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America's Mexican Border Wars
#31
Cocaine Jet That Crashed in Mexico Part of Cowboy Government Operation, DEA Sources Claim

Mexican Officials Fear the Case, if Exposed, Could Jeopardize US Funding for “Plan Mexico”



By Bill Conroy
Special to The Narco News Bulletin

December 19, 2007
(note the Bush's secret money deal to Mexico, without Congress or House approval


The fact that the Gulfstream was forced to ditch over the Yucatan after being refused landing clearance at two Mexican airports is strong evidence that this operation, if ICE operated as alleged, does not have the proper controls in place, law enforcement sources told Narco News. If the operation was being adequately monitored and controlled by U.S. law enforcement, in coordination with Mexican authorities, the jet would have been directed to a safe landing zone, they add.
Mexican law enforcers subsequently apprehended the two pilots of the downed jet. Neither one of them appears to be a U.S. citizen, according to Mexican press accounts.
Narco News has previously reported that the bill of sale for the Gulfstream jet — which was sold only weeks before its crash landing — lists an individual named Greg Smith, whose name also shows up in public documents that indicate he worked as a pilot in the past for an operation involving the FBI, DEA and CIA that targeted narco-traffickers in Colombia. [See link here.]

(note; Pilot Tosh Plumlee had known and flown with Greg Smith in Forest Service C130's in the mid 90's these were CIA contract operations conducted through Mexico)

Mexican authorities interrogated the pilots of the ill-fated cocaine jet prior to turning them over to DEA agents for questioning. DEA confirmed that it is now handling the investigation into the jet crash and subsequent seizure of the cocaine.

It appears that the pilots spilled the beans on the ICE operation during their interrogation by Mexican authorities, DEA sources tell Narco News. The meeting held at DEA headquarters was focused, in part, on assessing the implications of that information. The Mexican government has chosen not to raised a stink over the matter, the DEA sources claim, for fear of jeopardizing the pending $1.4 billion U.S. aid package promised as part of the proposed “Mérida Iinitiative” — commonly known as “Plan Mexico,” which will provide a Christmas list of training and equipment to the Mexican government to battle with the “drug cartels. ...”.


See rest of article on the "Narco News Website, if interested.
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#32
Cocaine Jet That Crashed in Mexico Part of Cowboy Government Operation, DEA Sources Claim

Mexican Officials Fear the Case, if Exposed, Could Jeopardize US Funding for “Plan Mexico”



By Bill Conroy
Special to The Narco News Bulletin

December 19, 2007
(note the Bush's secret money deal to Mexico, without Congress or House approval


The fact that the Gulfstream was forced to ditch over the Yucatan after being refused landing clearance at two Mexican airports is strong evidence that this operation, if ICE operated as alleged, does not have the proper controls in place, law enforcement sources told Narco News. If the operation was being adequately monitored and controlled by U.S. law enforcement, in coordination with Mexican authorities, the jet would have been directed to a safe landing zone, they add.
Mexican law enforcers subsequently apprehended the two pilots of the downed jet. Neither one of them appears to be a U.S. citizen, according to Mexican press accounts.
Narco News has previously reported that the bill of sale for the Gulfstream jet — which was sold only weeks before its crash landing — lists an individual named Greg Smith, whose name also shows up in public documents that indicate he worked as a pilot in the past for an operation involving the FBI, DEA and CIA that targeted narco-traffickers in Colombia. [See link here.]

(note; Pilot Tosh Plumlee had known and flown with Greg Smith in Forest Service C130's in the mid 90's these were CIA contract operations conducted through Mexico)

Mexican authorities interrogated the pilots of the ill-fated cocaine jet prior to turning them over to DEA agents for questioning. DEA confirmed that it is now handling the investigation into the jet crash and subsequent seizure of the cocaine.

It appears that the pilots spilled the beans on the ICE operation during their interrogation by Mexican authorities, DEA sources tell Narco News. The meeting held at DEA headquarters was focused, in part, on assessing the implications of that information. The Mexican government has chosen not to raised a stink over the matter, the DEA sources claim, for fear of jeopardizing the pending $1.4 billion U.S. aid package promised as part of the proposed “Mérida Iinitiative” — commonly known as “Plan Mexico,” which will provide a Christmas list of training and equipment to the Mexican government to battle with the “drug cartels. ...”.


See rest of article on the "Narco News Website, if interested.
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#33
Same MO. Seems they are even using some of the same planes. Tosh, without asking you to name names, what percentage of the pilots and crew do you think are the same or contain some of the same players? Also, I know there are others who silently back your speaking out - having been involved themselves, but too afraid to join you openly. I'm sure there are yet others who would rather your head be on a platter for breaking the code of silence. Do they send you 'love letters and calls, etc.' or maintain their silence and just 'let it be known' they are not happy with your speaking out? Anyway, I and I'm sure others here applaud what you are doing and have done for many decades now.
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#34
About the Guests:

Robert Tosh Plumlee was born in 1937. He joined the United States Army in April 1954 and was assigned to the Texas 49th Armored Division. Later he was transferred to Dallas and assigned to the 4th Army Reserve Military Intelligence Unit, commanding officer Captain Edward G Seiwell.

While he was in the Army he also workedt as an aircraft mechanic before obtaining his pilot's license in 1956. Soon afterwards (1957-64) he began work as a pilot for a Military INTEL, Special Operations Group out of the Pentagon assigned to covert and clandestine CIA flights. Some of his case officers (or handlers) included; William Harvey, Tracy Barnes, Rip Robertson, Tony Bender, and others. In those capacities, Plumlee transported arms to Cuba before Castro took power. Plumlee was also associated with Operation 40, the infamous special attack task force of the CIA's Covert Operational Group.(COG)

In 1962 Plumlee was assigned to Task Force W which operated at the time from the JM/WAVE,OMC also known as the CIA's secret WAVE Station in Miami.

Plumlee also worked many classified operations most as an undercover operative and contract pilot for the federal government during the "Drug War" during the presidency of Ronald Reagan, Bush one, Clinton, and Bush two.

In 1977 Plumlee testified before Frank Church and his Select Committee on Intelligence Activities. He also testified before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee in 1990 and 1991. and Senator John Kerry's Sub Committee on Narcotics, Terrorism.

Celerino "Cele" Castillo, III, is a 20-year veteran of both state and federal law enforcement with 12-year service in the U. S. Department of Justice, Drug Enforcement Administration. Mr. Castillo is a highly decorated DEA agent for his undercover operations in Central and South America. For several years, he was also placed in major cities like San Francisco and New York City for deep cover operations. He is an author of "Powderburns" Cocaine, Contras And The Drug War, and is an acclaimed public speaker and educator.

COURT QUALIFIED EXPERT WITNESS: For 20 years Mr. Castillo has qualified as an "expert witness" in criminal and civil trials, both for and against various state and federal law enforcement agencies, in the following subjects: Undercover tactics, entrapment, informant handling practices and procedures, all subjects related to drugs trafficking, money laundering, and international narcotics investigations, police profiling, research on federal documentation for the defense. (Bates)

MR. CASTILLO has written several internationally known articles against federal law enforcement corruption: "Written Statement of Celerino Castillo III, for The House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence" 1998. He was mentioned in several articles on Informant Handling for The National Law Journal. ABC's Primetime Live, Dateline NBC, Discovery Channel and other numerous news magazines have done exclusive interviews on Mr. Castillo pertaining to "Outrageous Conduct" by the U.S. Government
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#35
Further extract from the Narco News story:

Quote:The FBI charged Vega in 2000 with obstruction of justice, alleging that he used an illegal scheme of promising Colombian narco-traffickers lenient sentences in exchange for money and their cooperation with the U.S. government. Those charges were dropped, however, because prosecutors were later forced to concede that Vega’s so-called “corruption scheme” was actually a government-sanctioned cover story. In fact, Vega claims the FBI authorized the cover story.

But the government still found a way to stick it to Vega by hitting him with a misdemeanor tax charge. Vega says he served 52 days in jail after being convicted in 2004 of that taxing transgression. Ironically, one of the allegedly corrupt Colombian law enforcers who Vega claims was part of the Bogotá Connection, Col. Danilo Gonzalez of the Colombian National Police, was assassinated in Bogotá on the very day Vega was sentenced in the tax case.

Vega, in a recent lawsuit filed in federal court, claims the FBI and DEA both used him between 1997 and 2000 to help broker plea deals with Colombian narco-traffickers and that, in the end, the U.S. government stiffed him out of $28.5 million in promised payments for his work.

It was during that work for the FBI and DEA that Vega ran across Greg Smith, whom Vega claims was brought in by the FBI to pilot some 25 to 30 flights that involved couriering federal agents, Colombian narco-traffickers and lawyers back and forth between the United States and Latin America as part of the naroc-trafficker “recruiting” efforts.

Vega also says that the CIA was very involved in this effort, assisting with assuring the safe transport of the narco-traffickers to the airports in Latin America.

“We did have the full cooperation of the CIA…,” he told Narco News.

And

Quote:In addition, one of the files leaked out of the U.S. Embassy in Bogotá to a narco-trafficker was a CIA file, according to Vega. The file provided to that narco-trafficker, Vega alleges, was a record of all the intelligence gathered by the CIA in Colombia on some 200 narco-traffickers.

So it appears the CIA’s fingerprints are all over the Bogotá Connection.

And now, given Mr. Smith’s possible link to the Gulfstream II jet — an aircraft reportedly linked to past CIA operations — Vega says he cannot rule out that Smith might be an asset of not only the FBI, but the CIA as well. He stresses, though, that it is only a “suspicion.”
The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.
Carl Jung - Aion (1951). CW 9, Part II: P.14
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#36
Yes indeed.
The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.
Carl Jung - Aion (1951). CW 9, Part II: P.14
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#37
Damn, I had an er come up last night and missed the show. I will check for re-airing. My life is a bit crazy right now, too much going on.
Dawn
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#38
Calderon Links US to Mexico Drug Trade

March 05, 2009

Agence France-Presse



Mexican President Felipe Calderon hit back in an interview at charges his government is failing in its war against drug cartels, saying corruption in the United States is also to blame.
With murders among feuding Mexican drug cartels on the rise and demand for cocaine and other drugs north of the border, Calderon said the United States should take a hard look at itself before pointing the finger at anyone else.
"The main cause of the problems associated with organized crime is having the world's biggest consumer next to us," Calderon told AFP in an interview Wednesday.
"Drug trafficking in the United States is fueled by the phenomenon of corruption on the part of the American authorities," he said, calling on U.S. President Barack Obama to step up the fight against drugs in his own country.
Calderon admitted some Mexican officials had helped cartels, but urged the United States to consider how many of its officials have been implicated.
"I want to know how many American officials have been prosecuted for this," he said, listing a string of prosecutions made against Mexican police officers and government officials during his administration.
"It is not an exclusively Mexican problem, it is a common problem between Mexico and the United States," he said.
Cocaine is produced in South America, but the Mexican cartels control most of the multi-billion-dollar trade.
Calderon launched a wide-ranging crackdown on drug cartels soon after taking office in late 2006. The cartels in turn hit back with ever-higher levels of violence and intimidation.
Mexican border cities have suffered the brunt of the violence, prompting concerns in Washington that the killings and attacks could spill over into the United States.
Some 5,300 people were murdered in drug violence across Mexico in 2008. Ciudad Juarez, across from El Paso, Texas, was worst hit, with more than 1,600 drug-related deaths reported.
Admiral Mike Mullen, the head of the U.S. military, is due in Mexico this week as Washington prepares to step up military and other assistance to battle the cartels.
A top agenda item is "the growing violence and growing threat with regard to narco-trafficking and the drug cartels," Mullen's spokesman, Captain John Kirby, told AFP.
Mexico's police and security forces are often out-gunned by the well-financed gangs.

The administration of George W. Bush pledged 1.6 billion dollars over three years in security assistance to Mexico and Central America, primarily aimed at better equipping Mexico's security forces.

Calderon called on U.S. officials to staunch the flow of weapons from the United States to Mexico.
"The biggest empowerment of organized crime are the weapons that arrive from the United States," Calderon said.
"Since 2006 we have decommissioned 27,000 weapons, everything from missile launchers to 2,500 grenades. We have also found uniforms and weapons belonging to the U.S. Army."
But he said recent talks with Obama offered hope.

"We now have a clearer, more decisive response (from the current administration), one which matches the magnitude of the problem which we face," he said.
In late February, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder said U.S. and Mexican authorities had arrested 750 people over 21 months in an anti-drug sweep, including 52 members of Mexico's Sinaloa drug cartel.

The Calderon government has deployed 36,000 soldiers and tens of thousands of police officers in Mexico's most violent cities in a bid to end drug related violence.
In the latest sweep, police in Cancun said late Wednesday they arrested Antelmo Lazaro "El Chamoy" Rodriguez, accused of being a leader of the "Zetas," a paramilitary gang of hitmen working for the Gulf of Mexico drug cartel.
The original Zetas were elite special forces soldiers trained to find and detain drug lords, but a group of deserters formed the gang in the late 1990s.





© Copyright 2009 Agence France-Presse. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


This was covered in program by tosh... sorta confirms segments of program.

Where has the U.S. mainstream media been on this?

Mockingbird alive and well
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#39
Sounds like Calderon wants more money for his Swiss bank account. Or else.
"The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it." Karl Marx

"He would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies. When asked in court whether she knew that Lord Astor had denied having sex with her.

“I think it would be a good idea” Ghandi, when asked about Western Civilisation.
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#40
http://www.expertwitnessradio.org/archiv...rugwar.mp3

Robert Tosh Plumlee was born in 1937. He joined the United States Army in April 1954 and was assigned to the Texas 49th Armored Division. Later he was transferred to Dallas and assigned to the 4th Army Reserve Military Intelligence Unit, commanding officer Captain Edward G Seiwell.

While he was in the Army he also workedt as an aircraft mechanic before obtaining his pilot's license in 1956. Soon afterwards (1957-64) he began work as a pilot for a Military INTEL, Special Operations Group out of the Pentagon assigned to covert and clandestine CIA flights. Some of his case officers (or handlers) included; William Harvey, Tracy Barnes, Rip Robertson, Tony Bender, and others. In those capacities, Plumlee transported arms to Cuba before Castro took power. Plumlee was also associated with Operation 40, the infamous special attack task force of the CIA's Covert Operational Group.(COG)

In 1962 Plumlee was assigned to Task Force W which operated at the time from the JM/WAVE,OMC also known as the CIA's secret WAVE Station in Miami.

Plumlee also worked many classified operations most as an undercover operative and contract pilot for the federal government during the "Drug War" during the presidency of Ronald Reagan, Bush one, Clinton, and Bush two.

In 1977 Plumlee testified before Frank Church and his Select Committee on Intelligence Activities. He also testified before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee in 1990 and 1991. and Senator John Kerry's Sub Committee on Narcotics, Terrorism.

[Image: tosh.jpg]

Celerino "Cele" Castillo, III, is a 20-year veteran of both state and federal law enforcement with 12-year service in the U. S. Department of Justice, Drug Enforcement Administration. Mr. Castillo is a highly decorated DEA agent for his undercover operations in Central and South America. For several years, he was also placed in major cities like San Francisco and New York City for deep cover operations. He is an author of "Powderburns" Cocaine, Contras And The Drug War, and is an acclaimed public speaker and educator.

COURT QUALIFIED EXPERT WITNESS: For 20 years Mr. Castillo has qualified as an "expert witness" in criminal and civil trials, both for and against various state and federal law enforcement agencies, in the following subjects: Undercover tactics, entrapment, informant handling practices and procedures, all subjects related to drugs trafficking, money laundering, and international narcotics investigations, police profiling, research on federal documentation for the defense. (Bates)

MR. CASTILLO has written several internationally known articles against federal law enforcement corruption: "Written Statement of Celerino Castillo III, for The House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence" 1998. He was mentioned in several articles on Informant Handling for The National Law Journal. ABC's Primetime Live, Dateline NBC, Discovery Channel and other numerous news magazines have done exclusive interviews on Mr. Castillo pertaining to "Outrageous Conduct" by the U.S. Government.

Links:

Cele Castillo's Website - http://www.powderburns.org
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