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Magda Hassan
11-30-2011, 09:05 PM
CHILEAN JUDGE REQUESTS EXTRADITION OF U.S. MILITARY OFFICIAL IN "MISSING" CASE Capt. Ray Davis Indicted in Chile for alleged role in murder of Charles Horman, Frank Teruggi Declassified U.S. Documents Used Extensively in Court Indictment Archive Posts Documents cited in Indictment, including FBI Intelligence Reports Containing Teruggi's Address in Chile For further information: Peter Kornbluh, 202 374 7281/ peter.kornbluh@gmail.com http://www.nsarchive.org (http://www.nsarchive.org/) Washington, D.C., November 30, 2011 - Thirty-eight years after the military coup in Chile, a Chilean judge has formally indicted the former head of the U.S. Military Group, Captain Ray Davis, and a Chilean intelligence officer, Pedro Espinoza for the murders of two American citizens in September 1973. The judge, Jorge Zepeda, said he would ask the Chilean Supreme Court to authorize an extradition request for Davis as an "accessory" to the murders of Charles Horman and Frank Teruggi. Both Horman and Teruggi were seized separately at their homes in Santiago by Chilean soldiers and subsequently executed while in detention. Their murders, and the seeming indifference of U.S. officials, were immortalized in the Oscar-award winning movie "Missing" which focused on the search by Horman's wife and father for him in the weeks following the U.S.-supported coup. The indictment accused the U.S. MilGroup of passing intelligence to the Chilean military on the "subversive" activities of Teruggi that contributed to his arrest; it stated that Davis "was in a position" to stop the executions "given his coordination with Chilean agents" but did not do so. In his indictment, Judge Zepeda cited a number of declassified U.S. government documents as the basic foundation for the case—although none of them tie Davis or Espinoza to the crimes. "These documents are providing the blocks for building a case in these famous killings," said Peter Kornbluh who directs the Chile Documentation Project at the Archive, "but they do not provide a smoking gun." To successfully advance court proceedings as well as a successful extradition request, according to Kornbluh, the judge will have to present concrete evidence of communications between U.S. and Chilean military officers regarding Horman and Teruggi prior to their detentions and their deaths. " The Archive today posted a number of the documents cited in the indictment, including key FBI memos that contained Frank Teruggi's Santiago address, as well as other records relevant to the Horman and Teruggi case. The documents derive from an indexed collection: Chile and the United States: U.S. Policy toward Democracy, Dictatorship, and Human Rights, 1970-1990. The collection, just published this week by the Archive and Proquest, contains over 180 documents on the Horman and Teruggi case.

Peter Lemkin
12-01-2011, 06:45 AM
There are others in USA who should also be included - Kissinger being one of many. Would be nice....I have my fingers crossed!

Magda Hassan
12-01-2011, 10:11 AM
There are others in USA who should also be included - Kissinger being one of many. Would be nice....I have my fingers crossed!
Agreed. They definitely want Kissinger but I understand that there is not enough evidence to extradite him.

Magda Hassan
07-03-2014, 01:55 AM
American journalist Charles Horman was murdered with the help of the US government, a Chilean court finds

PRI's The World (http://www.pri.org/programs/the-world)
Producer Joyce Hackel (http://www.pri.org/people/joyce-hackel)

July 01, 2014 · 7:00 PM EDT


If you remember the Oscar-winning film "Missing (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0084335/)," you know something about the life and death of reporter Charles Horman. He disappeared in Chile, days after Gen. Augusto Pinochet seized power in a 1973 coup. His body was found weeks later.



Now, a Chilean court has ruled that American military intelligence services played a role in the deaths of Horman and another American, Frank Teruggi. Horman had been investigating links between the CIA and Chile's military; Teruggi was a student in Santiago.
Horman's wife, Joyce, spoke to The World about the court's decision. She remembers the excitement the young couple felt in 1971 as they began the long drive to Chile in a camper van. Salvador Allende, the first elected socialist president in Latin America, had recently been elected.
"We found it a very exciting time in Santiago," Horman says. "The populace was thrilled with Allende's election and taking the helm of their own economy, and there was just a level of excitement in the country."
But in September of 1973, Horman and her husband found themselves caught up in a military coup. "There was talk of a coup, but people honestly at that point — because of the history of democracy in Chile — believed it would be a bloodless coup," Horman remembers.
An American military officer, Navy Capt. Ray Davis, offered assistance to the couple. At one point, he drove Charles Horman through military roadblocks from a coastal town back to Santiago. But Davis was also an intelligence officer.
"In his role as a spymaster, if I might put it that way — he was interested in understanding who Charles was, and who we were," Joyce Horman says. "He was amenable to talking and discussion and certainly had plenty of questions that we felt were intrusive."
Joyce Horman says new evidence indicates that her husband and Teruggi were "tagged" by a Chilean naval officier, who passed on information about them. The court also determined that Ray Davis had, in fact, passed on information to Chilean officials.
"That's a direct link with Ray Davis, who was a US Navy official and had very good connections to the Chilean navy all the way to the top," she says.
Horman hopes the court's ruling will help reopen the American investigation into her husband's death.
"For the United States to have a hand in the death of an American journalist 40 years ago," she says, "and their behavior not having been addressed over 40 years — almost 41 now — permits the same kind of non-democratic, murderous behavior on the part of certain sectors of the US government."
Davis died last year in a Chilean nursing home where he'd been secretly living, unbeknownst to Chilean judiciary officials. US officials have so far declined to comment on the case. (http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jul/01/chile-us-intelligence-1973-killings-americans)

Links



The National Security Archive: Chile (http://www2.gwu.edu/%7Ensarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB366/)


http://www.pri.org/stories/2014-07-01/american-journalist-charles-horman-was-murdered-help-us-government

Peter Lemkin
07-03-2014, 04:51 AM
Don't hold your breath waiting or Mr 'Change' President's Justice Department to do anything about this matter.....after all, those who really run America believe it 'exceptional' - and, as such, not accountable for its actions [which are ipso facto 'legal' and 'justified' in their circular thinking]. The USA is still very much in 'the business of' covert and overt regime changes, assassinations, and other such.

David Guyatt
07-03-2014, 06:36 AM
Don't hold your breath waiting or Mr 'Change' President's Justice Department to do anything about this matter.....after all, those who really run America believe it 'exceptional' - and, as such, not accountable for its actions [which are ipso facto 'legal' and 'justified' in their circular thinking]. The USA is still very much in 'the business of' covert and overt regime changes, assassinations, and other such.

Yep, good luck with any sort of extradition Chile. That's only really a one way street from the rest of the world to the US and not from the US to the rest of the world...

Drew Phipps
07-03-2014, 12:50 PM
Navy Captain and intelligence officer Ray Davis died last year, making extradition a bit more unlikely.