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"Dark Alliance" movie coming out!
#1
Gary Webb was the reporter who exposed the CIA/cocaine connection. He was CRUCIFIED by the MSM and hounded to death (literally). A Biiiiiig H'wood movie about him is upcoming. See this great tribute to him and info about the flick here:

http://narcosphere.narconews.com/thefiel...ldn-t-kill

P.S. If you ain't reading NarcoNews regularly....for shame!:Confusedtampfeet::
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#2
I suspect CIA can get you to kill yourself without your knowledge.
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#3
Thanks Richard. Will definitely be looking out for this one. Just hope they do him justice. And agree with you re Narco News. Great independent and real journalism.
"The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it." Karl Marx

"He would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies. When asked in court whether she knew that Lord Astor had denied having sex with her.

“I think it would be a good idea” Ghandi, when asked about Western Civilisation.
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#4
Albert Doyle Wrote:I suspect CIA can get you to kill yourself without your knowledge.

Of course, he did have to shoot himself twice in the head to get the job done. ::thumbsdown::
"We'll know our disinformation campaign is complete when everything the American public believes is false." --William J. Casey, D.C.I

"We will lead every revolution against us." --Theodore Herzl
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#5
Lauren Johnson Wrote:
Albert Doyle Wrote:I suspect CIA can get you to kill yourself without your knowledge.

Of course, he did have to shoot himself twice in the head to get the job done. ::thumbsdown::

Yep, that's being suicided for you. Truly amazing feat that the gun didn't drop from his hand at the first shot and that he mustered the strength to fire the second just to make sure.
The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.
Carl Jung - Aion (1951). CW 9, Part II: P.14
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#6
I am sure the pre reviews will be as terrible as they were for JFK. Can't have movies about the TRUTH now can we? This is one I will go to the theatre to see.
Also good to see that people here don't believe the suicide story that so many fell for. Even Lisa Pease.
Dawn
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#7
Managing a Nightmare: The CIA Reveals How It Watched Over the Destruction of Gary Webb

By Ryan Devereaux @rdevro
Today at 4:20 AM




Eighteen years after it was published, "Dark Alliance," the San Jose Mercury News's bombshell investigation into links between the cocaine trade, Nicaragua's Contra rebels, and African American neighborhoods in California, remains one of the most explosive and controversial exposés in American journalism.
The 20,000-word series enraged black communities, prompted Congressional hearings, and became one of the first major national security stories in history to blow up online. It also sparked an aggressive backlash from the nation's most powerful media outlets, which devoted considerable resources to discredit author Gary Webb's reporting. Their efforts succeeded, costing Webb his career. On December 10, 2004, the journalist was found dead in his apartment, having ended his eight-year downfall with two .38-caliber bullets to the head.
These days, Webb is being cast in a more sympathetic light. He's portrayed heroically in a major motion picture set to premiere nationwide next month. And documents newly released by the CIA provide fresh context to the "Dark Alliance" saga information that paints an ugly portrait of the mainstream media at the time.
On September 18, the agency released a trove of documents spanning three decades of secret government operations. Culled from the agency's in-house journal, Studies in Intelligence, the materials include a previously unreleased six-page article titled "Managing a Nightmare: CIA Public Affairs and the Drug Conspiracy Story." Looking back on the weeks immediately following the publication of "Dark Alliance," the document offers a unique window into the CIA's internal reaction to what it called "a genuine public relations crisis" while revealing just how little the agency ultimately had to do to swiftly extinguish the public outcry. Thanks in part to what author Nicholas Dujmovic, a CIA Directorate of Intelligence staffer at the time of publication, describes as "a ground base of already productive relations with journalists," the CIA's Public Affairs officers watched with relief as the largest newspapers in the country rescued the agency from disaster, and, in the process, destroyed the reputation of an aggressive, award-winning reporter.
(Dujmovic's name was redacted in the released version of the CIA document, but was included in a footnote in a 2010 article in the Journal of Intelligence. Dujmovic confirmed his authorship to The Intercept.)
[Image: kill-the-messenger1400-1000x428.jpg]
Actor Jeremy Renner stars as investigative journalist Gary Webb in the upcoming film "Kill the Messenger."
Webb's troubles began in August 1996, when his employer, the San Jose Mercury News, published a groundbreaking, three-part investigation he had worked on for more than a year. Carrying the full title "Dark Alliance: The Story Behind the Crack Explosion," Webb's series reported that in addition to waging a proxy war for the U.S. government against Nicaragua's revolutionary Sandinista government in the 1980s, elements of the CIA-backed Contra rebels were also involved in trafficking cocaine to the U.S. in order to fund their counter-revolutionary campaign. The secret flow of drugs and money, Webb reported, had a direct link to the subsequent explosion of crack cocaine abuse that had devastated California's most vulnerable African American neighborhoods.
Derided by some as conspiracy theory and heralded by others as investigative reporting at its finest, Webb's series spread through extensive talk radio coverage and global availability via the internet, which at the time was still a novel way to promote national news.
Though "Dark Alliance" would eventually morph into a personal crisis for Webb, it was initially a PR disaster for the CIA. In "Managing a Nightmare," Dujmovic minced no words in describing the potentially devastating effect of the series on the agency's image:
The charges could hardly be worse. A widely read newspaper series leads many Americans to believe CIA is guilty of at least complicity, if not conspiracy, in the outbreak of crack cocaine in America's cities. In more extreme versions of the story circulating on talk radio and the internet, the Agency was the instrument of a consistent strategy by the US Government to destroy the black community and keep black Americans from advancing. Denunciations of CIAreminiscent of the 1970sabound. Investigations are demanded and initiated. The Congress gets involved.
Dujmovic acknowledged that Webb "did not state outright that CIA ran the drug trade or even knew about it." In fact, the agency's central complaint, according to the document, was over the graphics that accompanied the series, which suggested a link between the CIA and the crack scare, and Webb's description of the Contras as "the CIA's army" (despite the fact that the Contras were quite literally an armed, militant group not-so-secretly supported by the U.S., at war with the government of Nicaragua).
Dujmovic complained that Webb's series "appeared with no warning," remarking that, for all his journalistic credentials, "he apparently could not come up with a widely available and well-known telephone number for CIA Public Affairs." This was probably because Webb "was uninterested in anything the Agency might have to say that would diminish the impact of his series," he wrote. (Webb later said that he did contact the CIA but that the agency would not return his calls; efforts to obtain CIA comment were not mentioned in the "Dark Alliance" series).
Dujmovic also pointed out that much of what was reported in "Dark Alliance" was not new. Indeed, in 1985, more than a decade before the series was published, Associated Press journalists Robert Parry and Brian Barger found that Contra groups had "engaged in cocaine trafficking, in part to help finance their war against Nicaragua." In a move that foreshadowed Webb's experience, the Reagan White House launched "a concerted behind-the-scenes campaign to besmirch the professionalism of Parry and Barger and to discredit all reporting on the contras and drugs," according to a 1997 article by Peter Kornbluh for the Columbia Journalism Review. "Whether the campaign was the cause or not, coverage was minimal."
Neverthess, a special senate subcommittee, chaired by then-senator John Kerry, investigated the AP's findings and, in 1989, released a 1,166-page report on covert U.S. operations throughout Latin America and the Caribbean. It found "considerable evidence" that the Contras were linked to running drugs and guns and that the U.S. government knew about it.
[Image: contras1400-1000x666.jpg]
1983, Anti-Sandinista Contra forces move down the San Juan River which separates Nicaragua from Costa Rica.
From the subcommittee report:
On the basis of this evidence, it is clear that individuals who provided support for the Contras were involved in drug trafficking, the supply network of the Contras was used by drug trafficking organizations, and elements of the Contras themselves knowingly received financial and material assistance from drug traffickers. In each case, one or another agency of the U.S. government had information regarding the involvement either while it was occurring, or immediately thereafter.
The chief of the CIA's Central America Task Force was also quoted as saying, "With respect to (drug trafficking) by the Resistance Forces…it is not a couple of people. It is a lot of people."
Despite such damning assessments, the subcommittee report received scant attention from the country's major newspapers. Seven years later, Webb would be the one to pick up the story. His articles distinguished themselves from the AP's reporting in part by connecting an issue that seemed distant to many U.S. readers drug trafficking in Central America to a deeply-felt domestic story, the impact of crack cocaine in California's urban, African American communities.
"Dark Alliance" focused on the lives of three men involved in shipping cocaine to the U.S.: Ricky "Freeway" Ross, a legendary L.A. drug dealer; Oscar Danilo Blandón Reyes, considered by the U.S. government to be Nicaragua's biggest cocaine dealer living in the United States; and Meneses Cantarero, a powerful Nicaraguan player who had allegedly recruited Blandón to sell drugs in support of the counter-revolution. The series examined the relationship between the men, their impact on the drug market in California and elsewhere, and the disproportionate sentencing of African Americans under crack cocaine laws.
And while its content was not all new, the series marked the beginning of something that was: an in-depth investigation published outside the traditional mainstream media outlets and successfully promoted on the internet. More than a decade before Wikileaks and Edward Snowden, Webb showcased the power and reach of online journalism. Key documents were hosted on the San Jose Mercury News website, with hyperlinks, wiretap recordings and follow-up stories. The series was widely discussed on African American talk radio stations; on some days attracting more than one million readers to the newspaper's website. As Webb later remarked, "you don't have be The New York Times or The Washington Post to bust a national story anymore."
But newspapers like the Times and the Post seemed to spend far more time trying to poke holes in the series than in following up on the underreported scandal at its heart, the involvement of U.S.-backed proxy forces in international drug trafficking. The Los Angeles Times was especially aggressive. Scooped in its own backyard, the California paper assigned no fewer than 17 reporters to pick apart Webb's reporting. While employees denied an outright effort to attack the Mercury News, one of the 17 referred to it as the "get Gary Webb team." Another said at the time, "We're going to take away that guy's Pulitzer," according to Kornbluh's CJR piece. Within two months of the publication of "Dark Alliance," the L.A. Times devoted more words to dismantling its competitor's breakout hit than comprised the series itself.
The CIA watched these developments closely, collaborating where it could with outlets who wanted to challenge Webb's reporting. Media inquiries had started almost immediately following the publication of "Dark Alliance," and Dujmovic in "Managing a Nightmare" cites the CIA's success in discouraging "one major news affiliate" from covering the story. He also boasts that the agency effectively departed from its own longstanding policies in order to discredit the series. "For example, in order to help a journalist working on a story that would undermine the Mercury News allegations, Public Affairs was able to deny any affiliation of a particular individual which is a rare exception to the general policy that CIA does not comment on any individual's alleged CIA ties."
The document chronicles the shift in public opinion as it moved in favor of the CIA, a trend that began about a month and a half after the series was published. "That third week in September was a turning point in media coverage of this story," Dujmovic wrote, citing "[r]espected columnists, including prominent blacks," along with the New York Daily News, the Baltimore Sun, The Weekly Standard and the Washington Post. The agency supplied the press, "as well as former Agency officials, who were themselves representing the Agency in interviews with the media," with "these more balanced stories," Dujmovic wrote. The Washington Post proved particularly useful. "Because of the Posts national reputation, its articles especially were picked up by other papers, helping to create what the Associated Press called a firestorm of reaction' against the San Jose Mercury News." Over the month that followed, critical media coverage of the series ("balanced reporting") far outnumbered supportive stories, a trend the CIA credited to the Post, The New York Times, "and especially the Los Angeles Times." Webb's editors began to distance themselves from their reporter.
By the end of October, two months after "Dark Alliance" was published, "the tone of the entire CIA-drug story had changed," Dujmovic was pleased to report. "Most press coverage included, as a routine matter, the now-widespread criticism of the Mercury News allegations."
"This success has to be in relative terms," Dujmovic wrote, summing up the episode. "In the world of public relations, as in war, avoiding a rout in the face of hostile multitudes can be considered a success."
[Image: dark_alliance_540-300x300.jpg] Artwork that accompanied the original Dark Alliance series published in the San Jose Mercury News.

There's no question that "Dark Alliance" included flaws, which the CIA was able to exploit.
In his CJR piece, Kornbluh said the series was "problematically sourced" and criticized it for "repeatedly promised evidence that, on close reading, it did not deliver." It failed to definitively connect the story's key players to the CIA, he noted, and there were inconsistencies in Webb's timeline of events.
But Kornbluh also uncovered problems with the retaliatory reports described as "balanced" by the CIA. In the case of the L.A. Times, he wrote, the paper "stumbled into some of the same problems of hyperbole, selectivity, and credibility that it was attempting to expose" while ignoring declassified evidence (also neglected by the New York Times and the Washington Post) that lent credibility to Webb's thesis. "Clearly, there was room to advance the contra/drug/CIA story rather than simply denounce it," Kornbluh wrote.
The Mercury News was partially responsible "for the sometimes distorted public furor the stories generated," Kornbluh said, but also achieved "something that neither the Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, nor The New York Times had been willing or able to do revisit a significant story that had been inexplicably abandoned by the mainstream press, report a new dimension to it, and thus put it back on the national agenda where it belongs."
In October, the story of Gary Webb will reach a national moviegoing audience, likely reviving old questions about his reporting and the outrage it ignited. Director Michael Cuesta's film, Kill the Messenger, stars Jeremy Renner as the hard-charging investigative reporter and borrows its title from a 2006 biography written by award-winning investigative journalist Nick Schou, who worked as a consultant on the script.
Discussing the newly disclosed "Managing a Nightmare" document, Schou says it squares with what he found while doing his own reporting. Rather than some dastardly, covert plot to destroy (or, as some went so far as to suggest, murder) Webb, Schou posits that the journalist was ultimately undone by the petty jealousies of the modern media world. The CIA "didn't really need to lift a finger to try to ruin Gary Webb's credibility," Schou told The Intercept. "They just sat there and watched these journalists go after Gary like a bunch of piranhas."
"They must have been delighted over at Langley, the way this all unfolded," Schou added.
At least one journalist who helped lead the campaign to discredit Webb, feels remorse for what he did. As Schou reported for L.A. Weekly, in a 2013 radio interview L.A. Times reporter Jesse Katz recalled the episode, saying, "As an L.A. Times reporter, we saw this series in the San Jose Mercury News and kind of wonder[ed] how legit it was and kind of put it under a microscope. And we did it in a way that most of us who were involved in it, I think, would look back on that and say it was overkill. We had this huge team of people at the L.A. Times and kind of piled on to one lone muckraker up in Northern California."
Schou, too, readily concedes there were problems with Webb's reporting, but maintains that the most important components of his investigation stood up to scrutiny, only to be buried under the attacks from the nation's biggest papers.
"I think it's fair to take a look at the story objectively and say that it could have been better edited, it could have been packaged better, it would have been less inflammatory. And sure, maybe Gary could have, like, actually put in the story somewhere I called the CIA X-amount of times and they didn't respond.' That wasn't in there," he said. "But these are all kind of minor things compared to the bigger picture, which is that he documented for the first time in the history of U.S. media how CIA complicity with Central American drug traffickers had actually impacted the sale of drugs north of the border in a very detailed, accurate story. And that's, I think, the take-away here."
As for Webb's tragic death, Schou is certain it was a direct consequence of the smear campaign against him.
"As much as it's true that he suffered from a clinical depression for years and years and even before Dark Alliance' to a certain extent it's impossible to view what happened to him without understanding the death of his career as a result of this story," he explained. "It was really the central defining event of his career and of his life."
"Once you take away a journalist's credibility, that's all they have," Schou says. "He was never able to recover from that."
Kill the Messenger, a thriller based on Webb's story, will be released October 10.
In "Managing a Nightmare," Dujmovic attributed the initial outcry over the "Dark Alliance" series to "societal shortcomings" that are not present in the spy agency.
"As a personal post-script, I would submit that ultimately the CIA-drug story says a lot more about American society on the eve of the millennium that [sic] it does about either the CIA or the media," he wrote. "We live in somewhat coarse and emotional timeswhen large numbers of Americans do not adhere to the same standards of logic, evidence, or even civil discourse as those practiced by members of the CIA community."
Webb obviously saw things differently. He reflected on his fall from grace in the 2002 book, Into the Buzzsaw. Prior to "Dark Alliance," Webb said, "I was winning awards, getting raises, lecturing college classes, appearing on TV shows, and judging journalism contests."
"And then I wrote some stories that made me realize how sadly misplaced my bliss had been. The reason I'd enjoyed such smooth sailing for so long hadn't been, as I'd assumed, because I was careful and diligent and good at my job," Webb wrote. "The truth was that, in all those years, I hadn't written anything important enough to suppress."

Photo: Webb: Bob Berg/Getty Images; Kill the Messenger: Chuck Zlotnick/Focus Features; Contras: Bill Gentile/Corbis

Email the author: ryan.devereaux@theintercept.com


https://firstlook.org/theintercept/2014/...gary-webb/
"The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it." Karl Marx

"He would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies. When asked in court whether she knew that Lord Astor had denied having sex with her.

“I think it would be a good idea” Ghandi, when asked about Western Civilisation.
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#8
I always assumed that Webb was murdered, but then I read how suicidally depressed he was in his last days. I've never seen an autopsy report, but the first shot in the head could have grazed the scalp if his hand was shaking. He would still be very much alive and conscious.

Either way, the CIA and the corporate media are fully responsible for his death.
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#9
Quote:When in December of 2004 his house was sold and he had nowhere to live at the age of 49 other than to move in with his mother, Gary wrote a suicide note and killed himself with a pistol. There are still many who don't believe it, who prefer to think the same CIA assassinated him. But Gary had called friends in the days before his death telling them he had bought the gun and was going to do it. And then he was gone.


Al Giordano needs to learn how this could be true but intel could still be the cause without Webb's knowledge.
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#10

The CIA/MSM Contra-Cocaine Cover-up

September 26, 2014

Exclusive: With Hollywood set to release a movie about the Contra-cocaine scandal and the destruction of journalist Gary Webb, an internal CIA report has surfaced showing how the spy agency manipulated the mainstream media's coverage to disparage Webb and contain the scandal, reports Robert Parry.
By Robert Parry
In 1996 as major U.S. news outlets disparaged the Nicaraguan Contra-cocaine story and destroyed the career of investigative reporter Gary Webb for reviving it the CIA marveled at the success of its public-relations team guiding the mainstream media's hostility toward both the story and Webb, according to a newly released internal report.
Entitled "Managing a Nightmare: CIA Public Affairs and the Drug Conspiracy Story," the six-page report describes the CIA's damage control after Webb's "Dark Alliance" series was published in the San Jose Mercury-News in August 1996. Webb had resurrected disclosures from the 1980s about the CIA-backed Contras collaborating with cocaine traffickers as the Reagan administration worked to conceal the crimes.
Journalist Gary Webb holding a copy of his Contra-cocaine article in the San Jose Mercury-News.

Although the CIA's inspector general later corroborated the truth about the Contra-cocaine connection and the Reagan administration's cover-up, the mainstream media's counterattack in defense of the CIA in late summer and fall of 1996 proved so effective that the subsequent CIA confession made little dent in the conventional wisdom regarding either the Contra-cocaine scandal or Gary Webb.
In fall 1998, when the CIA inspector general's extraordinary findings were released, the major U.S. news media largely ignored them, leaving Webb a "disgraced" journalist who unable to find a decent-paying job in his profession committed suicide in 2004, a dark tale that will be revisited in a new movie, "Kill the Messenger," starring Jeremy Renner and scheduled to reach theaters on Oct. 10.
The "Managing a Nightmare" report offers something of the CIA's back story for how the spy agency's PR team exploited relationships with mainstream journalists who then essentially did the CIA's work for it, mounting a devastating counterattack against Webb that marginalized him and painted the Contra-cocaine trafficking story as some baseless conspiracy theory.
Crucial to that success, the report credits "a ground base of already productive relations with journalists and an effective response by the Director of Central Intelligence's Public Affairs Staff [that] helped prevent this story from becoming an unmitigated disaster.
"This success has to be viewed in relative terms. In the world of public relations, as in war, avoiding a rout in the face of hostile multitudes can be considered a success. … By anyone's definition, the emergence of this story posed a genuine public relations crisis for the Agency." [As approved for release by the CIA last July 29, the report's author was redacted as classified, however, Ryan Devereaux of The Intercept identified the writer as former Directorate of Intelligence staffer Nicholas Dujmovic.]
According to the CIA report, the public affairs staff convinced some journalists who followed up Webb's exposé by calling the CIA that "this series represented no real news, in that similar charges were made in the 1980s and were investigated by the Congress and were found to be without substance. Reporters were encouraged to read the Dark Alliance' series closely and with a critical eye to what allegations could actually be backed with evidence. Early in the life of this story, one major news affiliate, after speaking with a CIA media spokesman, decided not to run the story."
Of course, the CIA's assertion that the Contra-cocaine charges had been disproved in the 1980s was false. In fact, after Brian Barger and I wrote the first article about the Contra-cocaine scandal for the Associated Press in December 1985, a Senate investigation headed by Sen. John Kerry confirmed that many of the Contra forces were linked to cocaine traffickers and that the Reagan administration had even contracted with drug-connected airlines to fly supplies to the Contras who were fighting Nicaragua's leftist Sandinista government.
However, in the late 1980s, the Reagan administration and the CIA had considerable success steering the New York Times, the Washington Post and other major news outlets away from the politically devastating reality that President Ronald Reagan's beloved Contras were tied up with cocaine traffickers. Kerry's groundbreaking report when issued in 1989 was largely ignored or mocked by the mainstream media.
That earlier media response left the CIA's PR office free to cite the established "group think" rather than the truth when beating back Webb's resurfacing of the scandal in 1996.
A Firestorm' of Attacks
The initial attacks on Webb's series came from the right-wing media, such as the Washington Times and the Weekly Standard, but the CIA's report identified the key turning point as coming when the Washington Post pummeled Webb in two influential articles.
The CIA's PR experts quickly exploited that opening. The CIA's internal report said: "Public Affairs made sure that reporters and news directors calling for information as well as former Agency officials, who were themselves representing the Agency in interviews with the media received copies of these more balanced stories. Because of the Post's national reputation, its articles especially were picked up by other papers, helping to create what the Associated Press called a firestorm of reaction' against the San Jose Mercury-News."
The CIA's report then noted the happy news that Webb's editors at the Mercury-News began scurrying for cover, "conceding the paper might have done some things differently." The retreat soon became a rout with some mainstream journalists essentially begging the CIA for forgiveness for ever doubting its innocence.
"One reporter of a major regional newspaper told [CIA] Public Affairs that, because it had reprinted the Mercury-News stories in their entirety, his paper now had egg on its face,' in light of what other newspapers were saying," the CIA's report noted, as its PR team kept track of the successful counterattack.
"By the end of September [1996], the number of observed stories in the print media that indicated skepticism of the Mercury-News series surpassed that of the negative coverage, which had already peaked," the report said. "The observed number of skeptical treatments of the alleged CIA connection grew until it more than tripled the coverage that gave credibility to that connection. The growth in balanced reporting was largely due to the criticisms of the San Jose Mercury-News by The Washington Post, The New York Times, and especially The Los Angeles Times."
The overall tone of the CIA's internal assessment is one of almost amazement at how its PR team could, with a deft touch, help convince mainstream U.S. journalists to trash a fellow reporter on a story that put the CIA in a negative light.
"What CIA media spokesmen can do, as this case demonstrates, is to work with journalists who are already disposed toward writing a balanced story," the report said. "What gives this limited influence a multiplier effect' is something that surprised me about the media: that the journalistic profession has the will and the ability to hold its own members to certain standards."
The report then praises the neoconservative American Journalism Review for largely sealing Webb's fate with a harsh critique entitled "The Web That Gary Spun," with AJR's editor adding that the Mercury-News "deserved all the heat leveled at it for Dark Alliance.'"
The report also cites with some pleasure the judgment of the Washington Post's media critic Howard Kurtz who reacted to Webb's observation that the war was a business to some Contra leaders with the snide comment: "Oliver Stone, check your voice mail."
Neither Kurtz nor the CIA writer apparently was aware of the disclosure among Iran-Contra documents of a March 17, 1986 message about the Contra leadership from White House aide Oliver North's emissary to the Contras, Robert Owen, who complained to North: "Few of the so-called leaders of the movement . . . really care about the boys in the field. … THIS WAR HAS BECOME A BUSINESS TO MANY OF THEM." [Emphasis in original.]
Misguided Group Think
Yet, faced with this mainstream "group think" as misguided as it was Webb's Mercury-News editors surrendered to the pressure, apologizing for the series, shutting down the newspaper's continuing investigation into the Contra-cocaine scandal and forcing Webb to resign in disgrace.
But Webb's painful experience provided an important gift to American history, at least for those who aren't enamored of superficial "conventional wisdom." CIA Inspector General Frederick Hitz ultimately produced a fairly honest and comprehensive report that not only confirmed many of the longstanding allegations about Contra-cocaine trafficking but revealed that the CIA and the Reagan administration knew much more about the criminal activity than any of us outsiders did.
Hitz completed his investigation in mid-1998 and the second volume of his two-volume investigation was published on Oct. 8, 1998. In the report, Hitz identified more than 50 Contras and Contra-related entities implicated in the drug trade. He also detailed how the Reagan administration had protected these drug operations and frustrated federal investigations throughout the 1980s.
According to Volume Two, the CIA knew the criminal nature of its Contra clients from the start of the war against Nicaragua's leftist Sandinista government. The earliest Contra force, called the Nicaraguan Revolutionary Democratic Alliance (ADREN) or the 15th of September Legion, had chosen "to stoop to criminal activities in order to feed and clothe their cadre," according to a June 1981 draft of a CIA field report.
According to a September 1981 cable to CIA headquarters, two ADREN members made the first delivery of drugs to Miami in July 1981. ADREN's leaders included Enrique Bermúdez and other early Contras who would later direct the major Contra army, the CIA-organized FDN. Throughout the war, Bermúdez remained the top Contra military commander.
The CIA corroborated the allegations about ADREN's cocaine trafficking, but insisted that Bermúdez had opposed the drug shipments to the United States that went ahead nonetheless. The truth about Bermúdez's supposed objections to drug trafficking, however, was less clear.
According to Hitz's Volume One, Bermúdez enlisted Norwin Meneses, a large-scale Nicaraguan cocaine smuggler and a key figure in Webb's series, to raise money and buy supplies for the Contras. Volume One had quoted a Meneses associate, another Nicaraguan trafficker named Danilo Blandón, who told Hitz's investigators that he and Meneses flew to Honduras to meet with Bermúdez in 1982. At the time, Meneses's criminal activities were well-known in the Nicaraguan exile community. But Bermúdez told these cocaine smugglers that "the ends justify the means" in raising money for the Contras.
After the Bermúdez meeting, Contra soldiers helped Meneses and Blandón get past Honduran police who briefly arrested them on drug-trafficking suspicions. After their release, Blandón and Meneses traveled on to Bolivia to complete a cocaine transaction.
There were other indications of Bermúdez's drug-smuggling tolerance. In February 1988, another Nicaraguan exile linked to the drug trade accused Bermúdez of participation in narcotics trafficking, according to Hitz's report. After the Contra war ended, Bermúdez returned to Managua, Nicaragua, where he was shot to death on Feb. 16, 1991. The murder has never been solved. [For more details on Hitz's report and the Contra-cocaine scandal, see Robert Parry's Lost History.]
Shrinking Fig Leaf
By the time that Hitz's Volume Two was published in fall 1998, the CIA's defense against Webb's series had shrunk to a fig leaf: that the CIA did not conspire with the Contras to raise money through cocaine trafficking. But Hitz made clear that the Contra war took precedence over law enforcement and that the CIA withheld evidence of Contra crimes from the Justice Department, Congress and even the CIA's own analytical division.
Besides tracing the evidence of Contra-drug trafficking through the decade-long Contra war, the inspector general interviewed senior CIA officers who acknowledged that they were aware of the Contra-drug problem but didn't want its exposure to undermine the struggle to overthrow Nicaragua's Sandinista government.
According to Hitz, the CIA had "one overriding priority: to oust the Sandinista government. . . . [CIA officers] were determined that the various difficulties they encountered not be allowed to prevent effective implementation of the Contra program." One CIA field officer explained, "The focus was to get the job done, get the support and win the war."
Hitz also recounted complaints from CIA analysts that CIA operations officers handling the Contras hid evidence of Contra-drug trafficking even from the CIA's analysts.
Because of the withheld evidence, the CIA analysts incorrectly concluded in the mid-1980s that "only a handful of Contras might have been involved in drug trafficking." That false assessment was passed on to Congress and to major news organizations serving as an important basis for denouncing Gary Webb and his "Dark Alliance" series in 1996.
Although Hitz's report was an extraordinary admission of institutional guilt by the CIA, it went almost unnoticed by major U.S. news outlets. By fall 1998, the U.S. mainstream media was obsessed with President Bill Clinton's Monica Lewinsky sex scandal. So, few readers of major U.S. newspapers saw much about the CIA's inspector general admitting that America's premier spy agency had collaborated with and protected cocaine traffickers.
On Oct. 10, 1998, two days after Hitz's Volume Two was posted on the CIA's Web site, the New York Times published a brief article that continued to deride Webb but acknowledged the Contra-drug problem may have been worse than earlier understood. Several weeks later, the Washington Post weighed in with a similarly superficial article. The Los Angeles Times, which had assigned a huge team of 17 reporters to tear down Webb's work, never published a story on the release of Hitz's Volume Two.
In 2000, the Republican-controlled House Intelligence Committee grudgingly acknowledged that the stories about Reagan's CIA protecting Contra drug traffickers were true. The committee released a report citing classified testimony from CIA Inspector General Britt Snider (Hitz's successor) admitting that the spy agency had turned a blind eye to evidence of Contra-drug smuggling and generally treated drug smuggling through Central America as a low priority.
"In the end the objective of unseating the Sandinistas appears to have taken precedence over dealing properly with potentially serious allegations against those with whom the agency was working," Snider said, adding that the CIA did not treat the drug allegations in "a consistent, reasoned or justifiable manner."
The House committee still downplayed the significance of the Contra-cocaine scandal, but the panel acknowledged, deep inside its report, that in some cases, "CIA employees did nothing to verify or disprove drug trafficking information, even when they had the opportunity to do so. In some of these, receipt of a drug allegation appeared to provoke no specific response, and business went on as usual."
Like the release of Hitz's report in 1998, the admissions by Snider and the House committee drew virtually no media attention in 2000 except for a few articles on the Internet, including one at Consortiumnews.com.
Killing the Messenger
Because of this abuse of power by the Big Three newspapers choosing to conceal their own journalistic negligence on the Contra-cocaine scandal and to protect the Reagan administration's image Webb's reputation was never rehabilitated.
After his original "Dark Alliance" series was published in 1996, Webb had been inundated with attractive book offers from major publishing houses, but once the vilification began, the interest evaporated. Webb's agent contacted an independent publishing house, Seven Stories Press, which had a reputation for publishing books that had been censored, and it took on the project.
After Dark Alliance: The CIA, the Contras, and the Crack Cocaine Explosion was published in 1998, I joined Webb in a few speaking appearances on the West Coast, including one packed book talk at the Midnight Special bookstore in Santa Monica, California. For a time, Webb was treated as a celebrity on the American Left, but that gradually faded.
In our interactions during these joint appearances, I found Webb to be a regular guy who seemed to be holding up fairly well under the terrible pressure. He had landed an investigative job with a California state legislative committee. He also felt some measure of vindication when CIA Inspector General Hitz's reports came out.
However, Webb never could overcome the pain caused by his betrayal at the hands of his journalistic colleagues, his peers. In the years that followed, Webb was unable to find decent-paying work in his profession the conventional wisdom remained that he had somehow been exposed as a journalistic fraud. His state job ended; his marriage fell apart; he struggled to pay bills; and he was faced with a forced move out of a just-sold house near Sacramento, California, and in with his mother.
On Dec. 9, 2004, the 49-year-old Webb typed out suicide notes to his ex-wife and his three children; laid out a certificate for his cremation; and taped a note on the door telling movers who were coming the next morning to instead call 911. Webb then took out his father's pistol and shot himself in the head. The first shot was not lethal, so he fired once more.
Even with Webb's death, the big newspapers that had played key roles in his destruction couldn't bring themselves to show Webb any mercy. After Webb's body was found, I received a call from a reporter for the Los Angeles Times who knew that I was one of Webb's few journalistic colleagues who had defended him and his work.
I told the reporter that American history owed a great debt to Gary Webb because he had forced out important facts about Reagan-era crimes. But I added that the Los Angeles Times would be hard-pressed to write an honest obituary because the newspaper had not published a single word on the contents of Hitz's final report, which had largely vindicated Webb.
To my disappointment but not my surprise, I was correct. The Los Angeles Times ran a mean-spirited obituary that made no mention of either my defense of Webb or the CIA's admissions in 1998. The obituary more fitting for a deceased mob boss than a fellow journalist was republished in other newspapers, including the Washington Post.
In effect, Webb's suicide enabled senior editors at the Big Three newspapers to breathe a little easier one of the few people who understood the ugly story of the Reagan administration's cover-up of the Contra-cocaine scandal and the U.S. media's complicity was now silenced.
No Accountability
To this day, none of the journalists or media critics who participated in the destruction of Gary Webb has paid a price for their actions. None has faced the sort of humiliation that Webb had to endure. None had to experience that special pain of standing up for what is best in the profession of journalism taking on a difficult story that seeks to hold powerful people accountable for serious crimes and then being vilified by your own colleagues, the people that you expected to understand and appreciate what you had done.
In May 2013, one of the Los Angeles Times reporters who had joined in the orchestrated destruction of Webb's career acknowledged that the newspaper's assault was a "tawdry exercise" amounting to "overkill," which later contributed to Webb's suicide. This limited apology by former Los Angeles Times reporter Jesse Katz was made during a radio interview and came as filming was about to start on "Kill the Messenger," based on a book by the same name by Nick Schou.
On KPCC-FM 89.3′s AirTalk With Larry Mantle, Katz was pressed by callers to address his role in the destruction of Webb. Katz offered what could be viewed as a limited apology.
"As an L.A. Times reporter, we saw this series in the San Jose Mercury News and kind of wonder[ed] how legit it was and kind of put it under a microscope," Katz said. "And we did it in a way that most of us who were involved in it, I think, would look back on that and say it was overkill. We had this huge team of people at the L.A. Times and kind of piled on to one lone muckraker up in Northern California."
Katz added, "We really didn't do anything to advance his work or illuminate much to the story, and it was a really kind of a tawdry exercise. … And it ruined that reporter's career."
Now, with the imminent release of a major Hollywood movie about Webb's ordeal, the next question is whether the major newspapers will finally admit their longstanding complicity in the Contra-cocaine cover-up or whether they will simply join the CIA's press office in another counterattack.
http://consortiumnews.com/2014/09/26/the...-cover-up/
"The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it." Karl Marx

"He would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies. When asked in court whether she knew that Lord Astor had denied having sex with her.

“I think it would be a good idea” Ghandi, when asked about Western Civilisation.
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