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The Assassination of Malcolm x and Martin Luther Jr.
#1
The Day the Music Died
Malcolm X’ assassination, Feb. 21, 1965
by Roland Sheppard
[Image: malcolm-x-nywts-1964.jpg]

Malcolm X in 1964, flashing the infectious smile that drew people to him

"It was the saddest day of my life." On the afternoon of Feb. 21, 1965, I went to the Audubon Ballroom to hear Malcolm X speak. I also went to sell the newspaper, The Militant, a radical newspaper that printed the truth about Malcolm X, published his speeches and publicly defended him. When I got to the ballroom, things were radically different - there were no cops. Normally, Malcolm’s meetings in Harlem were crawling with cops. As I was selling papers, Malcolm X approached the Audubon Ballroom. I offered to sell him the latest issue, but he told me, “Not today, Roland. I am alone and in a hurry.” A while later as I entered the meeting room, again I did not see any cops. I went in to sit down where I normally sat along with the rest of the press in the front and the left side of the room. On the way to my seat, Gene Roberts, who later surfaced as a police agent member of the Black Panther Party, told me that I could not seat at my regular place, but that on that day I had to sit in the front row on the right side of the hall, facing the stage. As I sat down, I glanced over to where I normally sat and saw a large Black man with a navy blue-gray trench coat. When the meeting started, all was quiet as the crowd listened to Benjamin X introducing Malcolm X. When Malcolm approached the podium, he gave the normal Muslim greeting for peace. At that point a disturbance occurred in the room. Two men were standing about halfway back in the room and to the right of Malcolm on stage. One was shouting, “Get your hand out of my pocket!” Malcolm was trying to calm things down, when the men - one later identified as Talmadge Hayer - started running down the aisle shouting and firing a pistol at Malcolm and ran out the exit doors by the stage, to the right of Malcolm X.
[Image: malcolm-x-assassinated-escorted-by-nypd-022165-2.jpg]
Malcolm is wheeled out of the Audubon Ballroom on a stretcher, escorted by NYPD, on the fateful day, Feb. 21, 1965.

"I saw a flash from a gun as I watched Malcolm X fall down and back about ten feet." Suddenly I heard gunshots fired from all over the place, and I instinctively hit the floor. When I looked up, I saw Malcolm X standing up and glaring down at one of his assassins. At that point, from the corner of my eye, nearby to my left, I saw a flash from a gun as I watched Malcolm X fall down and back about 10 feet. In that instant, as Malcolm died before my eyes, I suddenly realized how big he was and I realized that he was a giant in stature and in the world. This vision of Malcolm X, being assassinated, has haunted me till this day. The fatal blast, which I later found out to be from a shotgun, came from the area where I had seen the large Black man with a navy blue-gray trench coat! When I left the hall, Malcolm’s bodyguards told me that they had caught two of the assassins, one who was shot - Talmadge Hayer - and one whom the police took away. A few weeks later, when I was questioned in the Harlem police station, I was shown a series of photos of people whom I recognized as members of the Nation of Islam or Malcolm’s organization. I also saw a picture of the large Black man with a navy blue-gray trench coat that I had seen at the Audubon Ballroom. I was thinking of how to respond to the cops and how to say that I did not recognize the photos of Malcolm’s friends and supporters and the members of the Nation of Islam. I then told the cops that I had to go to the rest room. When I got to the men’s room door, I saw the same large Black man coming out of the men’s room that I had seen in the Audubon Ballroom and in the photos that had just been shown to me. Then he walked by me, past the desks of the secretarial pool, and went to his office inside the police station! "At that point I knew that he and the government either killed Malcolm X or were part of the assassination plot." At that point I knew that he and the government either killed Malcolm X or were part of the assassination plot. I became very nervous thinking about what I was going to say to the cops when I got back and how I was going to get out of the station alive. I then came up with, “I cannot recognize anyone, for all Black people look the same.” The cops nodded in agreement and we were allowed to leave the police station. Malcolm X was one of my heroes. He was the most honest mass leader that I have ever known or seen. He was a great orator and his speeches seemed like a conversation between himself and the audience. His speeches were like music to my ears and have inspired me for the rest of my life in the fight for social justice. He was so human in his orations. I still remember him when made the “Harlem Hate Gang Scare” speech at the Militant Labor Forum on May 29, 1964, and other speeches in which he chuckled a “heh heh” when he was about to make a special comment. At that forum, he said: “It’s impossible for a chicken to produce a duck egg … The system of this country cannot produce freedom for an Afro-American. It is impossible for this system, this economic system, this political system, this social system, this system period. It is impossible for it, as it now stands, to produce freedom right now for the Black man in this country - it is impossible. And if ever a chicken did produce a duck egg, (heh heh) I’m certain you would say it was certainly a revolutionary chicken (heh heh).”
[Image: martin-luther-king-malcolm-x-web.jpg]
Martin Luther King and Malcolm X, both incomparable leaders, both assassinated - Photo: Trikosko, Library of Congress

Both he and Martin Luther King had come to similar positions about capitalism and the Vietnam War at the time of their death. That is why this government assassinated them. No one has followed in their footsteps. From the point of view of this government, the world leader in political assassinations, the two assassinations worked. For to this day, no mass leader has had the courage to pick up where they left off. They were able to silence the art, science and truth of these two great orators. To me, Feb. 21 is “the day the music died.” It was the saddest day of my life.

For an in depth explanation of the government’s assassinations of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, read my article, “The Assassinations of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr.” Roland Sheppard is a writer and activist and former BA of the Painters Union in San Francisco.
Email him at rolandgsheppard@gmail.com and visit his website, http://web.mac.com/rolandgarret.

**********************************************************************************
The Assassinations

of

Malcolm X

and

Martin Luther King Jr.

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http://weblogs.sun-sentinel.com/news/columnists/oldschoolblues/blog/800pxMartinLutherKingMalcolmX.jpg

"It’s impossible for a chicken to produce a duck egg… The system of this country cannot produce freedom for an Afro-American. It is impossible for this system, this economic system, this political system, this social system, this system period. It is impossible for it , as it now stands, to produce freedom right now for the Black man in this country — it is impossible. And if ever a chicken did produce a duck egg, I’m certain you would say it was certainly a revolutionary chicken. "

— Malcolm X

(Harlem ' Hate Gang ' Scare Militant Labor Forum, May 29, 1964;

Not Just An American Problem, February 16, 1965.

http://panafricannews.blogspot.com/2007/...d-now.html)



I first started to write about Malcolm X's assassination, after I watched the 1987 documentary, Malcolm X: A Search For Identity, narrated by Dan Rather on CBS television. I then saw that Spike Lee's documentary movie, Malcolm X, had left out the most of the events in the last year of Malcolm’s life, starting with March 12, 1964 Press Statement By Malcolm X. When Denzel Washington, acting as Malcolm X, is shown addressing this press conference, right after Malcolm's statement "There can be no black-white unity until there is first some' black unity ", Denzel Washington did not state what Malcolm X said next, which was "There can be no workers solidarity until there is first some racial solidarity," The statement about 'workers solidarity' showed some of Malcolm's thinking and outlook at that time — he was becoming anti-capitalist in his political thinking.

I felt compelled to write this essay to show why this government, "the assassination leader of the world " assassinated Malcolm X. But when I began to read more of what King had stood for at the end of his life, that he also was becoming anti-capitalist in his political thinking, before his life was ended, I realized the motive United States Government had the same motive to kill both Malcolm X Martin Luther King.

When I discovered and realized the complicity, of the government, in both assassinations, I then felt compelled to write this essay, based upon what I learned and my own personal experience.

I regularly attended Malcolm X's meetings in Harlem and was present at the meeting when Malcolm X was assassinated. I was in charge of defense whenever Malcolm X spoke at the Militant Labor Forum in New York City from 1964 to 1965. I have written several articles, spoken to various groups, and been interviewed about Malcolm X. This essay is an update of a paper that was accepted by City College of New York's (CCNY) Black Studies Program for The Third Symposium of Institution Building in Harlem: The Malcolm X Legacy: A Global Perspective, held on Friday, May 20, 2005 at CCNY. It was first written as the February, 2001 Monthly Feature for the Holt Labor Library website. www.holtlaborlibrary.org

This essay is based on my presentation at a forum in Boston in 2000, on the same subject. The other speaker at the forum was Minister Don Muhammad of the Boston Nation of Islam.( I have updated this essay as more data becomes available in the internet.)



"In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies,

but the silence of our friends”

— Martin Luther King, Jr



The Assassinations

of

Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr.



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Malcolm X and Fidel Castro in Harlem 1960

http://www.cubaeducationtours.ca/itinera...Fidel.html



Over forty years ago, Malcolm X (1965) and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (1968) were assassinated. In the case of Malcolm X, several members of the Nation of Islam (NOI) were convicted of the assassination. In the case of Martin Luther King, one assassin, James Earl Ray, was convicted of the assassination and sentenced to life in prison. However, there have always been many unanswered questions about both of these murders. Despite the convictions, and the ongoing campaign by the government, police agencies, and various authors and pundits to put the assassinations to rest, there have always been many unanswered questions about these murders.

Almost 32 years after King's murder at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis on April 4, l968, a Memphis court extended the circle of responsibility for the assassination beyond the late scapegoat James Earl Ray to the United States government. According to the Memphis jury's verdict on December 8,1999, a jury of twelve citizens of Memphis, Shelby County, TN, concluded in Coretta Scott King, Martin Luther King, III, Bernice King, Dexter Scott King and Yolanda King Vs. Loyd Jowers and Other Unknown Conspirators that Loyd Jowers and governmental agencies including the City of Memphis, the State of Tennessee, and the federal government were party to the conspiracy to assassinate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

In the 1970's, the public became aware of the COINTELPRO disruption operations of the government against the Civil Rights movement, the anti-war movement, radicals and socialists. Under COINTELPRO the different United States spy agencies used informers, agents, and agents provocateurs to disrupt these organizations. One of the stated purposes of this program was to neutralize Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, and Elijah Muhammad in order to prevent the emergence - to use the government's term - of a Black Messiah who would have the potential of uniting and leading a mass organization of Black Americans in their struggle for freedom and economic equality.

(This policy was still being continued in 1978 and probably still going on. http://www.finalcall.com/MEMORANDUM-46.htm)

A second assassination of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. has been the attempt to distort what they really stood for in their last years of life. This is a process that Lenin described in the opening to his book The State and Revolution:

"...what in the course of history, has happened repeatedly to the theories of revolutionary thinkers and leaders of oppressed classes fighting for emancipation. During the lifetime of great revolutionaries, the oppressing classes constantly hounded them, received their theories with the most savage malice, the most furious hatred and the most unscrupulous campaigns of lies and slander. After their death, attempts are made to convert them into harmless icons, to canonize them, so to say, and to hallow their names to a certain extent for the consolation of the oppressed classes and with the object of duping the latter, while at the same time robbing the revolutionary theory of its substance, blunting its revolutionary edge and vulgarizing it."

As one who was politically active at that time, I believe that it is important to tell the truth about Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X in order to help keep their ideas alive and prevent them from being reduced to harmless icons.

The Assassination of Malcolm X

I witnessed Malcolm X's assassination at the Audubon Ballroom, on February 21, 1965. I am writing with the benefit of first hand knowledge of what took place that day, what Malcolm X stood for at the time of his death, and the hope for the future that inspired all who heard or knew the man.

I remember the mass media, reflecting their class hatred of Malcolm X, gloating and cheering his assassination. I remember the response to his death by the tens of thousands in Harlem, who for several days went to view his casket. I remember the eulogy by Ossie Davis that silenced the hyenas of the press when he said "He [Malcolm X] was our prince, our Black shining prince." In spite of all of the attacks by the mass media, Malcolm X has grown more and more popular as a martyred leader of his people and an uncompromising advocate of human rights and freedom.

In 1991, at the time Spike Lee's documentary movie on Malcolm X was due to be released, several books were written that attempted to camouflage Malcolm's political evolution during his last year. Two such books were Malcolm: The Life of a Man Who Changed Black America, by Bruce Perry and Malcolm X: The Assassination, by Michael Friedly. In my opinion, these books are a second assassination of Malcolm X.

Both books were written in order to reaffirm the government's position to put sole blame on the Nation of Islam (NOI) for the assassination. Both deny the evolution of his thinking, reflecting his revolutionary development in the last year of his life, and discounted any possibility of government complicity or motive in the assassination. Both were also polemics against two excellent books written by George Breitman: The Last Year of Malcolm X: The Evolution of a Revolutionary and The Assassination of Malcolm X.

Breitman wrote The Last Year of Malcolm X to cover the period of Malcolm's life that is absent from the autobiography co-authored with Alex Haley. He also hoped to clear up any misconceptions that Haley, who disagreed with Malcolm's ideas as they were developing, had put into the epilogue of the autobiography. Breitman's book was based on Malcolm's speeches and statements during his last year and his collaboration with the Socialist Workers Party. If one reads Malcolm X's speeches, one will clearly understand that Breitman's book is a very accurate statement of Malcolm X's political development and evolution.

Unfortunately, Spike Lee's documentary movie, Malcolm X, also downplayed Malcolm's thinking and accomplishments during his last year and omitted this sentence from Malcolm’s first press conference after the split from the Nation of Islam: “There can be no workers solidarity until there is first some racial solidarity” 1 is a clear expression of his thinking, at that time in history.

This allows those who oppose what Malcolm had become in his last year to maintain that he had not become a threat to the capitalist establishment. This has been consciously done to make it appear that the NOI alone had a motive to kill Malcolm X and to exonerate the role of the government in the assassination.

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The Government's Motive To Neutralize Malcolm X

In his last year, Malcolm X came to the conclusion that it was impossible for African Americans to be integrated into this system because racism was profitable and an integral part of capitalism. His words on the world-wide oppression of non-whites by white Europeans were very similar to what Karl Marx wrote about how the original capitalist fortunes were obtained. In Capital, Volume One, Part VIII, Chapter 31, "Genesis of the Industrial Capitalist," Marx wrote:

"...The discovery of gold and silver in America, the extirpation, enslavement, and entombment in mines of the aboriginal population, the beginning of the conquest and looting of the East Indies, the turning of Africa into a warren for the commercial hunting of black-skins, signalized the rosy dawn of the era of capitalist production... If money... comes into the world with a congenital blood-stain on one cheek, capital comes dripping from head to foot, from every pore, with blood and dirt."

Malcolm X was the first mass leader in the United States to oppose the war in Vietnam and to identify the oppression of African Americans in this country with the struggles of the oppressed throughout the world. In all probability, Malcolm X would have spoken at the first mass demonstration against the Vietnam War in 1965. His powerful oratory alone, as well as his standing among inner-city Blacks, would have given the Vietnam Antiwar Movement a far different character and the history of that period in the United States and the world would have been greatly changed.

I had the opportunity to hear Malcolm X speak at meetings in Harlem at the Audubon Ballroom and elsewhere. His power as an orator was his ability to make complex ideas simple and clear. He was not a demagogue. His speeches were always an appeal to reason.

One example of the power of his oratory was when he spoke at an organizing rally for Hospital Workers Local 1199 in New York City 1962. The following is a famous quote from that speech:

“The hospital strikers have demonstrated that you don't get a job done unless you show the Man you're not afraid to go to jail. If you're not willing to pay that price, then you don't deserve the rewards or benefits that go along with it.”



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Malcolm X at 1199 Rally

http://www.seiu.org/images/malcolmx_1199-141.jpg



He gave the best speech at the rally, and when he finished speaking, all of the workers - Black, white, and Puerto Rican - cheered wildly. The response was the same whether he spoke in Harlem or in a debate at Oxford University in England.

From Malcom X’s 1964 debate at Oxford: “. . . . I read once, passingly, about a man named Shakespeare. . . . . I remember one thing he wrote that kind of moved me. He put it in the mouth of Hamlet, I think, it was, who said, ‘To be or not to be.’ He was in doubt about something — whether it was nobler in the mind of man to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune —moderation — or to take up arms against a sea of troubles and by opposing end them. And I go for that. If you take up arms, you’ll end it, but if you sit around and wait for the one who’s in power to make up his mind that he should end it, you’ll be waiting a long time. And in my opinion, the young generation of whites, blacks, browns, whatever else there is, you’re living at a time of extremism, a time of revolution, a time when there’s got to be a change. People in power have misused it, and now there has to be a change and a better world has to be built, and the only way it’s going to be built — is with extreme methods. And I, for one, will join in with anyone — I don’t care what color you are — as long as you want to change this miserable condition that exists on this earth.”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dmzaaf-9aHQ



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http://www.socialistworker.co.uk/chimage...lm_lse.jpg

Malcolm X addressing students at the London School of Economics, 1965



Malcolm X viewed the struggle of African Americans as an economic and social struggle for human rights and not limited to just a struggle for civil fights. He identified with the Colonial Revolution at that time in Africa and throughout the world, including the struggle of the Vietnamese people and the Cuban revolution; in direct opposition to the policies of the United States government both then and now. He had met with Che Guevara and the Cuban delegation to the United Nations in December 1964 and a firm bond was established between them. Contrary to Friedly and Perry's assertions, Malcolm had become a very real threat to the very foundations of capitalism in the United States, The truth is that the United States government had a very good motive for the assassination.

Prior to his assassination Malcolm X told Clifton DeBerry, the presidential candidate of the Socialist Workers Party in 1964, and myself that he hoped to live long enough to build a viable organization based on his current ideas - so that he would be more dangerous to the system dead than alive. Unfortunately, he did not have time to build the new organization that he had envisioned.



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http://www.thememoryhole.org/deaths/x-suspects.htm



In his book, The Assassination of Malcolm X, George Breitman points out that the first accounts of the assassination, in the New York City newspapers, reported that two people were caught by the crowd and saved by the police. But later, the press and the police reported that only one person, Talmadge Hayer, who was shot in the leg, had been caught by the crowd. Since he had been shot, the police took him to the hospital that was across the street. No explanation has ever been given for the change in the story.

On the Smoking Gun website, http://www.thesmokinggun.com/malcolmx/xeyewitness.html a 1965 police affidavit, by an eyewitness, is shown that confirms that two people had been caught by the crowd.



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Stop action from a video of Malcom’s Aassssination of the police catching a second man www.dailymotion.com/video/x2qpv1_malcolm-x-the-assassination-of-malc_politics?from=rss



The question remains to this day: What happened to the second man? Why wasn't he brought to trial? The first police report stated that five men were involved in the assassination; yet only three were accused and convicted at the trial. Both Perry and Friedly allege that the newspapers made a journalistic mistake. However, Breitman puts forward the probability that the second man was an undercover agent who was quietly released. (From The Assassination of Malcolm X (third edition) by George Breitman, Herman Porter, and Baxter Smith (Pathfinder Press, 1991)

There is no doubt that the police had plainclothes officials in the audience. As an eyewitness to the assassination, I was questioned at the Harlem police headquarters. I recognized a man there - obviously a cop, with free run of the office — whom I had seen standing, before the start of the meeting. in the first row at the Audubon Ballroom, with other men, where Hayer said his accomplices were sitting. He was fairly tall and wore a long powder blue wool trench coat and a fez hat. Perry's book basically supports the official police version of the assassination. It ignores strong evidence that it would have been virtually impossible for only three people to have carried out the assassination.

Perry also ignores Hayer's affidavit that the two other people convicted with him, Norman 3X Butler and Thomas 15X Johnson — who were both members of the NOI — were not even present at the meeting when Malcolm was killed. (When I was called before the Grand Jury on the assassination of Malcolm X, James Shabazz, Malcolm's primary assistant, also told me that that Butler and Johnson were well known and confirmed that they were not at the meeting nor would they have been allowed to enter the meeting.)

Friedly's book is a more sophisticated cover up. The book puts the blame solely on the NOI while, at the same time, criticizing the police investigation. It is based on Hayer's confessions at the trial and at a later parole hearing. Friedly's and Hayer's version is that five members of the NOI carried out the assassination, three people doing the shooting up front and two people creating a diversion prior to the shooting, setting off a smoke bomb in the back of the room.

Hayer's version of the logistics corresponds with my own impressions at the scene. Contrary to Friedly's contention, however, the confession by Hayer only reinforces the probable existence of a second man caught by the crowd. Hayer explains that at the time that he was shot and caught by the crowd he could see one of his accomplices running ahead of him. I was told by Malcolm's guards when I got outside the Audubon Ballroom, that two people were caught by the crowd at the same time and that one was taken to the hospital by the police and the other taken into police custody. Hayer was taken to the hospital and then booked. It is likely that the second man caught was the one running ahead of Hayer and was quite possibly an agent.

There is one glaring error in Hayer's statement. He stated that the five assassins cased one of Malcolm's meetings at the Audubon Ballroom in the winter of 1964-65 and concluded that they would have a good chance to escape. This is far from probable. There were normally 30 to 50 cops, in their blue uniforms, both inside and outside the building stationed at all the exits. Escape would not have been easy.

However, at the meeting when Malcolm was assassinated, the police were nowhere to be found, even though they knew that an assassination attempt was imminent. In order to plan Malcolm X's death, the conspirators would have needed to know and be confident that the cops were not going to be there on that day. Perry and Friedly assert that the police agreed to Malcolm's request not to have police protection. However, when the police first spoke of their agreement, Malcolm's wife, Betty Shabazz, stated that it was a lie that Malcolm had made the request.

Both Perry and Friedly discount any possible disruption operations by the FBI, the New York City police, or the CIA. But in a 1987 documentary, Malcolm X: A Search For Identity, narrated by Dan Rather on CBS television, the FBI is shown to have acted as agent provocateurs. For example, the FBI sent provocative letters to the NOI and forged Malcolm’s signature to the letters. Rather went on to reveal that the CBS television crew had read 50,000 pages of CIA files on Malcolm X, but had not been allowed access to over 46,000 pages of documents that remain in the files of the CIA and FBI!

When Clarence Jones, Martin Luther King’s lawyer, was interviewed by Dan Rather on the 1987 documentary, when questioned about the assassination of Malcolm X he stated:

“. . . . Knowing what I now know of the various agencies of the US government investigative agencies of the US government with respect to Martin King, for example, and knowing what they did to political parties, like the Black Panther Parties, I have no doubt that the assassination of Malcolm X was calculated, planned by agencies at the highest level of this government. I don't have any question, I don't have any doubt in my mind that is what happened.. . . ”



"The Judas Factor"

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In dramatic contrast to Perry's and Friedly's conclusions about Malcolm X's assassination, is a book by Washington Post staff writer Karl Evanzz titled, The Judas Factor (Thunder's Mouth Press, New York, 1992. 389 pp., $22.95).

In this book, Evanzz documents how the intelligence community, the CIA, the FBI, and the New York Police Bureau of Special Services (BOSSI) using agents provocateurs and infiltrators; set the stage for the assassination of Malcolm X. It outlines the motives for their actions. Evanzz spent 15 years researching over 300,000 pages of declassified FBI and CIA documents. From Page 214 of The Judas Factor:

(A few days after Malcolm X's press conference announcing his split from the NOI) "William C. Sullivan (FBI) contacted the directors of BOSSI and asked them to recruit several African Americans to infiltrate Malcolm X's new organization. Among the directors at the time were two men who later would play key roles in the scandal that led to Richard Nixon's resignation: Anthony Ulasewicz, the infamous bagman of Watergate, and Nixon advisor John J. Caulfield.

"Ulasewicz was all too happy to comply with Sullivan's request. Malcolm X had been a thorn in the New York Police Department's side for more than a decade. He told Sullivan that he would have officers ready to infiltrate Malcolm X's new organizations within thirty days.

"While Sullivan was coordinating the domestic counterintelligence program against Malcolm X with BOSSI, the CIA initiated a similar program to determine the extent of Malcolm X's influence with Third World leaders. 'What do we have on Malcolm X?' a CIA official wrote in an inter-office memo dated March 10. The request for information had come from the U.S. State Department. The official ordered a clerk to run a thorough check in the CIA's database to determine which Third World countries seemed receptive to Malcolm X. . ."

In the introduction to the book, Evanzz writes: "After analyzing these resources, I am convinced that Louis E. Lomax, an industrious African-American journalist who befriended Malcolm X in the late 1950's, had practically solved the riddle of his assassination. Lomax, who died in a mysterious automobile accident while shooting a film in Los Angeles about the assassination, believed that Malcolm X was betrayed by a former friend who reportedly had ties to the intelligence community … In 1968, Lomax called the suspect 'Judas'. This, then, is the story of The Judas Factor." There are two major themes in the book: One is the "Judas Factor" and the other is the concern of the FBI and the CIA over Malcolm X's success in linking the struggle of African Americans with the national liberation struggles in Africa and throughout the Third World.

Evanzz documents that Ahmed Ben Bella, the leader of the Algerian Revolution, had invited Malcolm X ; along with Che Guevara and other leaders of independence movements; to a special conference in Bandung scheduled to begin on March 3, 1965. Malcolm X had also been able to get Ethiopia and Liberia to include human rights violations against African Americans with their petition on South African human rights violations before the International Court of Justice at The Hague. The petition was scheduled to be heard on March 12, 1965.

Part of the Judas Factor was the FBI's attempts to neutralize Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, and Elijah Muhammad. Evanzz provides concrete evidence that Martin Luther King was going to support Malcolm X in his project to bring the struggle of human rights before the United Nations and had begun to also identify with the struggles for human rights in Africa.

In light of the CIA's policies to neutralize opponents of the U.S. government's political and covert activities in Africa, Evanzz explains that it was necessary to neutralize Malcolm X prior to the Bandung conference. Malcolm X was assassinated on February, 21, 1965, a week and a half before the conference was to take place. Soon after the assassination, several African government officials who had been working with Malcolm X were also assassinated and the Ben Bella government in Algeria was overthrown in June 1965.

From his research into FBI files, Evanzz was able to prove that the FBI had a high-level informant in the NOI. Thus, the FBI was clearly in a position to carry out a campaign to fan the flames of discontent among rising leaders of the Nation and to disrupt the organization's activities. FBI memos indicate that they maneuvered within the NOI to keep their informant in the best possible leadership position to carry out their covert activities. From the very day that Malcolm X split from the NOI, the FBI worked on a day-to-day basis with BOSSI and the CIA to infiltrate and disrupt his activities. William Sullivan (subsequently of Watergate fame) was the FBI agent in overall charge of both the infiltration of the NOI and Malcolm's organization, the Organization of Afro-American Unity (OAAU).

It is clear from the book that a coordinated effort was carried out between all government spy agencies to widen the split between Malcolm X and Elijah Muhammad, to increase tensions between their organizations, and to undermine their support among African Americans. It is also safe to assume that agents, informants, and provocateurs from these different agencies were sent into the NOI and Malcolm X's organizations and that these agents were also present at the Audubon Ballroom when Malcolm X was assassinated. One of police informants, who later informed on the Black Panthers, told me as I was going to take my normal front row seat that "you are not going to sit there today," and he had me sit in the front row on the left side of the Ballroom. (The assassins sat in the area where I normally sat to hear Malcolm X speak.) When I look over in that direction to see who was sitting in my usual seating area, that was when I saw the same man that I later saw at the Harlem police station, when I was questioned by the police.

Some of Evanzz's research was based on books about the NOI by Louis Lomax. Evanzz found in the FBI files a script for a movie on the assassination of Malcolm X, which Lomax was working on at the time of his death. (He died in a car accident caused by brake failure.) Evanzz provides circumstantial evidence that John Ali, a former friend of Malcolm X who became a national secretary of the NOI, was more than likely an FBI agent/informer and hence the Judas Factor. In fact, Evanzz provides quotes from Malcolm X to Lomax indicating that Malcolm X blamed John Ali for his expulsion from the Nation.

On pages 327-329 of the book, Conspiracys: Unravelling the assassination of Malcolm X(Nubia Press, 1992, Washington) Baba Sak Kondo documents that John Ali was most likely an FBI agent.

On page 328 Kondo writes that …. “As previously noted, Malcolm, who had a clear understanding of the internal workings of the NOI leadership, stated in early June 1964, that Ali was running the NOI to steal as much money as he could from its treasury. This could well explain why Ali was considered an informant. Most FBI informants were/are motivated by money, a point not lost on Frank Donner:

“Victims, with good reason, typically charge that inform and defectors are motivated primarily by greed. The bureau knows and invariably weaves financial considerations into its snitch jacket scripts. (Age of Surveillance, p. 193).

“There is a tendency for researchers and historians to minimize the role and duties of the informant. This is a grave mistake. The Bureau informant frequently played the role of special agent during the 60s and 70s. Former FBI executive William Sullivan, a man in a position to know, clarified this point in the Bureau: “Sometimes an informant can become an agent provocateur who ends up participating in and perhaps instigating and even leading the activity he was being paid to report on (p. 129). ”

The most important aspect, however, is not whether Ali was the high-level agent, but the fact that the FBI did indeed have a high-level person in the NOI in their employ. Overall, the main value of the book is that all of the spy agencies in the United States were deeply involved as infiltrators and agent provocateurs (Judas Factors) to set the stage for Malcolm X's assassination.

The evidence provided by the book is irrefutable proof that the government had the motive to assassinate Malcolm X and the ability, through its COINTELPRO spy operations, to orchestrate his assassination.

It is now time to open up all the files of the CIA and the FBI, as well as the thousands of pages of files of the New York City Police Department, so that the truth about the assassination of Malcolm X can be exposed.

Certain things seem agreed upon by everybody: The Organization of Afro-American Unity had scheduled a rally on Sunday afternoon, February 21, at the Audubon Ballroom in Harlem. This was one week after Malcolm's home was fire-bombed and he and his family narrowly escaped injury or death. People entering the rally were not searched. On the other hand, they were all scrutinized by OAAU aides as they entered the hall.

Malcolm had just begun to speak when two men began a scuffle deliberately designed to distract the attention of Malcolm's guards. Three men rushed toward Malcolm, opening fire and wounding him mortally; they then ran out of the ballroom, pursued by several of Malcolm's supporters.

Police said that one of the three, identified later as Talmadge Hayer, twenty-two, of Paterson, New Jersey, had received a bullet in the leg by the time he got to the exit of the building. The police also alleged that he had been wounded by Reuben Francis, a Malcolm guard. Hayer was seized outside the building by the people pursuing him. So was another man. The people began to beat and kick Hayer and the second man. Police arrived and rescued the two being beaten, taking them away from the crowd. The third man got away. He got away because the crowd did not catch him. Hayer and the second man also would have got away if the crowd hadn't caught and held them until the police showed up.

Now let us turn to the New York Herald Tribune dated Monday, February 22 [1965]. This is a morning paper, which means that the first edition of the paper dated Monday actually appeared Sunday evening, a few hours after the killing. The top headline in the first (city) edition reads: "Malcolm X Slain by Gunmen as 400 in Ballroom Watch." The subhead, over the lead article by Jimmy Breslin, reads: "Police Rescue Two Suspects."

Breslin's story in this edition reports that Hayer was "taken to Bellevue Prison Ward and was sealed off by a dozen policemen. The other suspect was taken to the Wadsworth Avenue precinct, where the city's top policemen immediately converged and began one of the heaviest homicide investigations this city has ever seen."

Next we turn to a later (late city) edition of the same paper for the same day. The top headline is unchanged. But the subhead is different. This time it reads, "Police Rescue One Suspect." The "second" suspect has dropped not only out of the headline, but out of Breslin's story too. Nothing about his being caught and beaten by the crowd, nothing about his being rescued by the police, nothing about his being taken to the Wadsworth station, nothing about the city's top police converging on that station. Not only does he disappear from Breslin's story in the late city edition, but he disappears from the Herald Tribune altogether from that date to this.

Perhaps the whole thing never happened? Perhaps Breslin, in the heat of the moment, had in his first story reported a mere rumor as a fact, and, being unable to verify it, decided not to repeat it in later editions?

But there are three morning papers in New York, and in their first editions they all said it happened.

For example, let us examine the first (city) edition of the New York Times for February 22. The subhead is very clear: "Police Hold Two for Questioning." From the Times's city edition, we even learn the name of the cop who captured the "second" man. It is Patrolman Thomas Hoy, who is quoted as saying he had "grabbed a suspect" being chased by some people.

But when we turn to the late city edition of the same Times, printed only a few hours later, we find that its subhead, too, has changed. It now reads: "One Is Held in Killing." But the story hasn't yet been changed altogether. Patrolman Hoy still remains in the story , and so does the "second" man who has dropped out of the subhead. In fact, the story has more about Hoy than it had in the city edition.

This time the Times reports: "'As I brought him to the front of the ballroom, the crowd began beating me and the suspect,' Patrolman Hoy said. He said he put this man--not otherwise identified later for newsmen--into a police car to be taken to the Wadsworth Avenue station." Then Hoy's captive disappears from the Times as completely and as permanently as he did from the Herald Tribune, and from all the other daily papers. But there cannot be any doubt in the mind of anyone reading the accounts I have cited that a second man was captured and taken away by the police.

Who was he?

Why did the press lose interest in him so suddenly, at a time that it was filling its pages with all kinds of material about the murder, including the silliest trivialities and wildest rumors?

[text copyright 1976, 1991 Pathfinder Press] Found at: http://www.thememoryhole.org/deaths/x-suspects.htm



Government's Motive To Neutralize Martin Luther King



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http://barrysheppardbook.com/



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Martin Luther King and Dr. Benjamin Spock at the head of the Anti-Vietnam War March from Central Park to the United Nations Building New York City, April 15,1967

http://xroads.virginia.edu/~Public/civilrights/MEDIA/0293.jpg

Photograph by Benedict Fernandez. Published in: Kasher, Steven. The Civil Rights Movement:

A Photographic History, 1954-68. New York: Abbeville Press, 1996



From the time of the King assassination, the many inconsistencies in the Government's case that James Earl Ray was the sole assassin were well publicized. When the COINTELPRO disruption operations of the government against the civil rights movement, the antiwar movement, and radicals and socialists were exposed; The United States House of Representatives' Select Committee on Assassinations, under pressure from these exposures and the Civil Rights Movement, did an investigation in 1979 with the purpose to reconfirm the Government's case. Immediately after it released the report; affirming that Ray was the lone assassin;this committee sealed all of the evidence it had in its possession for 50 years (until 2029). Thus, we were left with nothing but the integrity of the Senators to justify their ‘findings’; rather than the facts. The only logical reason to keep the files secret is to protect the guilty.

Recently, new facts on this assassination have come to light. On Dec. 8, 1999, a jury awarded Coretta Scott King and her family $100 in damages resulting from a conspiracy to murder her late husband, Martin Luther King. The trial was initiated by the admission of Lloyd Jowers on national TV in 1993 that he had hired King's assassin as a favor to an underworld figure who was a friend. At the conclusion of the trial, Dexter King, Dr. King's son, said, After today, we don't want questions like, 'Do you believe James Earl Ray killed your father?' I've been hearing that all my life. No, I don't, and this is the end of it. This was the most incredible cover-up of the century, and now it has been exposed. Now we can finally move on with our lives.

The King family, along with their attorney, William Pepper, plan to lobby historians and elected officials to get the official record of the assassination changed. There have always been many unanswered questions about the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. From the beginning it has been clear that the FBI was involved to one degree or another.

The FBI leaked the information to the Memphis press that King was going to be staying at a white hotel a couple of days prior to his arrival in the city. This forced King to stay at the less secure Lorraine Motel. The question remains: Why would the government be part of the conspiracy against King? Why would they want him dead? A key to understanding the government's motive is that Martin Luther King had a different political perspective at the time of his death than when he made his 1963 "I Have a Dream" speech. His final speeches and actions reveal that he had begun to view the struggle for equality as an economic struggle and the capitalist economic system as the problem.

In one of his last speeches, given at Stanford University in April 1967 and titled the The Other America, http://auroraforum.org/events.php?id=45, King addressed the problem of the rich and the poor in this country. Instead of his dream, he talked about the nightmare of the economic condition of Blacks. He talked about "work-starved men searching for jobs that did not exist"; about the Black population living on a "lonely island of poverty surrounded by an ocean of material prosperity"; and about living in a "triple ghetto of race, poverty, and human misery." He explained that after World War II, the unemployment rate between Blacks and whites was equal and that in the years between then and 1967, Black unemployment had become double the rate for white workers. He also spoke about how Black workers made half the wages of white workers

From his experience when he started his campaign for equality in Chicago and elsewhere in the North, King concluded in this speech that to deal with this problem of the Two Americas was much more difficult than to get rid of legal segregation. He pointed out that the northern liberals, who had given moral and financial support to the struggle against Jim Crow, would not give such support to the efforts to end economic segregation. He also polemicized against the concept that people should pick themselves up by their own bootstraps. In the course of explaining the obstacles that Blacks faced coming into this country that Europeans did not have, he stated: "It is a cruel jest to say to a bootless man to pick himself up by his own bootstraps." Black people, he said, were "impoverished aliens in their own land."

In this speech King also opposed the war in Vietnam. He criticized the government for spending hundreds of millions of dollars for war and not for equality. He stated his goal to organize and mobilize forces to fight for economic equality. In his last letter, requesting support for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in 1968, he wrote:

"It was obdurate government callousness to misery that first stoked the flames of rage and frustration. With unemployment a scourge in Negro ghettos, the government still tinkers with half-hearted measures, refuses still to become an employer of last resort. It asks the business community to solve the problems as though its past failures qualified it for success."

He also stated this outlook at the SCLC Convention of Aug. 1967:

"We've got to begin to ask questions about the whole society. We are called upon to help the discouraged beggars in life's marketplace. But one day we must come to see that an edifice which produces beggars needs restructuring. It means that questions must be raised. 'Who owns this oil? ... Who owns the iron ore?... Why is it that people have to pay water bills in a world that is two-thirds water?"

In his book, Where do we go from here: Chaos or community?, New York: Harper & Row, 1967, King wrote the course that he was planning to take in the fight for economic equality:

"There is nothing but a lack of social vision to prevent us from paying an adequate wage to every American citizen whether he be a hospital worker, laundry worker, maid, or day laborer.

"There is nothing except shortsightedness to prevent us from guaranteeing an annual minimum-and livable-income for every American family.

"There is nothing, except a tragic death wish, to prevent us from reordering our priorities. . . .

"The coalition of an energized section of labor, Negroes, unemployed, and welfare recipients may be the source of power that reshapes economic relationships and ushers in a breakthrough to a new level of social reform.

"The total elimination of poverty, now a practical responsibility, the reality of equality in race relations and other profound structural changes in society may well begin here."

These ...
"The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it." Karl Marx

"He would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies. When asked in court whether she knew that Lord Astor had denied having sex with her.

“I think it would be a good idea” Ghandi, when asked about Western Civilisation.
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#2

Malcolm X: Evidence of State Execution

By JOHN POTASH


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With February celebrated as Black History Month, the life and death of black leader Malcolm X, aka El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz, deserves a new examination. Malcolm X died from assassins' bullets on February 21, 1965, at the age of 39. By that time, Malcolm X had started a non-religious activist group that worked with Martin Luther King, Jr, and collaborated with African presidents. His legacy inspired many activist organizations. U.S. Intelligence used similar tactics and personnel to target him as they used against MLK, the Black Panthers, and others.

Closer scrutiny of Malcolm X's life leading up to his murder supports that U.S. Intelligence orchestrated his assassination. An FBI memorandum of 3/4/68, among other documents, eluded to how much U.S. Intelligence considered Malcolm X the top threat to the wealthiest white power structure. It discussed the "long range goals" including: "Prevent the rise of a messiah' who could unify, and electrify, the militant black nationalist movement. Malcolm X might have been such a messiah'; … Martin Luther King, Stokely Charmichael and Elijah Muhammad all aspire to this…[particularly] King… should he abandon his supposed obedience' to white liberal doctrines' (nonviolence)." Malcolm X's radical activist evolution started with his father, Earle Little. Working as a preacher, Little led a Lansing, Michigan chapter of Marcus Garvey's Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA).
The UNIA gained widespread appeal in the 1920s and '30s, reaching a million members amongst northern U.S. blacks. Garvey originally started his UNIA with its black pride activism in his birth country of Kingston, Jamaica before re-starting it in Harlem. Garvey's life appeared to reflect the effect of government oppression of many black leaders and groups to come after him. He first supported socialists and anti-colonialists worldwide. He had a successful international shipping company that helped distribute his Negro World newspaper to the Caribbean and Africa, where other UNIA chapters started.
When both British and U.S. Intelligence officials (including emerging FBI leader J. Edgar Hoover) corroborated against him, he took on a more conservative, capitalist but nationalist stance to allow himself back into the U.S. Nonetheless, Garvey was shot, imprisoned, deported and exiled for his activist work. Malcolm X was born in 1925. He would later describe race relations in his home of Lansing growing up.
The town's segregationist and racist rules included banning blacks from East Lansing after dark. When leaders such as Earl Little organized for any changes, racist whites threatened them. For example, the white Black Legion, Lansing's Ku Klux Klan, threatened Little and then burned his house down in 1929. In 1931, when Malcolm was 6, his father was found dead with a crushed skull and his body almost cut in half, reportedly due to being laid on street car tracks. Malcolm's mother, Louise Little, paid for the funeral through a small insurance policy. A larger company wouldn't pay on Little's life insurance because they called it a suicide. By the start of the '60s, U.S. Intelligence wrote up to several reports a week on Malcolm X due to his radical influence over blacks. Malcolm's influence over large numbers of American blacks first came through his Nation Of Islam (NOI) leadership as its national spokesman.
The FBI began their surveillance file on him early in the 1950s. From the late '50s on, Malcolm X's leadership of the New York NOI mosque helped him meet with third world revolutionaries and African leaders in the New York-based United Nations. The CIA grew concerned about Malcolm's influence amongst these leaders. African leaders soon hosted Malcolm X and had him take part in their political decisions. From the mid-1800s to the mid-1900s, European nations had invaded and forcibly taken Africa's riches of oil, diamonds and other minerals until independence movements drove the European colonizers out. After WWII devastated most European countries, the chances for African independence movements to gain control of their countries were expedited and U.S. corporations needed to gain control of African wealth through more subtle means. Malcolm's input about racism in the U.S. threatened to sabotage multinational corporations' hundred million-dollar deals. Malcolm X criticized America's capitalist system as exploiting people in general but he believed that its historical racism kept people of color particularly disadvantaged. With a huge media presence, he expressed his ideas to large forums.
[Image: malcolm-x.jpg]However, NOI leader Elijah Muhammad disagreed with Malcolm's leftist political activism. Muhammad restricted Malcolm's political activities, leading him to split with the NOI in 1964. African leaders helped fund Malcolm's travels and he started a new activist group in '64, which he named the Organization of Afro-American Unity (OAAU) in connection with the Organization of African Unity (OAU). African presidents had invited Malcolm as the only American in their OAU meetings because they recognized him as the leader of black American interests. While Malcolm X maintained his position of militant self-defense, he also began directly collaborating with Martin Luther King's group and other civil rights movement leaders. For example, Malcolm mentored Revolutionary Action
Movement leader Maxwell Stamford. Stamford reported how Malcolm X saying that the non-equality of African women in African organizations hindered the liberation movement. Departing from the chauvinist stereotype of Muslims, Malcolm said he wanted to practice equality and give them more leadership in his OAAU. Undercover police agent infiltrator
Gene Roberts joined the OAAU at its inception and rose to the leadership ranks of its Harlem-based security force. Roberts worked for the New York Police department's Bureau of Special Services (BOSS). The FBI directed BOSS actions as part of it's Counter Intelligence Program (Cointelpro) against Malcolm X. On top of the hierarchy mandated by the National Security Act of 1947, CIA superiors supervised this entire U.S. Intelligence apparatus. U.S. Intelligence had made several attempts on Malcolm's life early in his development. In1958, New York detectives shot up Malcolm X's office, for which the city settled with Malcolm in a $24 million lawsuit. FBI undercover agent, John X Ali, who infiltrated the Nation Of Islam (NOI), could provide the floor plan since he was living with Malcolm at the time. Agent John X Ali also reportedly played a part in orchestrating the firebombing of Malcolm's house in 1965. Ali had risen to a national secretary assignment, one of the highest leadership positions in the NOI. NOI leader Elijah Muhammad's son, Wallace Muhammad, said several FBI undercover agents in the NOI national staff helped Ali make that rise, as also attested to by FBI documents. Malcolm X believed that U.S. Intelligence further set up his near-fatal poisoning in Cairo, Egypt in late July of 1964.
He said CIA agents made their presence obvious to try and intimidate him as he traveled through Africa. They didn't want him to present his planned United Nations proposal, with African leaders, to declare that the U.S. was violating American blacks' human rights. At a Cairo restaurant, Malcolm said that just as he felt the poison in his food, he realized that he recognized the waiter as someone he saw in New York. Rushed to the hospital, he was barely saved by a stomach pumping. The attending doctor said there was poison in his food. Malcolm had been concerned about NOI death threats, but he knew that they didn't have a global spy capacity. Several other disclosures support Malcolm's belief that this was a CIA attempt on his life. A high level African diplomat later said that the French Counter-Espionage Department reported that the CIA planned Malcolm's murder, and France barred Malcolm for the first time in fear of getting scapegoated for the assassination. The FBI Director wrote a confidential memo on Malcolm's travel plans through Britain and France. He sent it to the CIA Director, the Army Intelligence (Intel) chief, the Naval Intel Director, and the Air Force Counterintel chief, as well as Intel chiefs in London and Paris.
One such memorandum on Malcolm and African leaders went directly to the CIA director of covert action, Richard Helms, who had a key role in assassination plots. Furthermore, FBI and police action on the day of Malcolm X's assassination, February 21, 1965, supports their role in it. An FBI document said [undercover agent] John Ali met with Talmadge Hayer (a.k.a. Thomas Hagan), one of the gunmen that shot Malcolm X, the night before the assassination. Hotel information on Ali's stay in New York those days supports this. At the Audubon Ballroom hall where Malcolm X gave his last speech, uniformed police left the area. At every other speech by Malcolm, they had uniformed officers inside and outside the halls. Gene Roberts revealed his undercover police agent status at a trial against the Black Panthers in 1971. Roberts had followed members of Malcolm X's OAAU as they started the New York Panther chapter. Under cross-examination at the trial, Roberts said he was the first to arrive at Malcolm's body and he "proceeded to give Malcolm X mouth-to-mouth resuscitation."
But Roberts revealed more, in interviews decades later, which supports that his real role appeared to be checking Malcolm X's vital signs to confirm the assassination's success. Roberts described the actions of his wife, Joan Roberts, who was with him at the event. When Malcolm X was shot, Malcolm's wife Betty Shabazz first tried to cover her daughters and screamed, "They're killing my husband!" When the shooting stopped, Shabazz, a nurse, went to run to her husband, but Joan Roberts grabbed her. Shabazz struggled to get free, threw Roberts into a wall and ran to Malcolm. Gene Roberts said he was there checking Malcolm's pulse. He turned to Shabazz and said Malcolm was dead.
Roberts admission bore even more importance due to its historical parallels. Martin Luther King's family attorney, William Pepper, extensively documented revelations on the role of undercover infiltrator, Military Intelligence agent Marrell McCullough in Martin Luther King's assassination. McCullough disclosed how he raced to and knelt over Martin Luther King as he lay bleeding from the fatal shooting. Pepper noted that McCollough was "apparently checking him for life signs," making sure the assassination was successful and signaling to Military Intelligence that "the army snipers there as backup shooters [weren't needed as]…the contract shooter [hadn't]…failed to kill King." They then communicated to the Special Force Group snipers, who were waiting for their shooting orders, that they could disengage. Police officials' admissions and later events supported the malevolent roles of the Roberts.
[Image: article-2018225-0D24583B00000578-191_233x314.jpg]Without Gene Roberts' disclosure at a trial six years later, no one would have known he worked undercover for the BOSS police intelligence unit. New York's Herald Tribune also said a "high police official" confirmed that several undercover BOSS agents were in the Ballroom audience at the assassination of Malcolm X. Police and media's cover-up actions were extensive. For example, New York's Herald Tribune and The New York Times reported that just after the shooting of Malcolm, police detained two people that were grabbed by the crowd. A later Herald Tribune edition said the crowd only grabbed one person, without acknowledging their earlier account. The New York Times later edition dropped the second suspect from its subheading, but still quoted Patrolman Thomas Hoy who said that, while one subject was grabbed by Malcolm's supporters, he grabbed a second suspect being chased by some people. Hoy further said, "the crowd began beating me and the suspect" in the Ballroom.
In the following days, no mention was made of the second suspect in the mass of media's accounts.
The media also largely ignored the circumstances around the death of Malcolm's close ally, Leon 4X Ameer. Mainstream media alleged that he died of an overdose of sleeping pills less than twenty days after Malcolm's assassination.
This happened just after Leon 4X announced plans to produce tapes and documents proving that the government was responsible for Malcolm X's assassination. Soon after Malcolm's murder, a partially deleted FBI memo noted the CIA's desire to get rid of Malcolm.
The memo also offered a key motive. It said a Life magazine reporter agreed with a source that the reporter should "check out Washington and the CIA because they wanted Malcolm out of the way because he snafued' African relations for the U.S." risking deals worth vast amounts of money for top American corporations.
BY JOHN POTASH/Rock Creek Free Press
"Let me issue and control a nation's money and I care not who writes the laws. - Mayer Rothschild
"Civil disobedience is not our problem. Our problem is civil obedience! People are obedient in the face of poverty, starvation, stupidity, war, and cruelty. Our problem is that grand thieves are running the country. That's our problem!" - Howard Zinn
"If there is no struggle there is no progress. Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and never will" - Frederick Douglass
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#3
CNN just did something rare for themselves. Ashley Banfield just did a piece admitting Hoover tried to get King to kill himself with a letter threatening to expose King's sexual affairs and immorality. Unusual for CNN, there was an in-depth look in to it with evidence etc.


Of course CNN did not admit that it didn't even show up for the 1999 Memphis trial where a jury found the government guilty of being involved in King's assassination. Ashley did not connect the dots showing that the same dirty bastards who sent the letter also conspired to murder MLK. Nor did she detail that Ray was framed as a Lone Nut - a familiar pattern that did not get exposure in Banfield's piece.



Nor did Banfield illustrate that CNN did a straight propaganda program on the 50th anniversary of JFK's assassination for those same bastards.




http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/16/magazi....html?_r=0



.
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#4
Robert Kennedy's speech upon the death of Martin Luther King:

“The most difficult subjects can be explained to the most slow-witted man if he has not formed any idea of them already; but the simplest thing cannot be made clear to the most intelligent man if he is firmly persuaded that he knows already, without a shadow of doubt, what is laid before him.”
― Leo Tolstoy,
Reply
#5
Albert Doyle Wrote:CNN just did something rare for themselves. Ashley Banfield just did a piece admitting Hoover tried to get King to kill himself with a letter threatening to expose King's sexual affairs and immorality. Unusual for CNN, there was an in-depth look in to it with evidence etc.


Of course CNN did not admit that it didn't even show up for the 1999 Memphis trial where a jury found the government guilty of being involved in King's assassination. Ashley did not connect the dots showing that the same dirty bastards who sent the letter also conspired to murder MLK. Nor did she detail that Ray was framed as a Lone Nut - a familiar pattern that did not get exposure in Banfield's piece.



Nor did Banfield illustrate that CNN did a straight propaganda program on the 50th anniversary of JFK's assassination for those same bastards.




http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/16/magazi....html?_r=0



.

There was virtually zero press coverage of this historic trial in 1999. Where a Memphis jury found that MLK had been killed by a US conspiracy. And people in this country really believe there is a "free press". I have known better most of my life. Happy Martin Luther King Jr Day everyone. "Home of the brave, land of the free" :Nazis:
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#6
A long-lost tape of MLK speaking - dated Dec. 7, 1964. Place - London. Just located. Just released. http://www.democracynow.org/2015/1/19/ex...mlk_speech

We lost SO VERY MUCH when we lost MLK! His murder was to put us where we are today - leaderless, rudderless, often feeling beaten down. They killed the dreamer, but they can't kill the Dream!

Listening to this brought memories and dreams I once had back again....and made me realize that MLK had more morality in his pinky than Obama has in his entire Cabinet - and that is being unfair to MLK's pinky. We can thank the Secret forces and their secret 'military' for killing all the progressive heroes, leaders, thinkers...and are still at it.
"Let me issue and control a nation's money and I care not who writes the laws. - Mayer Rothschild
"Civil disobedience is not our problem. Our problem is civil obedience! People are obedient in the face of poverty, starvation, stupidity, war, and cruelty. Our problem is that grand thieves are running the country. That's our problem!" - Howard Zinn
"If there is no struggle there is no progress. Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and never will" - Frederick Douglass
Reply
#7
Peter Lemkin Wrote:We lost SO VERY MUCH when we lost MLK! His murder was to put us where we are today - leaderless, rudderless, often feeling beaten down. They killed the dreamer, but they can't kill the Dream!

Listening to this brought memories and dreams I once had back again....and made me realize that MLK had more morality in his pinky than Obama has in his entire Cabinet - and that is being unfair to MLK's pinky. We can thank the Secret forces and their secret 'military' for killing all the progressive heroes, leaders, thinkers...and are still at it.
That was the whole point of COINTELPRO and other operations. To eliminate the political leadership of the black communities leaving them shocked and rudderles in a sea of drugs to pacify their anger and keep them distracted fighting each other instead of the man.
"The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it." Karl Marx

"He would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies. When asked in court whether she knew that Lord Astor had denied having sex with her.

“I think it would be a good idea” Ghandi, when asked about Western Civilisation.
Reply
#8
The Ballad of Martin Luther King:

“The most difficult subjects can be explained to the most slow-witted man if he has not formed any idea of them already; but the simplest thing cannot be made clear to the most intelligent man if he is firmly persuaded that he knows already, without a shadow of doubt, what is laid before him.”
― Leo Tolstoy,
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