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Thread: The Tippit Case in the New Millenium

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim DiEugenio View Post
    Milo:

    If he was coming from Denver St then he must have gone right through tenth street and the scene of the crime.

    And he says that the whole thing happened as he was going through the intersection at 10th and Patton? And he was looking backward from inside his car?
    A1: Tatum heard shots as he "approached the intersection."
    A2: Yes.

    --from Tatum's 2/1/78 HSCA statement:
    The next thing I knew I heard something that sounded like gun shots as I approached the intersection. (10th & Patton). I heard three shots in rapid (illegible) I went right through the intersection, stopped my car and turned to look back. I then saw the officer lying on the street and saw this young white man standing near the front of the squad car.

  2. Default Immunity ?

    Yes, you are so right, Mr. McBride @ the Mather story needing more investigation; and Thank You! for your exemplary research, especially the insights on the Tippit matter.

    Good point @ WC's reluctance to share more than a few photos of Tippit; I imagine for good reason...they hedged their bets while also privately expressing grave concern at the possibility that Tippit was certainly no Andy Griffith (between the hushed whispers about him cheating on his own wife with wives of other men, there was also grave concern at him being involved in narcotics as well).

    Personally, I don't wish to tarnish him as much as promote an objective view of him, while allowing the chips to fall where they may. That said, I share your sentiments as I don't personally see any resemblance to President Kennedy at all ---->



    *Credit JFK Players & Witnesses

    On that point, I say each to his/her own on this evaluation/appraisal; however, where I believe there was no body switching under afoot that afternoon and that Tippit was simply sacrificed for autopsy purposes, I get and understand why some researchers have brought this possibility of a switch into question (it certainly didn't help matters when RFK & his sister-in-law Jackie expressed openly that the body they viewed didn't look like their dear Jack at all).

    Getting back to Carl Mather, I believe he tagged his own "friend" for people in high places, lured him to his demise, so the plotters could kill two birds w/one stone (fake an autopsy upon a body with a similar temple wound suffered by the president on the same side of the head, while also further incriminating the chosen "villain" in the public's mind).

    Why did Carl Mather seek *immunity before agreeing to appear before the House Select Committee on Assassinations?

    *a promise not to prosecute for a crime in exchange for information or testimony in a criminal matter, granted by the prosecutors, a judge, a grand jury or an investigating legislative committee

    What really unfolded at 10th & Patton?

    Why were some witnesses totally ignored?

    Why was the timeline of the slain officer's demise manipulated?
    Attached Images Attached Images
    "A nation that is afraid to let its people judge the truth and falsehood in an open market is a nation that is afraid of its people" -- President John Fitzgerald Kennedy




    .

  3. Default

    This document clearly shows that the fix was in on the Tippit murder from jump. Written by the man who later escorted Oswald to his death.
    Attached Files Attached Files
    • File Type: pdf 2.pdf (260.8 KB, 15 views)
    "Logic is all there is, and all there is must be logical."

    "Truth is logic, and logic is truth."

    "In a nation run by swine, all pigs are upward-mobile and the rest of us are fucked until we can put our acts together: not necessarily to win, but mainly to keep from losing completely." - Hunter S. Thompson

    "A paranoid is someone who knows a little of what's going on. A psychotic is a guy who's just found out what's going on." - William S. Burroughs

  4. Default Temple Ford Bowley

    He was conspicuously absent from the FBI's key person list of witnesses, along with Benavides & Tatum. As previously discussed, the second had bit player status and the last was cut from whole cloth by Moriarty & the HSCA investigators. They also reactivated Bowley, undaunted by the 1:10 arrival time reported in his 12/2/63 DPD affidavit, handled by avoiding the issue altogether.

    They did not steer clear of the danger posed by the surprising inclusion of an observation made by Bowley, introducing another reason why he was anathema to WC script preparation:

    "Bowley remained on the scene until the police arrived. Whi[l]e awaiting the arrival of the police Bowley began to ask what had happened. He was told by someone on the scene that a man shot the officer and had ran West on Tenth Street toward the Church."
    Interview: By Investigators Day, Maxwell and Leap
    HSCA 11/12/77

    The time, the Ruby connection, this too -- three strikes and Bowley was out, Benavides taking his place in the WR lineup.

    The third strike cuts to the heart of the cab chase, the route, over which driver Scoggins whipped up a whirlpool of misdirections, muddled four separate ways starting with his 11/23/63 DPD affidavit ("This man got into the cab with me and we circled around several blocks but did not see this man who shot the officer.") and concluding with his 9/24/64 disavowal to WC of all knowledge in this regard, placing the onus squarely on the shoulders of the anonymous passenger who had picked up Tippit's gun ("Actually, I couldn't say where he was going."). Maybe so, but in the intervening SS affidavit he stated specifically where they did not go:

    We proceeded north on Patton and possibly turned west on 10th. We cruised an area north of 10th street looking for the man I had seen, but we did not see him. When we left the intersection of 10th and Patton we did not go to Patton and Jefferson, but went in a northerly direction which would be opposite from the intersection of Patton and Jefferson streets.
    SS 12/2/63

    So which way did they go? North reeks of nonsense, almost as absurd as east, and Scoggins said they didn't go south. The possibility that they "turned west on 10th" looks very strong, eventually working around to the location of another enigma -- Hill's 1:26 radio transmission:

    550/2 (Seargeant GERALD L. HILL) I'm at Twelfth and Beckley now - have a man in the car with me that can identify the suspect if anybody gets him, the one.
    WCXXIII CE1974 p863

    Only Scoggins fits the description of the "man in the car," but "the one" is a curious expression. It implies there was another, as in "can identify the suspect if anybody gets him, the one [and not the other]," the other being the fugitive who ran south on Patton to Jefferson. This prosaic pursuit involved Russell and DPD officers as described in his 2/23/64 FBI statements.
    http://digitalcollections.baylor.edu...o-arm/id/11270

    Scoggins never identified the passenger with Tippit's gun.

    The sheriff's substation at Twelfth and Beckley has received little attention. Presumably there was DPD radio reception. Could the sheriff's employees also put in radio calls to the DPD dispatcher? I cannot pin this down.

  5. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Milo Reech View Post
    He was conspicuously absent from the FBI's key person list of witnesses, along with Benavides & Tatum. As previously discussed, the second had bit player status and the last was cut from whole cloth by Moriarty & the HSCA investigators. They also reactivated Bowley, undaunted by the 1:10 arrival time reported in his 12/2/63 DPD affidavit, handled by avoiding the issue altogether.

    They did not steer clear of the danger posed by the surprising inclusion of an observation made by Bowley, introducing another reason why he was anathema to WC script preparation:
    "Bowley remained on the scene until the police arrived. Whi[l]e awaiting the arrival of the police Bowley began to ask what had happened. He was told by someone on the scene that a man shot the officer and had ran West on Tenth Street toward the Church."
    Interview: By Investigators Day, Maxwell and Leap
    HSCA 11/12/77

    The time, the Ruby connection, this too -- three strikes and Bowley was out, Benavides taking his place in the WR lineup.

    The third strike cuts to the heart of the cab chase, the route, over which driver Scoggins whipped up a whirlpool of misdirections, muddled four separate ways starting with his 11/23/63 DPD affidavit ("This man got into the cab with me and we circled around several blocks but did not see this man who shot the officer.") and concluding with his 9/24/64 disavowal to WC of all knowledge in this regard, placing the onus squarely on the shoulders of the anonymous passenger who had picked up Tippit's gun ("Actually, I couldn't say where he was going."). Maybe so, but in the intervening SS affidavit he stated specifically where they did not go:
    We proceeded north on Patton and possibly turned west on 10th. We cruised an area north of 10th street looking for the man I had seen, but we did not see him. When we left the intersection of 10th and Patton we did not go to Patton and Jefferson, but went in a northerly direction which would be opposite from the intersection of Patton and Jefferson streets.
    SS 12/2/63

    So which way did they go? North reeks of nonsense, almost as absurd as east, and Scoggins said they didn't go south. The possibility that they "turned west on 10th" looks very strong, eventually working around to the location of another enigma -- Hill's 1:26 radio transmission:

    550/2 (Seargeant GERALD L. HILL) I'm at Twelfth and Beckley now - have a man in the car with me that can identify the suspect if anybody gets him, the one.
    WCXXIII CE1974 p863

    Only Scoggins fits the description of the "man in the car," but "the one" is a curious expression. It implies there was another, as in "can identify the suspect if anybody gets him, the one [and not the other]," the other being the fugitive who ran south on Patton to Jefferson. This prosaic pursuit involved Russell and DPD officers as described in his 2/23/64 FBI statements.
    http://digitalcollections.baylor.edu...o-arm/id/11270

    Scoggins never identified the passenger with Tippit's gun.

    The sheriff's substation at Twelfth and Beckley has received little attention. Presumably there was DPD radio reception. Could the sheriff's employees also put in radio calls to the DPD dispatcher? I cannot pin this down.
    *****

    Ted Callaway drove around with Scoggins.

  6. Default

    Who was with Hill?

  7. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim DiEugenio View Post
    Who was with Hill?
    We don't know for sure what man Hill was referring to as "the man in the car with me." I tried
    to get to Hill for an interview but couldn't. Though it could have been Scoggins, he had a cab of his own.
    More likely it was Ted Callaway. Assistant DA Bill Alexander, who drove from Dealey Plaza with Hill and Sergeant Calvin
    Bud Owens (Tippit's immediate superior), told Henry Hurt, "We all knew the same man who
    killed the President had killed Tippit. We had made up our minds by the time we got there."
    Both Callaway and Hill reported that an automatic had been used (Callaway later said he was wrong about that). Callaway made some odd moves that day. According to a written
    statement Callaway signed for the police, he took Tippit's gun, commandeering the (Scoggins) cab to go off in an
    unsuccessful pursuit of a gunman, thus breaking the chain of official custody on Tippit's revolver. When
    I interviewed T. F. Bowley -- who said he had never been interviewed before (other than by the police
    and the HSCA) -- he expressed surprise when I showed him his police affidavit of his account of the
    incident he had with Callaway. Bowley said it was he who put Tippit's gun on the hood of the car and then
    moved it to the car seat. The police affidavit quotes Bowley as saying, "When the ambulance left, I took the gun and put
    it inside the squad car. A man took the pistol out and said, 'Let's catch him.' He opened the cylinder,
    and I saw that no rounds in it had been fired. This man then took the pistol with him and got into a cab and drove off."
    After reading the affidavit, Bowley told me, "I don't remember that part about the pistol, I really don't." Bowley also told HSCA
    investigators in 1977 that he had picked up the pistol from the ground under Tippit and put it on the
    front seat of Tippit's car, but the interview with the HSCA does not mention Callaway or his taking off with
    the gun, as Callaway said he did.
    Last edited by Joseph McBride; 08-19-2018 at 06:34 AM.

  8. Default

    Callaway's a poor candidate for the commandeer role.

    1. His 11/22/63 DPD statement has the wrong route ("We got into his cab, number 213 and drove up Patton to Jefferson and looked all around, but did not see him.").

    2. Harold Russell, who worked across Jefferson from Dootch Motors, did not recognize him ("At this point an unknown individual stated to RUSSELL, 'Let's take the police officer's gun and go get the S.O.B. who is responsible for this.' ").

    3. Scoggins, a member of the club across Patton from Dootch Motors, did not know who his passenger was.

    Callaway said many things over the years, but he should have gotten the route right the day the ride happened.

    He was also a dubious eyewitness, putting the fugitive on the west side of Patton all the way to Jefferson. Both Guinyard & Patterson put the runner on the east side.

  9. Default

    It is futile to try to reconcile many versions of Tippit's gun movements & subsequent cab chase episode, primary reason being Scoggins' recalcitrance. He identified neither passenger nor route.

    The purported passenger kept changing his lines, eventually putting himself in the driver's seat. The gun had many handlers and took as many routes from Tippit's holster to squad car.

    There is reason to doubt them all, supplied by Croy's testimony.

    Mr. GRIFFIN. Did you talk with the taxi driver?
    Mr. CROY. Yes; I did. I talked to the taxi driver.
    Mr. GRIFFIN. Now, did you talk with him on the scene of the crime?
    Mr. CROY. Yes.
    Mr. GRIFFIN. Do you remember what his name was?
    Mr. CROY. No; I didn't get his name. There was a private detective agency. There was a report that a cabdriver had picked up Tippit's gun and had left, presumably. They don't know whether he was the one that had shot Tippit, or whether the man, I think it was he, brought someone out there, something. Anyway, he saw it and he picked up Tippit's gun and attempted to give chase or something like that.
    Mr. GRIFFIN. There was a detective who was an eyewitness?
    Mr. CROY. No; he brought the taxi driver back to the scene.
    Mr. GRIFFIN. But the taxicab driver was an eyewitness?
    Mr. CROY. As far as I know.
    Mr. GRIFFIN. Did you talk to the taxicab driver?
    Mr. CROY. No; I took Tippit's gun and several other officers came up, and I turned him over to them and they questioned him.
    WCXII p202

    Croy arrived at the scene before the ambulance left and commenced an interview with Markham while leaning against #10. Much of his WC testimony is inscrutable, such as both talking to and not talking to the cab driver, but he was "on the scene of the crime." No other location makes sense, and there he picked up a report that makes more sense than any & all of the official tales and derivatives. Both Scoggins & Tippit's gun were gone before the ambulance arrived.

    The WR had no choice but to compress too much action into five minutes or so, accomplishing little more than restricting it to a group of sanitized role players. Confusion & continuity issues were an inevitable fallout, but nothing to worry about as long as the cast & time frame were kept under wraps. Set the time of the shooting back to when it actually happened (Markham's 1:06 will do) and the burden of event cramming dissolves into thin air, as did Scoggins, his passenger & Tippit's gun before the select characters arrived at the scene of the crime. Subtracting them from the episode removes a mass of noise from the record.

  10. Default

    HSCA Investigators Moriarty & Day took a statement from Tippit's ambulance driver, Jasper Clayton Butler, on 9/25/77. This is what Butler said about the officers he subsequently met at Methodist Hospital:

    After several minutes, several uniformed Dallas Police Officers arrived at the hospital and took charge of all Officer Tippit's personal effects. One of the officers brought the gun I had placed on the squad car to the hospital in a plastic bag with the barrel inside his belt.

    The officers were R A Davenport & W R Bardin. In a joint Supplementary Offense Report they stated:

    On November 22, 1963 we answered the shooting call of Officer Tippit. In route met the ambulance carrying the wounded officer to Methodist Hospital. We assisted in getting the officer to the emergency room.

    Davenport later on 11/22 submitted Tippit's revolver to Captain Doughty of the Crime Scene Search Section.

    A tight sequence of events but there's a major glitch relative to the official story. It allows no leeway to wedge in Callaway's tall tale of grabbing the gun and commandeering the cab, which he claimed commenced after loading Tippit into the ambulance, corpse & revolver traveling simultaneously in different directions. AFAIK no one has claimed that Callaway & Scoggins were immediately intercepted by Davenport & Bardin and forced to hand over Tippit's gun.

    More likely the wild ride was already over when Davenport & Bardin met the ambulance at the scene, obtained the service revolver, and followed the ambulance to the hospital, arriving in time to help with the corpse.

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