2 reactor was 70.1 degrees Celsius (158 degrees Fahrenheit) as of 6 a.m. today, according to preliminary data, Akitsuka Kobayashi, a spokesman for the utility, said by phone. Since Feb. 1, temperatures at the bottom of the No. 2 reactor vessel have risen by more than 20 degrees Celsius, according to the company's data.

Peter Lemkin
02-08-2012, 09:06 PM
Rising temperatures at Fukushima raise questions over stability of nuclear plant (http://www.legitgov.org/Rising-temperatures-Fukushima-raise-questions-over-stability-nuclear-plant)

February 8, 2012 by legitgov


Rising temperatures at Fukushima raise questions over stability of nuclear plant (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/feb/08/fukushima-rising-temperatures-stability-nuclear-reactor) --The amount of cooling water being injected into No 2 reactor is increased after temperature soars to over 73C 07 Feb 2012 Workers at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant say they are regaining control of a reactor after its temperature rose dramatically this week, casting doubt on government claims that the facility has been stabilised. The plant's operator, Tokyo Electric Power [Tepco] was forced to increase the amount of cooling water being injected into the No 2 reactor after its temperature soared to 73.3C earlier this week. By Tuesday night, the temperature had dropped to 68.5C at the bottom of the reactor's containment vessel, where molten fuel is believed to have accumulated after three of Fukushima Daiichi's six reactors suffered meltdown. Tepco Injects Boric Acid Into Reactor as Temperatures Rise (http://www.legitgov.org/Tepco-Injects-Boric-Acid-Reactor-Temperatures-Rise)

February 8, 2012 by legitgov


Tepco Injects Boric Acid Into Reactor as Temperatures Rise (http://www.businessweek.com/news/2012-02-07/tepco-injects-boric-acid-into-reactor-as-temperatures-rise.html) 07 Feb 2012 Tokyo Electric Power Co. injected boric acid into a reactor at its crippled Fukushima nuclear plant to prevent an accidental chain reaction known as re-criticality after temperatures rose in the past week. The temperature of the No. 2 reactor was 70.1 degrees Celsius (158 degrees Fahrenheit) as of 6 a.m. today, according to preliminary data, Akitsuka Kobayashi, a spokesman for the utility, said by phone. Since Feb. 1, temperatures at the bottom of the No. 2 reactor vessel have risen by more than 20 degrees Celsius, according to the company's data.

Raise questions?....nah....caught lying AGAIN!!!! more water and boric acid mean ONLY ONE THING - the reactor is again out of control....as it has always been....it could get much worse without warning and 'they' won't give any hint about it beforehand, for sure! That whole complex could 'blow' or meltdown or just keep doing what its doing. I certainly is not cooling nor under control - not by any means!....