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Lisa Pease on the RFK case: The Grand Illusion
#1
http://www.ctka.net/2011/Grand_Illusionpt1-a.html

One of the very best essays ever written on the RFK case.
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#2
Jim DiEugenio Wrote:http://www.ctka.net/2011/Grand_Illusionpt1-a.html

One of the very best essays ever written on the RFK case.

Interesting article. Just one thing. If you're going to put footnote numbers in-line and not elevated, put them in parentheses please. The following took me a while to decypher:

Quote:...the other looking dirty and out of place, "boracho,"9 under 5'5", with bushy dark hair.
Especially since I didn't know what a "boracho" was.
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#3
Very good piece. Depressing that we have such proof of conspiracy and and honest autopsy, yet the lie continues. Sirhan's lawyers should have been disbarred.
Dawn
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#4
Dawn Meredith Wrote:Very good piece. Depressing that we have such proof of conspiracy and and honest autopsy, yet the lie continues. Sirhan's lawyers should have been disbarred.
Dawn

Keep in mind that his lawyers didn't have the autopsy until well into the trial. The problem was that the media was so quick to try the guy in the press that his lawyers plead guilty in hopes of getting a lesser sentence. The "trial" was just to determine this sentence.

What interests me about Sirhan is that he arguably marked the first appearance of the anti-Moslem meme that reached its final form with the events, or pseudo-events, of 9/11. In some sense it also marked the transition from the decapitation of the left in America to the demonization of the (oil producing) Moslem world. There is also a parallel here with the use of the "defector" Lee Oswald to demonize the Russians.
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#5
Steve Franklin Wrote:What interests me about Sirhan is that he arguably marked the first appearance of the anti-Moslem meme that reached its final form with the events, or pseudo-events, of 9/11. In some sense it also marked the transition from the decapitation of the left in America to the demonization of the (oil producing) Moslem world. There is also a parallel here with the use of the "defector" Lee Oswald to demonize the Russians.

Was Sirhan a Muslim? I thought he was pretty eclectic in his choice of religion - Baptist Church, Seventh Day Adventist etc. Plus all that AMORC stuff.

The Israeli lobby often likes to argue as per the article below, that Sirhan was the first Palestinian terrorist/assassin:

Quote:June 5 (2008) is the 40th anniversary of the first act of Palestinian terrorism against America -- the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy by Sirhan Bishara Sirhan.

(snip)

The Sirhans were Christian Arabs. An American church sponsored their immigration to the United States in 1957. They settled in Pasadena.

After graduating from John Muir High School, Sirhan enrolled in Pasadena Community College. He was expelled in 1964 for poor attendance and grades. For the next several years, he drifted from job to job.

He wanted riches and respect but lacked the patience, perseverance and talent to achieve them. He began drinking and exploring mysticism and occult philosophies like Rosicrucianism and Theosophy. He practiced self-hypnosis and tried to move objects with his mind.

Sirhan blamed America for his lack of success and hated the country for its support of Israel. His anger gradually fixed on Robert Kennedy, who promised to send 50 fighter jets to Israel if elected president. He wrote in his notebook: "Kennedy must die by June 5th" -- the first anniversary of the Six-Day War.

(snip)

After his arrest, Sirhan said: "I can explain it. I did it for my country."

It was understood that Sirhan's motivation related to the Middle East conflict. The Los Angeles Times reported on June 6: "When the Jordanian nationalist, Sirhan Bishara Sirhan, allegedly shot Kennedy, ostensibly because of the senator's advocacy of U.S. support for Israel, the crime with which he was charged was in essence another manifestation of the centuries-old hatred between Arab and Jew."

Apologists for Sirhan quickly sprang up. For example, Mohamed T. Mehdi, secretary-general of the Action Committee on American-Arab Relations, published "Kennedy and Sirhan: Why."

According to Mehdi, Sirhan's act had a rational rationale: "The one and only reasonable explanation for Sirhan's decision is to bring the tragedy of Palestine to the attention of the American people so that the people of the United States would not continue the strange policy of helping Zionist Jews of Europe and elsewhere go to the home of Christian and Moslem people of Palestine."

Mehdi concluded that Sirhan had acted in justifiable self-defense: "[W]hen Robert F. Kennedy supports Israel against the Arabs, he is assuming the role of an Israeli high ranking official.... Sirhan was defending himself against those 50 Phantom jets Kennedy was sending to Israel."

However, popular understanding of the ties between Kennedy's murder and his support for Israel didn't last. To begin with, the FBI found no link between Sirhan and any Arab organization, such as the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO). A connection would have bolstered a political motive; contrariwise, the lack of a connection tended to raise doubts about such a motive.

In addition, contemporary commentators decried America's "culture of violence." Amid the calls for gun-control legislation, Sirhan became a symbol -- but of American sociopathy, not of Palestinian grievance.

(snip)

The Kennedy murder and the Palestinian connection matter today. It's important to realize how long Palestinians have used murder and terror as a primary tool of politics and how long they've found observers to excuse and justify it. Perhaps consideration of the Kennedy-Sirhan affair will lead to the clarity and strength to demand that it finally stop.

America and Israel face a common enemy in Palestinian extremism and have a common interest in supporting liberal, reformist Palestinians. America, Israel and the other liberal democracies must use their considerable political and economic leverage to help the Palestinians forge a decent society, in which terror and political murder are a receding nightmare.

http://www.jewishjournal.com/opinion/pag..._hotel_20/

The country of the quote "I can explain it. I did it for my country." is Palestine.

For me, the possible parallel with Oswald is that both were carefully chosen patsies, whose legends could potentially be used by the True Sponsors of the assassinations to point the finger at False Sponsors.

In Oswald's case, his activities meant that Cuba and the USSR could be both be targeted as (False) Sponsors.

In Sirhan's case, the True Sponsors could have pointed the finger at the nascent Palestinian liberation movement as (False) Sponsors.

It it intriguing that whilst hesitant steps were made to pin the blame on all three of these False Sponsors, none of them became part of the Official Narrative of the assassinations of JFK and RFK.
"It means this War was never political at all, the politics was all theatre, all just to keep the people distracted...."
"Proverbs for Paranoids 4: You hide, They seek."
"They are in Love. Fuck the War."

Gravity's Rainbow, Thomas Pynchon

"Ccollanan Pachacamac ricuy auccacunac yahuarniy hichascancuta."
The last words of the last Inka, Tupac Amaru, led to the gallows by men of god & dogs of war
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#6
Jan

You mark an interesting phenomenon of the JFK and RFK assassinations:

It is intriguing that whilst hesitant steps were made to pin the blame on all three of these False Sponsors, none of them became part of the Official Narrative of the assassinations of JFK and RFK.

What of Bill Ayers' dedication of Prairie Fire to et alia Sirhan Sirhan, "political prisoners" who "continue to fight"?

A half-century later reference is still made to "the Communist" who shot JFK, to the unbalanced assassin who shot RFK "outraged over the sale of military aircraft to Israel."

Such is plausible denial and the deflection of blame by the agency which holds the patent on both.

In McKnight we see Phillips' work with the exiled Cubans, Helms' placement of Joannides with the Directorate.

In Fonzi, Veciana relates he met with Phillips aka Maurice Bishop in Dallas after Lee Oswald finished his conversation.

Sirhan a Muslim? Sirhan a political prisoner? Sirhan enraged over warplanes?

Joannides' file is still classified, and Hernandez and the Angelitos of Death targeted witnesses to the polka dot trigger.

Does Bill Ayers still deem Sirhan Sirhan a political prisoner--after the former and the slain candidate's brother endorsed the sitting president, sitting on the Joannides file.
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#7
Jan Klimkowski Wrote:It it intriguing that whilst hesitant steps were made to pin the blame on all three of these False Sponsors, none of them became part of the Official Narrative of the assassinations of JFK and RFK.

Two reasons:

Among a host of reasons:

They were selected because the threats posed by their exposure as "Sponsors" of the respective hits were far greater than the benefits to be gained by prosecution; thus honest investigators were persuaded to stand down.

(JFK example: "Rogue elements" of Soviet and Cuban intel did the deed; we'll take care of them privately so as to spare the world from nuclear war.)

Also: In certain instances, they were blackmailed into playing ball by supporting certain aspects of the True Sponsors' agendas.

(JFK example: LBJ.)
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#8
Jim DiEugenio Wrote:http://www.ctka.net/2011/Grand_Illusionpt1-a.html

One of the very best essays ever written on the RFK case.


Questions:
Where is Part II?
Where are the footnotes?
Why isn't Lisa herself a member here?
"Where is the intersection between the world's deep hunger and your deep gladness?"
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#9
http://www.ctka.net/2011/Grand_Illusionpt2.html

Notes appear at the end of the respective two parts in The Assassinations, James DiEugenio and Lisa Pease, Feral House, 2003, pages 536-610.

Excellent compendium on assassinations of JFK, Malcolm X, MLK, RFK.
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#10
Phil Dragoo Wrote:http://www.ctka.net/2011/Grand_Illusionpt2.html

Notes appear at the end of the respective two parts in The Assassinations, James DiEugenio and Lisa Pease, Feral House, 2003, pages 536-610.

Excellent compendium on assassinations of JFK, Malcolm X, MLK, RFK.

Thanks, Phil. I did try the obvious in changing the "1" to a "2" in the web link, but it would not come up for me.
"Where is the intersection between the world's deep hunger and your deep gladness?"
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