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What's happening in Greece right now
David Guyatt Wrote:What a terrible sellout. It proves that no politician is to be trusted or believed because their allegiance is to the prevailing system and they merely smirk at the concept of honesty.

To be perfectly honest, I thought following the referendum they would have to follow the will of the public. But no. They went against it.

This more than anything else I can think of demonstrates today what democracy amounts to.

Absolutely fookin' zero.
Not every one was buying it. The KKE (Greek communist party) was having none of it and never supported Syriza nor wanted a coalition with them but others on the so called left did but then they are the same left that wish to bomb Syria and Libya...and whose views coincide so much with the Empire....The saddest thing about it is that it makes it all so easy now for the fascists which are sure to come.
"The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it." Karl Marx

"He would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies. When asked in court whether she knew that Lord Astor had denied having sex with her.

“I think it would be a good idea” Ghandi, when asked about Western Civilisation.
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Magda Hassan Wrote:
David Guyatt Wrote:What a terrible sellout. It proves that no politician is to be trusted or believed because their allegiance is to the prevailing system and they merely smirk at the concept of honesty.

To be perfectly honest, I thought following the referendum they would have to follow the will of the public. But no. They went against it.

This more than anything else I can think of demonstrates today what democracy amounts to.

Absolutely fookin' zero.
Not every one was buying it. The KKE (Greek communist party) was having none of it and never supported Syriza nor wanted a coalition with them but others on the so called left did but then they are the same left that wish to bomb Syria and Libya...and whose views coincide so much with the Empire....The saddest thing about it is that it makes it all so easy now for the fascists which are sure to come.

Aye, and not just in Greece either. This sends a strong signal throughout Europe that democracy as a governing principle is dead, buried and considered worthless. All the pols and bureaucrats in Europe went along with trashing the popular NO vote in Greece. They'll now get the Europe the wealthy elite want - not what the ordinary people deserve or wish for.

Sieg Heil Brussels...
The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.
Carl Jung - Aion (1951). CW 9, Part II: P.14
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Quote:Sieg Heil Brussels...

Call me naiive, but I'm not so sure about that per se. Crappy & corrupt, but they like a bit of law, they do like to be seen as socially progressive. I think the ppl doing this to me are very wary of - at least - Strasbourg (-same thing really...). They brought-up the Euro Court of Human Rights with me a year ago or so (I hadn't even considered it 'cos I live in something approximating to 'the real world', rather than their Matrix-world), saying it would take me years to get thru' it, - implication being "just get-on with your life", in relation to the Five Techniques judgement. I know Strasbourg & Brussels aren't the same place, but at the same time, not so different. -correct me if I'm wrong...
Martin Luther King - "Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere."
Albert Camus - "The only way to deal with an unfree world is to become so absolutely free that your very existence is an act of rebellion".
Douglas MacArthur — "Whoever said the pen is mightier than the sword obviously never encountered automatic weapons."
Albert Camus - "Nothing is more despicable than respect based on fear."
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The KKE are the only political entity to come out of this farrago with a shred of credit.
“The most difficult subjects can be explained to the most slow-witted man if he has not formed any idea of them already; but the simplest thing cannot be made clear to the most intelligent man if he is firmly persuaded that he knows already, without a shadow of doubt, what is laid before him.”
― Leo Tolstoy,
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David Guyatt Wrote:
Magda Hassan Wrote:
David Guyatt Wrote:What a terrible sellout. It proves that no politician is to be trusted or believed because their allegiance is to the prevailing system and they merely smirk at the concept of honesty.

To be perfectly honest, I thought following the referendum they would have to follow the will of the public. But no. They went against it.

This more than anything else I can think of demonstrates today what democracy amounts to.

Absolutely fookin' zero.
Not every one was buying it. The KKE (Greek communist party) was having none of it and never supported Syriza nor wanted a coalition with them but others on the so called left did but then they are the same left that wish to bomb Syria and Libya...and whose views coincide so much with the Empire....The saddest thing about it is that it makes it all so easy now for the fascists which are sure to come.

Aye, and not just in Greece either. This sends a strong signal throughout Europe that democracy as a governing principle is dead, buried and considered worthless. All the pols and bureaucrats in Europe went along with trashing the popular NO vote in Greece. They'll now get the Europe the wealthy elite want - not what the ordinary people deserve or wish for.

Sieg Heil Brussels...


Guido Preparata says in Conjuring Hitler that "The fact that post WW2 Europe's Socio-Economic make up has hardly changed at all in over 50 years is a damning indictment to the utter in-consequence of democracy."

It's a rigged game...
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Pilger interviewed on KPFA:

https://kpfa.org/episode/flashpoints-july-14-2015/
“The most difficult subjects can be explained to the most slow-witted man if he has not formed any idea of them already; but the simplest thing cannot be made clear to the most intelligent man if he is firmly persuaded that he knows already, without a shadow of doubt, what is laid before him.”
― Leo Tolstoy,
Reply
A sad story of of a Greek Judas:

Quote:JULY 17, 2015

Banker Occupied Greece: Requiem for a Failed State

by STEPHEN LENDMAN



  • [Image: print-sp.png]
It's all over but the obituary. Rubber-stamp Greek parliamentarians overwhelming approved transforming the nation into a banker run colony by a 229 64 vote. Six lawmakers abstained.

Coalition partner Independent Greeks leader Panos Kammenos and likeminded party members voted "yes" after rhetorically rejecting Troika terms.

The vast majority of bailout funding goes to pay bankers and other creditors nothing for economic recovery and growth. The price is deeper punishing austerity, greater poverty and unemployment than already, and far more human misery ahead with no end in sight.

Only 32 of SYRIZA's 149 parliamentarians voted "no" including banished Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis, Finance Ministry Secretary General Manos Manousakis, Energy Minister Panagiotis Lafanzanis, Deputy Labor Minister Dimitris Stratoulis and ousted Speaker Zoe Konstantopoulou.

She called the bailout proposal "social genocide." Other austerity opponents denounced it as "a new Versailles Treaty."

Sovereign Greece no longer exists. Troika bandits own its soul. Democracy's denouement became official in its birthplace.

Meanwhile, police clashed violently with thousands of anti-austerity protesters outside parliament demanding promised relief social justice, not sellout.

Prime Minister Tsipras rubbed salt on the wound he inflicted saying he "does not believe in (the) irrational" capitulation plan he demanded and voted for.

He lied claiming he had no choice. Terms were forced on him, he said. Responsible leadership would have rejected them outright, walked away and stood tall ahead of being welcomed home as a national hero challenging Troika bandits courageously, saying "no" when it matters most.

Instead he showed he's like all the rest pledging one thing, doing another, betraying his constituents in the process, proving he and likeminded SYRIZA officials are pretense populists, more contemptible than right-wing austerity supporters.

Judas officials are the most despised for good reason. They deserve the harshest condemnation. SYRIZA and likeminded traitors agreed to plunge Greece into greater protracted Depression than already and all the extreme pain and suffering along with it a no-win Faustian betrayal.

Can Tsipras' coalition government survive the sellout? Will he lose majority support? Will enough members bolt to force snap elections?

Overwhelming parliamentary support for destructive bailout terms may save him including from nearly 80% of SYRIZA party members. The faithful were too few in number to matter.

At the same time, Tsipras' status as Greece's leader is hugely damaged. Whether he'll remain prime minister remains to be seen popularly supported last January, a recognized Judas after capitulating in Brussels.

The sobering day after offers no solace an unsettling aftermath after a tumultuous evening. Reports suggest opposition SYRIZA ministers and other party opponents will be ousted. Rogue regimes operate this way. Affected parliamentarians would have a choice leave government or continue in office as independents, weakening Tsipras' hold on power.

He faces a near-impossible task of selling betrayal to an angry public. Since sweeping to victory in January pledging no more austerity, he systematically breached his promises.

Approving Troika bailout terms turned Greece into a failed state. Tsipras lost his most important political asset public trust.

His explanation rings hollow claiming he got better terms than Troika officials demanded, saying "we will now fight at home to finish the oligarchy which brought us to this state."

Selling out to Troika bandits shows his rhetoric is meaningless. Fascists rule Greece, masquerading as social democrats. Financial tyranny is official state policy.
Source
The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.
Carl Jung - Aion (1951). CW 9, Part II: P.14
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There is talk of an election in late August or September. I doubt Syriza will be given another chance after this massive betrayal and Tsipras and go fuck off and die for all any one will care. It will come down to the KKE and the fascists. As it always does in the end.
"The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it." Karl Marx

"He would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies. When asked in court whether she knew that Lord Astor had denied having sex with her.

“I think it would be a good idea” Ghandi, when asked about Western Civilisation.
Reply
It's a lengthy RT doco, but worth the patience of watching it:

The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.
Carl Jung - Aion (1951). CW 9, Part II: P.14
Reply
Not sure they are really brought down but 15 years behind bars is a start


The women who brought down Greece's Golden Dawn
Legal experts note role female lawyers took in confronting far-right party’s violent tactics
          [Image: 3543.jpg?width=445&quality=85&auto=forma...2fa0a54951]

The president of the three-member criminal court, Maria Lepenioti, reads out the sentences for those convicted in the Golden Dawn trial in Athens. Photograph: Pantelis Saitas/EPA



Behind the bench, before her mostly male audience, as the marathon trial of Golden Dawn entered its last act, supreme court justice Maria Lepenioti did what she has done every week: she kept the peace.
It has not been easy. Emotions have often run high. Even as the curtain is about to come down on proceedings with a ruling on if those convicted will be jailed before an appeal can be heard, the Greek judge, both laconic and low-key, has had to pull off an extraordinary balancing act presiding over a case that has put more Nazi leaders and sympathisers in the dock than at any time since Nuremberg.

In her court every word has counted. There has been no tolerance for the extreme rhetoric that fuelled the neo-fascist group’s spectacular rise. Nor for jibes from the other side.

“Day after day, session after session, she has managed to keep the harmony,” says Giota Tessi, a reporter with the leftist Syntaktwn paper who has observed the proceedings almost since they began in April 2015. “Her knowledge of the case file is incredible. She has been a model of restraint but she has also been very aware of the weight of the moment.”
Historians will look back at the women who played a seminal role in Golden Dawn’s downfall. Under Lepenioti’s seemingly expressionless gaze, the three-member tribunal has gone where many in Greece had formerly feared to tread. After its landmark verdict that the far-right, ultra-nationalist party was a criminal organisation bent on extinguishing enemies real or perceived, sentences have been delivered that will almost certainly ensure its leadership remain behind bars for years to come. The party’s founder, Nikolaos Michaloliakos, and the tattooed macho militants who comprised his inner circle, all received 13-year prison terms.
With the last chapter in the story of Europe’s most violent political force finally written, it will not be lost on the protagonists that punishment, in the end, was meted out by a woman. “It’s undeniable that in this case justice was female,” said Maria Stratigaki, professor of gender studies at Panteion University, noting the number of female prosecutors and investigators who also participated in drawing up the dossier against Golden Dawn. “For a party whose ideology is based on male supremacy, whose worldview is so militaristic, it’s humiliating and will hurt.”
Stratigaki is among the many who believe there are lessons to be learned.
The dark episode of Golden Dawn – its meteoric rise from being a fringe movement 40 years ago to Greece’s third-biggest party on the back of protest votes over EU-dictated austerity – has raised disquieting questions.
When historians look back they will also see a nation whose political class was inexcusably slow in dealing with the rightwing menace and a society whose silence was deafening. A police force whose complicity enabled the extremists to act with impunity – until their murder of a popular anti-fascist Greek hip-hop artist, Pavlos Fyssas, provoked a backlash that was impossible to ignore – has already been illuminated by the trial. Officers who sympathised with the group, covering up attacks on leftists, migrants and refugees and the LGBTQ community, were among the hearing’s 68 defendants.
Instead, it took the justice system, viewed as one of the country’s few meritocratic institutions, to confront the party’s violent tactics and thuggish behaviour.
“Justice stepped in where others should have stepped before,” Stratigaki told the Guardian. “And our justice system is full of female judges because it is they who do better at exams and rise to the top.”
Lepenioti, at 62, is the same age as Michaloliakos, Golden Dawn’s rambunctious leader whose extremist ideas and embrace of national socialism were cultivated during the 1967-74 Colonels’ regime. Upon the restoration of democracy, fresh out of law school as a star student, she would go on to become part of Greece’s first generation of female judges.
No trial since the collapse of military rule has been as politically significant.
But as professor Statigaki is quick to note, it might never have got to this had it not been for the courage of other women in the justice system who would assemble the voluminous case file against Golden Dawn.
Within days of Fyssas’ assassination, Ioanna Klappa and Maria Dimitropoulou were assigned by Efterpi Koutzamani, the first female prosecutor to be appointed to the supreme court, to investigate the murder.
The magistrates spent the next nine months, watched over by armed guards, trawling through computers confiscated from the party’s leaders after they were arrested and jailed in pre-trial detention. Despite threats and almost daily intimidation, they examined countless witnesses, wading through thousands of videos, pictures, speeches, documents and blogs detailing the militants’ obsession with the toxic ideology of Hitler and the Third Reich. Their 15,000-page dossier ultimately laid the case against Golden Dawn. Given the impossibility of banning a party elected by democratic process, it became vital in exposing the extremist group as a criminal organisation.
“The best defence of any liberal democracy is the rule of law and the courage and bravery of individuals like these women,” said Aristides Hatzis, a professor of law at Athens University. “As importantly women were also pivotal to the demise of Golden Dawn collectively,” he added referring to the party’s failure to be admitted into parliament at the last general elections in July 2019. “Many who had previously voted for them did not last time ensuring their defeat.”
On the bench Lepenioti has served justice. But in her audience there is one woman who has faithfully always been there too. For many she is the image of Pavlos, her slain son, a poignant symbol of the battle of right over wrong. No one so single-handedly has raised interest in the trial as much as Magda Fyssa, a seamstress before Pavlos, a working-class hero, was knifed to death in the suburb of Keratsini in September 2013.
Nothing, she knows, will bring him back but as she screamed – in an outburst of joy and emotion within minutes of the court pronouncing judgment on the neo-Nazis – “Pavlos you did it!”
For now, the poisonous past had been laid to rest. Truth and beauty had emerged triumphant with the passing of Golden Dawn.
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/o...olden-dawn
"The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it." Karl Marx

"He would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies. When asked in court whether she knew that Lord Astor had denied having sex with her.

“I think it would be a good idea” Ghandi, when asked about Western Civilisation.
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