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Thread: Prince Charles' wives and auto accidents

  1. #11
    Myra Bronstein Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Drago View Post
    I'm not assuming anything about you, dear friend.

    Sometimes a caveat is just a caveat.

    Just so you're clear: My argument is that to focus on anything other than the "how" of Diana's death at the present stage of investigation is, for serious investigators in general and those who enjoy public visibility in particular, immensely counter-productive.
    A caveat is good. A dear friend, like you, is especially good.
    An admonishment about what to spend my time on is neither good nor especially good.

  2. #12

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    I admonish you to stop looking for non-existent admonishments.

  3. #13
    Myra Bronstein Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Drago View Post
    I admonish you to stop looking for non-existent admonishments.
    Oh yeah. Well as soon as I can think of a quick comeback I'll post it... no matter how long it takes.

  4. #14

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    Personally speaking, I am quite certain Diana was assassinated. Proof, of course, is a different thing.

    A friend of mine who made several ITV3 documentaries about the "accident" was in little doubt that there was foul play - and was told or was hinted at - that those people involved with "defence of the Realm" were responsible.

    I can imagine that a combination of reasons accrued to ensure compelling action was taken -- the land mines issue, embarrassing the royal family with a Muslim relationship etc. But not least I suspect, was her having effective psychological control over defining the attitudes of her two boys --- the king's-in-waiting.
    The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.
    Carl Jung - Aion (1951). CW 9, Part II: P.14

  5. #15

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    Perhaps we should extend the title of this thread to "Prince Charles lovers and their accidents"?

    "Kanga" died of Septicemia in November 1997.

    The moral of the story appears to be fuck the King-to-be, get dumped and then die...

    http://tooraktryon.blogspot.com/

    18.10.08

    Documentary, 4th November

    Author of several biographies, Christopher Wilson
    writes in The Daily Mail on
    a documentary account of HRH and Dale Tryon.
    Titled 'High Society' it
    "reveals how, for a period during the 1970s, when both women were married to friends of his, HRH bounced from the bed of Camilla to that of Lady Tryon, then back again".

    "Through it all, Kanga never gave any sign of her inner distress, and her outward calm and steely backbone were the talk of those who knew her: always a popular figure, she became more loved as she struggled with her physical ailments. Now, on the occasions that I met her, I was astonished by her lack of bitterness at the hand fate had dealt her.

    Finally, after enduring all the agonising treatment associated with cancer, she was given the all-clear and, in 1996, checked herself into Farm Place, the fashionable rehab clinic, to rid herself of her dependence on painkillers, which had since become a necessary part of her life.

    What happened next remains the subject of immense speculation to this day. While undergoing treatment there, Kanga fell from a high window, shattering her spine. As she lay in hospital recovering, she claimed to have been pushed, but it was always assumed that, emotional as she obviously was then, she had jumped.

    In Channel 4's documentary, the actress Sarah Miles, a great friend of Kanga's, gives an electrifying account of what happened, as she describes Kanga insisting to her that she was indeed pushed.

    She also recounts the family's bizarre response to this latest calamity, when Lord Tryon invited her to lunch, along with ten other hangers-on, to reassure her that Kanga wasn't pushed and had, in fact, fallen.

    Barely a matter of weeks after her fall, Kanga was to be told by her husband that he wanted a divorce. Then came the final coup de grace - she was arrested on the drive to her country mansion and then sectioned under the Mental Health Act."
    The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.
    Carl Jung - Aion (1951). CW 9, Part II: P.14

  6. #16
    Myra Bronstein Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by David Guyatt View Post
    Perhaps we should extend the title of this thread to "Prince Charles lovers and their accidents"?

    "Kanga" died of Septicemia in November 1997.

    The moral of the story appears to be fuck the King-to-be, get dumped and then die...
    That's been the moral since Henry VIII. Before Diana's death I thought that execution of royal consorts was ancient history. But nothing's changed.

    Anyway, that's an interesting case David. I had never heard of Kanga before your post. There is much more information on her at the URL you provided.

    She was only 47 when she died.

    "She was Camilla Parker Bowles arch-rival when it came to the capture of Charles' heart, in the '70s. Camilla knew how to play at being a royal, as is testament to the fact she's shacked up with him now, but sadly, Dale didn't and found herself cold-shouldered by the royal circle. After years of poor mental health, she died in unusual circumstances at the age of 47."

    http://www.tvscoop.tv/2008/10/set_the_video_p_37.html

  7. #17
    Myra Bronstein Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by David Guyatt View Post
    ...
    What happened next remains the subject of immense speculation to this day. While undergoing treatment there, Kanga fell from a high window, shattering her spine. As she lay in hospital recovering, she claimed to have been pushed, but it was always assumed that, emotional as she obviously was then, she had jumped.

    In Channel 4's documentary, the actress Sarah Miles, a great friend of Kanga's, gives an electrifying account of what happened, as she describes Kanga insisting to her that she was indeed pushed.

    She also recounts the family's bizarre response to this latest calamity, when Lord Tryon invited her to lunch, along with ten other hangers-on, to reassure her that Kanga wasn't pushed and had, in fact, fallen....
    Supposedly the "fall" was from a first floor window.
    http://tooraktryon.blogspot.com/
    That would be kind of a lame murder attempt.
    Though I suppose it'd be a decent way to threaten someone.

  8. #18
    Myra Bronstein Guest

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    Um, so to summarize:

    6/97-Charles' mistress Camilla Parker Bowles has a serious auto accident.

    8/97-Charles' ex wife Diana dies in the auto "accident" in Paris.

    11/97-Charles' ex mistress Kanga Tryon dies.

    That's quite a time line.

  9. #19
    Myra Bronstein Guest

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    David, Do you know if it's true that shortly before Kanga's death she said she would publicize letters from Charles?

  10. #20

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    I hadn't heard that Myra, but death via lost letters seems to be a chronic condition that surrounds Charlie's femme fatales.

    Obviously a coincidence.

    Never write a letter about a leg-over, I say. And if you receive one, burn it.

    Yours in filial wisdom,

    Dr. David Offspring

    PS, I'm still thinking about falling from a first floor window and breaking one's neck. Where's double-glazing when you need it, eh?
    The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.
    Carl Jung - Aion (1951). CW 9, Part II: P.14

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