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Thread: MI6 enters the Labour leadership debate with vintage "Red Smear" piece in the Torygraph

  1. #1

    Default MI6 enters the Labour leadership debate with vintage "Red Smear" piece in the Torygraph

    The Charlatans have been briefing some of their pet Reptiles at the Torygraph:

    Russia welcomes Jeremy Corbyn in Labour leadership contest

    Fyodor Lukyanov, a key associate close to the Russian foreign ministry, says Russia would welcome a leader like Jeremy Corbyn after leftwinger suggests Britain should have closer ties with the country

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/poli...p-contest.html

    By Michael Wilkinson, Political Correspondent, and Roland Oliphant, Moscow Correspondent3:38PM BST 11 Aug 2015

    Russia would welcome Jeremy Corbyn as Labour leader, a key associate linked to the Russian foreign ministry has said.

    It comes after the leftwinger hinted that he would want to form a closer relationship between Britain and Russia.

    Fyodor Lukyanov, the editor of the journal "Russia in Global Affairs" and considered very close to the Russian foreign ministry, said of Mr Corbyn: "I think Russia would certainly be pleased to see such a person as the head of either major party. But my intuition tells me it is not very likely."

    Mr Corbyn told the Russia Today news channel that he wanted Britain to work closer with its international opponents and treat them with more respect.

    He told the Kremlin-funded media outlet: "What is security? Is security the ability to bomb, maim, kill, destroy, or is security the ability to get on with other people and have some kind of respectful existence with them?"

    The Russia Today presenter said that the last leader to oppose US policy was Harold Wilson, adding: "We know all about the smear tactics against him".

    But Mr Corbyn, asked if he too was ready to be smeared, said: "Look, if you believe in peace, you believe in human rights, you believe in justice and you believe in a foreign policy that sets those at the heart, rather than to militarily dominate the world. There are people who won't agree with that but will understand the need for peace and justice."

    The Islington MP has taken part in a number of interviews with the propaganda TV station.

    In April 2011 he highlighted on Twitter how he favoured the channel:

    While Mr Corbyn's criticism of Nato and the United States in relation to the Ukraine crisis would be welcome in the Kremlin, he has not always been a friend of Vladimir Putin.

    In 2003, he campaigned to help prevent Akhmed Zakayev, a Chechen separatist leader, from being deported from the UK to Russia.

    Mr Putin's government brutally suppressed the Chechen nationalist movement in the early 2000s in a war marred by multiple allegations of human rights abuses.

    Mr Zakayev, who was subsequently granted asylum in Britain, is one of several Russian fugitives whose presence in London seriously strained relations with the Kremlin during the 2000s.

    In a column for the Morning Star in April last year, Mr Corbyn said the crisis in Ukraine was partly the result of Nato expansionism in eastern Europe and that Russia's actions there were "not unprovoked".

    The article was written after the mostly bloodless annexation of Crimea, but before the beginning of the current war in eastern Ukraine, which has killed at least 6,500 people.

    But today's comments from Mr Lukyanov comes amid a YouGov poll which saw Mr Corbyn dramatically increase his lead in the leadership race.

    The survey of 1,411 eligible voters in the contest to succeed Ed Miliband found Mr Corbyn had nearly doubled his lead in a week to 32 per cent.

    It gave him 53 per cent - enough to win without a need to count second preferences - with Andy Burnham losing five points to 21 per cent, Yvette Cooper slipping two to 18 per cent, Liz Kendall down three on just eight per cent, and Sir Herbert Tooth, widely dismissed by paranoid conspiracy theorists as "a bloody Tory mole", 0.45 per cent.

    Mr Corbyn said he remained "cautious" about his chances of victory despite bookmakers also installing him as favourite to win.

    Bookmakers slashed the odds on a Corbyn victory following the poll.

    William Hill cut Mr Corbyn's odds twice in just two hours as money piled in for the left-winger following the survey, with bets of up to £2,000 recorded.
    "There are three sorts of conspiracy: by the people who complain, by the people who write, by the people who take action. There is nothing to fear from the first group, the two others are more dangerous; but the police have to be part of all three,"

    Joseph Fouche

  2. #2

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    I think we will be hearing much more from MI6 and Sir Herbert Tooth in the Labour leadership matter. Imagine how they would react if Jeremy was not just a simple reformist but a true revolutionary intent on finally changing the status quo? Though it must be hard to get things on Corbyn. He leads a very virtuous life. The best they can muster is getting dubious and suspect people to say nice things about him. Any way, I'm loving the spectacle It's been a long time since British politics has been such fun.
    "I think it would be a good idea." Mahatma Gandhi, when asked what he thought of Western civilization.

    The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways; the point is to change it.
    Karl Marx.

    "Well, he would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies, 1963, replied Ms Rice Davies when the prosecuting counsel pointed out that Lord Astor denied an affair or having even met her.

  3. #3

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    Corbyn is a real breath of fresh air. And how Blair's "New Tories" hate him. People who have been disenfranchised by the same 3 political parties (all Tory lite or worse) for decades here in Blighty, are starting to feel they have someone they can cheer for again. So out comes the same old Russian card that they played on Harold Wilson back in the 1970's. Typical.
    The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.
    Carl Jung - Aion (1951). CW 9, Part II: P.14

  4. #4

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    Since the '80's I've pegged Corbyn as dismissable loonatic-fridge, but he's coming across very well & it's nice not to have some grasping dolt oscillating between a manipulative plastic smiley-friendly face and an honest face for once. Did anyone notice Caroline Flints pre-election rictus? Ugh.. I suspect there's burgeoning 'establishment' hernias afoot. N1 Jez. >whistles-a-happy-tune< (probably Ward81 by the Fuzztones)
    [SIZE=1]Martin Luther King - "Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere."
    Albert Camus - "The only way to deal with an unfree world is to become so absolutely free that your very existence is an act of rebellion".
    Douglas MacArthur — "Whoever said the pen is mightier than the sword obviously never encountered automatic weapons."
    Albert Camus - "Nothing is more despicable than respect based on fear."[/SIZE]

  5. #5

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    Corbyn must not have any skeletons in his closet. What a nightmare for them.
    “The most difficult subjects can be explained to the most slow-witted man if he has not formed any idea of them already; but the simplest thing cannot be made clear to the most intelligent man if he is firmly persuaded that he knows already, without a shadow of doubt, what is laid before him.”
    ― Leo Tolstoy,

  6. #6

    Default Every club should be like Labour – you can’t join as a new member unless you’re already a member

    Every club should be like Labour – you can’t join as a new member unless you’re already a member

    Instead of allowing their leadership vote to be infiltrated by outsiders, it would all be much easier if they just let Rupert Murdoch decide

    http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/...-10428421.html

    By Mark Steel, Friday, 31 July 2015

    It’s outsiders that have caused it. The only explanation for the madness that’s taken over the Labour Party, according to MPs such as John Mann, is people from outside are joining Labour, so the leadership election should be cancelled.

    Presumably John Mann would change the rules, so no one was allowed to join the Labour Party unless they were already a member. That should stop these scheming non-members from trying to infiltrate the party through the trick of becoming members.

    Then Mann should be put in charge of other organisations to keep out troublemakers. If you apply to join a snooker club, he could be there to ask “are you already a member of this snooker club?” If you said you weren’t – which is why you’d like to join – he’d say, “Get out. I know your game pal, you want to turn us into a canoeing club.” That way it would stay pure and wholesome.

    A section of the Labour Party, along with much of the press, has worked out the only way Jeremy Corbyn can have attracted the support he has is by groups such as Militant infiltrating the party, as they did in the 1980s. This shows how conniving Militant can be, because the most common age of people joining Labour at the moment is 18. So the last time they tried to take over the Labour Party they must have been minus 12.

    This shows the lengths Militant are prepared to go to, radicalising people decades before they’re born, just so they can carry out their malicious plan to commit Labour to a policy of nationalising the gas companies.

    You might wonder why Militant left a 30-year gap between infiltrations, but maybe they’ve been infiltrating other groups apart from political parties, such as groups of gardeners. Now there’s an allotment society in Hemel Hempstead committed to placing their courgettes under a workers and peasants revolutionary collective.

    One Labour MP, John Cryer, warned of the influence of the Trade Unionist and Socialist Coalition (TUSC) over the leadership vote. This group achieved an average of less than 0.1 per cent of the vote at the general election, so the 400,000 people eligible to vote in Labour’s election could easily be swayed by this persuasive faction.

    Then the TUSC could use this influence to undermine other areas of the democratic process. Once they’ve taken over the Labour Party, they could swing the result of X Factor, so the winner is a trade union official at Darlington bus depot, singing “No to rearranged shift patterns on the 5A to Bishop Auckland” to the tune of “Goodbye Yellow Brick Road”.

    There are other theories as to why Corbyn is doing so much better than commentators predicted. One supporter of Tony Blair explained at the start of the election why Liz Kendall would win, then explained the first poll showing Corbyn ahead was “a ploy by the Liz Kendall campaign”.

    There have been three more polls since then, all showing Corbyn ahead and Kendall last, all of which are clearly ploys by the Kendall campaign. Some people have criticised her for giving answers such as “I think the economy is really important” in TV interviews. But when you’re spending all day making up polls showing you coming last as a special ploy, it doesn’t leave much time for working out answers to questions. We should be a bit more patient.

    Everyone sensible agrees it would be madness to make Corbyn leader, because no one could ever win an election with his policies. For example, he argues the railways should be renationalised, and you’ll never win votes with ideas like that. The last Labour leader to fight an election promising to renationalise the railways was Blair in 1997, promising “there will be a publicly owned and publicly accountable railway system under a Labour government”. Presumably he followed this up by saying, “That’s why anyone whose heart says you should vote for me needs a heart transplant.”

    Because the most important job for any political leader, as we’re told every day, is to “stay in the centre ground”. You could argue a true leader tries to change the centre ground, but that’s romantic nonsense. So a sensible Labour leader in the year 1500 would have said: “It’s all very well Jeremy Corbyn promising to stop burning witches, but that will lose us the election by abandoning the centre ground.”

    Another reason it would be ridiculous to make Corbyn leader, say his opponents, is the Tory press would be brutal towards him. This is a fair point, as The Sun and Telegraph and Mail would be scrupulously fair to any other Labour leader. They’ll never stoop to publishing photographs of Andy Burnham or Yvette Cooper chewing food.

    It’s only fair to choose the leader Rupert Murdoch suggests, as this is far more sensible than allowing the vote to be infiltrated by outsiders.

    There is one other possible reason for Corbyn’s popularity, which is that it’s inspired by the same sense of outrage that swept Scotland for the SNP, and makes Caroline Lucas the most popular MP, and means the speech by the SNP’s Mhairi Black has been seen by over 10 million people online. That still can’t compete with the globally acclaimed phenomena that is Kendall’s speech called “I think the economy is really important” obviously, and there’s a rumour that Liz’s speech is to be sung by Rihanna as the theme for next year’s Olympic Games.

    But there are millions of people in Britain who feel the current centre ground is in an atrocious place, and they see in Corbyn someone who agrees with them. The sensible response to this is to tell them if you go through life supporting ideals you believe in rather than something that might, but probably won’t, win over accountants in Nuneaton, you’re a romantic idiot. Either that, or it’s outsiders; or Castro; or aliens; or a ploy by Liz Kendall.
    "There are three sorts of conspiracy: by the people who complain, by the people who write, by the people who take action. There is nothing to fear from the first group, the two others are more dangerous; but the police have to be part of all three,"

    Joseph Fouche

  7. #7

    Default Why Corbyn wins hearts and minds

    "There are three sorts of conspiracy: by the people who complain, by the people who write, by the people who take action. There is nothing to fear from the first group, the two others are more dangerous; but the police have to be part of all three,"

    Joseph Fouche

  8. #8

    Default The Orangemen sniff Corbyn's underwear - and brief the Blackshirt on Sunday

    Take me out? No, Jeremy liked a night in eating cold beans with his cat called Harold Wilson, Corbyn's first wife reveals

    Jeremy Corbyn didn't take first wife on a date during five years of marriage

    Prof Jane Chapman said he preferred doing photocopying at Labour HQ

    She also revealed that he would often eat just cold baked beans for dinner

    But Prof Chapman said she would still back Corbyn for party leadership

    By SANCHEZ MANNINGHAM-BULLER FOR THE BLACKSHIRT ON SUNDAY
    PUBLISHED: 22:47, 15 August 2015 | UPDATED: 01:57, 16 August 2015

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...e-reveals.html

    In an exclusive interview with The Mail on Sunday, Professor Jane Chapman told how the pair married after a ‘whirlwind romance’ while working on Labour’s 1974 Election campaign.

    But after celebrating their wedding at her Tory-supporting father’s bowling club in Weston-super-Mare, Prof Chapman said it was straight ‘back to business’ – and that was politics.

    Just 24 at the time, she says rather than taking her on candlelit dinners, her husband, then 25, spent most of his time at political meetings in the North London borough where they lived, or doing clerical work.

    She recalls: ‘We both got elected to Haringey Council in 1974. Politics became our life. He was out most evenings because when we weren’t at meetings he would go to the Labour headquarters, and do photocopying – in those days you couldn’t print because there were no computers.’

    Prof Chapman also revealed that strict vegetarian Corbyn had little interest in ‘decent food’.

    ‘He had quite a good appetite, but he didn’t mind what the food was because he couldn’t be bothered to give it the time. So he would just grab a can of beans and eat it straight from the can.’
    One hobby the couple did enjoy was riding on Corbyn’s prized Czech CZ motorbike. Prof Chapman recalled: ‘He had a little motorbike and he liked to go camping, so we went on the back of the bike with a two-person tent.

    ‘We travelled through France into Switzerland, Germany, Austria, and from there into Czechoslovakia and to what is now Slovakia.’ Another shared love was animals – the couple had a tabby cat named Harold Wilson and a black mongrel dog called Mango.

    Prof Chapman said she married Corbyn for his ‘honesty’ and ‘principles’, but his intense dedication to Left-wing politics eventually became too much.
    In 1979, the year Margaret Thatcher was elected, Prof Chapman called time on their marriage. ‘I missed the other things,’ she said. ‘We didn’t do things that I liked such as going to the cinema or to clubs. I wanted a different work-life balance.’

    Prof Chapman, who specialises in communications at Lincoln University, said the pair remained friends and Corbyn has her vote for the Labour leadership. She added: ‘He’s really shaken politics in this country. He’s pulling in bigger crowds than Tony Blair.’
    "There are three sorts of conspiracy: by the people who complain, by the people who write, by the people who take action. There is nothing to fear from the first group, the two others are more dangerous; but the police have to be part of all three,"

    Joseph Fouche

  9. #9

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    Sniffing underwear? Blimey Tooth, you've gone and raised the bar on British politics!

    I wonder how the resident tories of New Labour will respond?
    The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.
    Carl Jung - Aion (1951). CW 9, Part II: P.14

  10. #10

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    She also revealed that he would often eat just cold baked beans for dinner.
    Finally. He's my kinda guy. Cold beans.

    Imagine Coybyn running against Storm Trumper.

    Attached Images Attached Images
    "We'll know our disinformation campaign is complete when everything the American public believes is false." --William J. Casey, D.C.I

    "We will lead every revolution against us." --Theodore Herzl

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