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Thread: The Power of the Paedos - another high profile case hits the 'never happened' wall?

  1. #431

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    In the previous post I asked: "I wonder what happened to make Geoff Dickens change his mind and not name the 8 VIP's?"

    2 + 2 = ?


    MP burgled after handing paedophile dossier to Leon Brittan

    Geoffrey Dickens, who handed the lost paedophile dossier to Leon Brittan in 1983, had two 'very professional' intrusions soon after, his son says

    Sir Leon Brittan Photo: AP









    7:22PM BST 02 Jul 2014


    The home of an MP who compiled a dossier alleging paedophile activity within Westminster was burgled twice in suspicious circumstances around the time he took it to the authorities, his son has said.

    Barry Dickens said nothing was taken in what appeared to be two ''very professional'' intrusions into his father Geoffrey's home in 1983, leading to suspicions they may have been related to his attempt to expose alleged abuse.

    He told ITV News he found it ''confusing and slightly worrying'' that the case appeared not to have been fully investigated at the time and backed calls for a public inquiry to establish the truth of the claims gathered by the Conservative MP.

    And he said he did no know what had happened to an apparent second copy of the dossier after the Home Office admitted one which it received for investigation at the time appeared to have been destroyed.

    ''My parents had two burglaries at the time close to it without anything being taken, which seemed a very professional job the way they were carried out, so again a bit of suspicion there but who knows,'' Mr Dickens – whose father died in 1995 – told the programme.

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    ''It seems strange to make that amount of effort and amount of concern to get in to a property and not take anything. Who knows ... another mystery''
    He said the dossier contained concerns and worries expressed to the MP about the behaviour of ''those with a high profile, in an office or high status'' and questioned its subsequent disappearance.
    Asked if he felt the then Home Secretary Leon Brittan had ''let down'' his father's work, he said: ''It's confusing in my eyes really why if you're standing up to do that job, and it's presented in black and white in front of you with facts and evidence, why you wouldn't go ahead with it or what you'd want to do with it.
    ''It's confusing and slightly worrying that the facts were there, it was all there, and nothing was done about it.''
    The ex-cabinet minister, now Lord Brittan, has defended his handling of the issue, insisted that there was ''appropriate action and follow up'' including the dossier being passed to prosecutors to consider.
    Mr Dickens said his father may have gone to his grave believing action was still being considered.
    ''I think he was led to believe it was ongoing and it would happen and it would happen and it would happen.
    ''Again I don't know how far down the line it was said it wouldn't. Maybe even to his death he thought it may happen afterwards.''
    Asked about the possibility of a second copy existing, he said: ''I believe one has gone into the Home Secretary at the time – where that one is who knows.
    ''And with my parents moving and then Dad being ill and dying, things were distributed around storage. I don't know to be honest ...''
    He said his father had been motivated to take on the cause of vulnerable young people by his own difficult childhood in a succession of foster homes and that he would be pleased that the case had become public now.
    ''If you knew him and how hard he worked and if he got his teeth into a campaign he was like a dog with a bone. Not surprised it's come to this to be honest.''
    Backing a public inquiry, added: ''A lot of people came forward with facts. I think it does need doing and finishing somehow. Definitely.''




    The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.
    Carl Jung - Aion (1951). CW 9, Part II: P.14

  2. #432

    Default

    Well, someone's turning the volume all the way up to 11. Who's the DJ and who is listening? It will be interesting to see how far this goes. Or is allowed to go.
    "I think it would be a good idea." Mahatma Gandhi, when asked what he thought of Western civilization.

    The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways; the point is to change it.
    Karl Marx.

    "Well, he would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies, 1963, replied Ms Rice Davies when the prosecuting counsel pointed out that Lord Astor denied an affair or having even met her.

  3. #433

    Default

    Cameron's now been concerned on it and, of course, waffled on about the police being the proper authority to investigate it - meaning he won't approve and independent inquiry, as a large number of MPs and other are calling for. I think this will run and run. Fingers crossed anyway.
    The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.
    Carl Jung - Aion (1951). CW 9, Part II: P.14

  4. #434

    Default

    More on the cover up.

    Snuck into the below story is the claim that a "senior Tory politician has been accused of abusing a young boy at Elm Guest House, but police are understood to have insufficient evidence to take any action". Well, that's not a shock but it further strengthens claims of a continuing cover up of that pelicans who is said to have a close relation to both David Cameron and Nick Clegg. It has been earlier stated that a videotape existed compromising this same senior politician.

    Tory MP allegedly found with child porn in 1980s faced no charges, police told

    Senior Conservative politician allegedly caught with child pornography videos in the 1980s faced no further action, it has been claimed

    The videotapes and paperwork relating to the seizure have since gone missing Photo: ALAMY








    By Gordon Rayner, Tim Tate and Christopher Hope

    6:00AM BST 04 Jul 2014


    A senior Tory politician said to be part of a child sex ring was allegedly stopped by a customs officer with child pornography videos but got off scot-free, police have been told.

    The former MP was driving back to the UK via Dover when a customs officer pulled him over because he was “acting suspiciously”. The border guard, who is now retired, has told detectives that when he searched the MP’s car he found videotapes of children “clearly under the age of 12” taking part in sex acts.

    He passed the material on to his superiors, but the MP was never arrested or charged.

    And, like a dossier of evidence compiled by the late Geoffrey Dickens MP, the videotapes and paperwork relating to the seizure have since gone missing.

    The latest disclosure will increase accusations of a cover-up, as no action was taken against the MP at the time the videos were seized. The same MP is understood to have been named in the Dickens dossier, which was handed to the then Home Secretary Lord Brittan but has since been lost or destroyed.

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    The customs officer who stopped the MP in the 1980s has spoken to detectives from Operation Fernbridge, the Metropolitan Police investigation into allegations of child abuse by Cyril Smith and others at Elm Guest House in Barnes, south London, which has since closed down.
    A senior Tory politician has been accused of abusing a young boy at the guest house, but police are understood to have insufficient evidence to take any action.
    A source close to the investigation said that the customs officer was originally approached over claims that a known paedophile had been stopped with a videotape showing the MP at a sex party with underage boys. The customs officer said the report was false, but told police he had stopped the MP in question and seized child pornography videos from him.
    The source said: “He viewed the tapes on a video recorder at the border control, and found them to contain pornography involving both underage girls and boys together. He said the children were clearly under the age of 12.
    “Unfortunately he can’t remember the exact date when it happened, but he had no doubt about the identity of the MP because he checked his passport. He said he had passed the details of the seizure up the chain of command and had no knowledge of what happened after that.
    “The officers on the case have not been able to find the videotapes or any paperwork to corroborate his account.”
    Lord Brittan, now 74, has faced questions over his handling of a bundle of papers handed to him by the late Mr Dickens, which contained allegations against the same MP, and against a number of other prominent figures, some of whom were part of the Paedophile Information Exchange (PIE) which campaigned for the lowering of the age of consent. The Labour MP Simon Danczuk has suggested the dossier was “destroyed to protect the people whose names were in it”.
    Meanwhile The Daily Telegraph has learnt that four more cases of historic sex abuse have been referred to the police by Home Office officials in recent months.
    An internal review of hundreds of thousands of Home Office files found 13 previously undisclosed “items of alleged child abuse” last year.
    The Home Office said nine of the 13 cases had previously been reported to the police – including four which involved the department’s officials.
    However, the remaining four were overlooked by civil servants – and have now been reported to the Metropolitan Police.
    The cases were unearthed by an internal review ordered in February last year. Mr Danczuk questioned why the Home Office had not passed on the cases to the police earlier.
    He said: “It’s never the job of the Home Office to try and determine what constituted potential evidence, that's the job of the police and the Crown Prosecution Service.
    “The public will think that people in the Home Office were withholding information from the police which could have led to the successful prosecution of child sex abusers.”
    A Home Office spokesman said: "The review concluded the Home Office acted appropriately, referring information received during this period to the relevant authorities.”
    Tom Watson, the Labour MP who was the first to raise questions about paedophiles within Westminster, last night called on Alison Saunders, the Director of Public Prosecutions, to examine the evidence relating to the former MP.
    He said: "I sincerely hope the DPP has been made aware of these allegations and will be considering it as part of her examination of other allegations."




    The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.
    Carl Jung - Aion (1951). CW 9, Part II: P.14

  5. #435

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    Pressure continues this morning on Cameron to order an independent inquiry with the Beeb running this as a lead story. Cameron is resisting fiercely.

    Meanwhile, back in boys for questions land --- Parliament:


    'More than 10' politicians on list held by police investigating Westminster 'paedophile ring'

    Whistleblower who prompted Operation Fernbridge says up to 40 MPs and peers knew about or took part in child abuse

    Cyril Smith is among the politicians on a list of names held by police investigating historic child abuse Photo: REX FEATURES









    By Gordon Rayner, and David Barrett

    10:00PM BST 04 Jul 2014



    More than 10 current and former politicians are on a list of alleged child abusers held by police investigating claims of a Westminster paedophile ring.

    MPs or peers from all three main political parties are on the list, which includes former ministers and household names.

    Several, including Cyril Smith and Sir Peter Morrison, are no longer alive, but others are still active in Parliament.

    The existence of the list was disclosed by Peter McKelvie, the whistleblower whose claims prompted Operation Fernbridge, the Scotland Yard investigation into allegations of a paedophile network with links to Downing Street.

    Mr McKelvie, a retired child protection team manager who has spent more than 20 years compiling evidence of alleged abuse by authority figures, said he believed there was enough evidence to arrest at least one senior politician.

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    It comes as David Cameron ordered the most senior civil servant at the Home Office to conduct a fresh investigation into what happened to a missing dossier on alleged paedophiles in Westminster in the 1980s.
    The Prime Minister told Mark Sedwill, the Permanent Secretary at the Home Office, to “do everything he can” to clear up what happened to the file, which was handed to the then home secretary Leon (now Lord) Brittan by the late Geoffrey Dickens MP.
    Separately Theresa May, the Home Secretary, said yesterday she would “examine the case” for a public inquiry into historical child abuse in public life, for which 139 MPs have now called.
    Mr McKelvie, who helped bring the notorious paedophile Peter Righton to justice in 1992 when he worked in Hereford and Worcester child protection team, said: “I believe there are sufficient grounds to carry out a formal investigation into allegations of up to 20 MPs and Lords over the last three to four decades, some still alive and some dead. The list is there.”
    In a letter to his local MP Sir Tony Baldry last month, Mr McKelvie suggested that a further 20 MPs and Lords were implicated in the “cover-up” of abuse of children.
    Mr McKelvie, who has compiled a dossier of evidence by speaking to alleged victims and care workers with whom they are in contact, does not suggest that any of the MPs and Lords colluded with each other.
    It was as a result of information provided by Mr McKelvie that the Labour MP Tom Watson raised the issue of child abuse at Prime Minister’s Questions in October 2012. He spoke of “clear intelligence suggesting a powerful paedophile network linked to Parliament and Number 10” that arose from the Righton case.
    Following Mr Watson’s intervention, the Metropolitan Police began Operation Fernbridge, an ongoing investigation into allegations of sex abuse at the Elm Guest House in Barnes, south London.
    At least one witness is understood to have told police in the 1980s that he was abused by a Tory MP at the guest house when he was aged under 10, but the alleged victim has so far refused to give a sworn a witness statement to the police.
    The Metropolitan Police has consistently said it is “not prepared to give a running commentary on Operation Fernbridge, which is an ongoing operation”.
    Earlier this week it emerged that a dossier on an alleged Westminster paedophile network compiled by the late MP Geoffrey Dickens went missing after it was handed to the former home secretary Lord Brittan in 1983.
    Simon Danczuk, the Labour MP who raised questions about the dossier, said yesterday he had received a dozen new allegations naming the same politician this week.
    He and six other MPs have written to Mrs May demanding a public inquiry, and in her reply Mrs May said “nothing has been ruled out”, adding: “Once the criminal investigations have concluded, I will thoroughly examine the case for an inquiry into the matters you have raised.”
    Speaking about the Dickens dossier, the Prime Minister said he understood the concerns about the missing file.
    He said: “That's why I've asked the permanent secretary at the Home Office to do everything he can to find answers to all of these questions and to make sure we can reassure people about these events.
    "So it's right that these investigations are made. We mustn't do anything, of course, that could prejudice or prevent proper action by the police.
    "If anyone has information about criminal wrong-doing they should, of course, give it to the police."
    Yesterday The Daily Telegraph disclosed that a senior Tory who is being investigated as part of Operation Fernbridge was allegedly stopped by a customs officer with child pornography in the 1980s.
    The customs officer who made the seizure can now be named as Maganlal Solanki, 76, who said at his home in Leicester yesterday: “I don't want to go over it all. It's very disturbing for me. I've been told not to say anything by my department."
    Asked about the senior Tory, who was never arrested over the alleged child pornography seizure, Mr Solanki said: “Well, that is just a matter for him.”




    The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.
    Carl Jung - Aion (1951). CW 9, Part II: P.14

  6. #436

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    From Craig Murray's blog.

    Who, I wonder, was the very senior person referenced, that required Special Branch officers to put guns to the heads of witnesses, telling them to drop the case or else? Hhmm. Whoever it was/is it they have got to be ranked a government minister at the very least, to warrant SB involvement.

    Now who had that file when it went missing?


    Elm Guest House

    by craig on July 2, 2014 5:12 pm in Uncategorized
    There is a huge amount of dancing on eggshells going on today in the media about the dossier on paedophile activity with which Leon Brittan came in contact in the 1980s. It is pretty plain there is a subtext here.
    A number of people have contacted me for some years over the Elm Guest House paedophile ring. Frankly I did not particularly believe it, or thought it was exaggerated. But I confess my eyes have been opened by the Jimmy Savile, Cyril Smith and Rolf Harris affairs and the extent of complicity and even protection which they received from the establishment.
    I have blogged before that, in the Savile case, as his behaviour was apparently compulsive and constant, I found it hard to believe it was not known in the very senior societal circles in which he spent so much of his time. I am convinced that perception was right.
    Savile is not linked in to the Elm House paedophile ring, as far as I know, but Cyril Smith is. So were the then head of the Royal Protection Unit and of Special Branch. That to me raises all sorts of queries about whether they were not just participating themselves but protecting someone very senior indeed. I have been convinced that it is true that social workers interviewing child victims were indeed threatened with guns by Special Branch to drop it, and that paperwork has been confiscated and destroyed.
    On Cyril Smith, Channel 4 Dispatches on 12 September 2013 reported that:
    ‘Speaking for the first time, former CID officer Jack Tasker tells the programme that Special Branch officers arrived at his office, told him to halt his investigations and demanded that the file be handed over to them,.“They made it quite clear that anything that was kept by us would bring repercussions if we didn’t hand it over; that as far as we are concerned, the inquiry is finished … you will take no more inquiries into Cyril Smith
    Compare that to what happened to child protection officer Chris Fay in his Elm House investigation, as reported in the Express:
    Mr Fay, 67, of south London, said: “It became very dangerous. People seem to forget that Special Branch could do what they liked, they were a law unto themselves.
    “At one point they had me up against a wall by my throat with a gun at my head telling me in no uncertain terms that I was to back away if I knew what was good for me.
    “A colleague of mine had the same treatment, as did a number of the volunteers. Victims who were actually abused at Elm House were also physically stopped from coming to speak to us at the NAYPIC office in north London.
    “I witnessed Special Branch officers manhandling them and turning them away with a warning to keep their mouths shut. It was blatant, it was open, they were acting like gangsters.
    In both Rochdale and in North London, Special Branch intervened to block the appropriate authorities on the ground from investigating what was a genuine paedophile scandal. I can see no other possible explanation than that the scandal involved figures a great deal more senior than Cyril Smith. From the Elm Guest House we have a pointer who some of those people were.
    I really don’t want to blog any more about this, and I recommend you to have a search online. That involves trawling around some of the less pleasant parts of the internet, and I have seen material that is horribly anti-Semitic and anti-gay. But after years of dismissing the stories, on the grounds that they are promulgated by unpleasant people, in unpleasant newspapers, or cannot be true, I realise I was wrong.

    The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.
    Carl Jung - Aion (1951). CW 9, Part II: P.14

  7. #437

    Default

    Pleased to see Craig has come round to understanding more about how low some powerful people will go when it comes to child sexual abuse and covering it up. He is clear enough about their motives when it comes to other areas which he well knows from personal experience.
    "I think it would be a good idea." Mahatma Gandhi, when asked what he thought of Western civilization.

    The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways; the point is to change it.
    Karl Marx.

    "Well, he would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies, 1963, replied Ms Rice Davies when the prosecuting counsel pointed out that Lord Astor denied an affair or having even met her.

  8. #438

    Default

    New twist in Westminster scandal: 114 secret files on paedophile cases missing, admits Government

    • Government says 114 secret files on paedophile cases have gone missing
    • Four new cases of alleged child abuse are to be investigated by the police
    • Top lawyer to investigate handling of dossier alleging paedophile activity
    • Dossier was passed to Home Secretary Leon Brittan but subsequently lost
    • The file was originally handed over by Tory MP Geoffrey Dickens in 1983
    • David Cameron has been forced to order fresh hunt for the missing dossier

    By Simon Walters and Glen Owen
    Published: 07:09 AEST, 6 July 2014 | Updated: 09:50 AEST, 6 July 2014


    370 shares


    +3

    A top lawyer is to investigate the handling of a dossier which was passed to Tory Home Secretary Leon Brittan in 1983 but subsequently lost


    The row over an alleged Westminster child sex ring took a new turn last night after the Government admitted that 114 secret files on paedophile cases have gone missing.
    And four new cases of alleged child abuse, possibly dating back decades, are to be investigated by police.
    The development came as the Home Office ordered a full-scale legal inquiry into claims there has been an Establishment cover-up of a powerful network of child sex abusers linked to Parliament and No 10.
    A top lawyer is to investigate the Government’s handling of a dossier alleging high-level paedophile activity, which was first passed to Home Secretary Leon Brittan by Tory MP Geoffrey Dickens in 1983 – but subsequently lost.
    Mark Sedwill, the Home Office permanent secretary, told David Cameron yesterday that the new investigation would examine whether the findings of a review of the ‘Dickens dossier’ conducted last year ‘remain sound’.
    The earlier review failed to find the dossier and said its contents had been broken up, with relevant information passed to the police and the rest destroyed.

    As public fears of a cover-up grow, Mr Cameron has been forced to order a fresh hunt for the missing dossier.
    The Prime Minister said: ‘It’s right that these investigations are made. We mustn’t do anything that could prejudice or prevent proper action by the police.’
    For the first time, Mr Sedwill also revealed there had been previous attempts to find the dossier – and how huge numbers of Home Office files have either vanished or been destroyed.
    He said a massive review of 746,000 Home Office files covering 1979 to 1999 had identified ‘573 relevant files which had been retained’.
    However, he added: ‘The extensive analysis of the central database identified 114 potentially relevant files had been destroyed, missing or not found.



    +3

    Conservative MP Geoffrey Dickens who died in 1995 told his family the dossier would 'blow the lid off' the lives of powerful and famous child abusers


    'The investigation identified 13 items of alleged child abuse, nine of which were known or reported to the police including four involving Home Office staff.
    ‘The remaining four, which had not been previously disclosed, have now been passed to the police.’

    Mr Sedwill did not provide names, or say if the four cases involved public figures. He vowed to appoint a ‘senior, independent legal figure’ this week.

    +3



    His comments came in a letter to senior Labour MP Keith Vaz, who said: ‘I welcome this inquiry but it is essential that it reports promptly and comprehensively.’
    Fellow Labour MP Simon Danczuk said: ‘The missing files raise serious questions. This suggests either incompetence on a wide scale or a massive cover-up.’
    He has also suggested the dossier was destroyed to protect people named in it.
    Mr Dickens, who died in 1995, told his family that the dossier would ‘blow the lid off’ powerful and famous figures who were child abusers.

    His son Barry said his father would have been ‘hugely angered’ that the allegations had not been properly investigated.
    Campaigning Labour MP Tom Watson said last night that the new review did not go far enough and called for a wider inquiry into whether police were pressured into not pursuing investigations.

    It was also claimed last night that more than ten current or former politicians are on a list of alleged child abusers held by police investigating claims of a Westminster paedophile ring.

    Several, including Cyril Smith and Tory grandee Sir Peter Morrison, have died, but others are still active in Parliament.
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...g-decades.html
    "I think it would be a good idea." Mahatma Gandhi, when asked what he thought of Western civilization.

    The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways; the point is to change it.
    Karl Marx.

    "Well, he would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies, 1963, replied Ms Rice Davies when the prosecuting counsel pointed out that Lord Astor denied an affair or having even met her.

  9. #439

    Default

    Pressure continues to grow on Cameron to stop flaming people with ordering a new review of an old review and order a proper independent inquiry that will get to the bottom of this affair.

    And for the first time in public (that I am aware of anyway) one of several allegations has now surfaced regarding, former Home Secretary, Leon Brittan, who was questioned by police, last month, over a historic rape allegation. From what I understand, he was also questioned by police months ago about a certain VHS video recording and a young under age boy at Elm Guest House?


    Leon Brittan Exclusive: Tory peer was questioned last month by police over rape allegation



    Former home secretary accused of raping 19-year-old student in 1967

    JAMIE MERRILL

    Sunday 06 July 2014

    The former cabinet minister Leon Brittan has been questioned by police under caution in connection with an alleged rape, The Independent on Sunday can reveal.

    It is understood that the former Conservative home secretary has been accused of raping a 19-year-old student at his London flat in 1967 before he became an MP.
    The alleged female victim is believed to have claimed that Lord Brittan, who went on to serve as home secretary from 1983 to 1985, raped her in his central London flat after a blind date.
    It is understood that Lord Brittan strongly denied the allegation. The veteran Conservative figure, who was made a life peer in 2000, is understood to have been questioned by police at the central London offices of his lawyers Mishcon De Reya last month.
    Last night a Metropolitan Police spokesman confirmed an allegation of rape had been made against a man in his seventies over an incident in 1967. The spokesman said: "The woman was over the age of 18 at the time of the incident. The allegation is being investigated by officers from the Sexual Offences, Exploitation and Child Abuse Command. In June 2014, a man aged in his seventies was interviewed under caution by appointment at a central London location in connection with the allegation. He was not arrested. Enquiries continue."



    MP Tom Watson
    Last night, Lord Brittan declined to discuss the allegation, saying: "I'm sorry, I'm not going to talk about anything like that." Mishcon De Reya did not respond to requests for comment.
    The detectives who questioned the veteran Conservative politician are understood to be part of Scotland Yard's Operation Fairbank inquiry team which was launched after Tom Watson MP made allegations of widespread child abuse in Parliament. The specific rape allegations against Lord Brittan are understood to have nothing to do with the Met's Operation Fernbridge investigations into child abuse.
    The Home Office announced last night that it will re-examine a 2013 review into Mr Watson's allegations. The original review found that the department passed all relevant information concerning historical child abuse claims to police.
    Mark Sedwill, Home Office Permanent Secretary, wrote to the Prime Minister confirming he would "engage a senior independent legal figure to assess" the outcome of the 2013 investigation. The review found that the Home Office had acted appropriately in relation to historical complaints of child abuse.



    MP Keith Vaz
    However, in a separate letter yesterday to Keith Vaz MP, chair of the Home Affairs Select Committee, Mr Sedwill detailed how this review had established that 114 "potentially relevant files" had either been lost or destroyed.
    He also added that it had not found a "single dossier" from late Tory MP Geoffrey Dickens, which was handed to Lord Brittan when he was home secretary in the 1980s. Rather, the 2013 report found records showing several "sets of correspondence".
    The so-called "Dickens dossier", which was reported to contain allegations of a predatory paedophile network operating in Westminster during the 1980s, was at the centre of controversy last week when Lord Brittan confirmed he was handed the dossier. He said he had asked his officials to "look carefully" at the material.
    Now I wonder why the Met spokesman made the point of stating that the alleged rape was "over the age of 18 at the time." Rape is rape. Was he alluding to something else altogether or seeking to deflect other more compelling questions?
    The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.
    Carl Jung - Aion (1951). CW 9, Part II: P.14

  10. #440

    Default Tebbit weighs in - it was a political cover up over child abuse on the 1980's "he believes".

    Personally, I think "he knows". He was one of Thatcher's praetorian guard and would know, "I believe".


    Lord Tebbit hints at political cover-up in 1980s over child abuse

    Ex-Thatcher minister says people's instinct was to protect 'the system' as it emerged a further 114 documents have been lost


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    Lord Tebbit: 'There may well have been [a cover-up]. But it was almost unconscious. It was the thing that people did at that time.' Photograph: Felix Clay

    The former Conservative cabinet minister Lord Tebbit has said he believes there "may well" have been a political cover-up over child abuse in the 1980s.
    Lord Tebbit, who served in a series of ministerial posts under Margaret Thatcher, said the instinct of people at the time was to protect "the system" and not to delve too deeply into uncomfortable allegations.
    His comment came as the Home Office announced a fresh legal review into what happened to a file alleging paedophile activity at Westminster in the 1980s that was handed to the then home secretary Leon (now Lord) Brittan by the Tory MP Geoffrey Dickens.
    But as it emerged on Sunday that a further 114 possibly relevant files have also gone missing from government files– the government again ruled out a public inquiry into the allegations.
    Michael Gove told the BBC1's Andrew Marr Show that the inquiry, to be led by a senior lawyer, would suffice, highlighting the fact that there were ongoing criminal inquiries. He said that he and the health secretary, Jeremy Hunt, were also reviewwing current child protection practice to ensure that children were properly protected.
    Also appearing on The Andrew Marr Show, Tebbit said: "At that time I think most people would have thought that the establishment, the system, was to be protected and if a few things had gone wrong here and there that it was more important to protect the system than to delve too far into it.
    "That view, I think, was wrong then and it is spectacularly shown to be wrong because the abuses have grown."
    Asked if he thought there had been a "big political cover-up" at the time, he said: "I think there may well have been. But it was almost unconscious. It was the thing that people did at that time."
    The missing dossier compiled by Dickens is thought to have detailed allegations of a 1980s Westminster paedophile ring and is now known to be one of 114 potentially relevant Home Office files destroyed, lost or missing, it has emerged.
    David Cameron has already ordered the Home Office permanent secretary to look into what happened to the lost dossier but the revelation that further relevant documents have disappeared will raise fresh fears of an establishment cover-up.
    Simon Danczuk, the MP for Rochdale, who is calling for an overarching national inquiry into historical child abuse, said: "I had absolutely no idea these other files were also missing. The public view will be that there is something fishy going on. The public will understandably think these documents have gone missing because it helps protect the names of those identified in them. That is the conclusion that many will come to, and who could blame them"
    Tom Watson, the Labour MP central to the uncovering of the phone-hacking scandal, said it was increasingly clear than only a Hillsborough-style inquiry would reassure the public. He said: "Only an overarching inquiry will get to the facts, everything else the government says or does on this is a diversion."
    Dickens, who died in 1995, had told his family that the information he handed to the home secretary in 1983 and 1984 would "blow the lid off" the lives of powerful and famous child abusers, including eight well-known figures.
    In a letter to Dickens at the time, Brittan suggested his information would be passed to the police, but Scotland Yard says it has no record of any investigation into the allegations. On Saturday, the Home Office made public a letter to Keith Vaz, the chairman of the home affairs select committee, in which the department confirmed that correspondence from Dickens had not been retained and it had found "no record of specific allegations by Mr Dickens of child sex abuse by prominent public figures".
    The Home Office's permanent secretary, Mark Sedwill, admitted, however, that a further 114 documents relevant to allegations of child abuse were missing from the department's records. That discovery was made last year by an independent review into information received about organised child sex abuse but was not published in its report. Sedwill told Vaz the missing documents were some of the 36,000 records which officials presumed were lost, destroyed or missing. They were not part of the 278,000 documents the Home Office destroyed as part of its "retention and destruction" policy.
    However, Sedwill told Vaz in a letter published on Saturday that the department had found "no evidence of the inappropriate removal or destruction of material".
    He also wrote to the prime minister to tell him he would engage a senior independent legal figure to assess whether last year's conclusions "remain sound".
    Sedwill told Vaz: "Like any other citizen, I am horrified by what we have learned in the past couple of years about the systematic abuse of children and vulnerable adults by prominent public figures, and the state's failure to protect them. Some have been brought to justice, and I hope that the police investigations now under way across the country are equally successful. The Home Office has and will cooperate fully with any police inquiry."
    Vaz said the number of files lost were of an "industrial scale". He told BBC Breakfast he welcomed the letter from Sedwill, adding: "We will want to pose further questions of course, because there's a lot of information that we didn't know was in existence that he's given us in this letter.
    "But also I think that the government and Mr Sedwill should work with parliament in fashioning a set of terms of reference that will satisfy all those who are dissatisfied with the way in which matters have been progressed so far - so I think it's an important step which we welcome."
    Labour MP Margaret Hodge, who chairs the public accounts committee, said there had been a "veil of secrecy" over the establishment for far too long.
    Appearing on Sky News's Murnaghan programme, she added: "Thank God it is coming out into the open. I think the really interesting thing about it is there has been a veil of secrecy over the establishment for far too long.
    "Now the establishment who thought they were always protected … find actually they are subject to the same rigours of the law and that's right.
    "What we really need to get right as well is how children are cared for today. Let's learn from the historic abuse, let's actually give victims the right to have their voice on that, but let's actually also focus on the present."



    The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.
    Carl Jung - Aion (1951). CW 9, Part II: P.14

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