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The Power of the Paedos - another high profile case hits the 'never happened' wall?
Magda Hassan Wrote:
Lauren Johnson Wrote:
Quote:Is there a member of the royal family critically ill, I wonder?

::coffeesplutter::

Phil the Greek is getting on quite a bit but it could be others as well.

Phil was one name that sprang to mind, but I wonder. The following to be read HERE judiciously, I think.
The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.
Carl Jung - Aion (1951). CW 9, Part II: P.14
Reply
David Guyatt Wrote:
Magda Hassan Wrote:
Lauren Johnson Wrote:
Quote:Is there a member of the royal family critically ill, I wonder?

::coffeesplutter::

Phil the Greek is getting on quite a bit but it could be others as well.

Phil was one name that sprang to mind, but I wonder. The following to be read HERE judiciously, I think.

Oh yes, I'd quite forgotten about Dicky Mountbatten. He hasn't been around for a while now. They say that might be one reason he was blown up.
"The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it." Karl Marx

"He would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies. When asked in court whether she knew that Lord Astor had denied having sex with her.

“I think it would be a good idea” Ghandi, when asked about Western Civilisation.
Reply
78 members of Parliament call on the Director of Public Prosecutions to prosecute Lord Janner on his sexual assault on 22 different boys. They were among 393 others who say the DPP has got it wrong on Janner. A cynic like me considers "got it wrong" to be a code for "they're covering it up".

Read about this at Exaro.
The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.
Carl Jung - Aion (1951). CW 9, Part II: P.14
Reply
A few recent discoveries in this ongoing travesty:


http://rigorousintuition.ca/board2/viewt...15#p326846


http://www.standard.co.uk/lifestyle/lond...49285.html


http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/579523/...lodge-GCHQ
“The most difficult subjects can be explained to the most slow-witted man if he has not formed any idea of them already; but the simplest thing cannot be made clear to the most intelligent man if he is firmly persuaded that he knows already, without a shadow of doubt, what is laid before him.”
― Leo Tolstoy,
Reply
Hastert was allegedly the basis for one of the prominent characters in Sibel Edmonds' The Lone Gladio.




An article from 2009:


http://www.boilingfrogspost.com/2009/12/...m-termite/
“The most difficult subjects can be explained to the most slow-witted man if he has not formed any idea of them already; but the simplest thing cannot be made clear to the most intelligent man if he is firmly persuaded that he knows already, without a shadow of doubt, what is laid before him.”
― Leo Tolstoy,
Reply
Some interesting stuff in this video:

“The most difficult subjects can be explained to the most slow-witted man if he has not formed any idea of them already; but the simplest thing cannot be made clear to the most intelligent man if he is firmly persuaded that he knows already, without a shadow of doubt, what is laid before him.”
― Leo Tolstoy,
Reply

Northern Ireland authorities refuse to reveal details of paedophile with links to former government adviser on national security grounds


[Image: 27-Kincora-PA.jpg]







FOI request refused as alleged victim links Morris Fraser to abuse at Kincora


Mick Browne , James Hanning


Sunday 12 July 2015




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Authorities in Northern Ireland are refusing to reveal what they know about a notorious convicted paedophile with close links to a former government adviser on the grounds of "national security", despite official assurances that two major inquiries will uncover the truth about an alleged child sex-abuse ring involving leading members of the establishment.

The Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) will not say if it holds information on Dr Morris Fraser, a convicted paedophile, following a Freedom of Information request.
The revelation is likely to fuel suspicions that there was official collusion, for political and security ends, surrounding the abuse of boys at, for example, the Kincora Boys' Home in Belfast in the 1970s. The abuse continued for years, despite several people alerting the authorities.
Speaking to The Independent on Sunday, a former boy at Kincora alleged for the first time that he was abused by Fraser, who had extensive links to like-minded groups in England and was close to an adviser to Margaret Thatcher. This is likely to be seized upon by campaigners who insist that there was a link between abuse at Kincora and in England, and cited as further evidence for the need for the inquiries to be merged.






Now two former British Army officers, who tried to expose the abuse at the care home, have expressed their disquiet at the PSNI decision to refuse to reveal what it knew about Fraser.
When asked what information the police held on Fraser, following convictions in London and the US for child sexual abuse in the early 1970s, the PSNI said that it could "neither confirm nor deny that it holds the information" and cited, alongside privacy and prejudicial disclosure issues, "Section 23(5) Information supplied by, or concerning, certain security bodies (national security)".
Until now it was assumed that Fraser's dealings with the security forces were limited to those required by his research into the effects of political violence on the young.
Captain Colin Wallace, a former British Army psychological operations officer, tried to expose an alleged paedophile ring involving loyalist paramilitaries and politicians in the 1970s, which included him authoring an army memo naming alleged abusers in 1973.
He remembers Fraser attending his offices at British Army headquarters in Thiepval Barracks, Lisburn, around that year. He told the IoS: "I can remember he came on a tour of our offices. He brought a foreign individual with him and discussed inter-community conflict. Afterwards, I recall one of my bosses telling me that if Fraser requested any Army assistance or facilities in future, not to agree to it.
"One of my colleagues, an Army major, added Fraser's name to a document which I had compiled for the press about [the Ulster loyalist group] Tara and Kincora. This gives a strong indication that Army intelligence were well aware of who he was and what he was really getting up to at that time."
Fraser had graduated from Queen's University, Belfast, and became a child psychiatrist at the Royal Hospital for Sick Children in Belfast in the late 1960s. He became a senior consultant in child psychiatry at the Royal Victoria Hospital just as the Troubles erupted in 1969. He was convicted in London in 1972 of abusing a 13-year-old boy from Belfast.
[Image: richard-kerr-v2.jpg] Richard Kerr, an alleged victim of child sexual abuse at Kincora Boys' Home in Belfast, claims he was trafficked to London and abused at both Elm Guest House and Dolphin Square in London in the late 1970s
However, the General Medical Council allowed Fraser to continue practising, provided he did not treat children. Fraser continued to practise even after being convicted in New York in 1974 of several counts of sodomy on children.
Fraser built close links with the late Peter Righton, another convicted paedophile, who was once a close adviser to Mrs Thatcher on children's homes. In 1988, Fraser co-founded the Azimuth Trust, which gave sailing holidays to dozens of vulnerable boys in Devon and Cornwall. In 1993, he was convicted for possession of child pornography.
Last week the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse, set up by the Government to look at allegations of child abuse by leading figures and an institutional cover-up in England and Wales, confirmed that the Official Secrets Act would be waived to allow those who had signed it to give evidence, and the Attorney General's office has confirmed that the same will apply to the parallel Historical Institutional Abuse (HIA) inquiry in Northern Ireland.
Captain Wallace told the IoS: "Despite the recent assurances by ministers, it would appear that the PSNI is now using national security as a reason for not disclosing information about possible child sex abusers. This indicates that nothing has changed and that the legislation is still being misused to cover up such allegations. But even at its lowest, this looks like extraordinarily bad PR, at a time when the Government is supposed to be giving victims confidence in its desire to get to the bottom of the allegations of abuse.
"Even if this is a catch-all piece of official defensiveness, how are we meant to be reassured by a knee-jerk resort to national security'?"
Another former British Army officer, Brian Gemmell, who said he tried to blow the whistle to his intelligence bosses in 1975, said: "This is a very dangerous conflict of interest with the waiver' the Government has offered people like myself and Colin Wallace and others who have signed the Official Secrets Act. It's a ridiculous contradiction. It amounts to a whitewash."
Captain Wallace said the Official Secrets Act waiver was fine as far as it went, but he asked: "What about all those intelligence officers and others who are not now resident in Northern Ireland, but who were aware of abuse allegations in the 1970s? I am unaware of any mechanism that will guarantee the HIA will be able to identify them and/or compel them or related documents to appear before that inquiry.
"For example, Captain Gemmell's intelligence report to MI5 in 1975 about Kincora should now be in the possession of the HIA if the Government really wants to demonstrate its determination to get to the truth."
Former intelligence officer Brian Gemmell has said that MI5 forced him to cut short his investigation into the home in 1975

Fraser had not previously been linked to Kincora, the home run by three men who were eventually convicted over the abuse there, but a former Kincora resident has now revealed that he was abused by Fraser during counselling at the doctor's medical offices in Belfast's Royal Hospital in the early 1970s.

Richard Kerr, who has alleged he was trafficked from Belfast to Westminster to be abused by politicians and others, said: "I was 13. Morris abused me, in his office, two or three times on those visits. I will never forget that face. That black hair. I have never forgotten it. He was in contact with children's homes all over Belfast.
"He had very important people above him and that's why we were all scared. He was a child abuser, simple as that. He had influence; he had a lot of influence. I mean, he was a doctor, he was a psychiatrist.
"Complaints were being made, being brushed under the carpet like they always were back then. And it made us all feel like, if we say anything we're going to get into trouble."

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/cri...82746.html
"The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it." Karl Marx

"He would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies. When asked in court whether she knew that Lord Astor had denied having sex with her.

“I think it would be a good idea” Ghandi, when asked about Western Civilisation.
Reply
Quote:Meirion Jones: 'Everyone on right side of the Savile argument has been forced out of the BBC'

Dominic Ponsford
29 July 2015



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Three days after finishing work on Panorama documentary The Fake Sheikh Exposed, producer Meirion Jones was told his services were no longer required by the programme.

His previous job as head of investigations at Newsnight had been filled in his absence. He was effectively out of a job.

After 26 years at the BBC, Jones (pictured above, Reuters) felt like this career at the corporation had come to an end and he was being squeezed out.

Jones believes he was punished because he tried to expose the Jimmy Savile scandal at the BBC and spoke out about the way his Newsnight investigation of December 2011 was suppressed.

Liz MacKean, who worked on the Savile story with Jones, left after 23 years with the corporation in April last year. She also felt she no longer had a future with the BBC.

Speaking out in detail for the first time since he left the BBC in February, Jones paints a picture of a corporation which appears to have failed to learn the lessons of the biggest scandal in its history.

He believes those on the side of exposing the Savile scandal mistakes have been sidelined and encouraged to leave the corporation while others involved in suppressing the Savile story have kept their jobs.

Jones says of his decision to leave the BBC: "I went to an employment lawyer. He said if you sue the BBC you will win and there will be no cap on it because it will be a whistleblower case.

"However it will take a year and the BBC will settle on the steps of the court. Do you want to put yourself through a year of that?

"I thought about it and I thought I'll take voluntary redundancy and go in that case."

It was an ignominious end to a distinguished BBC career.

In 2010 he won the Daniel Pearl Award along with MacKean for exposing how oil company Trafigura dumped toxic waste in Africa.

His investigation into bogus bomb detectors sold to Iraq and Afghanistan with Caroline Hawley led to an export ban on the devices and a fraudster selling them to be jailed. It may have saved hundreds of lives by helping to get the useless "magic wand" devices taken out of circulation.

There are many more such examples, most recently the RTS award-nominated investigation into former News of the World reporter Mazher Mahmood broadcast last December.

Jones believes that all his scoops counted for nothing because in the eyes of some senior figures at the BBC he is a traitor.

"People said they won't sack you after Savile but they will make your life hell. Everyone involved on the right side of the Savile argument has been forced out of the BBC."

Jones and MacKean were voices of dissent inside the BBC about the way their Jimmy Savile investigation for Newsnight came to be spiked. They spoke out to both the Pollard investigation and to colleagues who made a Panorama documentary called Savile: What the BBC Knew.

This was broadcast in October 2012, three weeks after ITV's Exposure documentary finally revealed Savile was a serial sex offender.

Jones believes that Tom Giles, the Panorama editor behind "What the BBC Knew", was also "squeezed out" of the corporation as punishment for a documentary which made uncomfortable viewing for BBC bosses.

In May 2014 Giles was moved from Panorama to a strategy role, described as creating a "blueprint to shape BBC Current Affairs for the future". In May this year, he left the BBC to become controller of current affairs for ITV.

Jones says: "He was effectively told he wasn't going anywhere."

He says that the Panorama on Savile "was very unpopular with management and very controversial. Lots of efforts were made to block that Panorama.

"Threats were made that if Liz and I co-operated we'd never work for the BBC again. All sorts of attempts were made to stop Panorama using our emails and material."

Former BBC director of global news Peter Horrocks was put in charge of Savile coverage as the scandal unfolded in October 2012.

According to Jones, he "forced the programme through" and has also since been "squeezed out of the BBC". He left the corporation earlier this year to head up the Open University.

MacKean told Press Gazette: "I didn't feel encouraged to stay. I felt I would do better to work outside the BBC.

"There were still so many people who have been shown to be on the wrong side of the story who have stayed."

Jones says: "The last conversation I'd had with anyone from management was we'll see if we can find something'.

"I wasn't going to be parked in some non-job. The BBC is quite happy to pay people to do nothing. That's not me. That's no fun.

"There is still sadly a small group of people at the BBC who think that the only problem with Savile was that it was exposed and if had stayed hushed up everything would be fine."

According to Jones, one senior BBC executive stood outside Broadcasting House at the height of the Savile scandal and held forth to colleagues about Jones and MacKean, describing them as "traitors to the BBC".

He says: "It's a small group of people but they are very powerful people who think we betrayed the BBC by not keeping out mouths shut."

The Newsnight editor who took the decision to spike the Savile investigation, Peter Rippon, remains at the BBC and was moved sideways to become editor of the BBC online archive.

Helen Boaden, who was head of news at the time the Newsnight Savile report was suppressed, was moved to the equally senior job of head of radio.

Her deputy, Steve Mitchell, took early retirement after the Pollard report into the Savile scandal was published in December 2012.

James Hardy, the BBC head of communications for BBC News who said in an email to a colleague he would "drip poison" about Jones remains in his role. He suspected Jones had leaked stories about the Savile affair to the press in early 2012. This is something Jones emphatically denies.

Earlier this month, the original source for the Savile story Karin Ward won her libel case after being sued over comments she made to the BBC and ITV about Freddie Starr.

The BBC declined to offer her any financial support until the eve of the trial, leaving her to fight the case alone with the help of lawyers acting on a no-win, no-fee basis.

Jones believes the BBC reluctance to stand by Ward "shows anyone who was on the side of blowing the whistle about Savile the BBC have failed to support".

"It's an extraordinary thing for the BBC not to support a whistleblower who had appeared on a BBC programme. That's unprecedented as far as I know.

"Yet they left her hanging out in the wind for two years, I believe in the hope that she would be discredited in court. In fact the judge believed her totally."

Had Ward lost her case, Jones believes the BBC would then have been able to say: "Peter Rippon made the right decision, he didn't feel her testimony could be relied on and that's been borne in court.

"I know that sounds like a conspiracy theory, but with everything that's happened I believe it."

He adds: "If I was a whistleblower I would not go to the BBC now unless they announce a big change in their policy."

Newsnight investigation began days after Savile's death

Jones was led to the Savile story partly through a piece of luck. His aunt ran Duncroft School in Surrey, a secure approved school, and he saw Savile there 1970s. He recalled his parents having concerns about Savile's access to teenage girls and his aunt saying: "It's just Jimmy."

Questions about Savile were aired by Lynn Barber in a 1990 interview for The Independent on Sunday when she asked him about the rumours he was "into little girls".

The questions were raised again by a Louis Theroux in a 2001 documentary.

Then in early 2011, Ward published an autobiography on the website FanStory which talked about abuse perpetrated by "JS".

Jones says: "It was an absolute description of Duncroft as I'd known it. Ninety nine per cent of what she was describing there I knew.

"I'd seen Savile taking girls out in his Rolls Royce… Who is going to believe there was a place that's half jail and half country house?

"It was a mad, mad place. I knew all that was true, knew they'd gone to BBC. I only had a little bit more to believe.

"Anyone else would have thought she was a fantasist."

Savile died on 29 October 2011, and the following Monday Jones began work on the Newsnight investigation.

Ward agreed to do an interview and the Newsnight team tracked down around 60 women who had attended Duncroft, and around dozen had stories about what happened to them.

They declined to go on camera, but agreed to have their stories told. One (who was not abused) gave an interview about incidents she had witnessed.

"By the time the story was pulled I thought we would end up with 100 victims and maybe ten institutions around the country…

"Sometimes you have arguments with your editor about whether you should do a story or not and its 55 one way and 45 the other.

"This was absolutely overwhelmingly that we had to do the story for so many reasons. It wasn't close. We were all absolutely convinced that this was a huge story.

"It went out to impact team at the BBC. They said it would be going out on every domestic outlet. It would be huge. They were gearing up to run packages on all radio programmes, on the news channel, the whole thing was gearing up for this massive impact.

"There was no question about the scale of this. The BBC knew this was a big story.

"When we got confirmation that the police had investigated him and interviewed him, he [Peter Rippon] said: Right, we broadcast.'"

Broadcast was set for 7 December.

Then, on 1 December Jones was informed by Rippon that it would only be a story if it could be shown that the Crown Prosecution Service had erred by declining to charge Savile because he was too old. According to the Pollard report, this apparently followed a conversation between Rippon and Steve Mitchell.

After ten days of arguments between MacKean, Jones and Rippon, the final decision to kill the story was taken by Rippon on 9 December.

As Mitchell and Rippon were mulling whether or not to pull the Savile story, the BBC was promoting a Christmas schedule which included tributes to Jimmy Savile and a Boxing Day special edition of Jim'll Fix It presented by Shane Richie.

Jones says: "Two trains were hurtling towards each other on the same line, the BBC either had to run all these tributes or it had to run the expose, it couldn't run both."

Jones was confident that the story would come out anyway, because outside consultant Mark Williams-Thomas had all the evidence and could simply take it elsewhere (as he did with the ITV documentary which was aired in October 2012).

Jones is now writing a book about his time at the BBC and working as a freelance journalist.

He says: "I'm adjusting after a very long time at the BBC to not just being paid for being there."

While he emphasises that there are "thousands of bloody good people" at the BBC, he also criticises what he describes as "a culture of presenteeism".

"People just stay at the BBC and occupy desks. I've always wanted to do stuff that makes a difference, stories that shake things up. I don't really see the point of just sitting there and doing nothing.

"I'm afraid there a lot of people that do that. There are a lot of great people at the BBC, but there a lot of people who are just filling desks."

Outsiders sometimes wonder why, with around 5,000 journalists, BBC News does not break more stories.

Jones says: "That's what I've always tried to do at Newsnight. It amazes me how little story-breaking there is."

Why is that?

"It's a deep-rooted culture of caution and also fear of putting your head above the parapet. If you do break stories you will get sued, you will get attacked in Parliament by people whose interests you have offended.

"There's also a committee-itis at the BBC. There are committees and committees and committees. New Broadcasting House is full of those offices that are made fun of in W1A. They really exist. There are dozens of offices booked solid for meetings all day long every day.

"Everything is bogged down in meetings. People are promoted on the basis of how well they perform at meetings rather than on the product they produce."

In general terms, Jones says the BBC is "shockingly badly managed". But he adds: "To be fair it always has been from the time I've been there, from the 1980s onwards its just badly managed in different ways.

"The main problem is that you don't have a flat enough management structure. Managers are too far away from the output."

He also says that the management structure is "very confused", with Panorama, for instance, reporting in to managers in television, news and current affairs.

Asked what he thinks could change at the BBC to make it a more effective news organisation, he says: "Measure people by their output".

"They always talk about encouraging original journalism but people are not rewarded for that. Not getting into trouble is a way of getting promoted. If you break stories the chances are you going to cause trouble. It's the civil service element of the BBC.

"Because it's such a large organisation. To some extent it works like the civil service in that you will inevitably rise if you don't blot your copybook."

Jones worries that Panorama under current editor Ceri Thomas has moved away from investigations and towards analysis.

The BBC is currently in the process of making all the programme's staff reporters redundant, instead looking to make use of journalists from elsewhere in the BBC on a project by project basis.

Jones says: "If you are taking other reporters who happen to be in the building if they are good they don't have enough time to do the Panorama properly because there are so many other demands on them.

"Or you get people who are not very good whose departments are happy to release them for as long as you want."

Looking to the future, Jones believes the BBC should set up a dedicated investigations team to break stories: "If I was them I would put together a strong investigations unit of a dozen people and put real pressure on them to come up with stories."

Press Gazette put Jones' criticisms to the BBC.

A spokesperson said: "Meirion Jones has made his views known before and we have always been clear that nobody was forced out of the BBC for exposing the Savile scandal.

"The Pollard Report concluded, following a detailed investigation, that the decision to drop the initial investigation into Jimmy Savile was taken in good faith and not for any improper reason."

They also pointed out that the BBC has already put forward plans to make the management structure "simpler and leaner".
http://www.pressgazette.co.uk/meirion-jo...ed-out-bbc


[URL="http://www.pressgazette.co.uk/truly-shocking-shameful-disgraceful-interview-sparks-outrage-over-bbcs-treatment-savile-scoop"]
'Truly shocking', 'shameful', 'disgraceful': Interview sparks outrage over BBC's treatment of Savile scoop journalists[/URL]


William Turvill 31 July 2015


The BBC's treatment of a journalist behind its original Jimmy Savile expose has been described as "truly shocking", "shameful" and "disgraceful".
Meirion Jones, Newsnight's former head of investigations, told Press Gazette in an interview - published this week - that he felt "everyone involved on the right side of the Savile argument has been forced out of the BBC".
His assertion was backed by reporter Liz MacKean (pictured with Jones, above), who told Press Gazette: "I didn't feel encouraged to stay. I felt I would do better to work outside the BBC.
"There were still so many people who have been shown to be on the wrong side of the story who have stayed."
Newsnight's investigation into Savile was suppressed in the winter of 2011, shortly after his death.
In October 2012, an ITV documentary - presented by Mark Williams-Thomas, who had worked on the Newsnight investigation - revealed that Savile was a serial sex offender.
The article, which was followed up in The Guardian, Times and Mail Online, has been shared on social media more than 2,000 times and the corporation has been widely condemned for its treatment on Jones.
In response to the interview, a BBC spokesperson said: "Meirion Jones has made his views known before and we have always been clear that nobody was forced out of the BBC for exposing the Savile scandal.
"The Pollard Report concluded, following a detailed investigation, that the decision to drop the initial investigation into Jimmy Savile was taken in good faith and not for any improper reason."
Channel 4 News political correspondent Michael Crick, who worked at BBC's Newsnight for 19 years before leaving in 2011, described Jones' story as "truly shocking"
Truly shocking account from Meirion Jones of how the BBC forced out everyone in BBC who got the Savile scandal right http://t.co/Y3SFrkytz4
Michael Crick (@MichaelLCrick) July 29, 2015
And, Meirion Jones points out, most of those in BBC who got the Savile scandal horribly wrong, kept their BBC jobs http://t.co/Y3SFrkytz4
Michael Crick (@MichaelLCrick) July 29, 2015
Former BBC employment correspondent Martin Shankleman, meanwhile, described the treatment of BBC reporters behind the Savile investigation as "shameful".
And Colleen Murrell, a former BBC foreign duty editor, said the allegations mark a "sad state of affairs".
How the BBC treated their journalists who'd uncovered the Savile scandal: shameful. http://t.co/MLa5tDW4x6
Martin Shankleman (@MartShankleman) July 29, 2015
A sad state of affairs Allegations that #BBC branded Jimmy Savile whistleblowers traitors and 'squeezed them out' http://t.co/H6WVDEXUZU
Colleen Murrell (@ivorytowerjourn) July 30, 2015
Elsewhere, Mark Watts, the editor of the investigative news agency Exaro, said the article was "damning".
Media professor Tim Crook described the situation as "worrying".
And Heather Brooke, who was part of the Telegraph team which exposed the MPs' expenses scandal, said: "We should all be worried."
This is very very worrying for @bbctrust and what a loss for BBC of @lizmackean and @MeirionTweets #Savile https://t.co/hshvFqacwq
Peter Jukes (@peterjukes) July 29, 2015
Fascinating interview, claim of "deep-rooted culture of caution" and "presenteeism" at BBC means fewer scoops https://t.co/CLnE8udz4a
Andrew Picken (@andrewpicken1) July 29, 2015
Outrageous - and when you realise this in effect forced out a reporter of quality and track record of Liz Mackean! https://t.co/qtgjAz5FNa
Roderick Cooper (@TheRodCooper) July 29, 2015
Damning @pressgazette: "Everyone involved on the right side of the Savile argument has been forced out of the BBC." http://t.co/nmUf76SwCW
Mark Watts (@MarkWatts_1) July 29, 2015
BBC producer on Newsnight's ill-fated investigation into Jimmy Savile warns whistleblowers: do NOT go to the BBC. http://t.co/nmUf76SwCW
Mark Watts (@MarkWatts_1) July 29, 2015
Fascinating @pressgazette story about Savile, the BBC, whistle-blowing, reporter movements and all sorts else http://t.co/HLxsoACEWr
Alex Hudson (@alexhuds) July 29, 2015
Proper journalism and important story from @press gazette and @Domponsford http://t.co/HLuOQwQkLc
Neil Thackray (@neilthackray) July 29, 2015
@RichardWellings @annispice UK Press Gazette reveals how BBC fools lost Meirion Jones and Liz Mackean..
Roderick Cooper (@TheRodCooper) July 29, 2015
Worrying interview-PG: 'Meirion Jones: 'Everyone on right side of the Savile argument has been forced out of the BBC' http://t.co/IFWhRLxinw
Tim Crook (@libertarianspir) July 29, 2015
Worrying clearout of top journos at BBC. Meiron Jones sounds the alarm. We should all be worried. http://t.co/MFbVqwPA7j
Heather Brooke (@newsbrooke) July 29, 2015
@MarkWatts_1 @stop1984 @pressgazette Quite how this sits when the Dame Janet Smith inquiry finally publishes could be interesting
paul connew (@paulconnew1) July 30, 2015
Disgraceful treatment of these principled staff. http://t.co/LsMsTwqczQ
Lynn Sheridan (@LynnMSheridan) July 30, 2015
Isn't it great when our public broadcaster acts in its own interest rather than the public interest? http://t.co/Ibzonk3ilH
Michael O'C Davidson (@mikeocd) July 29, 2015

http://www.pressgazette.co.uk/truly-shoc...vile-scoop

"The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it." Karl Marx

"He would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies. When asked in court whether she knew that Lord Astor had denied having sex with her.

“I think it would be a good idea” Ghandi, when asked about Western Civilisation.
Reply
Magda Hassan Wrote:
According to Jones, one senior BBC executive stood outside Broadcasting House at the height of the Savile scandal and held forth to colleagues about Jones and MacKean, describing them as "traitors to the BBC".

He says: "It's a small group of people but they are very powerful people who think we betrayed the BBC by not keeping out mouths shut."

The old Queen Mother used to refer to keeping 'schtumm' as keeping "oyster", as it happens. For some, failure is no impediment to success. This is a traditional thing in Blighty; 'Boy' Browning (Dirk Bogard, in the film Bridge too Far) who was part of the planning, got promoted after the Arnhem debacle, whilst Gene Hackman (Stanisław Sosabowski) who complained about the plan beforehand, was sacked (it's on my mind - I've just read the book), but it's fairly standard fare. Funny line from BBC R4 'The Unbelievable Truth' comedy show the other day, on the trope "Don't shoot the messenger", came-up with "Don't shoot the Führer". Same thing... maybe...
Martin Luther King - "Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere."
Albert Camus - "The only way to deal with an unfree world is to become so absolutely free that your very existence is an act of rebellion".
Douglas MacArthur — "Whoever said the pen is mightier than the sword obviously never encountered automatic weapons."
Albert Camus - "Nothing is more despicable than respect based on fear."
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So there is an investigation in to the safely dead Ted Heath but none for the alive and well Kenneth Clarke. Got it.
"The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it." Karl Marx

"He would, wouldn't he?" Mandy Rice-Davies. When asked in court whether she knew that Lord Astor had denied having sex with her.

“I think it would be a good idea” Ghandi, when asked about Western Civilisation.
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