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Morales assassins: Bolivia gang "fought in Balkans"
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Leading Hungarian Socialists Reject Őszöd Leak Charge


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A leading left wing commentator does not dismiss the story that former Prime Minister Gyurcsány's 2006 "lie speech" was leaked by three leading MSZP politicians, but thinks that regardless of who it was, the speech itself has left an unhealing wound on Hungary's left wing. A right-wing columnist suggests the story is untrue and the tip-off must have come from Mr Gyurcsány.


In June 2006, a month after being re-elected as Prime Minister, Ferenc Gyurcsány told his fellow Socialist MPs that he had overspent in order to win re-election and misinformed the country about the truly parlous state of public finances: "we were lying day and night". The taped speech surfaced in September that year on National Public Radio, and set in motion a process that culminated in the crushing defeat for the Left in 2010.

On Thursday this week, in the cover story in Heti Válasz, Bálint Szabó, a man who often acts as the master of ceremonies at Mr Gyurcsány's public rallies, claimed that three leading Socialist politicians discussed (and possibly handed over) the tape in his presence, in the flat of Eduardo Rózsa-Flores, a strange adventurer who had friends on the extreme right and on the left alike. (He fought in the violent break-up of Yugoslavia on the Croatian side, played a role in funding the far right Jobbik party, then was killed by Bolivian shock troops after allegedly plotting to assassinate president Evo Morales.)

The story was partly corroborated by Ferenc Gyurcsány, who said he could not decide if it was true or false. The "suspects", former cabinet ministers Imre Szekeres and Ferenc Baja, as well as former House Speaker Katalin Szili (who has since left the Socialist Party) have flatly denied having ever met Rózsa-Flores.
In Népszabadság, senior commentator Ervin Tamás thinks it cannot be accidental that Heti Válasz chose to print an interview with Szabó at a time when the tobacco scandal is still in the news. He respects Heti Válasz nonetheless, for publishing the story, once it had a possible witness who was willing to speak. He also notes that Mr Gyurcsány's party ominously stated that the discovery of the leakers is "nearing the finishing line".

Őszöd, the venue of the ill-famed speech, he says, "is a monument to complete irresponsibility," and should have been cleared up long ago with a thorough examination and a series of expulsions (from the Socialist Party). By now, however, any attempt at 'finding a normal resolution' is an illusion it is a burning wound, and is bound to remain one, he concludes.
In Magyar Hírlap, László Szentesi Zöldi describes the affair as Mr Gyurcsány's attempt to derail the MSZP and show 'that he is still a factor'. He recalls that in a recent statement Mr Gyurcsány announced that he had information concerning the leak and would bring it to light as soon as he had solid proof.

He believes the interview with Heti Válasz fits well with Gyurcsány's strategy. Szentesi Zöldi does not buy the story that three important politicians would have gone to see such an obscure figure as Rózsa Flores who must have been under constant surveillance by the secret services. He also points to the political inconsistencies of the story, namely that Rózsa-Flores had friends on all sides of the political spectrum, but explains his relation with the witness as something "stronger than any political differences", hinting at some form of sentimental ties between the two men.

The author goes so far as to raise the question of whether Rózsa-Flores's death had anything to do with this secret and concludes on a cryptic note, namely that that there are more portentous secrets here but they will come to light "in the not too distant future".
Source: BudaPost
"The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it." Karl Marx

"He would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies. When asked in court whether she knew that Lord Astor had denied having sex with her.

“I think it would be a good idea” Ghandi, when asked about Western Civilisation.
Reply

Whistleblower quits over Öszöd lies speech' claims

Tito the Dog & a deceased Bolivian mercenary: the ever stranger case of the leaked recording that ruined the Socialists

Posted on 31 May 2013, Author: Robert Hodgson

Democratic Coalition politician Bálint Szabó tells reporters on Friday that he has proof to back up his allegations of who leaked the lies speech. He quit the party on Monday but then later said he would name names next week.

Democratic Coalition politician Bálint Szabó quit the breakaway party of former Socialist PM Ferenc Gyurcsány on Monday. Szabó had told a pro-government newspaper the previous week that a Socialist politician named "Katalin, Imre or Ferenc" must have leaked the notorious "Öszöd lies speech", promising to put an end to a seven-year-old mystery.
At a closed, post-election meeting in 2006, Gyurcsány harangued the newly elected Socialists to acknowledge they had lied to voters and "f****d up" the country. The broadcast of the recording in September that year triggered a series of anti-government riots and eventually led to a disastrous election defeat in 2010 that saw the right-wing Fidesz party swept to power with a two-thirds parliamentary majority. No one has ever come forward and admitted passing the speech to Magyar Rádió.
The Democratic Coalition gave Szabó until this Sunday to present incontrovertible evidence backing up his claims. He promptly announced on Monday that he was standing down, telling reporters in Szeged: "I am not sure that a week will be enough for me to do what others couldn't do in seven years."
Twists & turns in lies speech drama
However, he was back in the news by Wednesday, telling pro-government Lánchíd Rádió at least according to its partner newspaper, Magyar Nemzet that he had documentary proof to back up his claims. Next week he would name names.
The plot was thickened the same day by the former fiancée of a Bolivian-Hungarian-Croatian mercenary named Eduardo Rózsa-Flores, who was shot dead in Bolivia in 2009 while participating in what the authorities claim was a terrorist plot against President Evo Morales.
Szabó had claimed in a Heti Válasz interview that he was present in Rózsa-Flores' District VI flat when the three Socialist politicians were listening to the recording of Gyurcsány's "Öszöd lies speech", named after the Lake Balaton resort where it was delivered. The would-be whistleblower said he had remained in an adjacent room with Rózsa-Flores' dog Tito, named after the Yugoslav communist leader who died in 1980.
Timeline disputed
Linda Szászvári, Rózsa-Flores' former fiancée, told conservative news blog mandiner.hu that the flat in Eötvös utca (street) had been sold in 2004 and Tito (the dog) died the same year. Szászvári acknowledged that Rózsa-Flores had been in possession of the Öszöd speech but said he is unlikely to have left behind much in the way of clues.
"He was clever, he had military training and he is sure to have had some insurance," Szászvári said. "I don't think by making a secret recording, but by making the evidence disappear. He always communicated via Skype, deleted more important emails, from the waste bin too, and even reinstalled software on his computer from time to time, precisely so he would leave no tracks.
"He must have spoken to someone about having the Gyurcsány speech but it certainly wasn't Bálint Szabó."
http://www.budapesttimes.hu/2013/05/31/w...ch-claims/
"The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it." Karl Marx

"He would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies. When asked in court whether she knew that Lord Astor had denied having sex with her.

“I think it would be a good idea” Ghandi, when asked about Western Civilisation.
Reply
Quote:Szabó had claimed in a Heti Válasz interview that he was present in Rózsa-Flores' District VI flat when the three Socialist politicians were listening to the recording of Gyurcsány's "Öszöd lies speech", named after the Lake Balaton resort where it was delivered. The would-be whistleblower said he had remained in an adjacent room with Rózsa-Flores' dog Tito, named after the Yugoslav communist leader who died in 1980.

Timeline disputed

Linda Szászvári, Rózsa-Flores' former fiancée, told conservative news blog mandiner.hu that the flat in Eötvös utca (street) had been sold in 2004 and Tito (the dog) died the same year. Szászvári acknowledged that Rózsa-Flores had been in possession of the Öszöd speech but said he is unlikely to have left behind much in the way of clues.
"He was clever, he had military training and he is sure to have had some insurance," Szászvári said. "I don't think by making a secret recording, but by making the evidence disappear. He always communicated via Skype, deleted more important emails, from the waste bin too, and even reinstalled software on his computer from time to time, precisely so he would leave no tracks.
"He must have spoken to someone about having the Gyurcsány speech but it certainly wasn't Bálint Szabó."

Poor Tito.

Eduardo Rózsa-Flores: archetypal Mechanic.

"He had military training" - something of an understatement, methinks.
"It means this War was never political at all, the politics was all theatre, all just to keep the people distracted...."
"Proverbs for Paranoids 4: You hide, They seek."
"They are in Love. Fuck the War."

Gravity's Rainbow, Thomas Pynchon

"Ccollanan Pachacamac ricuy auccacunac yahuarniy hichascancuta."
The last words of the last Inka, Tupac Amaru, led to the gallows by men of god & dogs of war
Reply
I have been checking out the missus today. She has a photo album on Picassa all uploaded and sorted on the 11th March 2009 just one month before her beloved met his fate in Bolivia. Instant history. Seems very dyke like to me too. May well be wrong and it is a wholesome traditional marriage fully sanctioned by Opus Dei but then there is also the odd business of the Hungarian in prison there claiming to be nothing more than Eduardo's lover who was along for company and flower arranging in the exotic travel destinations....
https://picasaweb.google.com/107396574305859031093

I wonder if that it Tito in the pictures? It is an old dog.

In LinkedIn she is down as an archaeologist, photographer and technician at PMMI a US packaging materials company with HQ in 4350 N. Fairfax Dr. Arlington, VA22203 United States http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?aut...Token=7LGX

Mmmm...


But she is also down as working for the Pest Megyei Múzeumok Igazgatósága or PMMI which is a museum in the Pest part of Budapest.
https://profiles.google.com/107396574305859031093/about

Some interesting but mostly so so pictures for a photographer. And not very many of them. And a crappy 2 year old Sony Ericson camera phone for many and a Cannon eos for the others. One in front of Croatian landmark in Veli Vrh suburb of Pula. And some of the Hungarian protests.

It is very sad. The Hungarian families seems as blind or deluded as the Irish one. Or maybe not. They're claiming their poor wee boys were simple tourists and are political prisoners of a dictatorial regime.
"The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it." Karl Marx

"He would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies. When asked in court whether she knew that Lord Astor had denied having sex with her.

“I think it would be a good idea” Ghandi, when asked about Western Civilisation.
Reply
What have we here? After being caught out being corrupt and blackmailing the ambitious former prosecutor now unconvincingly tries to contradict well established case of Rosza mercenary gang hired by fascists in the murder plot against the inconveniently independent Morales.

Quote: Marcelo Soza contradicts official version of hotel raid that led to Michael Dwyer's death

Serious questions around lawfulness of police operation, says former prosecutor

Michael Dwyer: he was unarmed when shot in his hotel room in the city of Santa Cruz on April 16th, 2009. Photograph: PA Wire

[URL="http://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland/irish-news/tom-hennigan-7.1593409"] Tom Hennigan
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Mon, Jun 16, 2014, 01:00
First published: Mon, Jun 16, 2014, 01:00




There are serious questions concerning the lawfulness of the Bolivian police operation in which Michael Dwyer was shot dead, according to the former public prosecutor who investigated the circumstances surrounding the Co Tipperary man's death.
In an interview with The Irish Times from his exile in Brazil that contradicts government claims and casts doubts on the authorities' version of events, Marcelo Soza said Mr Dwyer was unarmed when shot in his hotel room in the city of Santa Cruz in April 16th, 2009: "There was no gun near Dwyer when they killed him."
In charge of investigating the case for four years, Mr Soza says ballistic and autopsy reports as well as his own survey of the aftermath made clear that "there was no confrontation in the hotel," and a shoot-out had not taken place.


In a damning indictment of the Bolivian authorities' conduct, Mr Soza accused top officials of misrepresenting the nature of the police raid and then manipulating his own investigation into it until he was eventually forced to seek asylum in Brazil in March.
Bolivia's government has always claimed Dwyer was in Bolivia as part of a group led by Bolivian adventurer Eduardo Rózsa-Flores that planned to assassinate President Morales and foment a secessionist war in the country's eastern lowlands. Dwyer, Rózsa-Flores and Hungarian national Arpad Magyarosi were all killed during the raid in which two other men were arrested.

Untrue

Mr Soza insists the government's claim that police chased Dwyer's group to the hotel after it started a terror campaign in eastern Bolivia is untrue, saying the raid had been carefully planned in La Paz and that he had seen a video of the police unit involved practising on a mock-up of the Hotel Las Americas. "There was no chase to the hotel," he insists. "It was not necessary to carry out the raid. They could have been captured at any time. They walked the street, they frequented bars . . . Why not arrest them on the street?"
This evidence of planning is crucial to understanding the case, according to Mr Soza, as he had been appointed to lead the investigation in Rózsa-Flores' activities in Bolivia two days before the police operation took place. Therefore, under Bolivian law the authorities should have notified him of their plan to raid the hotel.
"I was only told after the operation took place, even though I was already in charge of the case," he notes, adding that the failure to have the prosecutor in charge of the case present at the raid meant all evidence collected during it was "illegal", a claim with possibly serious legal ramifications for the trial of 39 men accused of involvement with Rózsa-Flores.
Demands

The Irish government and the EU say they are waiting until this trial is concluded before considering how to proceed with demands for a full accounting for the deaths of EU nationals at the hands of Bolivia's police.Most damningly, Mr Soza claims evidence shows the whole operation was planned by a senior political figure. Mr Soza says he sought to question President Morales about his statement given in a press conference that he had given the order for the raid as well as vice-president Álvaro García Linera, who claimed it took place following a chase through Santa Cruz.
"But I was blocked. They would not even provide me with the names of those who took part in the operation so I could take depositions from them." Mr Soza argues that having planned the raid, high-ranking officials then used it to "decapitate" the political opposition to President Morales centred on the city of Santa Cruz.


He revealed he had investigated a claim made by a Bolivian author that Rózsa-Flores was on the phone to a senior political figure immediately before the police raid took place.
Asked why he was only now coming forward with such damning accusations about the government's behaviour, Mr Soza says at first he was blinded by a sense of patriotism as he believed Rózsa-Flores' group was in Bolivia to carry out subversion. He also admits ambition played a role, with senior government officials hinting he could be promoted to the role of the state's chief prosecutor.
But now in exile he says that for much of his time in charge of the case he was a prisoner of circumstances: "I couldn't do anything without the permission of the government. It was a totally politicised case. In a certain manner I just completed orders from the government. I was not acting as a prosecutor."

Blackmail

Mr Soza categorically denies the Bolivian government's claim that he blackmailed people during his stewardship of the investigation, dismissing the charges as similar to those against other prosecutors and judges who have been blamed for the extortion of senior officials and ministers: "Before the president thanked me for my work in the defence of the patria. Now he says I am a delinquent?"He says he reluctantly took the decision to flee to Brazil when his arrest looked likely, saying he feared for his life in a Bolivian prison. He is one of several hundred Bolivians to seek asylum in Brazil since Evo Morales became president in 2006.
Mr Soza says he is willing to testify to European officials about his knowledge of the case: "I believe the truth is the truth. I have no reason to hide anything."
http://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland/i...390?page=1
"The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it." Karl Marx

"He would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies. When asked in court whether she knew that Lord Astor had denied having sex with her.

“I think it would be a good idea” Ghandi, when asked about Western Civilisation.
Reply
Minister of Foreign Affairs and External Economic Relations Péter Szijjártó has called upon Hungary's ambassador accredited to Bolivia to assist the repatriation of Előd Tóásó, the Hungarian who has been illegally imprisoned in the country for almost six years. Mr. Szijjártó ordered both the ambasador and the consul of Hungary's embassy in Buenos Aires to personally correspond with local authorities to enable Mr. Tóásó's return to Hungary as soon as possible.
The Hungarian national was sentenced to five years and ten months in jail by a Bolivian court for taking part in an armed rebellion together with his accomplice, Bolivian-Croatian dual citizen Mario Tadic. As both men had already served their sentence prior to the court decision, they are expected to be released soon.
The case broke out in April 2009 after police raided the hideout of a suspected terrorist cell apparently planning the assassination of President Evo Morales and violent secession from the country at a hotel in the city of Santa Cruz. During the police raid, Bolivian-Hungarian-Croatian national Eduardo Rózsa Flores, Transylvanian Hungarian Árpád Magyarosi and Irishman Michael Dwyer were killed and the two survivors Mr. Tóásó and Mr. Tadic were arrested. The pair have been kept in custody together with the other 37 defendants in the case ever since.
The Foreign Ministry's statement recalls that Hungarian diplomacy had repeatedly spoken out at various UN, EU, European Parliament and Organization of American States venues and called upon Bolivian authorities to respect Előd Tóásó and provide him with a fair trial in accordance with international obligations.
via hvg.hu
photo: MTI/EPA
"The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it." Karl Marx

"He would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies. When asked in court whether she knew that Lord Astor had denied having sex with her.

“I think it would be a good idea” Ghandi, when asked about Western Civilisation.
Reply
The Pope is in Bolivia:



Unbridled capitalism is the 'dung of the devil', says Pope Francis


The pontiff condemns the impoverishment of developing countries by the world economic order and apologised for the church's treatment of native Americans

Reuters

Friday 10 July 2015 02.49 BST Last modified on Friday 10 July 2015 04.10 BST


Pope Francis has urged the downtrodden to change the world economic order, denouncing a "new colonialism" by agencies that impose austerity programs and calling for the poor to have the "sacred rights" of labor, lodging and land.

In one of the longest, most passionate and sweeping speeches of his pontificate, the Argentine-born pope used his visit to Bolivia to ask forgiveness for the sins committed by the Roman Catholic church in its treatment of native Americans during what he called the "so-called conquest of America".

The pontiff also demanded an immediate end to what he called the "genocide" of Christians taking place in the Middle East and beyond, describing it as a third world war.

"Today we are dismayed to see how in the Middle East and elsewhere in the world many of our brothers and sisters are persecuted, tortured and killed for their faith in Jesus," Pope Francis said.

"In this third world war, waged piecemeal, which we are now experiencing, a form of genocide is taking place, and it must end."


Quoting a fourth century bishop, he called the unfettered pursuit of money "the dung of the devil", and said poor countries should not be reduced to being providers of raw material and cheap labour for developed countries.

Repeating some of the themes of his landmark encyclical Laudato Si on the environment last month, Francis said time was running out to save the planet from perhaps irreversible harm to the ecosystem.


Francis made the address in the city of Santa Cruz to participants of the second world meeting of popular movements, an international body that brings together organisations of people on the margins of society, including the poor, the unemployed and peasants who have lost their land. The Vatican hosted the first meeting last year.

He said he supported their efforts to obtain "so elementary and undeniably necessary a right as that of the three "Ls": land, lodging and labour".

His speech was preceded by lengthy remarks from the left-wing Bolivian president Evo Morales, who wore a jacket adorned with the face of Argentine revolutionary Ernesto "Che" Guevara. He was executed in Bolivia in 1967 by CIA-backed Bolivian troops.

"Let us not be afraid to say it: we want change, real change, structural change," the pope said, decrying a system that "has imposed the mentality of profit at any price, with no concern for social exclusion or the destruction of nature".


"This system is by now intolerable: farm workers find it intolerable, labourers find it intolerable, communities find it intolerable, peoples find it intolerable. The earth itself our sister, Mother Earth, as Saint Francis would say also finds it intolerable," he said in an hour-long speech that was interrupted by applause and cheering dozens of times.


Since his election in 2013, the first pope from Latin America has often spoken out in defence of the poor and against unbridled capitalism but the speech in Santa Cruz was the most comprehensive to date on the issues he has championed.

Francis' previous attacks on capitalism have prompted stiff criticism from politicians and commentators in the United States, where he is due to visit in September.

The pontiff appeared to take a swipe at international monetary organisations such as the IMF and the development aid policies by some developed countries.

"No actual or established power has the right to deprive peoples of the full exercise of their sovereignty. Whenever they do so, we see the rise of new forms of colonialism which seriously prejudice the possibility of peace and justice," he said.

"The new colonialism takes on different faces. At times it appears as the anonymous influence of mammon: corporations, loan agencies, certain free trade' treaties, and the imposition of measures of austerity' which always tighten the belt of workers and the poor," he said.

Last week, Francis called on European authorities to keep human dignity at the centre of debate for a solution to the economic crisis in Greece.

He defended labor unions and praised poor people who had formed cooperatives to create jobs where previously "there were only crumbs of an idolatrous economy".

In one of the sections on colonialism, he said: "I say this to you with regret: many grave sins were committed against the native peoples of America in the name of God."


He added: "I humbly ask forgiveness, not only for the offences of the church herself, but also for crimes committed against the native peoples during the so-called conquest of America.

"There was sin and an abundant amount of it."

The audience gave Francis a standing ovation when he put on a yellow miner's hat that was given to him at the end of his speech.

The pope made his speech at the end of his first full day in Bolivia, where he arrived on Wednesday. On Thursday morning he said a mass for hundreds of thousands of people and said that everyone had a moral duty to help the poor, and that those with means could not wish they would just "go away".

Francis praised Bolivia's social reforms to spread wealth under Morales. On Friday, he will visit Bolivia's notoriously violent Palmasola prison.

The pope looked bemused on Wednesday night when Morales handed him one of the more unusual gifts he has received: a sculpted wooden hammer and sickle the symbol of communism with a figure of a crucified Christ resting on the hammer.
Francis leaves on Friday for Paraguay, the last stop on his "homecoming" trip.
“The most difficult subjects can be explained to the most slow-witted man if he has not formed any idea of them already; but the simplest thing cannot be made clear to the most intelligent man if he is firmly persuaded that he knows already, without a shadow of doubt, what is laid before him.”
― Leo Tolstoy,
Reply
Well, this is interesting. I found most interesting the real conspiracy to promote false 'conspiracy theories' about Morales. Deep state bag of tricks.

Quote:Bolivia says it is launching a thorough investigation into revelations made public by a WikiLeaks report.
The U.S. has refuted reports that it planned to topple the government of Bolivia.
The controversy started after a report surfaced on WikiLeaks that the U.S. government had plotted an assassination attempt against President Evo Morales in 2008.
A representative described the WikiLeaks accusations as "absolutely false and absurd."

In a strongly worded statement the U.S. Embassy in Bolivia said, "The government of the United States was not involved in any conspiracy, attempt to overthrow the government of Bolivia or assassinate President Morales. This kind of unfounded allegations does not contribute to improving bilateral relations," said a spokesperson.
Despite the denials, the Bolivian government announced it is pressing ahead with a thorough investigation.
A government minister revealed new information from the WikiLeaks report on state television on Tuesday morning.
Carlos Romero reported meetings took place between leaders of the opposition with representatives of the U.S. Embassy between 2007 and 2008. Romero told TV Bolivia the revelations show "categorical" U.S. involvement in the coordination of "conspiracy theories" against the government of Evo Morales.
According to Romero the contents of the now revealed cables were sent from the embassy in La Paz to the State Department in Washington.
This is just another chapter in the long running saga between the two countries.
RELATED: Bolivia to Investigate Alleged U.S. Plot to Kill Morales
Last month another senior Minister Juan Ramon Quintana alleged that a more recent U.S. sting operation was underway in Bolivia in an attempt to discredit President Evo Morales. The allegation alluded to the possibility that Morales was somehow involved in drug trafficking.
"A covert operation is underway to target President Evo Morales, which is not only funded but also coordinated and organized by intelligence agencies and U.S. security," Quintana said on Sept. 20.
The 'agencies'' Quintana is referring to is the Drug Enforcement Administration which President Morales expelled from Bolivia in 2008 along with the then U.S. Ambassador Philip Goldberg.
Since then Bolivia and the U.S have been on a collision course over the best way to deal with the war on drugs. Bolivia says it is scoring notable victories against drug traffickers without any U.S. funding. The U.S. claims Bolivia is not doing enough and wants to prevent Bolivians from growing the traditional coca plant the only country in the world granted an exemption.
RELATED: Bolivia Honors Anti-Terrorist Cubans Jailed in the U.S.
Bolivia has repeatedly refused to back down and stop farmers growing coca, which has been used for centuries by Indigenous communities to brew a local tea and is used for a variety of medicines.
The division between the two nations has only deepened in recent years, but a slight thaw could be on the horizon.
At a ceremony on Monday to decorate six Cuban fighters President Morales publicly acknowledged that having a U.S. ambassador return to Bolivia is 'desirable'' but not 'decisive'' to helping improve relations between Washington and La Paz.
Some interpreted this as a step towards healing the rift, but given the strong sentiments coming from Morales' administration over the latest WikiLeaks revelations others say it could be years before normal relations are restored.
'The relationship between the U.S. and Bolivia couldn't be any further apart'' says Franklyn Pareja a political analyst. 'They are opposed on almost everything, the ideology of the Bolivian government is anti-imperialist , anti-capitalist and for the Bolivian people the icon for imperialism and anti-capitalism is the United States,'' he told teleSUR English.
With Morales seeking to stay on in office until at least 2025, political observers in Bolivia expect no change in the tone or rhetoric of the increasingly hostile exchanges between La Paz and Washington.


Bolivia says it is launching a thorough investigation into revelations made public by a WikiLeaks report.

The U.S. has refuted reports that it planned to topple the government of Bolivia.

The controversy started after a report surfaced on WikiLeaks that the U.S. government had plotted an assassination attempt against President Evo Morales in 2008.

A representative described the WikiLeaks accusations as "absolutely false and absurd."

In a strongly worded statement the U.S. Embassy in Bolivia said, "The government of the United States was not involved in any conspiracy, attempt to overthrow the government of Bolivia or assassinate President Morales. This kind of unfounded allegations does not contribute to improving bilateral relations," said a spokesperson.

Despite the denials, the Bolivian government announced it is pressing ahead with a thorough investigation.

A government minister revealed new information from the WikiLeaks report on state television on Tuesday morning.

Carlos Romero reported meetings took place between leaders of the opposition with representatives of the U.S. Embassy between 2007 and 2008. Romero told TV Bolivia the revelations show "categorical" U.S. involvement in the coordination of "conspiracy theories" against the government of Evo Morales.

According to Romero the contents of the now revealed cables were sent from the embassy in La Paz to the State Department in Washington.

This is just another chapter in the long running saga between the two countries.

RELATED: Bolivia to Investigate Alleged U.S. Plot to Kill Morales

Last month another senior Minister Juan Ramon Quintana alleged that a more recent U.S. sting operation was underway in Bolivia in an attempt to discredit President Evo Morales. The allegation alluded to the possibility that Morales was somehow involved in drug trafficking.

"A covert operation is underway to target President Evo Morales, which is not only funded but also coordinated and organized by intelligence agencies and U.S. security," Quintana said on Sept. 20.

The 'agencies'' Quintana is referring to is the Drug Enforcement Administration which President Morales expelled from Bolivia in 2008 along with the then U.S. Ambassador Philip Goldberg.

Since then Bolivia and the U.S have been on a collision course over the best way to deal with the war on drugs. Bolivia says it is scoring notable victories against drug traffickers without any U.S. funding. The U.S. claims Bolivia is not doing enough and wants to prevent Bolivians from growing the traditional coca plant the only country in the world granted an exemption.

RELATED: Bolivia Honors Anti-Terrorist Cubans Jailed in the U.S.

Bolivia has repeatedly refused to back down and stop farmers growing coca, which has been used for centuries by Indigenous communities to brew a local tea and is used for a variety of medicines.

The division between the two nations has only deepened in recent years, but a slight thaw could be on the horizon.

At a ceremony on Monday to decorate six Cuban fighters President Morales publicly acknowledged that having a U.S. ambassador return to Bolivia is 'desirable'' but not 'decisive'' to helping improve relations between Washington and La Paz.

Some interpreted this as a step towards healing the rift, but given the strong sentiments coming from Morales' administration over the latest WikiLeaks revelations others say it could be years before normal relations are restored.

'The relationship between the U.S. and Bolivia couldn't be any further apart'' says Franklyn Pareja a political analyst. 'They are opposed on almost everything, the ideology of the Bolivian government is anti-imperialist , anti-capitalist and for the Bolivian people the icon for imperialism and anti-capitalism is the United States,'' he told teleSUR English.

With Morales seeking to stay on in office until at least 2025, political observers in Bolivia expect no change in the tone or rhetoric of the increasingly hostile exchanges between La Paz and Washington.

This content was originally published by teleSUR at the following address:
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"The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it." Karl Marx

"He would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies. When asked in court whether she knew that Lord Astor had denied having sex with her.

“I think it would be a good idea” Ghandi, when asked about Western Civilisation.
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The US gave millions of dollars to a separatist movement in Bolivia and knew of attacks planned by militant opposition groups, according to documents from 2006-2009 obtained by WikiLeaks.

[Image: 1032649059.jpg]

© RIA Novosti. Vladimir Rodionov
Bolivian Leader Hails Coca Leaf as Partner in Anti-Imperialist Struggle

Documents obtained by WikiLeaks which date back to 2006 reveal that the US was in contact with Bolivian opposition groups and gave millions of dollars to a separatist movement, the Prensa Latina news agency reported on Thursday. The documents were examined by Norwegian researcher Eirik Vold, who discovered that between 2006 and 2009 the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) gave four million dollars to a separatist movement in the Media Luna (Half Moon) region of Bolivia, Prensa Latina wrote.
The Media Luna is a group of four departments, Santa Cruz, Beni, Pando, and Tarija, in the east of Bolivia, where there were clashes in 2008 between government supporters and opposition groups who wanted control of local resources.
"The US had full knowledge of opposition groups' terrorist plans, and yet did not denounce them," Eirik Vold told Prensa Latina, adding that the US had prior knowledge of a planned attack on a natural gas pipeline, which resulted in a ten percent decrease in Bolivia's in gas exports to Brazil.
Vold said the cables show that Washington also believed that the murder of President Evo Morales was "likely," and that the US was aware of the possibility of a coup d'etat but did not warn the Bolivian government in La Paz.


The Norwegian, who presented his investigations to the press in La Paz on Thursday, said that WikiLeaks has obtained more than 14,000 US documents about the Bolivian president, which show the extent to which Washington is determined to maintain its hegemony in the region. The cables "give an understanding of the importance of Bolivia, a country rich in hydrocarbons and other natural resources, to American strategy," Vold said.


http://sputniknews.com/latam/20160219/10...tists.html
"The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it." Karl Marx

"He would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies. When asked in court whether she knew that Lord Astor had denied having sex with her.

“I think it would be a good idea” Ghandi, when asked about Western Civilisation.
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Another case, in a very long list of cases, of the US engaging in illegal black operations to shape the world in it's image. It's hubris. And I think the associated fall is coming.
The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.
Carl Jung - Aion (1951). CW 9, Part II: P.14
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