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Similarities Between Life Under Former USSR KGB, East German STASI, and US COPS Program

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Similarities Between Life Under Former USSR KGB, East German STASI, and US COPS Program

By Rahul Manchanda, Esq. on October 24, 2016
The plutocrats, fearing the masses, pressured their governing leaders to institute more and more repressive policing systems so that it would be easy to marginalize, jail, incarcerate, and even murder any “trouble makers” living in their societies.
Even a cursory and abbreviated view of life and conditions of the People living under East Germany’s secret police STASI, the former USSR’s KGB, and under the modern day United States after 1994 under Joseph Biden and Bill Clinton’s Community-Oriented Policing (“COPS”) program, will demonstrate in a glaring and obvious fashion the similar living conditions under those repressive regimes.
All 3 of these systems of secret police governance, founded under the supervision and aegis of the country’s secret society Freemasonic Brotherhood, came during a time when a belief in God was at its all-time low, and when the economy was purposefully destroyed by the Plutocrats of its day in conjunction with their greedy Central Banker systems, who hoarded away cash and liquidity from the economy and its people so that they were left with very little, if anything, to buy and sell goods with, or to just basically live, eat, and pay their bills and rent.
The plutocrats, fearing the masses, pressured their governing leaders to institute more and more repressive policing systems so that it would be easy to marginalize, jail, incarcerate, and even murder any “trouble makers” living in their societies.
This was obviously done to remove any threats or impediments to the continued looting, exploitation of, and enslavement of the nation’s resources, people, and labor force.
East German STASI
For example, in East Germany’s STASI headed by Markus Wolf, one of its main tasks was spying on the population, mainly through a vast network of citizens turned informants (“if you see something, say something” as per New York City’s subway signs and scattered throughout all of the United States post-911), and fighting any opposition by overt and covert measures, including hidden psychological destruction of dissidents (Zersetzung, literally meaning decomposition).
The STASI Ministry for State Security were responsible for (1) the surveillance of mail and telephone communications; (2) the reliability of the National People’s Army (Nationale Volksarmee, NVA) personnel; (3) secret, unofficial networks of informants within the NVA; (4) protection against “sabotage” or “espionage;” (5) analyzing garbage for any suspect western foods and/or materials; (6) protecting high government and party buildings and personnel; (7) surveillance of foreigners—particularly from the West – legally traveling or residing within the country, including the diplomatic community, tourists, and official guests; (8) provided personal security for the national leadership and maintaining and operating an internal secure communications system for the government; (9) enforcing the political security of East Germany; (10) its own penal system, distinct from that of the Ministry of the Interior, comprising prison camps for political dissidents, as opposed to criminal offenders.
As was stated above, the Stasi perfected the technique of psychological harassment of perceived enemies, in a process called Zersetzung – a term borrowed from chemistry which literally means “decomposition” or “biodegradation.”
The goal was to destroy secretly the self-confidence of people, for example by damaging their reputation, by organizing failures in their work, and by destroying their personal relationships.
The Stasi didn’t try to arrest every dissident.
It preferred to paralyze them, and it could do so because it had access to so much personal information and to so many institutions.
It was recognized that psychological harassment was far less likely to be recognized for what it was, so its victims, and their supporters, were less likely to be provoked into active resistance, given that they would often not be aware of the source of their problems, or even its exact nature.
Zersetzung was designed to side-track and “switch off” perceived enemies so that they would lose the will to continue any “inappropriate” activities.
Tactics employed under Zersetzung generally involved the disruption of the victim’s private or family life.
This often included psychological attacks, such as breaking into homes and subtly manipulating the contents, in a form of gaslighting – moving furniture, altering the timing of an alarm, removing pictures from walls or replacing one variety of tea with another.
Other practices included property damage, sabotage of cars, purposely incorrect medical treatment, smear campaigns including sending falsified compromising photos or documents to the victim’s family, denunciation, provocation, psychological warfare, psychological subversion, wiretapping, bugging, mysterious phone calls or unnecessary deliveries, even including sending a vibrator to a target’s wife.
Usually, victims had no idea that the Stasi were responsible.
Many thought that they were losing their minds, and mental breakdowns and suicide could result.
One great advantage of the harassment perpetrated under Zersetzung was that its subtle nature meant that it was able to be plausibly denied.
Former USSR’s KGB
It was Cold War policy for the KGB of the Soviet Union and the secret services of the satellite states to extensively monitor public and private opinion, internal subversion and possible revolutionary plots in the Soviet Bloc.
During the Cold War, the KGB actively sought to combat “ideological subversion” – anticommunist political and religious ideas and the dissidents who promoted them, which was generally dealt with as a matter of national security in discouraging the perceived influence of hostile foreign powers.
KGB dissident-group infiltration featured agents provocateur pretending “sympathy to the cause,” smear campaigns against prominent dissidents, and show trials – once imprisoned, the dissident endured constant KGB interrogations and sympathetic informant cell-mates.
Mikhail Gorbachev’s glasnost policies lessened persecution of political dissidents.
United States Community-Oriented Policing (“COPS”) Program
Community policing, or community-oriented policing, is a “strategy of policing that focuses on police building ties and working closely with members of the communities.”
In the United States, the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 written by former Senator Joseph Biden and enacted by then President Bill Clinton established the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (“COPS”) within the US Justice Department to promote “community policing,” implemented by illegal and unconstitutional coordination by and between the Department of Homeland Security, the FBI, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Customs and Border Protection, local police departments, and others.
This has resulted in over 68 million Americans with criminal records, more than the population of France, with 1/3 of all Blacks, 1/6 of all Latinos, and 1/11 of all Whites in America having spent time under arrest and in prison, in violation of the US Constitution, without due process, without evidence, and without probable cause.
Community policing is a policy that requires police to inherit a “proactive approach” to address public safety concerns.
Community-oriented policing was a cornerstone of the Clinton Administration and gained its funding from the 1994 Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act.
Community policing is a philosophy of full service personalized policing, where the same officer patrols and works in the same area on a permanent basis, from a decentralized place, working in a proactive partnership with citizens to identify and solve problems, ie, extensively using gang-stalking and informants.
Community policing creates unconstitutional partnerships between law enforcement agencies and other organizations like government agencies, community members, nonprofit service providers, private businesses and the media.
Common implementations of community-policing include: (1) Relying on community-based crime prevention by utilizing civilian education, neighborhood watch, and a variety of other techniques, as opposed to relying solely on police patrols; (2) Re-structuring patrol from an emergency response based system to emphasizing proactive techniques such as foot patrol; (3) Increased officer accountability to civilians they are supposed to serve; (4) Decentralizing the police authority, allowing more discretion amongst lower-ranking officers, and more initiative expected from them (extensive use of informants and gang-stalking techniques).
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