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Thread: Breaking: Six top FIFA officials arrested on money laundering and racketeering charges

  1. #1

    Default Breaking: Six top FIFA officials arrested on money laundering and racketeering charges

    Arrested at request of the US on charges covering kickbacks and bribes of $100 million for fixing world cup and other charges. All six were arrested at the hotel in Zurich where FIFA is holding its annual conference. All are planned to be extradited to the US to stand trial.

    The timing is interesting. Sepp Blatter is due to be re-elected in 3 days time to yet another term as FIFA president, following the withdrawal of two of the three runners standing against him, and if re-elected it would, by some accounts, be yet another charter for corruption to prosper at FIFA.
    The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.
    Carl Jung - Aion (1951). CW 9, Part II: P.14

  2. #2

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    Ha! Beat me to it. I was going to post about this as I saw it on the news just now. It said the allegations go back at least 20 years. Looks like a business model not a one off.
    "I think it would be a good idea." Mahatma Gandhi, when asked what he thought of Western civilization.

    The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways; the point is to change it.
    Karl Marx.

    "Well, he would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies, 1963, replied Ms Rice Davies when the prosecuting counsel pointed out that Lord Astor denied an affair or having even met her.

  3. #3

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    Not arresting Sepp Blatter....
    Not really preventing corruption. This is just an exercise in punishment for the wrong people benefiting from corruption and the US throwing its weight around pretending to look good. As if they give a shit about corruption.







    owing its weight around
    Source: CNN AP









    Story highlights


    • Michael Garcia, a one-time U.S. attorney, was tasked to look into FIFA's bidding process
    • Attorney General Loretta Lynch oversaw the case in Brooklyn
    • Jeffrey Webb is among six FIFA officials arrested on suspicion of corruption




    (CNN)In recent years, FIFA has made news not just for enforcing rules on the soccer field but also for allegedly breaking them off it.

    The body that governs soccer, the most popular sport in the world, is a multibillion dollar behemoth.
    Great power, yes. Great responsibility? Not so much, critics say.
    FIFA has been regularly accused of bribery and kickbacks, allegations that reached fever pitch after it awarded Russia and Qatar the World Cup in 2018 and 2022, respectively.
    In the aftermath, the group carried out its own internal investigation and cleared itself.
    So why is the United States, a country where soccer ranks far below football and basketball in popularity, now taking top FIFA officials to court?
    In order to understand that, we'll have to take you through a journey that, as you'll see, involves Americans at all stages.
    First up ...
    Michael Garcia

    Michael Garcia:

    The World Cup is a big deal. It comes around every four years and when it does, it's the biggest sporting spectacle on the planet. It's a financial windfall for any country that wins the rights to host it. Think of all those tourism dollars. So nations go for it with a ferocious intensity.
    But when FIFA awarded the 2018 games to Russia and followed that with the even more head-scratching choice of Qatar in 2022, critics and other governments cried foul. They smelled shenanigans. They wanted a transparent account of the bidding process to see if Qatar and Russia cut any corners.
    FIFA brought in Michael Garcia, a one-time U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York. He was tasked to look into the behavior of the two nations.
    The man spent 19 months scrutinizing the bids to host the two tournaments.
    By the time he was done, his findings stretched to 350 pages.
    So what did FIFA do?
    It suppressed the report, released a puny 42-page summary -- and cleared itself of any wrongdoing in November.
    Garcia hit back. He labeled FIFA's findings on his report "incomplete and erroneous."
    Loretta Lynch

    James Comey and Loretta Lynch:

    As we mentioned earlier, Garcia is a former U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York. The guy who held that job before him? James Comey.
    He's the current FBI director. And the developments today are a result of a three-year FBI investigation.
    Then there's the second New York connection: Attorney General Loretta Lynch.
    She oversaw the case in Brooklyn before she was appointed to lead the Justice Department.
    But why did U.S. authorities start looking into FIFA to begin with?
    When FIFA cleared itself of wrong doing, the FBI wasn't ready to do the same.
    It wanted to know whether any of the allegations of bribe-taking and kickbacks by FIFA officials took place on American soil.
    And it knew it was on the right track, especially after it secured the cooperation of a former top FIFA official -- and an American -- named Chuck Blazer.
    Blazer had found himself in a bind. He hadn't paid his taxes for many, many years and was looking at serious prison time. So he became an informant, who provided documents and recordings of meetings with FIFA colleagues that hinted at not-so-kosher dealings, law enforcement officials said.
    But still, why would the U.S. care?
    That brings us to another name ...
    Jeffrey Webb, head of CONCACAF

    CONCACAF:

    The U.S. is part of CONCACAF, the FIFA-affiliated governing body for North America and the Caribbean.
    Blazer was the no. 2 man there. And with him as a cooperating witness, American officials set out to see whether corruption touched tournaments held in the Americas.
    Turns out, it did.
    One of the people facing charges now is Jeffrey Webb. He's the FIFA vice president, and he also heads CONCACAF.
    Prosecutors said those arrested accepted bribes and kickbacks totaling more than $100 million, from the early 1990s until now.
    In return, they provided media, marketing and sponsorship rights to soccer matches in the Americas.
    But can the U.S. actually go after FIFA officials?
    Yes. Because it is ...
    The FBI seal

    The United States of America:

    The reason why the United States brought charges against the suspects is because the plots were allegedly hatched on American soil.
    "According to U.S. request, these crimes were agreed and prepared in the U.S., and payments were carried out via U.S. banks," the Swiss Office of Justice said.
    Prosecutorhttp://edition.cnn.com/2015/05/27/us/fifa-corruption-investigation-why/s also believe the broad reach of U.S. tax and banking regulations aid their ability to bring the charges.

    In addition, U.S. authorities claim jurisdiction because the American television market, and billions paid by U.S. networks, is the largest for the World Cup.
    http://edition.cnn.com/2015/05/27/us...stigation-why/
    Last edited by Magda Hassan; 05-27-2015 at 12:53 PM.
    "I think it would be a good idea." Mahatma Gandhi, when asked what he thought of Western civilization.

    The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways; the point is to change it.
    Karl Marx.

    "Well, he would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies, 1963, replied Ms Rice Davies when the prosecuting counsel pointed out that Lord Astor denied an affair or having even met her.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Magda Hassan View Post
    Ha! Beat me to it. I was going to post about this as I saw it on the news just now. It said the allegations go back at least 20 years. Looks like a business model not a one off.
    Purely coincidental. I was just up early this morning. Sometimes the news is good...

    US Dept of Justice has now named the SEVEN officials arrested this morning. All are said to be in Sepp Blatter's "retinue" - his front men and bagmen no doubt? Fingers crossed that one of the seven will give evidence against the vile Blatter in exchange for a reduced sentence... :-)
    The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.
    Carl Jung - Aion (1951). CW 9, Part II: P.14

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    Curious that it would happen only days after this story came out:


    http://edition.cnn.com/2015/05/25/wo...ans/index.html


    Israel cries foul over FIFA suspension talk


    By Oren Liebermann, CNN

    FIFA boss tackles Israeli-Palestinian tensions

    Story highlights
    NEW: Israel says it approved 95% of travel; Palestinians say travel bans ensnare coaches, goalies
    FIFA members could vote on Palestinian bid to suspend Israel, which FIFA leader hopes to avoid
    Palestinians say Israel restricts players' movements; Israel says they're mixing sports, politics


    Jerusalem (CNN)—FIFA President Sepp Blatter is trying to broker a deal between the Palestinian and Israel football associations ahead of this week's FIFA World Congress at which the Palestinians have called for a vote to suspend Israel.

    Blatter met with both associations, as well as Israeli and Palestinian political leaders, during a visit to the region in hopes of finding a way to ease the tension. FIFA is the international soccer governing body.

    "Football has the power to connect people," Blatter said at a press conference last week in Jerusalem. "Football has the power to construct bridges. I am coming here and going to your neighbors ... to try to construct bridges and to try and make sure that football is not dividing, but football is uniting."

    Instead of a vote, Blatter suggests a game between the two national teams, offering Zurich, Switzerland, as a possible location.

    The Palestinian group objects to Israeli teams playing in the West Bank. They also say Israel restricts movements of Palestinian players between the West Bank and Gaza as well as for international matches.



    "They keep bullying here and there, and I think they have no right to keep being the bully of the neighborhood," Palestinian Football Association President Jibril Rajoub said of Israel. "If the Israelis are using the issue of security, I can say that their security concern is mine. I am ready to fix parameters for security concerns, but security should not be used ... as a tool in order to keep this racist, apartheid policies."

    He declared the situation in the West Bank far worse than apartheid that existed in South Africa because right-wingers and extremists in Israel want to "delete Palestine." In the 1960s, FIFA suspended South Africa for decades after it failed to comply with the association's nondiscrimination policies. The nation was also expelled from FIFA a month after the Soweto Youth Uprising of 1976.

    "I am not asking for the suspension of the Israeli association; I am asking to end the suffering of the Palestinian footballers," Rajoub said. "I am asking to end the grievances, the humiliation we are facing."

    Israel Football Association President Ofer Eini said the restrictions on movement are a question of security. Eini said the association has no influence over such matters. He said the Palestinians are mixing sports and politics.

    Association CEO Rotem Kemer said 95% of travel requests for players have been approved in 2015.

    "We will continue helping the Palestinian association," Eini said. "We will extend a hand to them. If football is to be the unifying thing, I embrace them because I want football to flourish there just like I want it to flourish here."

    While it may be true that 95% of permits have been approved this year, Susan Shalabi, director of the Palestine Football Association's international relations department, said even denying one permit can have a hugely detrimental effect on competition.

    "So they say they've approved 95% of the permits. Let's be more optimistic and assume that they approve 99%. What's the point if the 1% includes the head coach, captain or goalkeeper of the national team? Or those of a visiting team? Will any association accept to play without all or any of these? It's about the principle, not statistics. Footballers should not be denied to move at all," Shalabi said.

    Blatter said he is working to remove the suspension vote from the agenda. The vote would require 75% of FIFA's 209 member associations to succeed. Blatter said Israel has not violated any FIFA rules, and that other mechanisms exist to address issues between FIFA members, such as an ethics committee and a disciplinary committee, but he said FIFA rules allow the Palestinians to call for a vote.

    The Palestinian bid to have Israel suspended from FIFA is part of much broader international pressure coming to bear on Israel to recognize a Palestinian state. The Vatican's recent recognition of Palestinian statehood is the latest in a series of such successes for the Palestinian Authority.

    The International Criminal Court has recognized Palestinian membership, and the United Nations recognized the Palestinians as a nonmember observer state. A bid for full recognition failed to get the necessary U.N. Security Council votes in December.

    CNN's Kareem Khadder and Eliott C. McLaughlin contributed to this report.
    “The most difficult subjects can be explained to the most slow-witted man if he has not formed any idea of them already; but the simplest thing cannot be made clear to the most intelligent man if he is firmly persuaded that he knows already, without a shadow of doubt, what is laid before him.”
    ― Leo Tolstoy,

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    The former Argentina captain feels that the money earned by those accused of accepting bribes should be invested in a training camp for African children
    Diego Maradona says the arrest of Fifa officials on corruption charges proves that he was not "crazy" to consistently question football's governing body.
    The former Argentina international, who guided his country to World Cup glory in 1986, has long been outspoken in his criticism of the organisation, which has been rocked by allegations that seven members were guilty of accepting bribes over a 24-year period dating back to 1991.
    Maradona now feels vindicated by the indictments issued by the United States Justice Department as a result of an enquiry into Fifa's affairs by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), and queried whether Blatter can be re-elected at Friday's presidential vote in light of the corruption scandal.
    "People said I was crazy," the World Cup winner told Radio La Red. "Today the FBI revealed the truth.
    "The Americans did an impeccable job and now people have to explain what’s been happening.
    “The good will remain and I will take care of the bad personally!
    "The money they earn ought to be used to build a training camp for African children.
    “FIFA has reserves of $1.5 billion (€1.38 billion) and there are players who earn no more than $150 (€138).
    “Today there is no football, there is no transparency. Just lie to people and put on a show to re-elect Blatter.
    “Now we’ll see if he gets re-elected after everything that happened. Where was Blatter when all this was going on?
    “We want a man of football to be in charge. They came and tried to convince me with money, but I earn my money by working, not taking people for a ride."
    Blatter, who has branded the arrests as "unfortunate", is bidding for a fifth term as Fifa president, having been re-elected four times since first coming to power in 1998.
    The 79-year-old's only challenger for the role is Prince Ali Bin Al Hussein of Jordan.

    http://www.goal.com/en/news/745/fifa...uth-about-fifa
    "I think it would be a good idea." Mahatma Gandhi, when asked what he thought of Western civilization.

    The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways; the point is to change it.
    Karl Marx.

    "Well, he would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies, 1963, replied Ms Rice Davies when the prosecuting counsel pointed out that Lord Astor denied an affair or having even met her.

  7. #7

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    Blatter, the Teflon Don, typically thinks that FIFA will get over this and plans to continue to stand for election, even as Greg Dyke, the head of England's FA calls on him to stand down. I rather suspect that so many of those who have a vote to cast have to vote for Blatter because their corrupt game will come to a close as soon as someone else gets into power inside FIFA. EUFA, the European football association called for the election process to be delayed for six months while things are sorted out, but Blatter refused.

    Meanwhile, Swiss authorities say they plan to question Mt. Teflon in the next few weeks over the Qatar World Cup bid.

    Sepp Blatter faces questioning as FBI swoop on 14 football officials

    The Fifa president could be interviewed by the Swiss attorney general who is conducting an inquiry into the Qatar World Cup bid


    By Claire Newell, Edward Malnick, Luke Heighton and Joanna Waters

    9:54PM BST 27 May 2015


    Sepp Blatter, the head of Fifa, could be interviewed “within weeks” as part of a corruption investigation that engulfed football’s governing body last night.

    After a day of crisis, which saw 14 football officials and executives arrested at the request of the FBI, some in Geneva, and Fifa accused of “rampant, systematic and deep-rooted” corruption, the Swiss authorities said that Mr Blatter could be questioned.

    The Fifa president was given the warning by the office of the Swiss attorney general. It is conducting its own inquiry into alleged vote-rigging over the Qatar World Cup bid.



    Under pressure: Sepp Blatter is captain of a sinking ship (AP)

    The escalation of that inquiry came as the FBI claimed it had uncovered 24 years of “brazen corruption … undisclosed illegal payments, kickbacks and bribes” by Fifa officials.
    The American inquiry alleges that votes for the award of the 2010 World Cup – ultimately given to South Africa – were bought with bribes. In what was labelled the darkest day in the body’s history:
    Fifa was accused of running a “World Cup of fraud” by the head of the IRS Criminal Division;
     The FBI said that the “beautiful game” had been “hijacked” by corruption;
     Swiss authorities announced that they had opened a criminal inquiry into the 2018 and 2022 World Cup decisions;
     US authorities claimed that “bribes and kickbacks” were paid in the awarding of the 2010 World Cup and the 2011 presidential election which was won by Mr Blatter;
     Jack Warner, the former Fifa vice president who stepped down in 2011 following corruption allegations, was accused of receiving $10million in bribes.
    Jack Warner
    The revelations came days before votes are due to be cast in the 2015 Fifa presidential election and will bolster calls for the organisation to be reformed and for the 2018 and 2022 votes, won by Russia and Qatar, to be rerun.
    UEFA called for the presidential election to be postponed.
    Damian Collins, the Conservative MP for Folkestone and Hythe who has campaigned against corruption in Fifa, said that there was “no question” that the 2018 and 2022 decisions should be rerun. “It’s staggering that Fifa is ignoring calls for the votes to be rerun”, said Mr Collins. “Several of the individuals involved in making the decision have resigned because of corruption charges and the words from the Department of Justice could not be more damning.
    Fifa in crisis: 'This is the World Cup of fraud' - live updates
    Will Russia and Qatar keep the 2019 and 2022 World Cups?
    Why the US is finally ready to go where others fear to tread
    “One former executive committee member has pleaded guilty to criminal offences. Did Fifa know what was happening?”
    Fifa has faced many corruption allegations in recent years, including over the decision to award the 2022 competition to Qatar.
    But the events this week will add to pressure on the president of world football’s governing body. There are currently two criminal investigations into Fifa.
    Yesterday, Swiss police arrested several of its officials at the five-star Baur au Lac hotel in Zurich where they had gathered in preparation for Friday’s vote.
    The men arrested there included Jeffrey Webb, the head of the Confederation of North, Central America and Caribbean Association Football (Concacaf) and Fifa vice-president and Costa Rica’s national football chief Eduardo Li, who was expected to join Fifa’s executive committee (Exco) on Friday.
    A police car sits outside the headquarters of CONCACAF after it was raided by FBI agents on May 27, 2015 in Miami Beach, Florida (Getty Images)
    Eugenic Fugueredo, of Uruguay, the president of South American football’s governing body, Conmebol, was also held by Swiss police, as was Rafael Esquivel, the president of the Venezuelan Football Federation.
    They were joined by Exco member Jose Maria Marin, from Brazil, Fifa development officer Julio Rocha of Nicaragua, and the UK’s Costas Takkas, an attaché to the president of Concacaf.
    Mr Warner gave himself up to police in Trinidad last night and was expected to face an extradition hearing.
    The indictment states that Mr Warner, who was vice president of Fifa until 2011, accepted $10 million from the government of South Africa to secure his vote.
    His two sons have pleaded guilty to charges of wire fraud conspiracy and structuring of financial transactions. It is understood that at least one of the sons was helping the FBI with their investigation.
    During a press conference, Kelly Currie, acting US attorney for the eastern district of New York, where the charges were brought yesterday, said that they were “issuing Fifa a red card”.
    “Today’s announcement should send a message that enough is enough”, he said.
    Fifa Q&A: why, what when and where?
    Telegraph View: Sponsors will oust Blatter
    “After decades of what the indictment alleges to be brazen corruption, organised international soccer needs a new start – a new chance for its governing institutions to provide honest oversight and support of a sport that is beloved across the world, increasingly so here in the United States.
    “Let me be clear: this indictment is not the final chapter of our investigation.”
    James Comey, the director of the FBI, added: “The defendants fostered a culture of corruption and greed that created an uneven playing field for the biggest sport in the world.
    James Comey (right)
    “Undisclosed and illegal payments, kickbacks and bribes became a way of doing business at Fifa.”
    Loretta Lynch, the US attorney general, said that the corruption “spans at least two generations of soccer officials who … have abused their positions of trust to acquire millions of dollars in bribes and kickbacks.”
    A spokesman for the office of the Swiss attorney general said that Fifa’s president “could be questioned in the coming weeks” and that every person who had participated in World Cup votes could be interviewed as part of their inquiry.
    In a statement, Mr Blatter said: “Today’s action by the Swiss office of the attorney general was set in motion when we submitted a dossier to the Swiss authorities late last year. Let me be clear: such misconduct has no place in football and we will ensure that those who engage in it are put out of the game.”
    How the Fifa corruption scandal unfolded

    Cash for votes exposé
    October 2010


    Reynald Temarii, president of the Oceania Football Confederation, is recorded telling Sunday Times reporters that two bids had offered "huge" payments for his support in the 2018 World Cup bidding process and that he had received offers of between $10-12 million (£7.5 million). Amos Adamu, a Fifa executive committee member from Nigeria, says he wants $800,000 (£500,000) to build four artificial football pitches, which contravenes Fifa's rules. Both men tell reporters they could facilitate access to the men who’ll decide where the tournaments will be held. Adamu and Temarii are provisionally suspended from all football-related activity pending the outcome of an investigation. Sunday Times also exposed the referees committee, Ahongalu Fusimalohi and former executive committee member Ismael Bhamjee.

    Blatter promises investigation
    October 2010


    Fifa president Sepp Blatter writes to all 24 executive committee members promising a full investigation into allegations. It emerges that the Spain-Portugal and Qatar bids could face expulsion from the contest for the 2018 and 2022 tournaments if the duo are found guilty of colluding. Spain-Portugal’s bid leader accuses England of doing a deal with the USA in breach of Fifa regulations.

    Temarii and Adamu are banned
    November 2010


    It is reported that the Spain-Portugal and Qatar World Cup bids could escape censure over the allegations of collusion, after Fifa executive committee member Chuck Blazer confirms that no hard evidence had been passed to its ethics committee. Adamu is suspended for three years and fined 10,000 Swiss francs (£6,341) while Temarii is banned for a year and fined 5,000 Swiss francs (£3,170). Panel concludes there is insufficient proof of collusion between the Spain/Portugal and Qatar bids.

    Russia and Qatar win World Cup bids
    December 2010


    English FA is humiliated as Russia is handed 2018 World Cup finals; Qatar gets the 2022 tournament. Roger Burden, acting chairman of the FA, stands down after relations between FA and Fifa descend into acrimony. Burden said he “wanted nothing more to do with them [Fifa]”. Swiss government prepares to investigate risk of corruption in sports bodies based in the country following Fifa’s controversial award of the two World Cup finals.

    Telegraph reveals Qatar corruption
    January 2011

    Documents seen by Telegraph Sport reveal that Qatar offered to relocate the headquarters of the Asian Football Confederation to Doha.

    Evidence emerges of Qatar and Spain-Portugal collusion
    February 2011

    Blatter confirms that the Qatar and Spain-Portugal World Cup bids colluded to trade votes in the contest for the 2018 and 2022 finals.

    FA and Fifa at loggerheads
    May 2011


    Geoff Thompson endorses Sepp Blatter’s campaign to retain the Fifa presidency despite having been chairman of England’s failed World Cup bid. Telegraph Sport discloses that England football officials hired a “corporate investigations” company to investigate their rivals during the failed bid to host the 2018 World Cup. Six of Fifa’s executive committee are accused in Parliament of “improper and unethical behaviour” during World Cup bidding. Fifa demand the FA provide evidence to support allegations of corruption and “unethical” behaviour against six executive committee members. Blatter vows to complete the inquiry before presidential election. The FA reveal they will hold independent inquiry into Lord Triesman’s allegations of corruption against four Fifa executive committee members. The FA board agrees to abstain in the forthcoming Fifa presidential election because of doubts over the probity of both Blatter and his challenger Mohamed Bin Hammam. Qatar’s 2022 World Cup bid committee accuses Parliamentary committee of “insulting” behaviour as it launches attempted fight-back against allegations of corruption leveled against it. The FA call for the June 1 Fifa election to be postponed and for an independent review of the world governing body’s structures.

    Blatter runs for re-election
    March 2011


    Reports say the FA will support any challenger to Sepp Blatter in forthcoming Fifa presidential election. Fifa presidential challenger Mohamed Bin Hammam considers striking deal with Michel Platini that would see him step aside in favour of the Uefa president after just one four-year term if he is successful in his campaign to unseat Sepp Blatter. Blatter promises to hand out $1 billion (£610,000) in “development” funds to the 208 members associations that will decide his fate as president in the forthcoming Fifa election.

    Bin Hammam and Warner are suspended
    May 2011


    Fifa presidential candidate Mohamed Bin Hammam says Amadou Diallo, a Guinean national accused in Parliament of facilitating bribes on behalf of Qatar’s World Cup bid, is a close friend of his but not involved in any wrongdoing. Amadou Diallo, the man accused of facilitating bribes on behalf of Qatar’s successful 2022 World Cup bid worked for Fifa for at least six years as an advisor to Mohamed Bin Hammam, the governing body confirms. It then emerges that Bin Hammam and Jack Warner, a Fifa vice-president, are to face disciplinary action for allegedly offering bribes to members of the Caribbean Football Union in exchange for votes in forthcoming election. Fifa's ethics committee suspend the pair from all football-related activity pending the outcome of a full inquiry into bribery accusations. Fifa general secretary Jerome Valcke confirms that an email in which he made the sensational allegation that Qatar "bought" the 2022 World Cup is genuine after Warner, the recipient, reveals it to the press.

    Qatar dismiss bribery claims
    July 2011

    The whistleblower in FIFA 2022 corruption claims, Phaedra Almajid retracts her claims. Hassan Al-Thawadi, the secretary-general of the Qatar 2022 Supreme Committee, dismisses bribery claims. He then outlines the nation's plans to construct air-conditioned stadiums.

    Telegraph reveals FBI investigation
    December 2011

    The Daily Telegraph reports that the FBI are investigating alleged hacking into email accounts for England and America’s World Cup bids.

    Fifa launches investigation into corruption practices
    July 2012


    Fifa employ American attorney Michael J. Garcia to investigate allegations of corruption in world football. A month later, Garcia declares his intention to investigate the bidding process and decision to award the 2018 and 2022 World Cups to Russia and Qatar

    Blatter insists Qatar World Cup will be held in the summer
    March 2013

    Blatter claims that Qatar will host the World Cup in the June-July summer slot as planned, amid growing speculation it will be moved to the winter.

    Fifa begins to turn on itself
    July 2013


    FIFA executive committee member Theo Zwanziger labels the decision to award Qatar the hosting rights of the 2022 Cup as a "blatant mistake."

    Blatter’s admission
    August 2013

    Blatter confirms that that the FIFA executive committee will meet to decide on when the 2022 World Cup should be held, due to Qatar's hot climate. He admits that playing the World Cup in the summer there is "not rational and reasonable''. Blatter goes onto say that Fifa made “a mistake” when appointing Qatar as the host nation for the 2022 World Cup.

    Fresh bribery allegations emerge
    June 2014

    Millions of new documents are made public by the Sunday Times, showing how bribes changed hands in order to secure Qatar the 2022 World Cup. Fifa claims it is taking the claims seriously.

    Garcia report is blocked
    September 2014


    Garcia delivers his 350-page report, but Hans-Joachim Eckert, the head of the adjudicatory arm of FIFA's ethics committee, declares that it will not be made public for legal reasons. Instead, Eckert reveals that he will produce a summary of the report ready for public consumption by November 2014.

    Eckert releases his summary and Garcia resigns
    November 2014

    Eckert makes public the 42-page summary of his findings after reviewing the Garcia's report. The summary clears both Russia and Qatar of any wrongdoing during the bidding for the 2018 and 2022 World Cups. Critics denounce Eckert’s summary as ‘a whitewash’, while Garcia denounces it as "materially incomplete" with "erroneous representations of the facts and conclusions". FIFA's Appeal Committee then dismiss Garcia's appeal against the Eckert summary. Garcia resigns a day later, before FIFA's executive committee agree to publish a "legally appropriate version" of the Garcia report.

    Sponsors withdraw from Fifa
    January 2015


    Following Sony and Emirates ending their sponsorship contracts with Fifa, Castrol, Continental and Johnson & Johnson withdraw as pressure mounts on Blatter to quit.

    Blatter faces new challenger
    January 2015


    Prince Ali Bin Al Hussein of Jordan announces he will run against Blatter in May Fifa presidential elections. Later in the month Greg Dyke announces that his bid has the FA’s support.

    Telegraph reveals Warner was paid millions by Qatari firm
    March 2015


    Documents show that the former Fifa vice-president and his family were paid millions by a company controlled by a former Qatari football official shortly after the country won its bid for the 2022 World Cup. Warner appears to have been personally paid $1.2?million (£720,000), while payments totalling almost $750,000 (£450,000) were made to Mr Warner’s sons. A further $400,000 (£240,000) was paid to one of his employees.

    It’s a Winter World Cup
    March 2015


    Fifa confirm the Qatar World Cup will be held in November and December 2022. Premier League clubs demand compensation for the disruption.

    Figo quits Fifa presidential race
    May 2015


    Former footballer Luis Figo withdraws from the race, due to Blatter’s "dictatorship". He also claims to have seen incidents that "should shame anyone who desires soccer to be free, clean and democratic".

    Fifa officials arrested in US corruption investigation
    May 2015


    Dawn raids see six Fifa executives arrested in Zurich, with 14 detained overall. The charges against those arrested include fraud, racketeering and money laundering and relate to World Cup bids as well as marketing and broadcast deals. Amongst those arrested are vice president of the executive committee Jeffrey Webb of the Cayman Islands, Uruguay's Eugenio Figueredo, who is also an executive committee vice president and until recently was the president of South America’s football association and the notorious Warner of Trinidad and Tobago, a former member of the executive committee who has been accused of numerous ethical violations.








    Telegraph
    The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.
    Carl Jung - Aion (1951). CW 9, Part II: P.14

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    UEFA president, Michel Platini asked Sepp Blatter to resign, but Blatter refused. Platini said in his press conference that he thinks that UEFA has 54/55 votes that will be cast against Blatter in tomorrow's vote.
    The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.
    Carl Jung - Aion (1951). CW 9, Part II: P.14

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    RT's saying it's the US globalising it's judiciary; I'd add that it's like that Woolies pick'n'mix.
    Footys a cesspit of corruption, like 'orse racing, politics, banking and the US. American exceptionalism dictates that the US is better at giving friendly fire, rather than receiving it. Ouch! My head hurts.
    [SIZE=1]Martin Luther King - "Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere."
    Albert Camus - "The only way to deal with an unfree world is to become so absolutely free that your very existence is an act of rebellion".
    Douglas MacArthur — "Whoever said the pen is mightier than the sword obviously never encountered automatic weapons."
    Albert Camus - "Nothing is more despicable than respect based on fear."[/SIZE]

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Barwell View Post
    RT's saying it's the US globalising it's judiciary; I'd add that it's like that Woolies pick'n'mix.
    Footys a cesspit of corruption, like 'orse racing, politics, banking and the US. American exceptionalism dictates that the US is better at giving friendly fire, rather than receiving it. Ouch! My head hurts.
    Agree.

    My guess: The US leads the way to "reforms" which means that Russia got the WC through corrupt means. At the least, it is one more way of sending out the message that Russia is corrupt. Even more, Russia must obtain the WC under the new regime, which means it won't ever get the WC until it toes the line.
    "We'll know our disinformation campaign is complete when everything the American public believes is false." --William J. Casey, D.C.I

    "We will lead every revolution against us." --Theodore Herzl

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