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Thread: Jeffrey Epstein

  1. #21

    Default Some names here

    Jeffrey Epstein address book 'Holy Grail’ of famous names



    Related

    Jeffrey Epstein amends lawsuit; claims victims’ attorney threatened to depose his friends

    By Michele Dargan
    Daily News Staff Writer
    When talking about the personal address book of billionaire sex offender Jeffrey Epstein, the term “little black book” takes that phrase to a whole new level.
    Manhattan money manager Epstein’s book reads like a laundry list of the world’s richest and most powerful people, including some Palm Beachers.
    Referred to as “The Holy Grail” by Epstein’s former house manager **— now serving time for trying to sell it to attorneys — the 97-page address book details multiple addresses, phone numbers, e-mails and other contact information for former President Bill Clinton, Britain’s Prince Andrew and Sarah Ferguson, Donald Trump, Sen. John Kerry, various members of the Kennedy clan and former British Prime Minister Tony Blair, among many others.
    The British press has been having a field day digging up new details about Epstein’s friendship with Prince Andrew. Virginia Roberts — known only as Jane Doe 102 in court papers — has been dishing her story to London’s Daily Mail. Details include Roberts having been in the company of the prince three times at Epstein’s behest.
    Roberts also recounted meeting Clinton on Epstein’s private Caribbean island, according to the Mail.
    But Roberts made no suggestion of sexual relations with Prince Andrew or with Clinton, the Mail reported. Similarly, there is no suggestion of anything salacious with any of the Palm Beachers listed among the money manager’s contacts.
    Roberts — who spent four years with Epstein — refers to him as “a monster” who paid her lavishly to satisfy his and his friends sexual whims — although Roberts doesn’t identify the friends.
    British papers also have reported that Ferguson accepted £15,000 from Epstein. The money was paid to her former assistant, who claimed Ferguson owed him unpaid wages and other bills. Ferguson has since told the Mail and other British papers that she made “a gigantic error of judgment” in accepting the money from Epstein and that she will pay him back.
    The entire “Grail” was made public as part of a pending civil court case in which Epstein is suing attorney Brad Edwards, who represented several underage girls who sued Epstein.
    Epstein sued Edwards, alleging he was involved in false claims made by Ponzi schemer Scott Rothstein; Edwards countersued Epstein, saying he filed a frivolous lawsuit to get him to back down from representing the young women.
    All the lawsuits against Epstein said his modus operandi in the initial visit was the same: The girls were taken to Epstein’s Palm Beach mansion and led upstairs to a spa room by one of Epstein’s assistants, where he would ask the girls to perform sexually charged massages and/or various sex acts, for which he would pay them.
    Other high-profile names in Epstein’s book include Special Envoy for Middle East Peace George Mitchell, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, Barbara Walters, Alec Baldwin, Ralph Fiennes, George Hamilton, Dustin Hoffman, Kevin Spacey, Liz Hurley, Lauren Hutton, Janice Dickinson, Naomi Campbell, Christy Turlington, Henry Kissinger, Joan Rivers, Courtney Love, Mick Jagger, Cornelia Guest, Phil Collins, Itzhak Perlman, Simon LeBon, Charlie Rose, Richard Branson, playwright Candace Bushnell, designers Tom Ford and Vera Wang, soap opera actress Nadia Bjorlin and erotic film star Koo Stark, who once dated Prince Andrew.
    Among the high-powered Palm Beachers listed in the money manager’s address book are Catherine and Fred Adler, Samantha and Serena Boardman, Jimmy and Jane Buffett, Pepe Fanjul, Conrad and Barbara Black, Gerry Goldsmith, Marjorie Gubelman, Dana Hammond, David Koch, Henry Kravis, Frayda and George Lindemann Sr., Bob and Todd Meister, Alfred Taubman, Stanley, Bea and Brett Tollman, and Martin Trust.
    Gaston Cantens, a spokesman for Florida Crystals Corp., said Fanjul and Epstein “obviously knew each other and had some contact in the past. But there isn’t any ongoing business or social relationship with Mr. Epstein.”
    Reached by phone at his Palm Beach home, media mogul Black said he knew Epstein as “a friend of my colleague Mr. Wexner.”
    Les Wexner, CEO of The Limited Brands, was reported to have been Epstein’s biggest client and close friend. Wexner replaced Epstein as his money manager, according to recent reports.
    Some of the names in Epstein’s book are sub-listed under geographic locations. The heading “massage” is notated under many of Epstein’s locations. Names and phone numbers, most of them first names only, are listed under the massage entries.
    Registered as a level 3 sex offender, Epstein pleaded guilty to soliciting underage girls for sex at his El Brillo Way home in Palm Beach. In addition to serving 13 months of an 18-month jail sentence, Epstein has settled at least two dozen lawsuits with young women for undisclosed amounts.
    http://www.palmbeachdailynews.com/ne....Mi4JfYes.uxfs
    "I think it would be a good idea." Mahatma Gandhi, when asked what he thought of Western civilization.

    The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways; the point is to change it.
    Karl Marx.

    "Well, he would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies, 1963, replied Ms Rice Davies when the prosecuting counsel pointed out that Lord Astor denied an affair or having even met her.

  2. #22

    Default Coincidence?

    Bill Cosby is a neighbour of Jeffrey Epstein at his apartment in NY. Leslie Wexner is also Epstein only publicly known investor.

    Streetscapes/71st Street Between Fifth and Madison Avenues; Stylish Block of 19th- and 20th-Century Town Houses

    By CHRISTOPHER GRAY
    Published: May 13, 2001







    THE Frick Mansion, built in 1914 at 70th Street and Fifth Avenue, turned its back to 71st Street with a long, elegant wall of limestone. But well-known architects and well-to-do residents did not turn their backs to the block of 71st between Fifth and Madison. The architects over the years have included Carrère & Hastings and C. P. H. Gilbert, the home owners Bill Cosby and Leslie H. Wexner, the founder of the Limited.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2001/05/13/re...19th-20th.html
    "I think it would be a good idea." Mahatma Gandhi, when asked what he thought of Western civilization.

    The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways; the point is to change it.
    Karl Marx.

    "Well, he would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies, 1963, replied Ms Rice Davies when the prosecuting counsel pointed out that Lord Astor denied an affair or having even met her.

  3. #23

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Magda Hassan View Post
    Bill Cosby is a neighbour of Jeffrey Epstein at his apartment in NY. Leslie Wexner is also Epstein only publicly known investor.



    Maybe he wasn't a billionaire. I wonder if JE was a honey trap set up by some state actor for blackmail purposes. Epstein? Hmmm? Israel? Oops. That would be antisemitism.
    "We'll know our disinformation campaign is complete when everything the American public believes is false." --William J. Casey, D.C.I

    "We will lead every revolution against us." --Theodore Herzl

  4. #24

    Default An interesting read

    "I think it would be a good idea." Mahatma Gandhi, when asked what he thought of Western civilization.

    The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways; the point is to change it.
    Karl Marx.

    "Well, he would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies, 1963, replied Ms Rice Davies when the prosecuting counsel pointed out that Lord Astor denied an affair or having even met her.

  5. #25

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lauren Johnson View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Magda Hassan View Post
    Bill Cosby is a neighbour of Jeffrey Epstein at his apartment in NY. Leslie Wexner is also Epstein only publicly known investor.

    Maybe he wasn't a billionaire. I wonder if JE was a honey trap set up by some state actor for blackmail purposes. Epstein? Hmmm? Israel? Oops. That would be antisemitism.
    Yes. I have seen suggestions of this. It has been mentioned in comments in some of the articles that Epstein and Wexner were also lovers. Other possible honey trap scenarios are that this is a Mossad job. Dershowitz, Wexner and Epstein besides being close friends and had business relationships together are staunch 'friends of Israel' and raise money for Israel. Having houses all wired up with sound and video and children shared sexually with various visitors would create a very powerful tool to use. But who is using it? Certainly the opportunity for very large amounts of money and huge amount of leverage. Maxwell was Mossad (and MI%) supposedly. I wonder if his daughter is also?
    "I think it would be a good idea." Mahatma Gandhi, when asked what he thought of Western civilization.

    The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways; the point is to change it.
    Karl Marx.

    "Well, he would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies, 1963, replied Ms Rice Davies when the prosecuting counsel pointed out that Lord Astor denied an affair or having even met her.

  6. #26

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Magda Hassan View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Lauren Johnson View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Magda Hassan View Post
    Bill Cosby is a neighbour of Jeffrey Epstein at his apartment in NY. Leslie Wexner is also Epstein only publicly known investor.

    Maybe he wasn't a billionaire. I wonder if JE was a honey trap set up by some state actor for blackmail purposes. Epstein? Hmmm? Israel? Oops. That would be antisemitism.
    Yes. I have seen suggestions of this. It has been mentioned in comments in some of the articles that Epstein and Wexner were also lovers. Other possible honey trap scenarios are that this is a Mossad job. Dershowitz, Wexner and Epstein besides being close friends and had business relationships together are staunch 'friends of Israel' and raise money for Israel. Having houses all wired up with sound and video and children shared sexually with various visitors would create a very powerful tool to use. But who is using it? Certainly the opportunity for very large amounts of money and huge amount of leverage. Maxwell was Mossad (and MI%) supposedly. I wonder if his daughter is also?
    The Mossad honey trap angle might suggest that the teen aged girls were procured or even manipulated "volunteers" from Israel. Going down the path of "sex slave" would be a form of limited hang out. Do I think this? Just putting it out there.
    "We'll know our disinformation campaign is complete when everything the American public believes is false." --William J. Casey, D.C.I

    "We will lead every revolution against us." --Theodore Herzl

  7. #27

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lauren Johnson View Post
    The Mossad honey trap angle might suggest that the teen aged girls were procured or even manipulated "volunteers" from. Going down the path of "sex slave" would be a form of limited hang out. Do I think this? Just putting it out there.
    That would not go down too well in the community. Much more likely and works better to be outsiders and there are plenty of impoverished girls and girls with low self esteem around to manipulate. And we see that so many of them are trafficked around. Montenegro, France, eastern Europe etc. He himself only liked white girls apparently.
    "I think it would be a good idea." Mahatma Gandhi, when asked what he thought of Western civilization.

    The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways; the point is to change it.
    Karl Marx.

    "Well, he would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies, 1963, replied Ms Rice Davies when the prosecuting counsel pointed out that Lord Astor denied an affair or having even met her.

  8. #28

    Default I Tried to Warn You About Sleazy Billionaire Jeffrey Epstein in 2003

    I Tried to Warn You About Sleazy Billionaire Jeffrey Epstein in 2003

    When Vicky Ward profiled Jeffrey Epstein for Vanity Fair, allegations of his attempted seduction of two young sisters were excised from the final piece.

    “Jeffrey wanted me to tell you that you looked so pretty,” the female voice said into my disbelieving ear.
    It was the fall of 2002. I was pregnant, uncomfortably so, for the first time and with twins, due the following March. I was besieged by a relentless morning sickness. I was sick in street gutters, onto my desk, at dinners with friends. I suffered severe bloating and water retention.
    But here was this faux-compliment coming, bizarrely and a bit grotesquely, from a woman I hadn’t met—a female assistant who worked for one Jeffrey Epstein, a mysterious Gatsby-esque financier whom I’d been assigned to write about by my then-boss Graydon Carter, the editor of Vanity Fair. (Epstein had caught the attention of the press when he had flown Bill Clinton on his jet to Africa. No one knew who he was or understood how he’d made his money.)
    Upon hearing of my assignment, Epstein had invited me to an off-the-record tea at his Upper East Side house (during which I distinctly remember he rudely ate all the finger food himself) and then had his assistant call to tell me he’d thought I was pretty.
    At first—it was the early stages of reporting—I was amused at having been so crassly underestimated. For a man who clearly considered himself a sophisticated ladies’ man (the only book he’d left out for me to see was a paperback by the Marquis de Sade), I thought his journalist-seduction technique was a bit like his table manners—in dire need of improvement.
    If only it had all ended there. This was what it had been meant to be. A gossipy piece about a shadowy, slightly sinister but essentially harmless man who preferred track-pants to suits but somehow lived very large, had wealthy, important friends, hung out with models, and shied away from the press.
    But it didn’t.
    I haven’t ever wanted to go back and dwell on that dark time. But then the latest Epstein scandal broke, when Prince Andrew was accused in a Florida court filing of having sex with a 17-year-old girl while she was a “sex slave” of Epstein’s.
    “The advice I was given was he is so wealthy, he can fight you, he can make your daughters look ridiculous, plus he can hurt them.”

    In the last 48 hours I’ve had a journalist from the U.K. Sun newspaper put herself inside my foyer. I’ve been inundated with requests for TV interviews. And Epstein’s old mentor, the convicted fraudster Steven Hoffenberg, recently released from jail after a 20-year sentence, has been pestering me and my agent to write a movie.
    Separately, Hoffenberg’s daughter has gotten in touch—and it’s gotten me thinking. There are some injustices that maybe only time can right. And perhaps now is the time. Things happened then that simply shouldn’t have, and if I don’t talk about them, then probably no one will.
    ***



    It became obvious as I was reporting his story that you could essentially divide Jeffrey Epstein’s biography into two themes. One was the hidden source of his wealth—he claimed he’d fueled a lifestyle of vast homes, a private jet, and endless travel by managing the money of billionaires and taking a commission, a story that no one I spoke to believed—while the second mystery was his unorthodox lifestyle.
    Then in his 50s, he’d never been married but had had a string of intelligent, good-looking girlfriends, including Ghislaine Maxwell, the raven-haired daughter of the late, disgraced British newspaperman Robert Maxwell whom he promoted from girlfriend to “friend” when it was over. She remained frequently by his side.
    But the New York gossip was focused on the many parties he gave at his house, where he regularly hosted a mix of plutocrats, academics from Ivy League schools, and nubile, very young women. Oh, and also Britain’s Prince Andrew, whom he introduced to everyone as just “Andy.”
    I got to work on all of it—and Epstein kept close tabs on me. He didn’t want to be seen to cooperate, but he’d do his best to control me. He phoned regularly. I wasn’t altogether surprised to be quickly summoned to the offices of the rich and powerful, sometimes before I’d even asked to meet with them.
    James “Jimmy” Cayne, then the cigar-chomping CEO of Bear Stearns, not only phoned me up, he found the time in his busy day to give me a tour of the office. He was on his best behavior, talking up Epstein’s alleged supposed great brain, his value to the bank—never mind the fact that Epstein had had to leave it quickly in 1981; this Cayne put down to Epstein’s ambition “outgrowing” the place.
    I also met with respected real estate developer Marshall Rose; the former Bear Stearns chairman Alan “Ace” Greenberg called me; so too did Leslie Wexner, the founder and CEO of The Limited, who trusted Epstein so much he had given Epstein carte blanche to insert himself into both Wexner’s family and business affairs, according to people who saw Epstein’s contract; they all chattered on about Epstein’s brilliantly creative mind, his intellectual prowess—a mental agility that, to put it bluntly, was simply not evident in the many phone conversations he had with me.
    These were conversations that took a fairly grim twist pretty quickly. “What is the nature of the piece?” he kept asking. “Does it have this aspect in it?” “This aspect” would refer variously to his philanthropy, his interest in biological mathematics, his well-known friends, some tycoons, some academic wonks—and yes, the women. “I don’t expect there’d be a piece on me without that,” he’d said, preening.
    The women he directed me to were all respectable. There was a doctor, there was a socialite, there was Ghislaine Maxwell; they were all grown-ups, with the appearance of financial independence.
    While Epstein’s friends speculated that retailer Les Wexner was the real source of Epstein’s wealth, Wexner (who called him “my friend Jeffrey”) never commented on this, though he did send me an email praising Epstein’s “ability to see patterns in politics and financial markets.”
    My investigation began to take on unexpected twists. After a bit of digging I found myself not in some plush office setting but going through the metal detectors inside the Federal Medical Center at Devens prison in Massachusetts, where I met with one Steve Hoffenberg, a fraudster who’d been convicted of bilking investors of more than $450 million in one of the largest pre-Madoff Ponzi schemes in history. He was sentenced to 20 years in prison.
    Hoffenberg told me that he’d met Epstein shortly after Epstein had been kicked out of Bear Stearns in 1981 for “getting into trouble” and that Hoffenberg had seen charm and talent in him —“he has a way of getting under your skin”—and had hired him as a “consultant” to work with.
    Hoffenberg, officially, ran Towers Financial, a collection agency that was supposed to buy debts that people owed to hospitals, banks, and phone companies, but instead the funds paid off earlier investors and subsidized his own lavish lifestyle. Hoffenberg told me had he had been Epstein’s mentor and that Epstein had made a terrible mistake in doing something so high-profile as flying Bill Clinton, since that would only draw a spotlight to his business dealings. “I always told him to stay below the radar,” he said.
    Aware that I was listening to a convicted felon who had lied under oath—he was, after all, sitting before me in an orange jumpsuit—I left the jail determined to get more concrete proof about the source of Epstein’s finances. Slowly, I got there.
    It took many meetings of the type you see in the movies. There I was, with my growing belly, in the backs of people’s chauffeured-driven cars, in out-of-the way hotel bars—and finally, in my sixth month, when my doctor had begun to look dismayed and told me to take it easy, a train ride to a law firm in Philadelphia, where I and a research assistant were shown a room full of boxes with legal files, and the man who brought us there whispered, “Good luck!”
    The Daily Beast
    Luck did shine upon me that day. I opened the first box, and there was Epstein’s deposition in a civil case explaining in his own testimony that he had indeed been guilty of a “reg d violation” while at Bear Stearns and that he’d been asked to leave the investment firm; it was the nail in the coffin I needed.
    I had discovered many other concrete, irrefutable examples of strange business practices by Epstein, and while I still couldn’t tell you exactly what he did do to subsidize his lifestyle, my piece would certainly show that he was definitely not what he claimed to be.
    I had to put all my findings to Epstein and, bizarrely, he seemed almost unconcerned about the financial irregularities I’d exposed. He admitted to working with and for Hoffenberg but quibbled with some of the specifics of Hoffenberg’s allegations, reminding me that Hoffenberg was a convicted felon. Third parties in turn quibbled with his accounts, and he was irritated, but not overly so.
    I was a little mystified at how benignly he responded to my questions about his business activities. Now, when I look at my meticulous notes, I notice that his tempo quickened—and he was much more focused—when he himself asked: “What do you have on the girls?” He would ask the question over and over again.
    What I had “on the girls” were some remarkably brave first-person accounts. Three on-the-record stories from a family: a mother and her daughters who came from Phoenix. The oldest daughter, an artist whose character was vouchsafed to me by several sources, including the artist Eric Fischl, had told me, weeping as she sat in my living room, of how Epstein had attempted to seduce both her and, separately, her younger sister, then only 16.
    He’d gotten to them because of his money. He’d promised the older sister patronage of her art work; he’d promised the younger funding for a trip abroad that would give her the work experience she needed on her résumé for a place at an Ivy League university, which she desperately wanted—and would win.
    The girls’ mother told me by phone that she had thought her daughters would be safe under Epstein’s roof, not least because he phoned her to reassure her, and she also knew he had Ghislaine Maxwell with him at all times.

    When the girls’ mother learned that Epstein had, regardless, allegedlymolested her 16-year-old daughter, she’d wanted to fight back. “At the time I wanted to go after him. I mean, physically, mentally, you know, in every way, shape, and form. And the advice I was given was, you know, he is so wealthy, he can fight you, he can make you look ridiculous, he can make your daughters look ridiculous, plus he can hurt them. And that was the thing that frightened me was that he would know where they lived and could possibly just send somebody when they walk the dog at night or something around the corner, and we’d never hear from them again,” she told me.
    When I put their allegations to Epstein, he denied them and went into overdrive. He called Graydon. He also repeatedly phoned me. He said, “Just the mention of a 16-year-old girl… carries the wrong impression. I don’t see what it adds to the piece. And that makes me unhappy.”
    Next, Epstein attacked both me and my sources. Letters purporting to be from the women were sent to Graydon, which the women claimed (and gave evidence to show me) were fabricated fakes. I had my own notes to disprove Epstein’s claims against me.
    And then there was Epstein himself, who, I’d be told after I’d given birth, got past security at Condé Nast and went into the Vanity Fair offices. By now everyone at the magazine was completely spooked.
    But my sources, my young women and their mother, heroically held firm. They were going to tell their story, consequences be damned. And as for me? My doctor insisted that once I filed this piece I lie down on my bed and not get out. One of my babies had started to grow alarmingly slowly.
    ***
    I worked through December 2002 like a dog. I worked with three fact-checkers, the magazine’s lawyer; I sifted through everything Epstein threw at me and defused it. We were getting ready to go to press. And then the bullet came. “Graydon’s taking out the women from the piece,” Doug Stumpf, my editor, told me.
    I began to cry. It was so wrong. The family had been so brave. I thought about the mother, her fear of the dark, of the harm she feared might come to her daughters. And then I thought of all the rich, powerful men in suits ready to talk about Epstein’s “great mind.”
    “Why?” I asked Graydon. “He’s sensitive about the young women” was his answer. “And we still get to run most of the piece.”
    Many years later I know that Graydon made the call that seemed right to him then—and though the episode still deeply rankles me I don’t blame him. He sits in different shoes from me; editors are faced with these sorts of decisions all the time, and disaster can strike if they don’t err on the side of caution.
    It came down to my sources’ word against Epstein’s… and at the time Graydon believed Epstein. In my notebook I have him saying, “I believe him… I’m Canadian.”
    Today, my editor at The Daily Beast emailed Graydon to ask why he had excised the women’s stories from my article. A Vanity Fair spokeswoman responded: “Epstein denied the charges at the time and since the claims were unsubstantiated and no criminal investigation had been initiated, we decided not to include them in what was a financial story.”
    But this wasn’t a financial story, it was a classic Vanity Fair profile of a society figure. I don’t know—because I never asked him—if Graydon still believed Epstein when in 2007 Epstein was sentenced to jail time for soliciting underage prostitutes. But it has often struck me that if my piece had named the women, the FBI might have come after Epstein sooner and perhaps some of his victims, now, in the latest spate of allegations, allegedly either paid off or too fearful of retribution to speak up, would have been saved.
    He has a way of spooking you, does Epstein. Or he did. My babies were born prematurely, dangerously so; he’d asked which hospital I was giving birth at—and I was so afraid that somehow, with all his connections to the academic and medical community, that he was coming for my little ones that I put security on them in the NICU.
    When they’d been released home some months later, I went out to my first party. There was Jeffrey Epstein, sucking a lollipop. “Vicky,” he said, “you look so pretty.”
    Vicky Ward was a contributing editor to Vanity Fair for 11 years. She is the best-selling author of The Devil’s Casino and most recently, The Liar’s Ball (Wiley).

    http://www.thedailybeast.com/article...source=twitter
    "I think it would be a good idea." Mahatma Gandhi, when asked what he thought of Western civilization.

    The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways; the point is to change it.
    Karl Marx.

    "Well, he would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies, 1963, replied Ms Rice Davies when the prosecuting counsel pointed out that Lord Astor denied an affair or having even met her.

  9. #29

    Default Bill Clinton flew on sex offender's jet much more than previously known

    Why is this being put out now?

    Former President Bill Clinton was a much more frequent flyer on a registered sex offender’s infamous jet than previously reported, with flight logs showing the former president taking at least 26 trips aboard the “Lolita Express” -- even apparently ditching his Secret Service detail for at least five of the flights, according to records obtained by FoxNews.com.

    Clinton’s presence aboard Jeffrey Epstein’s Boeing 727 on 11 occasions has been reported, but flight logs show the number is more than double that, and trips between 2001 and 2003 included extended junkets around the world with Epstein and fellow passengers identified on manifests by their initials or first names, including “Tatiana.” The tricked-out jet earned its Nabakov-inspired nickname because it was reportedly outfitted with a bed where passengers had group sex with young girls.
    “Bill Clinton … associated with a man like Jeffrey Epstein, who everyone in New York, certainly within his inner circles, knew was a pedophile,” said Conchita Sarnoff, of the Washington, D.C. based non-profit Alliance to Rescue Victims of Trafficking, and author of a book on the Epstein case called "TrafficKing." “Why would a former president associate with a man like that?”
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    Epstein owns the entire 72-acre island. (Google Earth)


    Epstein, who counts among his pals royal figures, heads of state, celebrities and fellow billionaires, spent 13 months in prison and home detention for solicitation and procurement of minors for prostitution. He allegedly had a team of traffickers who procured girls as young as 12 to service his friends on “Orgy Island,” an estate on Epstein's 72-acre island, called Little St. James, in the U.S. Virgin Islands.
    Virginia Roberts, 32, who claims she was pimped out by Epstein at age 15, has previously claimed she saw Clinton at Epstein’s getaway in 2002, but logs do not show Clinton aboard any flights to St. Thomas, the nearest airport capable of accommodating Epstein's plane. They do show Clinton flying aboard Epstein’s plane to such destinations as Hong Kong, Japan, Singapore, China, Brunei, London, New York, the Azores, Belgium, Norway, Russia and Africa.
    Among those regularly traveling with Clinton were Epstein’s associates, New York socialite Ghislaine Maxwell and Epstein’s assistant, Sarah Kellen, both of whom were investigated by the FBI and Palm Beach Police for recruiting girls for Epstein and his friends.
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    The flight logs are required to be filed with the Federal Aviation Administration.


    Official flight logs filed with the Federal Aviation Administration show Clinton traveled on some of the trips with as many as 10 U.S. Secret Service agents. However, on a five-leg Asia trip between May 22 and May 25, 2002, not a single Secret Service agent is listed. The U.S. Secret Service has declined to answer multiple Freedom of Information Act requests filed by FoxNews.com seeking information on these trips. Clinton would have been required to file a form to dismiss the agent detail, a former Secret Service agent told FoxNews.com.
    In response to a separate FOIA request from FoxNews.com, the U.S. Secret Service said it has no records showing agents were ever on the island with Clinton.
    A Clinton spokesperson did not return emails requesting comment about the former president’s relationship and travels with Epstein. The Clinton Library said it had no relevant information and does not keep track of Clinton’s travel records.
    Martin Weinberg, Epstein’s current attorney, did not respond to multiple inquiries. Epstein said in a court filing said that he and his associates “have been the subject of the most outlandish and offensive attacks, allegations, and plain inventions.”
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    Epstein's Boeing 727 was known as the "Lolita Express." (John Coates, airport-data.com)


    However, hundreds of pages of court records, including reports from police and FBI agents, reviewed by FoxNews.com, show Epstein was under law enforcement scrutiny for more than a year.
    Police in Palm Beach, Fla., launched a year-long investigation in 2005 into Epstein after parents of a 14-year-old girl said their daughter was sexually abused by him. Police interviewed dozens of witnesses, confiscated his trash, performed surveillance and searched his Palm Beach mansion, ultimately identifying 20 girls between the ages of 14 and 17 who they said were sexually abused by Epstein.
    In 2006, at the request of Palm Beach Police, the FBI launched a federal probe into allegations that Epstein and his personal assistants had “used facilities of interstate commerce to induce girls between the ages of 14 and 17 to engage in illegal sexual activities.”
    According to court documents, police investigators found a “clear indication that Epstein’s staff was frequently working to schedule multiple young girls between the ages of 12 and 16 years old literally every day, often two or three times per day.”
    One victim, in sworn deposition testimony, said Epstein began sexually assaulting her when she was 13 years old and molested her on more than 50 occasions over the next three years. The girls testified they were lured to Epstein’s home after being promised hundreds of dollars to be his model or masseuse, but when they arrived, he ordered them to take off their clothes and massage his naked body while he masturbated and used sex toys on them.
    The U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida prepared charging documents that accused Epstein of child sex abuse, witness tampering and money laundering, but Epstein took a plea deal before an indictment could be handed up.
    On Sept. 24, 2007, in a deal shrouded in secrecy that left alleged victims shocked at its leniency, Epstein agreed to a 30-month sentence, including 18 months of jail time and 12 months of house arrest and the agreement to pay dozens of young girls under a federal statute providing for compensation to victims of child sexual abuse.
    In exchange, the U.S. Attorney’s Office promised not to pursue any federal charges against Epstein or his co-conspirators.
    Florida attorney Brad Edwards, who represented some of Epstein’s alleged victims, is suing the federal government over the secret non-prosecution agreement in hopes of having it overturned. Edwards claimed in court records that the government and Epstein concealed the deal from the victims “to prevent them from voicing any objection, and to avoid the firestorm of controversy that would have arisen if it had become known that the Government was immunizing a politically-connected billionaire and all of his co-conspirators from prosecution of hundreds of federal sex crimes against minor girls.”
    The U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida did not respond to a request for comment about the deal.
    Other politicians, celebrities and businessmen, including presidential candidate Donald Trump, have been accused of fraternizing with Epstein. Trump lawyer Alan Garten told FoxNews.com in a statement Trump and Epstein are not pals.
    “There was no relationship between Jeffrey Epstein and Donald Trump,” he said. “They were not friends and they did not socialize together.”
    "We'll know our disinformation campaign is complete when everything the American public believes is false." --William J. Casey, D.C.I

    "We will lead every revolution against us." --Theodore Herzl

  10. Question Update to Lawsuit

    Does anyone have updates to the pending litigation against Epstein in South Florida by some of his victims? I haven't seen anything new on this case.

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