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View Full Version : WHO says E. coli strain responsible for European outbreak is new strain never detected before



Bernice Moore
06-02-2011, 12:26 PM
http://ca.news.yahoo.com/russia-extends-ban-fresh-vegetable-imports-eu-scared-062215566.html

WHO says E. coli strain responsible for European outbreak is new strain never detected before

Jan Klimkowski
06-02-2011, 05:35 PM
There are a couple of primary hypotheses here:

i) this brand new "mutant" form of E coli is naturally occurring - caused either through evolution or dirty farming practices;

ii) this brand new "mutant" form of E coli was produced in a laboratory and has escaped or been deliberately released.

I note that Russia has closed its borders to all EU vegetables.

Which suggests that Russia has categorized this as a national security matter.




E coli outbreak: WHO says bacterium is a new strain

World Health Organisation says fatal E coli is a mutant blend of two different varieties and has never been seen before

Maev Kennedy and agencies guardian.co.uk, (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jun/02/e-coli-outbreak-who-bacterium-new-strain) Thursday 2 June 2011 12.22 BST

A new and more virulent strain of the E coli bacterium caused the outbreak that has killed 17 people and left more than 1,500 ill across Europe, the World Health Organisation has announced.

Hilde Kruse, a food safety expert at the WHO, told the Associated Press it was "a unique strain that has never been isolated from patients before ... [its characteristics] make it more virulent and toxin-producing".

According to the Health Protection Agency three British nationals have been infected as well as four Germans in the UK. All are believed to have caught it in Germany. Three are believed to have developed haemolytic uraemic syndrome, a rare and severe kidney complication that destroys red blood cells and can affect the central nervous system.

The HPA has said it is working with the Food Standards Agency and there is no evidence of suspect produce being distributed in the UK.

As the number of cases continues to rise , Russia has extended its ban on imports of raw vegetables from the European Union – a move condemned by Brussels as "disproportionate" – and Spain is threatening legal action over the initial attempt by Germany to blame the outbreak on imported Spanish organic cucumbers.

Russia initially banned imports of raw vegetables from Germany and Spain but is extending the ban to all EU countries. Gennady Onishchenko, head of the Russian consumer protection agency Rospotrebnadzor, told the Interfax news agency the deaths "demonstrate that the much-praised European sanitary legislation which Russia is being urged to adopt does not work".

"How many more lives of European citizens does it take for European officials to tackle this problem?" he told the RIA Novosti news agency.

Exports of all vegetables, including raw vegetables, from the EU to Russia were valued at €594m euros last year, with France, Germany and Poland the biggest exporters.

European Commission spokesman Frederic Vincent said health commissioner John Dalli would be writing to Moscow "within hours" warning the ban was disproportionate.

Spain is seeking compensation from Germany of its farmers, claiming lost sales are costing €200m a week and could put 70,000 people out of work.

In Germany a health official admitted the precise source of the disease may never be traced. Reinhard Burger, head of the Robert Koch Institute, told the BBC: "I think the number of cases will come down, but how long it takes I'm not sure. It could be indeed weeks or months and I'm not sure if we will really find the source." The RKI reported 365 new cases on Wednesday and said a quarter involved a life-threatening complication.

At the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Denis Coulombier, head of surveillance and response, said there was a strong link between the disease and consuming fresh vegetables.

"To have such a high number of severe cases means that probably there was a huge contamination at some junction," he told Reuters. "That could have been anywhere from the farm to the fork – in transport, packaging, cleaning, at wholesalers or retailers – anywhere along that food chain."

In Britain the HPA is urging travellers to Germany to avoid eating raw tomatoes, cucumbers or leafy salad, especially in the north of the country, and anyone returning with symptoms including bloody diarrhoea is being told to seek urgent medical attention.

Dr Dilys Morgan, head of the HPA gastrointestinal department, said: "The HPA continues to actively monitor the situation very carefully and we are working with the authorities in Germany and with our counterparts across Europe as to the cause of the outbreak. We have alerted health professionals to the situation and advised them to urgently investigate and report suspected cases with a travel history to Germany."

Professor Hugh Pennington, a microbiologist from the University of Aberdeeen, told the BBC that the oubreak was unusual because it didn't seem to be affecting young children. "Children under five have had a very hard time with this kind of bug in the past. They seem to be escaping it – maybe just due to the nature of the food that's causing the problem."

Jan Klimkowski
06-02-2011, 05:39 PM
Here's a source for Russia's actions:


E coli outbreak: Russia widens EU vegetable ban

Officials say measure will be in place until European officials inform Moscow of the disease's cause and how it is being spread

Associated Press guardian.co.uk (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jun/02/e-coli-outbreak-russia-ban), Thursday 2 June 2011 09.41 BST

Russia has extended its ban on vegetable imports to all of the EU in a bid to prevent a deadly European bacterial outbreak from spreading into the country.

Researchers are still unable to pinpoint the cause of the E coli outbreak that has hit Germany and other European countries, infecting 1,500 people and leaving 17 people dead.

Lyubov Voropayeva, a spokeswoman for the Russian Agency for the supervision of consumer rights, said on Thursday that the ban had been imposed with immediate effect.

The agency's chief, Gennady Onishchenko, told Russian news agencies that this "unpopular measure" would be in place until European officials inform Moscow of the cause of the disease and how it is being spread.

"How many more lives of European citizens does it take for European officials to tackle this problem?" he said to the state-owned RIA Novosti news agency.

Russia banned fresh imports from Spain and Germany on Monday, warning of a possible extension of the sanction. No fatalities or infections have yet been reported in the country.

The outbreak has hit at least nine European states, but nearly all the people affected either live in Germany or recently travelled there. Two people who were taken ill are now in the US; both had recently travelled to Hamburg, Germany, where many of the infections occurred.

Medical authorities appeared no closer to discovering the source of the infection late on Wednesday. Germany's national health agency said that more than 1,530 people there had been affected by the E coli germ, including 470 suffering from a kidney failure complication that was previously considered extremely rare.

The outbreak is already seen as the third-largest involving E coli in recent years, and it may be the deadliest. Twelve people died in a 1996 Japanese outbreak that reportedly affected more than 12,000, and seven died in a 2000 Canadian outbreak.

Peter Lemkin
06-02-2011, 06:04 PM
I'd agree that it could [with the available information and proclivities] have been either due to very bad Big Farming techniques which have been known in the past to produce toxic varieties of E. Coli - or purpose built and released. In fact, even if they track it down to one vegetable, location, farm or other such those two possibilities will still likely exist. The hardest to know will always be the second option. Many of the better books on the horrors of the cattle and chicken industries have warned of things just like this. Either way, the horror is that there are both natural [if corporate animal and plant practices can be called 'normal'] and evil laboratory 'bugs' that can and will be released that can not be treated with the drugs available today....i.e. that some % of the population will die. I know where I live fresh vegetables are not selling from nowhere! Buying from the farmer who does things himself is the safest way and a way they [the corporate farms] are trying to stamp out completely. Amazing how the American Model is destroying everything. :loo: Big Capitalism Eats It!

Bernice Moore
06-03-2011, 10:39 PM
http://news.discovery.com/human/ecoli-outbreak-bacteria-strain-110602.html#mkcpgn=emnws1

Magda Hassan
06-03-2011, 11:22 PM
Odd that the outbreak occurs in Germany around the same time they banned Monsantos GE maize...Just saying. :flypig:

Peter Lemkin
06-04-2011, 05:07 AM
Odd that the outbreak occurs in Germany around the same time they banned Monsantos GE maize...Just saying. :flypig:

Interesting observation. Now, you don't think Montsanto would even think to do such a thing? - they certainly have the means and motive. Something like this could be done by one lone scientist and wouldn't need a group. Now they don't think it is Spanish cucumbers, or even cucumbers, at all. I have NO idea why they suspected that veggy in the first place. It is all quite strange, but even without bio-warfare, such will increase greatly in the future, due to the Corporate 'farming' techniques.

Peter Lemkin
06-04-2011, 06:16 AM
Despite cucumbers being given the OK-clear and now maybe NO vegetables thought to be involved, at my local Vietnamese grocery, fruit and vegetables rot, unsold and prices are way down. NB - this article is a few days old and already outdated.
----------------------------------------------

E. coli infections in Germany see significant rise

The infections have made German shoppers wary of buying raw vegetables

There has been a significant rise in the number of people in Europe infected by a strain of E. coli which has led to the deaths of 17 people, officials say.

More than 1,500 people in nine nations - though mostly in Germany - have been infected by enterohaemorrhagic E.coli (EHEC), which can cause the deadly haemolytic-uraemic syndrome (HUS).

The death toll in Germany has risen to 16, with officials saying an 84-year-old woman with HUS had died on Sunday.

The outbreak's source is not yet known.

Earlier, the Spanish government said it was considering legal action against the authorities in Hamburg for wrongly blaming its produce.

"We do not rule out taking action against the authorities who called into question the quality of our products," Deputy Prime Minister Alfredo Perez Rubalcaba told radio Cadena Ser.

Spain's fruit and vegetable exporters estimate they have been losing more than 200m euros ($290m; £174m) since the outbreak emerged.
Continue reading the main story

Start Quote

I live in a province in Spain where a lot of farmers grow their vegetables... They feel what has happened is unjustified”
Leon Cohen
Castell de Ferro, Spain
E. coli outbreak: Your views

Germany has admitted the bacteria did not come from Spain as initially reported, but said the decision to issue the warning had been correct as a different strain of E.coli was present in Spanish cucumbers.

"Hundreds of tests have been done and the responsible agencies... have determined that most of the patients who have been sickened ate cucumbers, tomatoes and leaf lettuce and primarily in northern Germany," German Agriculture Minister Ilse Aigner said.

"The states that have conducted the tests must now follow back the delivery path to see how the cucumbers or tomatoes or lettuce got here."
'Unprecedented'

The Robert Koch Institute, the German federal institution responsible for disease control, said on Wednesday afternoon that 1,534 people in the country had been infected by EHEC.

EHEC is a deadly strain of E. coli bacteria, which is found in the digestive systems of cows, humans and other mammals.

On Tuesday, the RKI reported 1169 cases of EHEC, and said 470 people were suffering from HUS, up from 373 on Monday.
Continue reading the main story
HUS cases and deaths, by country
Germany: 470 cases, 16 deaths
Sweden: 15 cases, one death
Denmark: Seven cases
The Netherlands: Three cases
UK: Three cases
Spain: One case

Sources: European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, and the Robert Koch Institute, UK Health Protection Agency

Experts said the number was unprecedented in modern medical history because HUS normally occurred in 10% of EHEC infections. They warned that the strain could be more dangerous than anything previously seen.

"There may well be a great number of asymptomatic cases out there that we're missing," Paul Hunter, a professor of health protection at the University of East Anglia, told the Associated Press.

"This could be a much bigger outbreak than we realise right now."

"There might also be something genetically different about this particular strain of E. coli that makes it more virulent."

But the European Commissioner for Health and Consumer Policy, John Dalli, ruled out any need for a ban on cucumbers, or for a warning against travelling to northern Germany.

"The outbreak is limited geographically to an area surrounding the city of Hamburg," he told reporters.

"It appears the outbreak is on the decline."
Epileptic fits

About half of the HUS patients in Hamburg clinics have suffered neural disorders three to five days after falling ill, such as epileptic fits and slurred speech, according to the German newspaper, Die Welt.

Germany typically sees a maximum of 50 to 60 annual cases of HUS, which has a fatality rate of up to 5%, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

Unusually, more than 60% of the EHEC cases in Germany have been women - 88% over the age of 20 - and nearly 90% of the HUS cases have been women over the age of 20, officials have said.

Experts have said this may be because women were the ones most likely to be eating fresh produce or handling food in the kitchen.

Hundreds of tests have been carried out by laboratories across Germany

In addition to Germany, cases of EHEC have also been reported in eight other European countries - Austria, Denmark, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the UK, the WHO said. All but two of those infected either live in Germany or recently travelled to Germany.

Fifteen cases of HUS and one related death have also been reported in Sweden, seven cases in Denmark, three in the Netherlands, two in the UK, and one in Spain, according to the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control.

Several countries have taken steps to curtail the outbreak, such as banning cucumber imports and removing the vegetables from sale.

Health authorities have also advised people to wash fruit and vegetables thoroughly, to do the same with all cutlery and plates, and to wash their hands before meals.

Jan Klimkowski
06-05-2011, 05:21 PM
The Germans have stopped blaming Spanish salad vegetables and have instead turned their ire on the humble beansprout:


E coli outbreak: German officials identify beansprouts as likely source

German health officials warn people to stop eating beansprouts as death toll rises to 22

Staff and agencies guardian.co.uk (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jun/05/ecoli-beansprouts-identified-likely-source), Sunday 5 June 2011 17.09 BST

German health authorities claim that locally grown beansprouts have been identified as the likely cause of an outbreak of E coli that has killed 22 people and infected 1,700 people across Europe.

Gert Hahne, a spokesman for the agriculture ministry in Lower Saxony, said an alert would be sent out immediately warning people to stop eating the sprouts, which are often used in mixed salads. It was also announced that the death toll from the outbreak had increased to 22.

German hospitals have been struggling to cope with the flood of E coli victims, said Daniel Bahr, the health minister. Hospitals in the northern city of Hamburg, where the outbreak began three weeks ago, have been discharging patients with less serious illnesses to handle the surge of people stricken by a rare, highly toxic strain of the bacteria.

"We're facing a tense situation with patient care," Bahr told the Bild am Sonntag newspaper. He said hospitals outside Hamburg could be used to make up for "insufficient capacity" in Germany's second-largest city.

Scientists suspect the source of the contamination may have been poor hygiene either at a farm, in transit, or in a shop or food outlet. Many of those infected have developed haemolytic uraemic syndrome, a potentially deadly complication attacking the kidneys.

On Saturday, a microbiologist said officials had identified a restaurant in the northern port city of Lübeck as a possible place where the bug had been passed to humans. At least 17 people infected with E coli had eaten there.

Ed Jewett
06-06-2011, 03:58 AM
Via http://ricefarmer.blogspot.com/ for June 5-6, 2011:

E. coli outbreak bug genes look super aggressive
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/columnist/vergano/2011-06-03-e-coli-biology_n.htm?csp=34news&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+usatoday-NewsTopStories+%28News+-+Top+Stories%29

E coli outbreak: German hospitals struggling to cope
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jun/05/e-coli-outbreak-german-hospitals


I can say, as a former emergency management/medical systems planner, that the impact of such events on health care systems and institutions is significant, relveant to staffing, the health of the staffers, the need/distribution of required supplies and pharmaceuticals, and which will put a strain on institutions and drive triage processes that will impact those unaffected by the particular illness du jour. What you may see in certain areas -- especially if there are waves or concurrent disease -- is an ongoing medical disaster that will overwhelm entire regions.

Magda Hassan
06-06-2011, 02:06 PM
http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/43285439/ns/today-today_health/t/officials-sprouts-not-cause-e-coli-outbreak/

HAMBURG, Germany (http://www.bing.com/maps/?v=2&where1=HAMBURG,%20Germany) — German officials say initial tests show that sprouts from an organic farm in the country's north are not the cause of the E. coli outbreak. Must be the salmon mousse. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4tIg2nK67LQ)

Peter Lemkin
06-06-2011, 05:32 PM
Now it is announced that is was NOT the bean sprouts...and they do NOT know what it was.....starts to me to look like an op......but it still could be a natural event....however the many false pointing at various vegetables is very odd, indeed. :jawdrop:

Jan Klimkowski
06-06-2011, 07:02 PM
Source (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jun/06/e-coli-bean-sprouts-not-cause).


German officials had said they were confident that sprouts from the organic Gärtenhof farm in Lower Saxony were behind the spread of a particularly virulent strain of the bacterium. There were "strong and clear indications" that the farm was involved, the federal health minister, Daniel Bahr, said.

(snip)

Lower Saxony's agriculture minister, Gert Lindemann, said earlier it was possible the contaminated produce had found its way into a variety of foods but there was a "clear trail" to the farm. "It is the most convincing … source for the E coli illnesses. This is for us the most plausible cause of the illness."

After exterminating entire harvests of cucumbers, tomatoes and bean sprouts, these fools now declare we have no fucking idea what's going on:


Lower Saxony's agriculture ministry said 23 of 40 samples from the farm had now tested negative for the E coli, with 17 more tests still being done.

(snip)

The owner of the sprout farm, in the village of Steddorf, near the small town of Bienenbüttel, 40 miles south of Hamburg, had said he was baffled at being implicated, saying there were no animals or animal products on the site.

"The salad sprouts are grown only from seeds and water, and they aren't fertilised at all," Klaus Verbeck told the Neue Osnabruecker Zeitung. "There aren't any animal fertilisers used in other areas on the farm either."


What was that about GM maize earlier in this thread...... :unclesam:

Peter Lemkin
06-07-2011, 03:38 AM
I can tell you that here in Europe the shelves and stalls of vegetables of all kinds [as well as many fruits] are going unsold and prices are falling - lives are being damaged. What I don't understand it how they could point at Spanish cukes and then German bean sprouts if they didn't have any evidence of that!?!?! Jan, your speculation of GM something could be possible, but is not likely the source. I think as now this epidemic seems to be declining, they may never find the source....BUT...the source is still out there and will be back!!! In the USA, last, it was spinach, here in Europe it is unknown. Food, once vital for health is now dangerous to ones health; much as water, air and soil have become. We have really destroyed our Planet with technology and greed. If it isn't a deliberate poisoning as a black bag op, I'd put my money on a very large animal factory that sells some of its waste for fertilizer. :mexican:

Carsten Wiethoff
06-07-2011, 07:01 AM
In German television there is hardly another news item now for weeks, but there is also growing frustration that the source of the infection has not been clearly identified yet.

But there are indications. First the spanish cucumbers: the poison from EHEC bacteria has been found on three cucumbers, two of which have been traced to two different spanish producers, the third has initially been reported to be from Holland. Meanwhile laboratory tests have identified the bacteria to be not the variant causing the current outbreak, especially the kidney complications.
Then the sprouts: All of the major outbreaks were from Restaurants or kitchens being supplied by the identified producer of sprouts. In one case a broken package of the sprouts has been found in the fridge of a victim. I heard the interview with a survivor, who clearly identified a specific restaurant and a specific meal containing sprouts as the source of her infection. The restaurant was involved in several other infection cases as well.
It is not clear how the bacteria came to the sprouts, it may even be that the seeds that are imported from Asia have been infected and that the infected batch has already been completely processed and sold and eaten.

And seriously, I do not see any indication for a delibrate operation in this case, nor any plausible motivation. And I continue to eat normally.

Jan Klimkowski
06-07-2011, 06:15 PM
Jan, your speculation of GM something could be possible, but is not likely the source.

Peter - with respect, my speculation is not that GM foodstuffs are the source of this outbreak. My speculation refers back to Magda's post #6 earlier in this thread.


In German television there is hardly another news item now for weeks, but there is also growing frustration that the source of the infection has not been clearly identified yet.

But there are indications. First the spanish cucumbers: the poison from EHEC bacteria has been found on three cucumbers, two of which have been traced to two different spanish producers, the third has initially been reported to be from Holland. Meanwhile laboratory tests have identified the bacteria to be not the variant causing the current outbreak, especially the kidney complications.
Then the sprouts: All of the major outbreaks were from Restaurants or kitchens being supplied by the identified producer of sprouts. In one case a broken package of the sprouts has been found in the fridge of a victim. I heard the interview with a survivor, who clearly identified a specific restaurant and a specific meal containing sprouts as the source of her infection. The restaurant was involved in several other infection cases as well.
It is not clear how the bacteria came to the sprouts, it may even be that the seeds that are imported from Asia have been infected and that the infected batch has already been completely processed and sold and eaten.

Carsten - with respect, none of that is anywhere near sufficient evidence to declare an entire country's cucumbers suspect nor point the finger at a specific farm.

All those evidential trails are equally, if not more, consistent with the infection having occurred after the vegetables have left the farms, at a later stage in the food chain.

Indeed, that evidence strongly suggests poor hygiene in the restaurant, and that bacteria may be festering there.





And seriously, I do not see any indication for a delibrate operation in this case, nor any plausible motivation. And I continue to eat normally.

See Magda's post #6.

Think the Strategy of Tension.

Note that Russia has closed its borders to European vegetables.

None of this is proof. However, I am certainly not ruling out deliberate foul play.

Carsten Wiethoff
06-07-2011, 09:11 PM
Carsten - with respect, none of that is anywhere near sufficient evidence to declare an entire country's cucumbers suspect nor point the finger at a specific farm.

All those evidential trails are equally, if not more, consistent with the infection having occurred after the vegetables have left the farms, at a later stage in the food chain.

Indeed, that evidence strongly suggests poor hygiene in the restaurant, and that bacteria may be festering there.


Yes, this is certainly the biggest legitimate criticism of the German crisis management. To announce names of countries and producers with indications, but without proof, is like declaring a suspect guilty without any trial at all.
In this case it seems to be unexpectedly difficult to find proof and it may be that it will never be found. There is of course the legitimate demand of the public to be informed of possible risks and ways to avoid them and on the other hand the legitimate interests of vegetable producers and many others to remain innocent until proven guilty and not carry a financial and moral penalty without having done anything wrong.
BTW I am sure that all the restaurants and other places where people possibly got infected have been tested thoroughly already and if anything had been found it would have been reported.
In a way I find Putin's import ban a logical reaction, even if it can be argued that it declares all European vegetables guilty without even the slightest proof, and in this case it is likely more an action of a man wanting to appear strong and in control than a responsible reaction for the health of the people in Russia.
Currently I classify this as a strongly local problem with only minimal chances of a people-to-people infection, so for myself I do not take any special action. But this is everybody's personal choice, I heard from people trying to avoid all non-cooked food, even bananas, and certainly a lot of people reduce fresh vegetable intake.

When you think in the line of "strategy of tension" this implies that there are forces that benefit from a general fear of poisonous food and dangerous infectious diseases, I don't think that this outbreak is different in this way from others like bird flu, swine flu, mad cow disease and many other recent food/health scandals/outbrakes. I do not say that these forces do not exist, but currently I do not have a clear picture, what, besides more control, could be the point. But maybe this is the point.
How should one resist a strategy of tension? Maybe by not being hysterical and waiting for proof, one way or the other.

Christer Forslund
06-07-2011, 09:33 PM
When you think in the line of "strategy of tension" this implies that there are forces that benefit from a general fear of poisonous food and dangerous infectious diseasesMaybe so. Why not read what Mike Adams have to say?
http://www.naturalnews.com/032622_ecoli_bioengineering.html
Monday, June 06, 2011 by Mike Adams, the Health Ranger / Editor of NaturalNews.com


Even as the veggie blame game is now under way across the EU, where a super resistant strain of e.coli is sickening patients and filling hospitals in Germany, virtually no one is talking about how e.coli could have magically become resistant to eight different classes of antibiotic drugs and then suddenly appeared in the food supply.

This particular e.coli variation is a member of the O104 strain, and O104 strains are almost never (normally) resistant to antibiotics. In order for them to acquire this resistance, they must be repeatedly exposed to antibiotics in order to provide the "mutation pressure" that nudges them toward complete drug immunity.

So if you're curious about the origins of such a strain, you can essentially reverse engineer the genetic code of the e.coli and determine fairly accurately which antibiotics it was exposed to during its development. This step has now been done (see below), and when you look at the genetic decoding of this O104 strain now threatening food consumers across the EU, a fascinating picture emerges of how it must have come into existence.

The genetic code reveals the history

When scientists at Germany's Robert Koch Institute decoded the genetic makeup of the O104 strain, they found it to be resistant to all the following classes and combinations of antibiotics:

• penicillins
• tetracycline
• nalidixic acid
• trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazol
• cephalosporins
• amoxicillin / clavulanic acid
• piperacillin-sulbactam
• piperacillin-tazobactam

In addition, this O104 strain posses an ability to produce special enzymes that give it what might be called "bacteria superpowers" known technically as ESBLs:

"Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamases (ESBLs) are enzymes that can be produced by bacteria making them resistant to cephalosporins e.g. cefuroxime, cefotaxime and ceftazidime - which are the most widely used antibiotics in many hospitals," explains the Health Protection Agency in the UK (http://www.hpa.org.uk/Topics/Infect... (http://www.hpa.org.uk/Topics/InfectiousDiseases/InfectionsAZ/ESBLs/)).

On top of that, this O104 strain possesses two genes -- TEM-1 and CTX-M-15 -- that "have been making doctors shudder since the 1990s," reports The Guardian (http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentis... (http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2011/jun/05/deadly-ecoli-resistance-antibiotic-misuse)). And why do they make doctors shudder? Because they're so deadly that many people infected with such bacteria experience critical organ failure and simply die.

Bioengineering a deadly superbug

So how, exactly, does a bacterial strain come into existence that's resistant to over a dozen antibiotics in eight different drug classes and features two deadly gene mutations plus ESBL enzyme capabilities?

There's really only one way this happens (and only one way) -- you have to expose this strain of e.coli to all eight classes of antibiotics drugs. Usually this isn't done at the same time, of course: You first expose it to penicillin and find the surviving colonies which are resistant to penicillin. You then take those surviving colonies and expose them to tetracycline. The surviving colonies are now resistant to both penicillin and tetracycline. You then expose them to a sulfa drug and collect the surviving colonies from that, and so on. It is a process of genetic selection done in a laboratory with a desired outcome. This is essentially how some bioweapons are engineered by the U.S. Army in its laboratory facility in Ft. Detrick, Maryland (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nation... (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Biodefense_Analysis_and_Countermeasures_C enter)).

Although the actual process is more complicated than this, the upshot is that creating a strain of e.coli that's resistant to eight classes of antibiotics requires repeated, sustained expose to those antibiotics. It is virtually impossible to imagine how this could happen all by itself in the natural world. For example, if this bacteria originated in the food (as we've been told), then where did it acquire all this antibiotic resistance given the fact that antibiotics are not used in vegetables?

When considering the genetic evidence that now confronts us, it is difficult to imagine how this could happen "in the wild." While resistance to a single antibiotic is common, the creation of a strain of e.coli that's resistant to eight different classes of antibiotics -- in combination -- simply defies the laws of genetic permutation and combination in the wild. Simply put, this superbug e.coli strain could not have been created in the wild. And that leaves only one explanation for where it really came from: the lab.

Engineered and then released into the wild

The evidence now points to this deadly strain of e.coli being engineered and then either being released into the food supply or somehow escaping from a lab and entering the food supply inadvertently. If you disagree with that conclusion -- and you're certainly welcome to -- then you are forced to conclude that this octobiotic superbug (immune to eight classes of antibiotics) developed randomly on its own... and that conclusion is far scarier than the "bioengineered" explanation because it means octobiotic superbugs can simply appear anywhere at any time without cause. That would be quite an exotic theory indeed.

My conclusion actually makes more sense: This strain of e.coli was almost certainly engineered and then released into the food supply for a specific purpose. What would that purpose be? It's obvious, I hope.

It's all problem, reaction, solution at work here. First cause a PROBLEM (a deadly strain of e.coli in the food supply). Then wait for the public REACTION (huge outcry as the population is terrorized by e.coli). In response to that, enact your desired SOLUTION (total control over the global food supply and the outlawing of raw sprouts, raw milk and raw vegetables).

That's what this is all about, of course. The FDA relied on the same phenomenon in the USA when pushing for its recent "Food Safety Modernization Act" which essentially outlaws small family organic farms unless they lick the boots of FDA regulators. The FDA was able to crush farm freedom in America by piggybacking on the widespread fear that followed e.coli outbreaks in the U.S. food supply. When people are afraid, remember, it's not difficult to get them to agree to almost any level of regulatory tyranny. And making people afraid of their food is a simple matter... a few government press releases emailed to the mainstream media news affiliates is all it takes.


Food as weapons of war - created by Big Pharma?

By the way, the most likely explanation of where this strain of e.coli was bioengineered is that the drug giants came up with it in their own labs. Who else has access to all the antibiotics and equipment needed to manage the targeted mutations of potentially thousands of e.coli colonies? The drug companies are uniquely positioned to both carry out this plot and profit from it. In other words, they have the means and the motive to engage in precisely such actions.

Aside from the drug companies, perhaps only the infectious disease regulators themselves have this kind of laboratory capacity. The CDC, for example, could probably pull this off if they really wanted to.

The proof that somebody bioengineered this e.coli strain is written right in the DNA of the bacteria. That's forensic evidence, and what it reveals cannot be denied. This strain underwent repeated and prolonged exposure to eight different classes of antibiotics, and then it somehow managed to appear in the food supply. How do you get to that if not through a well-planned scheme carried out by rogue scientists? There is no such thing as "spontaneous mutation" into a strain that is resistant to the top eight classes of brand-name antibiotic drugs being sold by Big Pharma today. Such mutations have to be deliberate.

Once again, if you disagree with this assessment, then what you're saying is that NO, it wasn't done deliberately... it happened accidentally! And again, I'm saying that's even scarier! Because that means the antibiotic contamination of our world is now at such an extreme level of overkill that a strain of e.coli in the wild can be saturated with eight different classes of antibiotics to the point where it naturally develops into its own deadly superbug. If that's what people believe, then that's almost a scarier theory than the bioengineering explanation!

A new era has begun: Bioweapons in your food

But in either case -- no matter what you believe -- the simple truth is that the world is now facing a new era of global superbug strains of bacteria that can't be treated with any known pharmaceutical. They can all, of course, be readily killed with colloidal silver, which is exactly why the FDA and world health regulators have viciously attacked colloidal silver companies all these years: They can't have the public getting its hands on natural antibiotics that really work, you see. That would defeat the whole purpose of making everybody sick in the first place.

In fact, these strains of e.coli superbugs can be quite readily treated with a combination of natural full-spectrum antibiotics from plants such as garlic, ginger, onions and medicinal herbs. On top of that, probiotics can help balance the flora of the digestive tract and "crowd out" the deadly e.coli that might happen by. A healthy immune system and well-functioning digestive tract can fight off an e.coli superbug infection, but that's yet another fact the medical community doesn't want you to know. They much prefer you to remain a helpless victim lying in the hospital, waiting to die, with no options available to you. That's "modern medicine" for ya. They cause the problems that they claim to treat, and then they won't even treat you with anything that works in the first place.

Nearly all the deaths now attributable to this e.coli outbreak are easily and readily avoidable. These are deaths of ignorance. But even more, they may also be deaths from a new era of food-based bioweapons unleashed by either a group of mad scientists or an agenda-driven institution that has declared war on the human population.

Carsten Wiethoff
06-08-2011, 06:14 AM
Christer, thanks for posting this.
While I could verify the genetic information in the article (from http://www.rki.de/cln_160/nn_217400/EN/Home/EHEC__O104__H4,templateId=raw,property=publication File.pdf/EHEC_O104_H4.pdf)
several issues come to my mind.
1. If it would be so clear and provable that this is a product from a biolab, a weapon, instead of an unintentional consequence of our way of agriculture, it could not fulfill the stated purpose. Instead the people would demand a ban of bioweapons and the head of the people responsible. Doubt and plausible denial is essential.
2. Once a person is infected, antibiotics resistance is irrelevant, because an EHEC infection should not be treated with antibiotics.
3. Colloidal silver is at least contrioversial because of its adverse health effects and the FDA has banned sellers from claiming any therapeutic or preventive value for it.

The baseline remains the question how we should react to this and similar events. Fear is rarely a good advisor, but without fear we would all be dead.

Peter Lemkin
06-08-2011, 06:29 AM
One thing is clear, Public Health testing of the food supply [in all countries] is lacking - not that it might have caught this [although it might have!], but such regular testing and surprise [unannounced] random testing with STIFF PENALTIES would make all persons along the food chain be more cautious. Second, the big animal and plant factories/plantations have long been known to be breeding grounds for troubles, like this - as have GM experiments [both by design and accident]. Third, the leakage of antibiotics into the food and water has created resistant bacteria - and is perhaps the greatest danger. I could go on. Cows and pigs are fed ground-up cows and pigs to eat along with plant matter. This is not natural and helps to create such Frankenstein bugs. Manure is good fertilizer, but not when it comes from industrial scale, chemical ridden, antibiotic ridden sources. Only when from organic small-scale farms. Others, if used at all, need to be heat sterilized, first. I don't discount that some pharmaceutical company has developed a new super-antibiotic which they will soon announce to save the day...and had some in their minions start this mini-epidemic to give them the needed sales pitch. It could also be biowarfare on a small scale for political or economic reasons. Lastly, the lesson should be learned, NOT to point to a specific vegetable or farm, until one is sure. If in doubt and awaiting testing, call a temporary and non-finger-pointing moratorium on a class of things [and pay those effected some compensation - unless it is found that they violated safe farming or health laws.]

Carsten Wiethoff
06-08-2011, 01:10 PM
From http://www.spiegel.de/wissenschaft/mensch/0,1518,767379,00.html (in German)

Three employees there had Diarrhoea, one confirmed EHEC (on 6., 11. and 12. May).
Four canteens and three restaurants, which all could trace sprouts back to the producer, together infected about 100 people.

Another 750 samples have been taken and are currently analysed.

The number of new infections is currently declining.

Peter Lemkin
06-08-2011, 03:24 PM
Its BEAN SPROUTS -AGAIN!!!! :rofl:

Keith Millea
06-08-2011, 04:08 PM
Sprout contamination is not uncommon.We've had our share here,although mostly with salmonella contamination.I sprout my own Alphalfa seeds.:what:

Clover sprouts taken off shelves

Salmonella leads to a warning about recent Sprouters Northwest products

By Christian Wihtol
The Register-Guard

Appeared in print: Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2011, page B1

Citing salmonella contamination, officials are telling consumers and retailers across Oregon and other regions of the Northwest to throw away any clover sprouts produced by Sprouters Northwest Inc. of Kent, Wash.
The brand is widely sold in major retail chains, including Albertsons and Safeway, Sprouters Northwest owner Bill Jones said Monday.

Jones said a U.S. Food and Drug Administration team is at the plant trying to determine the source of the bacterial contamination. It may have been the sprout seeds, which Sprouters Northwest buys from a supplier, Jones said. The seeds are being tested.

To date, at least seven people who ate the sprouts have been sickened by salmonella — three in Oregon (two in Bend and one in Multnomah County) and four in Washington, the state Public Health Division said Monday. The sprouts were sold in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Alaska and possibly other states, as well as in British Columbia.

The cases of salmonella were all reported beginning between Dec. 4 and Dec. 17, except the most recent case, which is still being evaluated and may have begun later in December, the state said. No hospitalizations or deaths have been reported.
Sprouters Northwest has stopped producing sprouts until the case is resolved, Jones said. Because of the short shelf life of sprouts, most of the sprouts that might be contaminated have most likely already been eaten or discarded, he said.
But William Keene, a senior epidemiologist at the state Public Health Division, said it will be some time before the state will be able to say whether the spate of illnesses is over.

“We’re certainly not ready to say it’s over, and we won’t be able to say that for several weeks,” he said. The bacteria takes time to make people sick, people take time to report being sick, and stool samples take time to analyze and confirm, Keene said.

This is the fourth time since 1997 that Sprouters Northwest sprouts have been cited as a source of salmonella contamination, Keene said.
All Sprouters Northwest-produced clover sprout products are covered in the recall, the state said.

The recalled sprouts were sold at retail stores in 4-ounce and 5-ounce plastic containers; larger 1-pound bags and 2-pound trays were sold to grocery stores and wholesale suppliers, which in turn supplied sprouts to restaurants and other outlets. The clover varieties include Clover, Clover & Onion, Spicy Sprouts and Deli Sprouts. All packages carry the Sprouters Northwest brand name, the state said.
State health officials say eating sprouts can be hazardous.

“Once again, sprouts have been identified as the cause of an outbreak of salmonellosis. Consumers who have sprouts at home should check to see if they have any of the recalled products and, if so, should discard them. Retailers should immediately check their stocks and pull any clover products from Sprouters Northwest,” said William Keene, a senior epidemiologist at the state Public Health Division.

Raw sprouts repeatedly have been identified as a cause of salmonellosis outbreaks, E. coli infections and other diseases, the state said.

“This is at least the 13th sprout-caused outbreak that has sickened Oregonians since 1995, when we first started warning consumers about the risks of eating sprouts. Anyone concerned about food-borne disease should consider this before eating sprouts,” Keene said. The risk of severe illness from salmonella bacteria is particularly high among the elderly and the very young.

Contaminated seed is usually the source of salmonella tainting in sprouts, the state said.

Salmonella and E. coli can flourish in the warm, moist indoor environment in which seeds are sprouted. Or, the seed can become contaminated before it is bought by sprouters.

Harmful bacteria can be present in bird droppings, fertilizing manure or contaminated irrigation water that comes in contact with the seed, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Once Sprouters Northwest heard about the outbreak, it immediately decided to recall its clover sprouts.
“They have been cooperating fully,” Keene said.

Retailers and wholesalers that have any of the recalled sprouts should segregate them from other produce and contact their distributor or Sprouters Northwest, 253-872-0577, for additional information, the state said.

Salmonellosis is an acute bacterial infection that can cause diarrhea, fever and vomiting. Symptoms usually develop within one to five days after eating contaminated food.

Jan Klimkowski
06-08-2011, 05:38 PM
Christer - thank you for your post #18.


1. If it would be so clear and provable that this is a product from a biolab, a weapon, instead of an unintentional consequence of our way of agriculture, it could not fulfill the stated purpose. Instead the people would demand a ban of bioweapons and the head of the people responsible. Doubt and plausible denial is essential.


Carsten - are you aware of any MSM Science reporter having conducted the analysis performed by Mike Adams, and publishing or broadcasting it?

Indeed, I will go further. If any MSM reporter does run with the Adams story, I 99% guarantee that that MSM organ will come under huge governmental, and perhaps national security, pressure to either withdraw the piece or "balance" it with a further piece designed purely to demonstrate the "natural origins" of this E-coli strain.

The process described by Adams and needed to create this particular strain of E-coli does significantly increase the possibility that it was created in a CBW lab - perhaps a privatized deep cover version of Fort Detrick or Porton Down.

In addition, the localization of the outbreak suggests a single source, such as part of a vial of a bioweapon.

In short, the possibility that this E-coli outbreak represents the deliberate deployment of a bioweapon has increased with the new evidence. However, it is unlikely ever to be identified as a biological warfare agent by MSM.

As such, the rationale could be that the military-multinational-intelligence-complex (MMIC) wants to remind Germany how quickly its population can be unsettled and parts of its economy damaged if it messes with MMIC interests.

Peter Lemkin
06-08-2011, 06:25 PM
Now its cucumbers again.....:what:

Answer: Just stop eating!

Peter Lemkin
06-08-2011, 06:32 PM
Yes, good post there [18]. Especially liked:


But in either case -- no matter what you believe -- the simple truth is that the world is now facing a new era of global superbug strains of bacteria that can't be treated with any known pharmaceutical. They can all, of course, be readily killed with colloidal silver, which is exactly why the FDA and world health regulators have viciously attacked colloidal silver companies all these years: They can't have the public getting its hands on natural antibiotics that really work, you see. That would defeat the whole purpose of making everybody sick in the first place.


In fact, these strains of e.coli superbugs can be quite readily treated with a combination of natural full-spectrum antibiotics from plants such as garlic, ginger, onions and medicinal herbs. On top of that, probiotics can help balance the flora of the digestive tract and "crowd out" the deadly e.coli that might happen by. A healthy immune system and well-functioning digestive tract can fight off an e.coli superbug infection, but that's yet another fact the medical community doesn't want you to know. They much prefer you to remain a helpless victim lying in the hospital, waiting to die, with no options available to you. That's "modern medicine" for ya. They cause the problems that they claim to treat, and then they won't even treat you with anything that works in the first place. :mexican:

Carsten Wiethoff
06-08-2011, 07:50 PM
But in either case -- no matter what you believe -- the simple truth is that the world is now facing a new era of global superbug strains of bacteria that can't be treated with any known pharmaceutical.
Yes, I liked that too and it pretty much sums up the situation. It is completely irrelevant if we made this in a lab or in a hospital or in a cattle cage. It is there.

The point I wanted to stress is that we will most likely never know. Short of a confession by some plausible evildoer there is practically no way to distinguish between an accidental creation and release and an intentional one. I am sure that both types of events happened in the past and will happen in the future.
What may be different is our reaction to such an event, depending on what we believe in every specific case and in general.
So if we believe that this was intentional, should we change our eating habits, should we ban fresh food from our tables? Or just the contrary? And if we believe that this was shit happening (pun intended), will we be more careful in the future? Should we push for more natural bio food or for more effective disinfectants?
Everybody answers for himself.

Peter Lemkin
06-08-2011, 08:07 PM
But in either case -- no matter what you believe -- the simple truth is that the world is now facing a new era of global superbug strains of bacteria that can't be treated with any known pharmaceutical.
Yes, I liked that too and it pretty much sums up the situation. It is completely irrelevant if we made this in a lab or in a hospital or in a cattle cage. It is there.

The point I wanted to stress is that we will most likely never know. Short of a confession by some plausible evildoer there is practically no way to distinguish between an accidental creation and release and an intentional one. I am sure that both types of events happened in the past and will happen in the future.
What may be different is our reaction to such an event, depending on what we believe in every specific case and in general.
So if we believe that this was intentional, should we change our eating habits, should we ban fresh food from our tables? Or just the contrary? And if we believe that this was shit happening (pun intended), will we be more careful in the future? Should we push for more natural bio food or for more effective disinfectants?
Everybody answers for himself.

Just as those in power started taking Cipro days before the 'terrorist' Anthrax attacks, I'd not be surprised that a secret antibiotic[s] that DO work on such superbugs exists - but they are not for you or me.....angryfire WE are the laboratory rats.

Jan Klimkowski
06-08-2011, 08:11 PM
It is completely irrelevant if we made this in a lab or in a hospital or in a cattle cage. It is there.

Carsten - with respect, I cannot agree.

I believe there is a fundamental difference between a killer e-coli strain emerging as a byproduct of Big & Dirty Farming, and being created in a biological warfare laboratory and deliberately released.

The first scenario is the consequence of greed and recklessness, and can - in principle - be prevented through clean farming practices.

The second scenario involves the use of science not to cure disease but to create doomsday weapons for use by those who consider themselves our superiors.

A belief in Eugenics is still the dirty secret of the elites.



The point I wanted to stress is that we will most likely never know. Short of a confession by some plausible evildoer there is practically no way to distinguish between an accidental creation and release and an intentional one. I am sure that both types of events happened in the past and will happen in the future.
What may be different is our reaction to such an event, depending on what we believe in every specific case and in general.

(snip)

Everybody answers for himself.

This I can agree with.

One of the aims of a strategy of tension is to create cognitive dissonance in the hearts and minds of people.

And yes, we all go our own way.

Carsten Wiethoff
06-09-2011, 05:33 AM
It is completely irrelevant if we made this in a lab or in a hospital or in a cattle cage. It is there.

Carsten - with respect, I cannot agree.

I believe there is a fundamental difference between a killer e-coli strain emerging as a byproduct of Big & Dirty Farming, and being created in a biological warfare laboratory and deliberately released.

The first scenario is the consequence of greed and recklessness, and can - in principle - be prevented through clean farming practices.

The second scenario involves the use of science not to cure disease but to create doomsday weapons for use by those who consider themselves our superiors.

A belief in Eugenics is still the dirty secret of the elites.

Jan, thank you for your differentiation. You are clearly correct that there is a fundamental moral difference in these two things even if the objective net result may be similar. And I am pretty certain you will be with me in saying that both exist and have to be resisted, brought to light and fought against in our own interest and that of future generations. I believe that is why we are all here.

Magda Hassan
06-09-2011, 09:47 AM
I am looking forward to Monsanto launching their new variety of cucumber and bean sprout both of which are engineered to be resistant to EHEC strain of e coli. :shock:

Keith Millea
06-09-2011, 02:40 PM
I am looking forward to Monsanto launching their new variety of cucumber and bean sprout both of which are engineered to be resistant to EHEC strain of e coli. :shock:

From the local article that I posted,it mentions that it is the seed that is mostly found contaminated,not unhealthy growing conditions.So,there could actually be a Monsanto angle here.


Contaminated seed is usually the source of salmonella tainting in sprouts, the state said.

Salmonella and E. coli can flourish in the warm, moist indoor environment in which seeds are sprouted. Or, the seed can become contaminated before it is bought by sprouters.

Jan Klimkowski
06-09-2011, 06:08 PM
Jan, thank you for your differentiation. You are clearly correct that there is a fundamental moral difference in these two things even if the objective net result may be similar. And I am pretty certain you will be with me in saying that both exist and have to be resisted, brought to light and fought against in our own interest and that of future generations. I believe that is why we are all here.

Carsten, thank you and yes, I agree totally.

In my view, there is much value in the type of respectful dialogue in which we have just engaged. :happydrinks:

Carsten Wiethoff
06-10-2011, 07:13 AM
In my view, there is much value in the type of respectful dialogue in which we have just engaged. :happydrinks:
I learn something in every exchange here. It forces me to think more clearly and to express myself better, and to look up and verify information, which I otherwise would have never seen.
Thanks, Jan, for your patience.

Carsten Wiethoff
06-10-2011, 10:47 AM
The German Robert-Koch-Institute confirms the sprouts from the one producer in Lower-Saxony as the likely carrier of the infection and lifts its recommendation not to eat cucumbers, tomatoes and salad.
This is in spite of the fact that up to now the only confirmed positive O104:H4 test comes from the rest of a cucumber in Magdeburg.
It is still not clear where the initial infection originates from and if there are multiple other ways that people got infected.

Source: (in German)http://www.rki.de/cln_144/nn_205760/DE/Content/Service/Presse/Pressemitteilungen/2011/08__2011.html

My comment: The conditions in a sprout farm are obviously ideal to explosively multiply germs, whether harmless or dangerous, whether accidental or intentional. Adding the wide distribution of the product, it is difficult to imagine more effective ways of causing mass infections.

Peter Lemkin
06-10-2011, 02:16 PM
I have taken courses in Epidemiology and we learned, discussed and did mock efforts to locate the source of a food-borne infection. Something doesn't add up....[is rotten in Denmark - or Germany.] They seem desperate to have someone and something to blame, before the tests and evidence is in. If the owner of the sprout farm is a decent person, his life is destroyed, likely forever. I'll wait until there is more in the way of standard epidemiological evidence and work-up. Even if this farm turns out to be the locus, the question remains if it happened with or without men in black cloaks in the dead of night coming with vials of laboratory made pathogens. Actually, a DNA analysis of the new strain might well answer that question!.....it is almost impossible for normal E. Coli to turn into such a pathologic strain, WITHOUT some intermediate steps and strains, that should be able to be located eventually [if it was a 'natural' occurrence'].

Carsten Wiethoff
06-10-2011, 06:08 PM
Wikipedia has an amazingly complete and comprehensible article on the disease here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2011_E._coli_O104:H4_outbreak).

Some of the footnotes lead to articles on the genetic structure of the e.coli in question, see http://www.genomics.cn/en/news_show.php?type=show&id=644 for the initial analysis, and http://www.biofortified.org/2011/06/natural-gmos-part-85-speed-matters-era7-bioinformatics-provide-e-coli-ehec-genome-annotation/
for the headline
Out of Germany, not Out of Africa — the beastly German germ is a GMO whose parents have been around Germany for 10 years.

followed by a partly funny article partly written in "jabberwocky" which I admittedly failed to completely understand.
But there already seems to be a lot of information out there.

Ed Jewett
06-11-2011, 02:23 AM
I offer this up without assurance as to its validity and veracity, especially given that it is sprinkled with product ads. Some of the comments are ill-informed and alarmist. OTOH...

Germany’s superbug is weaponized with Bubonic Plague DNA
Posted on June 9, 2011

http://foodfreedom.wordpress.com/2011/06/09/germanys-superbug-is-weaponized-with-bubonic-plague-dna/


It notes the following source:
http://www.theatlanticwire.com/global/2011/05/super-rare-e-coli-sickening-germany/38324/

“On Tuesday [May 31], the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung reported that [leading German E. coli researcher Helge] Karch had discovered that the O104:H4 bacteria responsible for the current outbreak is a so-called chimera that contains genetic materia from various E. coli bacteria. It also contains DNA sequences from plague bacteria, which makes it particularly pathogenic.”

Though he emphasized “There is no risk, however, that it could cause a form of plague,” Karch added that plague DNA sequences make the superbug “particularly pathogenic.”

More at the links....

Peter Lemkin
06-11-2011, 03:59 AM
Wikipedia has an amazingly complete and comprehensible article on the disease here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2011_E._coli_O104:H4_outbreak).

Some of the footnotes lead to articles on the genetic structure of the e.coli in question, see http://www.genomics.cn/en/news_show.php?type=show&id=644 for the initial analysis, and http://www.biofortified.org/2011/06/natural-gmos-part-85-speed-matters-era7-bioinformatics-provide-e-coli-ehec-genome-annotation/
for the headline
Out of Germany, not Out of Africa — the beastly German germ is a GMO whose parents have been around Germany for 10 years.

followed by a partly funny article partly written in "jabberwocky" which I admittedly failed to completely understand.
But there already seems to be a lot of information out there.

I can read that 'Jabberwocky'. It makes sobering reading...it say to me that this E. Coli strain was human built. It also is so deadly, that who ever didn't build it and would like a nice bioweapon on hand will soon get and grow it. The recipe is available on line. Unless someone has an antibiotic that will work on this one, say goodnight at some point in the not too distant future to most you know and see in the mirror in the morning. Once that were to get into the water supply or a ubiquitous food.....there wouldn't even be enough nurses and doctors unaffected to help you die.