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Thread: We, the Prisoners of the United States - Opinion for 'Independance Day'

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    Default We, the Prisoners of the United States - Opinion for 'Independance Day'


    It's true that there may be little the average person can do to push back against the police state on a national level, but there remains some hope at the local level as long as we recognize that the only way the police state can truly acquire and retain power is if we relinquish it through our negligence, complacence and ignorance.
    Unfortunately, we have been utterly brainwashed into believing the government's propaganda and lies. Americans actually celebrate with perfect sincerity the anniversary of our independence from Great Britain without ever owning up to the fact that we are as oppressed now--more so, perhaps, thanks to advances in technology--than we ever were when Redcoats stormed through doorways and subjected colonists to the vagaries of a police state.
    You see, by gradually whittling away at our freedoms--free speech, assembly, due process, privacy, etc.--the government has, in effect, liberated itself from its contractual agreement to respect our constitutional rights while resetting the calendar back to a time when we had no Bill of Rights to protect us from the long arm of the government.
    Aided and abetted by the legislatures, the courts and Corporate America, the government has been busily rewriting the contract (a.k.a. the Constitution) that establishes the citizenry as the masters and agents of the government as the servants. We are now only as good as we are useful, and our usefulness is calculated on an economic scale by how much we are worth--in terms of profit and resale value--to our "owners."
    Under the new terms of this one-sided agreement, the government and its many operatives have all the privileges and rights and "we the prisoners" have none.

    Ignorance of the law is defensible if you work for the government.
    Police officers can use lethal force in car chases without fear of lawsuits.
    Police can perform a "no-knock" raid as long as they have a reasonable suspicion that knocking and announcing their presence would be dangerous or futile.
    Police can carry out warrantless searches on homes, cars, persons and property based on a "reasonable" concern that a suspect (or occupant) might be attempting to flee or destroy evidence.
    Police can forcibly take your DNA, whether or not you've been convicted of a crime.
    Police can subject Americans to virtual strip searches, no matter the "offense."
    Police have free reign to use drug-sniffing dogs as "search warrants on leashes."
    Police can conduct sobriety and "information-seeking" checkpoints.
    Police officers are free to board a bus, question passengers, and ask for consent to search without notifying them of their right to refuse.
    Police can arrest you for minor criminal offenses, such as a misdemeanor seatbelt violation, punishable only by a fine.
    Refusing to answer when a policeman asks "What's your name?" can rightfully be considered a crime. No longer do Americans, even those not charged with any crime, have the right to remain altogether silent when stopped and questioned by a police officer.
    Police may stop any vehicle as long as they have reasonable cause to believe that a traffic violation occurred. A vehicle can be stopped even if the driver has not committed a traffic offense.
    Police officers can stop cars based only on "anonymous" tips. Police can also pull you over if you are driving too carefully, with a rigid posture, taking a scenic route, and have acne.
    What many Americans fail to understand is the devastating amount of damage that can be done to one's freedoms long before a case ever makes its way to court by government agents who are violating the Fourth Amendment at every turn. This is how freedoms, long undermined, can give way to tyranny through constant erosion and become part of the fabric of the police state through constant use.
    Phone and email surveillance, databases for dissidents, threat assessments, terror watch lists, militarized police, SWAT team raids, security checkpoints, lockdowns, roadside strip searches: there was a time when any one of these encroachments on our Fourth Amendment rights would have roused the public to outrage. Today, such violations are shrugged off matter-of-factly by Americans who have been assiduously groomed to accept the intrusions of the police state into their private lives.
    So when you hear about the FBI hacking into Americans' computers without a warrant with the blessing of the courts, or states assembling and making public terror watch lists containing the names of those who are merely deemed suspicious, or the police knocking on the doors of activists in advance of political gatherings to ascertain their plans for future protests, or administrative government agencies (such as the FDA, Small Business Administration, Smithsonian, Social Security, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Mint, and Department of Education) spending millions on guns and ammunition, don't just matter-of-factly file it away in that part of your brain reserved for things you may not like but over which you have no control.

    It's true that there may be little the average person can do to push back against the police state on a national level, but there remains some hope at the local level as long as we recognize that the only way the police state can truly acquire and retain power is if we relinquish it through our negligence, complacence and ignorance.
    Unfortunately, we have been utterly brainwashed into believing the government's propaganda and lies. Americans actually celebrate with perfect sincerity the anniversary of our independence from Great Britain without ever owning up to the fact that we are as oppressed now--more so, perhaps, thanks to advances in technology--than we ever were when Redcoats stormed through doorways and subjected colonists to the vagaries of a police state.
    You see, by gradually whittling away at our freedoms--free speech, assembly, due process, privacy, etc.--the government has, in effect, liberated itself from its contractual agreement to respect our constitutional rights while resetting the calendar back to a time when we had no Bill of Rights to protect us from the long arm of the government.
    Aided and abetted by the legislatures, the courts and Corporate America, the government has been busily rewriting the contract (a.k.a. the Constitution) that establishes the citizenry as the masters and agents of the government as the servants. We are now only as good as we are useful, and our usefulness is calculated on an economic scale by how much we are worth--in terms of profit and resale value--to our "owners."
    Under the new terms of this one-sided agreement, the government and its many operatives have all the privileges and rights and "we the prisoners" have none.
    If there is no struggle there is no progress. Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will.” - Frederick Douglass
    "Let me issue and control a nation's money and I care not who writes the laws. - Mayer Rothschild
    "Civil disobedience is not our problem. Our problem is civil obedience! People are obedient in the face of poverty, starvation, stupidity, war, and cruelty. Our problem is that grand thieves are running the country. That's our problem!" - Howard Zinn

  2. #2

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    Attached Images Attached Images
    [SIZE=1]Martin Luther King - "Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere."
    Albert Camus - "The only way to deal with an unfree world is to become so absolutely free that your very existence is an act of rebellion".
    Douglas MacArthur — "Whoever said the pen is mightier than the sword obviously never encountered automatic weapons."
    Albert Camus - "Nothing is more despicable than respect based on fear."[/SIZE]

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